SAB JEETE YAHAAN, HAIN RUSTOM YEHI!! (RUSTOM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Raghav Sachar, Ankit Tiwari & Jeet Gannguli
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Mandar Cholkar & Arko Pravo Mukherjee
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 14th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th August 2016

Rustom Album Cover

Rustom Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Rustom is an upcoming Bollywood mystery/drama film starting Akshay Kumar, Ileana D’Cruz, Esha Gupta and Arjan Bajwa. The movie is directed by ‘1920 London’ director Tinu Suresh Desai, and produced by Neeraj Pandey, Aruna Bhatia, Nittin Keni, Akash Chawla, Virender Arora, Ishwar Kapoor and Shital Bhatia. The film is based of the life of Naval Officer K.M. Nanavati. The film has a pretty long 10-track album, with four composers working together to make it so big. The first of these four is Arko Pravo Mukherjee, a composer whose heartbreaking as well as heat-touching song ‘Saathi Rey’ from ‘Kapoor & Sons (Since 1921)’ is still on my playlist, being the wonderfully sweet and emotional song that it is. Arko has two songs in the album, of which the second is actually a reprise of the first. Next up on the composers list is Raghav Sachar, who has been out of the picture for quite some time; I remember his last outing as a remake of a pop song in ‘Alone’, in which he didn’t quite impress. Here, he has been given charge of four songs, out of which two are versions of the first, and the fourth is the instrumental of that. 😂 Hopefully, these versions are entertaining songs!! Third on the list, is Ankit Tiwari, who surprisingly hasn’t disappointed completely this year, though going into déjà vu mode, but not giving too bad songs. His last song happens to be ‘Ishqe Di Lat’ (Junooniyat) which I loved loved loved. So hopefully, his two songs in the album are just as GREAT! Last is the most experienced of the lot, Jeet Gannguli, who let us down with one of his two songs in his last outing, ‘Junooniyat’, but hopefully, his two songs here are just as lovely as that one was disappointing! 😀 So, with verrrrry high hopes, let’s start off the analysis of the ‘Rustom’ album!!


1. Tere Sang Yaara / Tere Bin Yaara (Reprise)
Singers ~ Atif Aslam / Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir / Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Arko gets to open the album, with a calm and dulcet, and endearing, though templatised melody. We’ve seen what a great combination Arko and Akshay Kumar have made in the past with that unforgettable song, ‘Meherbaani’ (The Shaukeens). This time too, Arko weaves magic with a wonderful melody, one that definitely isn’t something innovative or something we haven’t heard before, but still, is so sweet and lovable, that you just feel wonderful and fresh. The composition is not so complicated, as Arko has kept it sweet and simple — which is his speciality. It starts off with Atif singing a calm couplet, which paves way for the actual melody, a tune carried high by its pillars of simplicity. The mukhda hooks you instantly, and you can feel the romance infused into it. The innocence of the song is in the tune. The antara is quite well-composed too, having all the qualities of a good antara — maintained continuity, catchiness and of course something that makes you want to hear it again and again. In the original version ‘Tere Sang Yaara’, Arko has orchestrated it with wonderful violins and guitars too, but the highlight is of course, the piano, something that is a key part of Arko’s arrangements. The flute soothes you too, while the digital beats sound quite templatised, but nevertheless, work in favourite of the song. In the reprise, ‘Tere Bin Yaara’, Arko cranks the arrangements down, making them hit you with a less force. The arrangements are mostly the same, just that they are less prominent, and the beats do not stand out as much, and especially the hookline has been unplugged-ised. This version too, is a calming and soothing version, almost equal to the original. The vocals in the first version, by Atif are beautiful and a very important part in making the song sound so good. Arko, however, with his less-polished vocals, steals your heart away anyway, in his reprise version. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics for the first version are good as well, though a bit templatised, and have been adapted by Arko very well, for the reprise version. Overall, the song is a great start to the album. In all its simplicity and innocence, it is a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Rustom Vahi / Rustom Vahi (Theme) / Rustom Vahi (Marathi Version) / Rustom Vahi (Male Version)
Singers ~ Sukriti Kakkar / (Instrumental) / Jasraj Joshi / Jasraj Joshi, Music by ~ Raghav Sachar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir / (Instrumental) / Mandar Cholkar / Manoj Muntashir

Raghav Sachar presents the next song of the album, in not less than four versions! We’ve heard Pritam giving four versions of ‘Afghan Jalebi’ in his album to ‘Phantom’, and now Raghav Sachar follows with the title song of ‘Rustom’, in as many as four versions! Of course, excited as I was to check them out, I did wonder if they were all necessary! 😀 Anyway, that comes later. First, the review. So Raghav has composed an awesome, hard-hitting, theme song, with mysterious undertones, resembling the 80s era wonderfully. The jazz/disco touch has been given wonderfully. The composition actually hooks you onto the song. It is sweetness delivered in a sinister package. The composition seems sweet, but has dark hints scattered throughout. Especially the line “Pyaar toh pyaar hai, chaahe jaise mile”, is wonderfully mysterious. Songs from movies like ‘Don’ (the old one) and ‘Shaan’, instantly come back to you a after hearing this one, and you can just imagine an Asha Bhosle or an Usha Uthup crooning it in those days, while Parveen Babi gyrates to it. A very similar infectiousness is spread all over the song. Raghav makes sure we the listeners, have the best possible experience while listening to it, as he tries to recreate the 80s. (Though the film is set in the 60s. 😛 But who cares!) The arrangements help the song throw us back into that era. The saxophone being the highlight of the song, has been played very energetically and it is so catchy! Techno beats, like disco, work to make the song sound actually retro. Occasional piano and the unceasing drums just infuse more energy into the song. And now, coming to the vocals. In the main female version, Sukriti manages to bring in that sinister undertone in her voice, and hits the bullseye with all the notes that jump frantically here and there. In the Marathi version and Male version, Jasraj Joshi infuses just as much energy, but the song doesn’t sound as good in a male voice as it does in a female voice! Personally, I feel that the Marathi version was unnecessary, and it must’ve been added to increase the reach of the movie! (By the way, how can you INCREASE the reach of an Akshay Kumaar movie!???!!) The arrangements of the Marathi and Male versions are exactly the same, while the theme is a very short piece of music — but with a very spunky arrangement. The lyrics of the song have been penned well by Manoj Muntashir, describing the shady character very well, while Mandar Cholkar seems to falter a bit with the Marathi lyrics — they seem pretty forced! An electrifying title track, and a very commendable job by Raghav Sachar! Kudos to Sukriti for mastering the vocals!! Her version is definitely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tay Hai
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Music by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

A melodic piano piece very dulcetly lures you into the other song. After the energizing title song, the song comes as a pleasant surprise. The piano gives way to Ankit’s voice, who surprisingly sounds the very least bit autotuned in this song! The soulfulness of it all just shocked me. As I have been liking/loving Ankit’s songs throughout the year, this one really doesn’t surprise me much, but nevertheless, I’m blown away by the majestic and opulent orchestration, composition and great vocals. The composition by Ankit is so deep and layered and touching, that it barely takes seconds for it to work its magic on you. The mukhda opens up quite like any other Ankit Tiwari song, but it is when the first time the “Maujood hai…” hook plays, that you can gauge the magnificence and grandeur of it all. The antara has been composed just as wonderfully, with Tiwari minding to use contrasting low notes. Contrasting because the hook was oh-so-high-pitched. And the tune of the low notes, is just so dazzling! It sounds like a Rahman antara, in fact! The next bewitching thing about the song, are the arrangements! Sumptuous as they sound, they make you feel very simple, happy and just plain good! Especially in the hookline, those wonderful strings are tooooooooo grand to keep away the goosebumps. Tiwari even uses drums, something that sounds odd in such a song, but here, works in its favour! And then there’s the wonderful arrangement in the antara, devoid of any instruments except a wonderful piano that plays around the words so cutely. There’s a great digital beat supporting the tune as well, which is what makes it sound oh-so-Rahmanish! Ankit’s voice is very enchanting, and is one of the main reasons the song has turned out so hauntingly beautiful. Manoj Muntashir also, writes beautiful lyrics, complementing the enchanting composition very well. A spectacular song composed and sung by Ankit, with the arrangements playing a vital role in propelling it so much! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Dekha Hazaro Dafaa
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Jeet Gannguli steps into the album next, with a cute and lovely little waltz. The composer has got everything right with this one, right from the ballroom waltz-y composition, that sounds so retro and lovable, to the arrangements, that are bliss to the music lover. Firstly, the composition. It is something that instantly makes you love it. There is no intermediate step. You either hate it (which you won’t!) or love love love it. And I love love loved it. Right from the first time I heard it, the simple yet grand tune won my heart over, and couldn’t leave my head thereafter. The mukhda is scintillatingly calming and charming, while the antara is beautifully structured to keep the charm intact. While hearing the song, I actually thought that if ‘Cinderella’ were to be remade in Hindi, this song would be perfect. Jeet has wonderfully brought in the ballroom melody and makes the song sound so innocent and sweet. The arrangements are beautiful too, with the strings doing their job right from the beginning. The way the low and high strings alternate with each other, is something worth noticing, and also something that is likely to be missed. The flute adds to the sugar and dreamy ambience. In the antara, after the first line, Jeet has put this EXTRAORDINARY violin solo, which is soooooo charming! The way it has been played, briskly, is what makes it sound so charming! (Hear it at 1:20 or 2:27 in the song, don’t thank me later! 😉 ) The chimes and the very European-ish choir add to the ballroom ambience. Of course, a ballroom song is incomplete without the piano, and Jeet makes sure the piano makes some appearance in the song, too. All in all, the orchestration is as dreamy and angelic as it can get. Ever. I mean, the last time I heard such opulent and magnificent ballroom orchestration was in ‘Nazdeekiyan’ (Shaandaar), which was a gem! On the vocals front, Arijit with his calm voice sounds so sweet and innocent, while Palak complement beautifully. Though at first, Palak seems an odd choice, it all fits in perfectly after a couple of listens. Manoj’s lyrics are so sweet, that if you sum the sweetness of the song all up, the chances of getting diabetes are as high as the Burj Khalifa! Of course, such a sweet song can be no less than a 5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Dhal Jaun Main
Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Aakanksha Sharma, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Now it’s time for the sad song of the album. Jeet Gannguli, an expert at sad songs in my opinion, gets to helm it. However, the song turns out to be a great disappointment. Jeet resorts to his usual Vishesh Films-ish template to convey the sadness. The composition is typical Jeet Gannguli, with a strong Vishesh Films undertone to it. Right from the beginning, you feel that either you have accidentally started playing the ‘Raaz 28362’ (and I won’t be surprised if so many ‘Raaz’ films do get made!) album, instead of ‘Rustom’. The hookline is the typical melodrama we get to hear in Bhatt films. And there I am, in a pickle, trying to understand where the Bhatts came into the 1960s. The arrangements are digital beats mostly, and do not really stand out much. Jubin’s vocals a quite good, and give you a reason to hear the song, while Aakanksha sounds strictly forced at places and cute at places. Jubin basically carries the song on his shoulders, a song which is otherwise a yawn fest for me! Manoj’s lyrics too, stick to the conventions of modern Bollywood. After the four good and suitable songs, here comes an oddball that brothers fits here, nor is catchy or exciting. Even if it were in ‘Raaz 28362’, I wouldn’t have liked it!

 

6. Jab Tum Hote Ho
Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit Tiwari gets to close the album, and after that majestic song of his, all I expected was an even better song. Imagine my happiness when I get to know the song has been sung by none other than today’s nightingale Shreya Ghoshal. Naturally, my heart jumped with joy. And Ankit, with a tranquilizing and pacifying composition, satiates my desire for a great song. His composition, yet again, is very emotional and layered, with shades difficult to unravel right away. The hookline is very, very calm, as is the rest of the song. In this song, the sadness and emotion actually works, unlike the hollow emotion of the previous song. Ankit masters the composition, which is very slow-paced, but keeps you listening. (If you’re a lover of calm music, that is) The calming notes really touch your heart and make you feel loved and cared. Coming to the arrangements, they are pretty minimal, until the interlude. The initial part of the song is graced by piano, strings and acoustic guitars, out of which each excels in its place, particularly the piano. The interlude brings with it, a wonderful blend of strings of different kinds, producing a wonderful symphonic ambience. The second stanza is more accentuated with strings and the guitars are louder too. It is so beautiful how the arrangements open up towards the end, just as the singer does. And that brings us to the vocals. When it is Shreya Ghoshal, it is highly impossible for vocals to go wrong, and here too, it is displayed very beautifully. Even though the composition is so slow and the arrangements minimal, her voice makes you get hooked to the song. She sings each note with a certain innocence and beauty. Manoj’s lyrics are touching, and the song gets raised higher due to them. Ankit weaves even more magic with his second song, and Shreya helps us end the album on a very calm and emotional note. #5StarHotelSong!!


Rustom is yet another example of a mulicomposer album done right. Here, four composers come together to make an album that seems very fulfilling as a whole. Yes, there are some glitches as well, in that the makers seem to have crammed too many unnecessary versions of the good songs into the album, and also tried to increase the taker count of the album by adding a modernized number that just doesn’t work. However, the songs that go with the theme of the movie, perform really well and help in making the album a success. The surprise package is Ankit, who stuns with his two glorious songs, songs that I would never forget. However, the winner is our very own Jeet who makes a song that is so sugar-coatedly sweet, that if it had to be sold as a toffee, the whole world would have got diabetes. All in all, ‘Rustom’ is an album that is going to stay with you for quite some time! I would say “sab jeete yahaan, hain ‘Rustom’ yehi”!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dekha Hazaro Dafaa > Tay Hai > Tere Sang Yaara > Jab Tum Hote Ho > Rustom Vahi > Tere Bin Yaara (Reprise) > Rustom Vahi (Male Version) > Rustom Vahi (Theme) > Rustom Vahi (Marathi Version) > Dhal Jaun Main

 

Which is your favourite song from Rustom? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

21st MUSIC MASTANI MONTHLY AWARDS (JULY 2016)

The albums for July 2016 releases have released and I’ve reviewed them, so, as is the custom, here are the awards! The albums included in the awards — ‘Sultan’, ‘Madaari’, ‘Great Grand Masti’, ‘Kabali (Hindi)’ and ‘Dishoom’. So let’s go ahead!

 

21st Music Mastani Monthly Awards

 

♪ MAIN AWARDS

• Singer of The Month (Female) : Neha Bhasin for Jag Ghoomeya — Female Version (Sultan)

• Singer of the Month (Male) : Papon for Bulleya (Sultan)

• Composer of the Month (Song) : Sunny-Inder Bawra for Masoom Sa (Madaari)

• Composer(s) of the Month (Album) : Vishal-Shekhar for Sultan

• Album of the Month: Sultan (Music by: Vishal-Shekhar; Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Badshah; Singers: Vishal Dadlani, Shalmali Kholgade, Badshah, Isheeta Chakrvarty, Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Mika Singh, Sukhwinder Singh, Shadab Faridi, Mohit Chauhan, Harshdeep Kaur, Jyoti Nooran, Sultana Nooran, Papon, Neha Bhasin & Shekhar Ravjiani; Music On: YRF Music)

• Musical Jodi of the Month (Best Duet) : Amit Mishra & Jonita Gandhi for Sau Tarah Ke (Dishoom)

• Lyricist of the Month: Irshad Kamil for Bulleya (Sultan)

 

♪ SONG AWARDS

• Best Romantic Song: Jag Ghoomeya (Sultan)

• Best Dance Song: 440 Volt (Sultan) AND Teri Kamar Ko (Great Grand Masti)

• Best Sad Song: Masoom Sa (Madaari) AND Bulleya (Sultan)

• Best Club Song: Sau Tarah Ke (Dishoom)

• Best Classical-Based Song: Jadoo Rawan Rawan (Kabali – Hindi)

• Best Song With A Western Influence: Sachi Muchi (Sultan)

• Best Song With A Folk Influence: Jag Ghoomeya (Sultan)

• Song With Best Use Of Fusion: Tuk Tuk (Sultan)

• Best Backing Vocals: Akash, Himanshu & Ashwin for Sau Tarah Ke (Dishoom)

• Best Sound Effects In A Song: Sau Tarah Ke (Dishoom) {THAT VOCAL BREAK!! 😍😍}

• Best Retro-Styled Song: N/A

• Best Humorous Song: 440 Volt (Sultan)

• Best Rap in A Song: Badshah for Baby Ko Has Pasand Hai (Sultan)

 

♪ SPECIAL AWARDS

• Bandar Kya Jaane Adrak Ka Swaad (Best Album That Went Pretty Much Unnoticed / Most Underrated Album) : Madaari (T-Series)

• Newcomer(s) of the Month:

– Newcomer of the Month (Composer): N/A

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Female) : Isheeta Chakrvarty for Baby Ko Bass Pasand Hai (Sultan)

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Male) : Pradeep Kumar & Ananthu for Jadoo Rawan Rawan (Kabali – Hindi)

• Music Label of The Month: YRF Music (Sultan)

• Most Unusual, But Awesome Choice of Singer: Mika Singh for 440 Volt (Sultan) AND Jonita Gandhi for Sau Tarah Ke (Dishoom)

 

I hope you liked the awards and agree! 🙂

Reviews This Month: Rustom, The Legend of Michael Mishra, A Flying Jatt, Happy Bhag Jayegi, Budhia Singh – Born To Run

 

A DISHOOM LACKING PRITAM’S USUAL PUNCH!! (DISHOOM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Ashish Pandit & Mayur Puri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 15th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 29th July 2016

Dishoom Album Cover

Dishoom Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dishoom is an upcoming Bollywood action/adventure/thriller film starring John Abraham, Varun Dhawan and Jacqueline Fernandez in leads, while Akshaye Khanna plays the baddie. The film is directed by ‘Desi Boyz’ director, Varun Dhawan’s brother, Rohit Dhawan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala and Sunil A. Lulla. The film is about two cops, Kabir (John Abraham) and Junaid (Varun Dhawan) who are on a case to find a missing cricketer, who happens to be India’s top batsman and whom the makers have cleverly named as Viraj Kohli (played by Saqib Saleem). The two cops have 36 hours before an ‘India vs. Pakistan’ match (come on, how clichéd can you get!!) to find the man. The only reason I’m following this movie is — no, not the energy of Varun Dhawan or the action by John Abraham. And no, not because Akshaye Khanna is returning in a ‘villainous’ avatar after doing ‘Gali Gali Chor Hai’ in 2012 and disappearing. But the reason is because of the music. My personal favourite, Pritam Chakraborty is in charge, and I’m so excited to hear it, because he had given enjoyable songs for ‘Desi Boyz’ as well, and I’m hoping he has done so in his second collab with Rohit Dhawan too! The movie is expected to have some dance tracks, which I know Pritam does very well! So, here goes! Let’s explore the music album of ‘Dishoom’!!


1. Sau Tarah Ke / Sau Tarah Ke (Revisited)
Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Amit Mishra / Aditi Singh Sharma & Abhijeet Sawant, Backing Vocals by ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Himanshu Shirlekar & Akash, Arabic Choir by ~ Maher Al Halabi, Karim Khayat, Youmni Abou Al Zahab, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Hookline Lyrics by ~ Ashish Pandit

Pritam starts off the soundtrack with an energetic dance track just as expected, and really makes you dance with this one. The song starts off with a very unusually addictive vocal break, which just lures you into the composition so effectively. Pritam sure knows how to attract his audience in a classy way, and he does it here. That vocal break is toooo innovative, and also my favourite part of the song — fortunately for me, it plays everywhere throughout the song. Pritam’s composition is a fun one, with a few grey shades that add the mystery and shadow of the thriller/action film to the song. It is an item-song-ish composition, and you can almost call it one, but of course, everything is done so classily that you can classify it as a club song. The hookline has that folksy feel to it, that tells you that the movie (or at least the song) is set in the middle east. The mukhda doesn’t stand out too well during the first couple of listens, but later on, it grows tremendously. It repeats once more after the antara, to end up the song. The antara itself is a nice portion of the song, with a sensuous tune to it. Pritam conveniently uses club beats to enhance the reach of the song, and the booming bass in the song really helps to propel it ahead in the playlist of the listeners. And again, that wonderful vocal break! He uses EDM at places too, and towards the end, the hookline is played with the EDM sound, and sounds so dynamic! In the beginning, a very thrilling oud invites you into the song with that Arabic flavour. The ney by Sahi Shamat is wonderful as well. Both versions have only the vocals different, and everything else exactly, or almost exactly, the same. In the first version, Jonita startles with her performance — it being her first song of this kind. She has brought a naughtiness into her voice, which always used to sound so pure and innocent. It has that sharp texture to it, which it didn’t in her other songs. Amit Mishra, on the other hand, works well as a replacement for Nakash Aziz, sounding quite like him, but impressing nevertheless. In the second version however, Aditi Singh Sharma’s overstylised vocals are a pain to the ears. She hasn’t modulated her voice well and it comes across as too soft where it should’ve been more confident like Jonita’s! Jonita, who sang such a song for the first time, performed better than a singer who is known for such songs, and that’s pretty shocking! Abhijeet Sawant too, doesn’t work well with the composition. He seems to be trying to hard to sing in the way he’s required to. In both versions there’s this awesome Arabic hookline, sung by the Arabic choir I mentioned above. Kumaar and Ashish Pandit together have come up with quite enjoyable lyrics, that suit the theme as well as appeal to the audience. Nothing seems put of place according to Bollywood standards, and so I’m accepting the lyrics! 😂 Pritam opens the album with a great club song, that has the potential to be a chartbuster and also the club anthem of the year! The first version is definitely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Toh Dishoom
Singers ~ Raftaar & Shahid Mallya, Lyrics by ~ Mayur Puri

Next up, we have the title track for the movie, a theme song that is composed on sinister lines, with dark shades predominating in the composition. The composition is actually very less; it is mostly made up of Raftaar’s rap, which is in a tune that keeps repeating whenever the hookline isn’t playing, so in the mukhda and antara. Actually there is no mukhda and antara, as it is the Punjabi rap-styled tune that keeps playing on loop until the hookline comes to rescue it. 😀 The hookline, which is sung by Shahid Mallya and actually has a tune, is pretty good, and has kind of a sinister tune to it. It is actually the backing music that has the mysterious tone to it; the guitars which play in the background. Pritam has not impressed as such with the composition, as the song is very simple, and not of his level. Also, the credits in the jukebox read “Melody based on generic traditional punjabi folk progressions.” I don’t know how to interpret that! The rap is the most prominent part of the song, and that too, gets kind of irritating towards the end. However, as I said, the hookline is good. There is a rapid rap in the second interlude, and at that part I just completely zoned out of the song; it was so tedious to hear. Raftaar’s voice is not too impressive, of course, as he isn’t a singer. Shahid, on the other hand, tries his best to save the song, and manages to do so to a good extent. It is his “Toh dishoommm… Toh dishoommm” parts that I keep waiting for in the song. Pritam’s arrangements are good, and stick to the action theme of the movie, and perfect for a theme song for a heroic character. Especially those guitars and club beats. Some places, it sounds a lot like the ‘Desi Boyz’ title track too! Mayur Puri is back after ‘Bajrangi Bhaijaan’s ‘Selfie Le Le Re’ and ‘Chicken Kuk-Du-Koo’, and writes words that hardly make any sense. After impressing so much with so many songs, he disappoints very badly with this one, literally writing whatever comes to mind and adding a “Toh dishoom” at last to make it sound related to the movie. Lines in the rap sound pretty unbelievable as well. It’s pretty much how the person has a very bad personal life, but in a mock-heroic style, tries to explain how he will punch people when they do stuff he doesn’t like. All in all, a disappointing offering, with just the hookline being the saviour of the song!!

 

3. Jaaneman Aah (Version 1) / Jaaneman Aah (Version 2)
Singers ~ Aman Trikha & Antara Mitra / Nakash Aziz & Antara Mitra, Backing Vocals by ~ Ashwin, Akashdeep & Himanshu, Lyrics by ~ Mayur Puri

Claps, percussion and guitars start off the third song of the album, quire resembling ‘Afghan Jalebi’ (Phantom) in its overall treatment. After that, a bazooka-like instrument plays a tune that is what makes the starting interesting, and alluring. But from there, the song suffers a number of ups and down, never being consistent in its catchiness. The composition by Pritam is pretty bland and tasteless, and it is that kind of composition that depends on its arrangements to do its work of attracting the listeners to it. There is a line however, that really impressed me, in all its oddness and though it is kind of a misfit in the song. The line I mention, is the line just before the hookline, which, in the mukhda goes like “Ishq mein saare, ilzaam hai sacche.. “. The tune of that line is an oddball in the song, which is predominantly of a happy tune. But that line has a darker shade to it, which is why I loved it! The rest of the tune follows a really Sajid-Wajid-ish template of item songs, which I didn’t exactly expect from Pritam, after great songs of this genre like ‘Dhating Naach’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), ‘Gandi Baat’ (R…Rajkumar) and ‘Afghan Jalebi’ (Phantom). It is the arrangements that makes the song at least listen-worthy. The exciting dhols (Percussion by Dipesh Varma, Keyur Barve and Shikhar Naad Qureshi) help the song get the required energy, while that bazooka tune keeps playing throughout. Aditya Benia is great with the guitars, too. On the vocals front, again, we have two choices to choose our favourite from. In the first place we have Himesh Reshammiya’s blue-eyed boy, Aman Trikha. Singing for Pritam for the first time, it was bound to be a powerpacked rendition from his side, and that’s what we get, but we can’t help but miss Nakash. Pritam saves us the time that we would spend in brooding over Nakash not being there, and actually records the “Film Version” or “Version 2” of the song in Nakash’s voice. His infectious energy is unmatchable, and he sings well, putting in the punch that was lacking in the first version! 😀 The female voice in both versions is Pritam’s own blue-eyed girl, Antara Mitra. You can’t believe it is the ‘Gerua’ girl who’s sung it, but then you remember she sang ‘Saree Ke Fall Sa’ and ‘Kaddu Katega’ from ‘R…Rajkumar’ too, and then realize it isn’t such a big deal. She sings with the right vocal texture, but I’ve said this many a time jokingly and will say it again — she needs to find a comfort zone for herself in the industry! I can’t help but think she keeps changing her voice too many times and it is getting irritating now!! 😀 Jokes apart, her versatility is really commendable. It is Mayur Puri, the lyricist, who disappoints gravely. His lyrics in this song are nothing like what I like his lyrics for! The whole song is full of lines that a man sings to a lady, trying to convince her to marry him! Lines like “Do saal mein hinge tere bacche, mere bachhe” really make you cringe and think where Mayur’s splendid writing has gone in that one year! 😦 The song starts with the two characters playing ping-pong with names of relatives. I didn’t get that part of the song, either! Though Pritam has scored very well in the past with these songs, this time, he doesn’t really make the cut! Most of the credit for it goes to the disappointing lyrics!

 

4. Ishqa
Singers ~ Abhijeet Sawant & Antara Mitra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The album ends on a very celebratory note, with an Arabic-styled party song that has distinct shades of Pritam’s typical composition styles. The composition is really enjoyable though! The song, standing at a duration of just less than three minutes, 2:47 to be precise, is too short, and too catchy; I wish there was more! There is no distinct demarcation of hooklinebut there is one loop of a line, sung by Antara, which goes like “Zyaada main toh nahi kehti…” and that line is so insanely catchy!!! Pritam has composed the song very beautifully, given that it is so short. The mukhda and antara are both by Abhijeet, and he sounds way better here than he did in the second version of ‘Sau Tarah Ke’. Antara has just that one line which repeats many times, but as I said is really well sung by her, and really well composed by Pritam too. Another great thing is the arrangements. The Spanish guitars are the highlight of the song, while the Arabic percussion is really great. The Arabic strings are stunning as well! There is a great electronic interlude that is so insane! The whole thing together sounds very catchy and groovy. Kumaar’s lyrics are good, as well, again, without being cheap or anything. A finale that actually delivers what was expected throughout the album!! #5StarrHotelSong!!


Dishoom is definitely not what I expected. I rarely say this, but this time, Pritam did not deliver as much as I was expecting. He has composed all four songs as per the requirements to make a fun album, but I know he can do way better than this. Two songs, ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ and ‘Ishqa’ actually deliver what I expect when I hear the name ‘Pritam’. The other two seem very templated songs, with very less composition and more of a dependency on lyrics, which are bad, and arrangements, which excel. So, I would say, the Pritam Punch in this ‘Dishoom’ was lacking!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sau Tarah Ke > Ishqa > Toh Dishoom > Jaaneman Aah (Version 2) > Jaaneman Aah (Version 1) > Sau Tarah Ke (Revisited)

 

Which is your favourite song from Dishoom? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

WHO DA MAN? SANTHOSH DA MAN! (KABALI – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Santhosh Narayanan
♪ Lyrics by: Raqueeb Alam & Roshan Jamrock
♪ Music Label: Think Music
♪ Music Released On: 12th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd July 2016

Kabali (Hindi) Album Cover

Kabali (Hindi) Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Kabali is an upcoming Tamil gangster-drama film, starring the one and only superstar Rajinikanth, along with Winston Chao and Radhika Apte. The film has been directed by Pa. Ranjith, and produced by Kalaipuli S. Thanu. I am shocked at how the Hindi version of the film hasn’t been promoted too much, like the Hindi versions of ‘Robot’, ‘Kochadaiiyaan’ and ‘Lingaa’ were, but hopefully, the film attracts the audience to theaters! Behind the music, this time, we have not A.R. Rahman, who up till now was a regular in Rajinikanth’s soundtracks, but we have Santhosh Narayanan, a very promising composer, who incidentally also debuted in Bollywood earlier this year with ‘Saala Khadoos’, which had quite some good and energetic songs according to the movie’s theme. This time, his Tamil album has been released in Hindi for the dubbed version of the film, and what a prestige it must be for him to have composed for Rajinikanth in just his fourth year of being a professional composer! (He debuted as a composer for films in 2012). Expectations are high from the music, and keeping in mind that the movie is a gangster drama, I’ll be on the lookout for such music! 😀 Though I don’t always like such songs, hopefully Santhosh’s songs will make me change my likes!! So let’s get into the soundtrack for ‘Kabali’!!


1. Jag Hai Ye Dabang Ka
Singers ~ Shankar Mahadevan & Rohit Fernandes, Rap Written and Performed by ~ Roshan Jamrock

A powerpacked song is offered to you as the first song in the album. The song starts off with dynamic notes, indicating an energetic theme track that is about to start. The song is just that, a theme song that praises and worships the titular character of the movie, Kabali. The composition is just perfect for such a song; it has shades of inspiration, motivation and worship for a god-like figure (who in this case is a gangster 😲) Santhosh adds great variations in each line, and each line has a different effect. The hookline is pretty much the mukhda of the song, and though it sounds like a very typical Rajinikanth song, it manages to hook you very well. The part where they sing “Kabaliiii” sounds very beautiful. Also, the “Taakat apni himmat karde… ” sounds very inspirational. Santhosh Narayanan chooses singers wisely here, and in choosing Shankar Mahadevan for the lead vocals, exercises great cleverness. Shankar is perfect for the energetic and confident vocals of the song, and nobody else could’ve sung it be better. The backing vocals are very motivational and are a characteristic of such motivational songs. It is actually the composition that makes the song work so well. A rap portion by Roshan Jamrock in the interlude entertains and actually has better lyrics. At least it isn’t about party and drinks. Santhosh also wins in the arrangements. Energetic percussion (R.K. Sundar) helps the song to get the required zeal and enthusiasm. The occasional techno sound helps to increase the universal appeal of the song. Strings and electric guitars also add to the majestic part of the arrangements. Raqueeb Alan’s lyrics are, as I said, worshipping a larger-than-life figure, and are pretty functional. A winner by Santhosh right at the beginning of the album! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Jadoo Rawan Rawan
Singers ~ Pradeep Kumar, Ananthu, Shreya Ghoshal & Sanjana Kalmanje

In the next song, we get bliss for 4½ minutes, and Santhosh leaves no stone unturned while ensuring that the listeners get the best experience of their lives listening to the song. To start off, we get a ravishing guitar loop, which is what makes you get goosebumps right at the beginning of the song. When Pradeep Kumar starts singing though, you know nothing can get better. Santhosh has created such a soulful, emotional, melancholic composition with strong classical undertones, haunting to the core. Each and every line holds a surprise for the listener. It is a melody that will take the listener into an altogether different space for 4½ minutes. It is the hookline that’s sooooo well composed and haunting, and giving you the most haunting experience you’ve had since a long time. I wish more songs like this were composed in proper Bollywood! Coming to the singers, it is not a surprise that the song needed three voices to make it sound so good. The two male voices are excellent. On the one hand, we have Pradeep Kumar (a Tamil singer), whose voice is so sweet and smooth, while on the other hand there’s Ananthu, with a folksier voice. He has taken charge of the hookline, which is composed like a Carnatic classical song. The composer has brought a great contrast between the two. And then we have our very own Bollywood singer Shreya Ghoshal, who handles her parts so charismatically, it actually feels like a dream. Sanjana Kalmanje with the backing vocals, in the second interlude too, does well. Arrangements have to be fabulous if I’m praising the song so much. Santhosh weaves magic with the tablas (played oh-so-wonderfully by Sai Shravanam) and then there is the acoustic guitar by Keba Jeremiah, which impresses highly! The Spanish guitars (by the singer himself, Pradeep Kumar) bring a great variation into the song in the first interlude. The Macedonian Radio Symphonic Orchestra does some wonderful strings in the song, too. At the end of the song, though, it is the tabla that has left a striking impact on us. Raqueeb’s lyrics are great, too, and make you think, or rather, are meant to make you think. I’m saying that because Santhosh’s wonderful composition hardly let’s you think of anything else except the composition, arrangements and the vocals!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Veeron Ki Bheed Men
Singer ~ Francois Castellino, Rap Written & Performed by ~ Roshan Jamrock

After that beautiful classical gem of a song, here’s a song that takes you back to the jazz era. The song sounds quite weird at the first listen, but later you start grooving to it, dancing along to it and whatnot. The song starts off with an awesome acapella group, that makes the start of the song really interesting. Santhosh doesn’t really have to compose much in this song, which leaves you thinking where you are, and whether you’ve played the right song. The whole song is like a rap song, with most of it being just rao and nothing else much. This really makes it sound a lot like what it should, being a song in a gangster-themed movie. The problem is, there’s nothing to follow in the song, with everything going haywire. Arrangements make up for the minimal composition, and Santhosh really experiments with jazz — the trumpets (Vijay) accompanying each other nicely. Drums (Tapass Naresh) are another highlight of the track. Jhanu Chantar’s electric guitars give that groove, a characteristic groove that each song of this type usually has. Francois Castellino, who I remember only as the ‘Nakhre’ (Action Replayy) singer, ‘sings’ or rather, says the song with the required ‘swag’ and attitude. At some places, he actually sounds like Amitabh Bachchan. 😀 Raqueeb Alam writes the Hindi lyrics, while Roshan Jamrock writes the English rap, and performs both Hindi and English raps. 😛 Both are situational, so there really is no point in deciphering what they mean. Pretty good, but without that gripping factor that the previous two songs had!

 

4. Taare Saare Chhup Gae
Singer ~ Pradeep Kumar, Backing Vocals ~ Vasudevan, Senthil Das, Sam, Sunderrajan, Balaji, Murali

A dazzling flute (Vishnu Vijay) opens up this song, another melodic piece composed on classical notes. The composition does have shades of ‘Jadoo Rawan Rawan’, and seems like a reprise of it, but it isn’t. The composition is endearing, and Santhosh puts all his soul into it. It results in a melodious song which seems to be placed at a very critical scene in the movie. Again, the composition is totally unpredictable, with vast ranges of notes and sudden changes. It is heavy on the ears, but grows slowly. The vocals by Pradeep are applause worthy. He very beautifully puts the emotion into the song. The backing chorus does well too, arriving mostly after the first antara, and singing a haunting operatic piece. The haunting composition stands out because of the minimal arrangements. Piano notes play out the melody, while the strings (again by the Macedonian Radio Symphonic Orchestra) impress a lot. The flute happens to impress thoroughly though, and like every song has a highlight, the flute is the highlight of this song. Haunting percussion are present after the first antara, when things get more heavy and haunting, replacing the minimal guitars (Pradeep Kumar) that led through the first part of the song. Raqueeb’s lyrics are good, but of course the dubbing disadvantages kick in at places, and some lines seem out of their place. Another beautiful symphonic piece! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Aag Hun Main
Singers ~ Suraj Jagan & Arunraja Kamaraj

To end the soundtrack, we have a grungy heavy metal song, which really suits the theme of the movie, but kind of tough to digest for me! Nevertheless, I will try to rate it unbiasedly. The song starts off with a weird, wailing, siren sound, which is earsplitting. Until someone says in a grungy voice, “Aag Hun Main!!!!”, which makes you make that weird facial expression signifying “What have I landed myself into!?” The composition by Santhosh is very situational, and definitely not to be liked by everyone. It is more like a theme track, like the ones that play in a movie when the bad guy has finished doing his bad deeds, and walks away with the camera focusing on his evil smile. The tune is really tough to catch, but will be devoured by rock lovers. The arrangements however, provide really interesting stuff to hear! The rock guitars (Jhanu Chantar) are soooo electrifying. They do resemble the rock guitars in ‘Dil Haara’ (Tashan) a bit in the beginning of the song though. The next main highlight in the arrangements is the whistle. It is as good as the whistle in the ‘Kill/Dil’ title track, which had that type of whistle, and which was lapped up by all kinds of listeners. Vijaynarain and Sri Shyamalangan have done the whistle wonderfully! Nothing else is really prominent, except maybe the drums by Tapass Naresh. Electronic noises are present as well, making it just as much of a dynamic affair. Suraj Jagan is at comfort, with the vocals, as it is his forte. Raqueeb writes lyrics that again, are situational, so I don’t really mind about them. Pretty disappointing for someone who doesn’t hold much interest in such heavy rock, but will be devoured by the rock lovers!


Kabali is a great theme-based album. It may be lacking in its qualities as a whole album, but it does have some good songs. Santhosh, after proving himself in Bollywood with ‘Saala Khadoos’ earlier this year, also makes it big in his first Rajinikanth album. (And I say first because I believe there are many more to come!) Santhosh sticks to the theme of the movie, and proves that he’s da man!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jadoo Rawan Rawan > Taare Saare Chhup Gae > Jag Hai Ye Dabang Ka > Veeron Ki Bheed Men > Aag Hun Main

 

Which is your favourite song from Kabali? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NEITHER GREAT, NOR GRAND, BUT DEFINITELY FULL OF MASTI!! (GREAT GRAND MASTI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sanjeev-Darshan, Sharib-Toshi & Superbia (Shaan-Gourov-Roshin)
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan, Manoj Yadav & Kumaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 7th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th July 2016

Great Grand Masti

Great Grand Masti

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Great Grand Masti is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film, starring Riteish Deshmukh, Vivek Oberoi, Aftab Shivdasani and Urvashi Rautela in lead roles. The film has been directed by Indra Kumar, and produced by Sameer Nair, Aman Gill, Ashok Thakeria, Sri Adhikari Brothers and Anand Pandit. The film is the third of its type to release this year, and all I know is that both of those, namely ‘Mastizaade’ and ‘Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3’, fell flat on their noses, and I expect this one to do so, as well, so all I’m concerned about is the music. The music of ‘Mastizaade’ was a one-hit wonder, with ‘Rom Rom Romantic’ by Amaal Mallik being the only song I loved out of four other songs by Meet Bros Anjjan and Anand Raaj Anand. In ‘Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3’ too, only one song — ‘Jawaani Le Doobi’, was really addictive, out of the four, all by Sajid-Wajid. Here, we have three entities — firstly, the thrice-in-a-blue-moon (please understand what that means) composers Sanjeev-Darshan, sons of Shravan Rathod of Nadeem-Shravan. They had composed the title track for ‘Grand Masti’ and now get two songs out of four in the sequel. Next up is the consistently disappointing (at least this year) duo, Sharib-Toshi, with one song, and last up is the band Superbia, with its members being singer Shaan, and Gourov Dasgupta and Roshin Balu. They too, get one song, and so the album is very conveniently made up of songs composed by two duos and a trio. What we have to see, is exactly how enjoyable the songs actually are. (because those of ‘Grand Masti’ weren’t at all!)


1. Teri Kamar Ko
Singers ~ Sanjeev Rathod, Darshan Rathod & Kanika Kapoor, Music by ~ Sanjeev-Darshan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

An ode to the “Mastiiiiiii” from Anand Raaj Anand’s title track of the first ‘Masti’ movie, begins the album to the third instalment of the franchise. Not before long, the title of this movie comes and the peppy song takes off. Sanjeev-Darshan, who had composed a very dull and uninteresting title song fro ‘Grand Masti’, actually make up for their mistake there, with this song. This is the ideal song you want in a comedy movie — peppy, enjoyable, addictive and hummable. The duo have proved themselves in the 90s and it is commendable how they’ve evolved and are composing contemporary music, till date. Here, they do get in a bit of the templatised late 2000s sound of Bollywood, but everything is done very craftily. By craftily, I don’t mean it is a musical gem or something, but it is quite catchy, as it should be! The hook is infectious and energetic. It makes you groove along to it. The duo has composed a just as infectious tune, with three parts repeating, which are 1) the “Teri Kamar Ko” hook, 2) Kanika’s “darliiing” part, and 3) the 90s bhangra piece that goes like “oh baby teri look kamaal lagti hai…” . All three parts repeat throughout the song and mutually complement each other, to result in quite an appealing composition, overall. There is not even one word above the three parts I have mentioned, and that is kind of weird for a Bollywood song. So the mukhda is the antara and vice versa. Sanjeev-Darshan’s energetic singing too, gives the song half of its catchiness. Kanika sounds good, but not as unique as she does in other songs. It is Sanjeev-Darshan, who steal the spotlight. Arrangements are good as well. That groovy beat is present throughout the song, which is unforgettable. Brass has been used generously and it sounds great. The Punjabi part I spoke about has a great Dhol rhythm to it. Kumaar’s lyrics are enjoyable too. Especially true female part, is hilarious. Indifferent to the boys’ pleas, the clever girlfriends want a party, a ride in the car, a margarita, a diamond AND a meeting with his parents, before, in Kumaar’s words, “Jo bhi chaahe karle”! Surprisingly VERY catchy, and something that will play everywhere for a while! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Resham Ka Rumaal
Singers ~ Toshi Sabri & Soniya Sharma, Original Song by ~ Ila Arun, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

Sharib-Toshi are back after an unsuccessful stint in the first half of this year, with bad or just below average songs from ‘1920 London’, ‘Veerappan’ & ‘Housefull 3’. After composing for two ‘third instalments’ — those of ‘1920’ and ‘Housefull’, they are back in the third instalment for ‘Masti’, and this time, they remix a traditional folk song by Ila Arun, ‘Resham Ka Rumaal’, with, of course, many modern club beats and whatnot. The song actually starts off with a funky groove, but when the actual composition starts, you can’t help but daydream and get bored. The composition is really dull, and also a desperate mix of their very own ‘Emotional Fool’ (Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania) and ‘Pyaar Ki’ (Housefull 3). It is just the typical Sharib-Toshi composition for dance songs. {They have typical compositions in dance as well as romance!! :\ } The hookline is taken as it is from Ila Arun’s song, and I don’t actually like the composition of that either, so this was a nightmare, especially with the masculine voice of the female voice! That brings us to the vocals. Toshi sounds dull and bland, and as feminine as ever. The female singer sounds more masculine than him. Both sound bad, in short. She has included unnecessary nuances in order to sound cool, especially in the hookline, adding the “ha” sound everywhere she can, to make it sound kind of like this — “Rehesham kaha ruhumaahal galehe pehe dahalke tu aajana, o dude mere main, main dillihi kaha surma lagahake arree, khadi hun ca-lub kehe darwahajje pehe.” It is so irritating! I was as irritated while hearing it, as you were while reading that! And then there’s a rap that sounds stupid. The arrangements are not interesting at all, with club beats trying to elevate the song’s quality, but reducing it in the bargain. Manoj Yadav changes the hookline to make it sound more modern and ‘cool’, like changing “dildar” to “dude”, and “kab Se khadi hun darwaje pe” in the original to “khadi hun ca-lub [club] Ke darwaaje pe.” Disgusting. And then another disgusting line goes “Where are you, where are you, mujhe taiyaar karke”, to which the female singer answers with the hookline of the song in that annoying voice and pronunciation. Sharib-Yoshi and Manoj Yadav are back with another bad song! Skip!

 

3. I Wanna Tera Ishq
Singers ~ Shivranjani Singh & Shivangi Bhayana, Music by ~ Sanjeev-Darshan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This song starts off VERRRRYYY addictively. The percussion that starts off the song really helps in attracting the listener’s attention. And the rattles after that just increase his/her interest. Sanjeev-Darshan have cone up with another catchy and haunting tune, which grabs you, but not as great as the title song. Nevertheless, it is quite groovy! The hookline is something that irritates you the first time, but gets better and better with each listen. The antara is something that has gotten stuck in my mind. The mukhda, too, attracts the listener and makes sure he doesn’t leave halfway. The arrangements are another great aspect of the song, with catchy and addictive beats, Arabic arrangements like the percussion and the rattle, which reminds me of a snake rattle for some reason. 😀 A wonderful saxophone interlude fills the gap between two stanzas, and electronic tabla beats sound great. The two lead singers really sing the song the way it is supposed to, with a sensuous tone, to make it more addictive. I can’t differentiate between the two, but both sound good (irritating at first, but again, better each time) and also remind one of Neha Kakkar. It is the lyrics where the song lacks out, as was expected. The hookline makes no sense. 😛 “I wanna tera ishq” means “I want to your love” which is nonsensical. But again, the vocals and composition saves Kumaar! Another catchy song from Sanjeev-Darshan! #5StarHotelSong!! {I haven’t had tomatoes thrown at me for a long time!! Bring it on!!}

 

4. Lipstick Laga Ke
Singers ~ Payal Dev & Shaan, Music by ~ Superbia, Lyrics by ~ Sameer Anjjan

The last song on the album goes into the calmest mode of the album, more like Indipop of 2000s, with Superbia (a trio comprising Shaan, Gourov Dasgupta & Roshin Balu) behind the composition and arrangements. The trio composes a decent song, which could’ve easily topped the charts, but in the time period I mentioned — the 2000s. In this decade, too, it is sounding good, but just that. The song is a like Punjabi pop number, with a slow-paced tune arranged on an overdose of tumbi, making it sound like a Kanika Kapoor song without Kanika Kapoor, and a Kanika Kapoor song without Kanika Kapoor is like ice cream without ice cream! 😦 😂😂😂 Nevertheless, the trio have made a nice instrumentation for themselves in the song, with a great guitar riff, and nice shehnais throughout. It is just the tumbi that sounds unnecessarily overdone. The “oh saiyyan ve” is crazily infectious, even in its slow pace! Payal Dev sounds good here, and at least she doesn’t sound irritating (like in “Veerappan”), but her voice sounds pretty addictive. And Shaan sings in a different avatar after a loooooonnnngggg time. His goody-goody songs are done I hope, and he features in an outright baddy-baddy song here, and sounds great rapping in Punjabi! A pleasant surprise for his peers. At least he didn’t add his too-sugary voice here, and spoil the song! Sameer’s lyrics are ATROCIOUS though. They’re too ridiculous to be talked about, but here are some highlights: “Lipstick lagake tenu loot liya ve / akhiyaan milake heart attack diya ve.” Excuse me, what’s “Myocardial infarction” then?? :\ I’m pretty sure Sameer learnt Biology with the lyricists of ‘Taang Uthake’, who are of the opinion that all our body parts have legs! A good composition, but a bit predictable and “on-and-off” type grooviness.


I never expected Great Grand Masti to have good songs. At the most, I was expecting one great song and the rest time pass. Yes, I know all are time pass songs, but for me, two of them stood out, and those are the two composed by the most senior composers, Sanjeev-Darshan. I know they’re ridiculous and I usually thrash such songs, but why thrash them when the movie needs such ridiculous songs. On one hand, we can have ridiculous songs with bad compositions (‘Housefull 3’) and on the other, they can have really addictive tunes (like these two). Even Superbia comes up with a functional composition, and partially gains my interest, but it is only Sharib-Toshi who disappoint. Again. And again. And again… All in all, it is an album that is neither great, nor grand, but full of ‘Masti’ for sure!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Kamar Ko > I Wanna Tera Ishq > Lipstick Laga Ke > Resham Ka Rumaal

 

Which is your favourite song from Great Grand Masti? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SINDHU MAA KA SANGEET!! (MOHENJO DARO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman
♪ Lyrics by: Javed Akhtar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th August 2016

Mohenjo Daro Album Cover

Mohenjo Daro Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mohenjo Daro is an upcoming epic adventure drama/action film starring Hrithik Roshan and Pooja Hegde in lead roles, and Kabir Bedi and Arunoday Singh in supporting roles. The movie is directed by the ‘Lagaan’, ‘Swades’, ‘Jodhaa Akbar’, ‘What’s Your Raashee?’ director, Ashutosh Gowariker, and produced by Siddharth Roy Kapur, Sunita Gowariker and Ashutosh Gowariker himself. The film is set in 2016 B.C. in the ancient city, Mohenjo Daro. It revolves around a farmer, Sarman (Hrithik Roshan), who falls in love with his enemy’s daughter, Chaani (Pooja Hegde), a dancer. After seeing the trailer, the historical accountability of the film has been doubted by almost everyone, and to me, everything looks over the top. That leaves only one thing for me to be waiting for, and that is something you get no prizes for guessing. It is the soundtrack to the movie, composed by the genius A.R. Rahman, whose Tamil album just received a great response from me. Now it’s time to see how his first Hindi album of the year fares, and being an album for an Ashutosh Gowariker film, it is expected to be great and extraordinary, going by the albums to ‘Lagaan’, ‘Swades’ and ‘Jodhaa Akbar’, all of which were beautiful albums. Rahman composes eight songs for this movie, and the lyrics are penned by Javed Akhtar. My excitement is engulfing me, so here I proceed with the actual review!!


1. Mohenjo Mohenjo
Singers ~ A.R. Rahman, Arijit Singh, Bela Shende & Sanah Moidutty

The album starts off with a grand theme song to the movie, a title song, and also an introduction to the ancient folksy music which we will get a glimpse of in the album. The song starts off with some rustic, earthy chants in an unintelligible language, probably the language which the makers of the film have made up as the language of the Mohenjodaroans gives the song a distinct earthy feel. What’s more, Rahman uses the perfect percussion to make it feel even more ancient. We have to keep in mind that the civilization is one of India’s first civilizations, that existed in the Before Christ era, and Rahman takes that into account and tries to make a song which matches the criteria, as well as appeals to the Bollywood audience. The composition, though it seems very simple and straightforward for a Rahman song at first, works its magic on you after a couple of listens. A good maze of lines that are composed in different manners make up the composition, a variety of twists and turns, even in the simplicity, being its feature. The mukhda is simple, while the antara is very enchanting. The mukhda repeats towards the end, in a female voice, probably Bela’s. The hookline is anthemic, and suitable for the theme of the film, with an ancient civilization to describe. Reminiscent of ‘Azeem-O-Shaan Shahenshah’ (Jodhaa Akbar), this one too, is a great introduction to the ways of Mohenjo Daro and summarizes the album and the city in 6½ minutes. Rustic wails and vocal noises grace the song, and make it all the more worthwhile. Arijit leads the song gracefully, and is wonderfully supported by a chorus of male and female singers, which I guess are A.R. Rahman, Bela Shende & Sanah. Bela does get a stanza to herself and she does good, though she is not very impressive either. The chorus is what makes the song sound even more lively and junglee, especially the chorus that goes something like “mil Jul aur ghul mil…” Rahman’s arrangements are mind-blowing, a wonderful show of rustic percussion, probably African drums in reality, though I can hear thavils and the like. The fiddle makes a nice special appearance in the interlude, which is rich with the sound of the chorus, which just can’t stop impressing throughout the song. And then there’s the flute. 😍😍😍😍 Rahman always creates magic with the flute, and that’s evident here as well! The clapping beats are also catchy and addictive. At the end, we get a nice dhol-taasha conclusion to the energetic track. Javed Akhtar writes words that aren’t really extraordinary, but they very well describe the city in the eyes of its citizens. All I feel is that it sounds too much like one of Rahman’s dubbed songs, because of the irregular tune. A song that is so energetic, but takes time to grow. Rahman succeeds in transporting us to an era that nobody can imagine to be transported to, except through music! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Sindhu Ma
Singers ~ A.R. Rahman & Sanah Moidutty

It is a romantic song that comes next in the album, and it starts with some wind instruments followed by Rahman making tribal noises with his tongue, and these same noises later sound so magical and enchanting that it seems unbelievable. The song proceeds with a stanza sung enchantingly and marvelously by Sanah, who I’m glad has at last got a song where she will be noticed, after that small part in the ‘Gori Tere Pyaar Mein’ song with Vishal-Shekhar. She sings with as much divinity as possible, and Rahman follows with some lines that are irregular in structure but the magic is in their irregularity, first in that Mohenjodaroan language and then in Hindi. 😀 I loved it how each line has a different tune and tempo, yet everything sounds so soothing in Rahman’s distinct voice. It has that deep, nasal quality that impresses so much, and transports you to another world. Rahman’s composition too, is something that takes time to grow, but again, after it has grown, you can’t forget it. It stays there forever. A divine, sweet, innocent, pure romance is indicated through the composition, which is unusually slow-paced, but its slow pace is what appeals. There are lines where the singers have to sing rapidly, and it fits in too well with the surroundings. The pitch change towards the end works well, and the song ends with you feeling fresh and relaxed. The hookline actually has nothing to do with the title, which just comes once in the beginning of the song. Instead, the hookline is the title of a song that is going to come later on in the album, and that song is a version of this or vice versa. Again, it is not a conventional hookline where the listener gets a buy one get one free treat of it, but it comes very humbly and leaves its mark on you. The first time you hear the song, the tribal language in the starting, sung by Rahman might seem over-the-top, but after a few listens, you understand that it gels in inconspicuously with the rest of the song. Rahman’s arrangements are stellar. Guitars lead the arrangements, and of course, a flute impresses with its playful nature in the interlude. Rahman has a chorus singing little attractions throughout the song, and again, this chorus changes the entire listening experience. They add their magic in places which would’ve sounded bland without them. The percussion is wonderful, as well. Strings accompany all this, rather conspicuously, though. Brass instruments and bells are welcome attractions in the song as well. Javed Akhtar’s lyrics are good, but it requires a lot of courage to focus on them, leaving the heavenly composition alone. It is a song that doesn’t actually need great lyrics to propel it along! A ravishing, surreal experience. Both the singers bring out the charm in the composition beautifully! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Sarsariya
Singers ~ Shashwat Singh & Shashaa Tirupati

It is a very enticing folksy rhythm that paves the way into the next song, an enjoyable-to-the-core dance track, which has Rahman in his top form. It is such tracks that even you know, that I love Rahman the most in. On the lines of ‘Kilimanjaro’ (Robot) and a bit of ‘Barso Re’ (Guru) and the whackiness of ‘Mawaali Qawwali’ (Lekar Hum Deewana Dil) and ‘Mona Gasolina’ (Lingaa), this is Rahman with all of his creativity. So as I was saying, the wonderful percussion that makes the song sound so inviting and catchy, takes the listener with surprise, surprise that is born out of the sheer rawness of the rhythm. The tambourines, flutes and the ethnic drums make the prelude something that is very promising. The rest of the song doesn’t disappoint after that promising prelude, though. Rahman comes up with a tune that is so rustic, raw and earthy in its presentation, that you may even believe that Mohenjo Daro’s folk music was like this! The mukhda has a weird addictiveness, and the antara is what gets into the contemplative mode, with a very lilting tune, brought to life by those ravishing drums, once again. And the hookline, oh! It is the hookline that is the USP of the song, a great mix of whacky sounds and those clever tribal lyrics, of which nobody understands neither head nor tail. The “Emase-nana-maya” after the antara makes a very, very clever bridge to the hookline, though completely changing the lulling mood of the antara to a lively one. About the arrangements, whatever I say will not do justice to them. Rahman has employed exquisite and lively instruments to make the song sound genuinely ancient, tribal and folksy. The percussion, that is quite close to the Rajasthani or Kutchi folk, is what infuses life into the song. Charming flutes and strings too, in the latter part of the song, gives it the sweetness required for it to flourish completely. Mandolin scattered throughout in the background captures your attention whenever it plays. An oud-like instrument makes up a wonderful first interlude, while an engrossing rhythm backs the lilting first antara, and makes you sit back and enjoy the song with closed eyes. Matkas and dandiya, typical of the Kutchi folk, have been used generously, and work in favourite of the song. Flute and guitars help the second interlude keep the listener entertained, while the song ends with a wonderful violin conclusion. Coming to the vocals, nothing can be more impressive than what Shashwat and Shashaa have done here. Shashaa particularly, who sings that little gibberish prelude before the Hindi parts start, impresses right away, and we know she is going to impress all throughout the song, which she does! She modulates her voice beautifully, so it sounds just as great in the upbeat portions, as it does in the lilting melodious parts. Shashwat’s voice sound perfectly clear and smooth, unlike what it did in ‘Wat Wat Wat’ (Tamasha), where it sounded folksy. And he impresses highly, though overshadowed by Shashaa. Javed Akhtar has written enjoyable lyrics, especially the alien ones!! A cracker of a song from Rahman, though not outwardly loud and blaring. It proves that dance songs don’t have to be loud and blaring in order to be catchy and addictive! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Tu Hai
Singers ~ A.R. Rahman & Sanah Moidutty

The next song, we are familiar with. It is the part of ‘Sindhu Ma’ without the actual prelude that was an ode to River Sindhu (present-day Indus), which was the sacred river of the Mohenjodaroans. The presence of this version gives a whole different meaning to that song. I had thought while hearing that song, that it is the romantic song of the album. However, it is this version which has the romantic connotation to it. And after hearing this version, we realize that that version was more of a devotional song, an ode to the river, and Javed Akhtar’s lyrics really suit as a romantic as well as a divine song. 😀 Vocals, arrangements, composition and everything else is exactly the same as the latter part of ‘Sindhu Ma’, so no use repeating the review again! 😀 The only thing I could notice that was different, is the starting prelude, which is a beautiful guitar strum here, while it was blended into the devotional prayer in that song. It is all in the different perspectives of the two versions — the former devotional, while this one is romantic. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Whispers of The Mind / Whispers of The Heart
Vocals ~ Arjun Chandy

These two tracks are background scores, which are the essence of the film’s setting. The setting of the film is perfectly described and conveyed to the listeners, with those weird tribal-sounding noises amidst a background of chirping crickets and birds, and it sounds like you are out in the wild. Perfect for the theme of the story but not exactly something to enjoy in a music album. Arjun Chandy chants the “whispers” very slowly and mysteriously, and makes the track sound genuine. The “Zoooaaaa” did sound irritating at first, but if the theme of the movie is taken into mind, it fits in well. The “Heart” version has more happening in the form of a divine female chorus singing in the background, and tribal drums playing a wonderful beat towards the end. And, its shorter than the “Mind” version! The “Mind” version runs over four minutes and bores until the end, while there’s a lot to look forward to at the end of the “Heart” version!! It just proves that what your heart says, is better than what your mind does! 😛 LISTEN TO THE HEART! And by that, I mean that the second version is a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. The Shimmer of Sindhu
Guitars ~ Keba Jeremiah, Flute ~ Kareem Kamalakar

It is a Rahman album. It cannot finish without an instrumental of at least one of the tracks! And so, we have an instrumental of ‘Tu Hai’ presented to us, with guitars, strings and flutes carrying the heavenly tune on their shoulders. Rahman employs wonderful guitars played by Keba Jeremiah, for the base melody of the song, and it sounds sooooo idyllic! Imagine what  would happen when beautiful flutes and orchestral strings join that melody! You don’t need to imagine, however, as Rahman saves you the effort of doing so, by adding them himself! The flutes by Kareem Kamalakar are well-done, and played in the most unexpected places, in a delightful classical way. It is the strings that infuse grandeur into the already a majestic instrumentation. The blissful melody, when played in that slow pace, sounds as pretty as ever. A heavenly reprise of the entrancing love ballad. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. Lakh Lakh Thora
Instrumental by ~ Tapas Roy & P.M.K. Naveen Kumar

A very oriental-sounding Oud opens the last song on the album, and before you think of anything else, that addictive tune of ‘Sarsariya’ comes back to you, and you realize it is the same tune. Therefore, this song is an instrumental version of that one, which was my favourite vocal song out of the three. Tapas Roy with the oud and the mandolin, impresses highly, and the glory of the song lies in the brilliance with which he plays them! It has the power to attract your attention, and even though it is a background piece, it is just as great as an actual song — can be played, hummed and danced to. 😀 Rahman many other attractions like the percussion (the djembe is really great!) and water drops. The way the string instrument has been played in what’s supposed to be the interlude of the song (you can’t make out as all it is, is just instruments 😛 ) is sooooo beautiful. Naveen Kumar joins in quite late, and plays a few lines on the flute before the song ends. Whoever has done the percussions, really knows his or her job very well! They’re engaging and help the song stay to its catchy nature. CATCHY!!! The Oud and Mandolin make things way more catchier! #5StarHotelSong!!


Mohenjo Daro completely lives up to expectations. I mean, I was expecting a lot more, and was quite disappointed during the first time I heard it, but later I realized how each song has been made to suit the film and its ancient setting and not even one song extra has been crammed into the album, which explains why it’s just three-tracks-long (if you practically see it). Rahman uses a great blend of traditional and even modern instruments to make songs sounding ancient and folksy! Though we never imagined Mohenjo Daro and its music like this when we were taught about in school, thanks to Rahman, that information about the recreation of the Mohenjodaroans has got some life now! 😛 I also noticed that he has used relatively new singers in most of the songs — Arijit and Bela being the only exceptions, and of course, himself. Sanah Moidutty, Shashaa Tirupati and Shashwat Singh are the singers he has used, and they literally infuse life into the album, while at the same time, they’re gonna establish themselves in Bollywood with this album. And then there are those ravishing background pieces, out of which one bored me (frankly speaking…! Sorry!!) but the other three really fascinated me! Rahman has really given us a glimpse of Sindhu Ma’s sangeet! 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating. 

Recommended Listening Order: Sarsariya > Sindhu Ma > Tu Hai > Lakh Lakh Thora > Mohenjo Mohenjo > The Shimmer of Sindhu > Whispers of The Heart > Whispers of The Mind

 

Which is your favourite song from Mohenjo Daro? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

QUITE A SHORT, BUT ENJOYABLE ‘MADAARI’ SHOW!! (MADAARI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vishal Bhardwaj & Sunny Bawra-Inder Bawra
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 5th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th July 2016

Madaari Album Cover

Madaari Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Madaari is an upcoming Bollywood social thriller film starring Irrfan Khan in a central role, and Vishesh Bansal, Jimmy Shergill, Tushar Dalvi, Nitesh Pandey and Sadhil Kapoor in other supporting roles. The film is directed by ‘Drishyam’ & ‘Rocky Handsome’ fame, Nishikant Kamat, and produced by Irrfan Khan, Shailesh Singh, Madam Paliwal, Sutapa Sikdar, and Shailja Kejriwal. The movie is about a man who loses everything he has in a man-made disaster, and his search for the answers as to the reasons for the disaster, during which he encounters shocking discoveries. His search for justice in a thriller manner, is the gist of the movie. After ‘Drishyam’, which was so thrilling, we are naturally expecting a lot from this. However, ‘Drishyam’ was lacking a bit in the music department in that its songs weren’t universally appealing. (Though I loved them except one). And I’m confident that the songs in this movie too, aren’t going to be the regular song-and-dance-routine songs that we get to see in Bollywood. They will be like those of ‘Drishyam’. Even ‘Rocky Handsome’ had some Bollywood-ish songs. What’s more, this movie, as opposed to the five songs in ‘Rocky Handsome’ and the four in ‘Drishyam’, has merely two tracks. After a long album like ‘Fever’, I should be partying at the moment, but I’m not because of the names attached to the music! Two songs by two musical entities, the first being the famous and renowned-for-his-unconventional-music Vishal Bhardwaj, who left us with unconventional but haunting songs in ‘Talvar’ (coincidentally, another thriller starring Irrfan). The second is duo Sunny-Inder Bawra, who debuted verrrrryyy impressively with ‘Rocky Handsome’, especially that gem of a haunting song, ‘Rehnuma’ by Shreya. So, I was let down seeing the number of songs after knowing the names behind them, but then I get all the more chances of calling it stuff like ‘chhota packet bada dhamaka’ and all that nonsense, so… Yeah. :p Let’s see what this two-track-long soundtrack offers! By the way, before we start, I noticed that there’s a single lyricist, Mr. Irshad Kamil, who has written for both the song, inspite of the songs being composed by different people! 😀 And I also noticed Vishal Bhardwaj has been separated from his partner-in-creating-great-songs, Gulzar!


1. Dama Dama Dam
Singer ~ Vishal Dadlani, Music by ~ Vishal Bhardwaj

It is a social thriller, so a satirical track is necessary! And this soundtrack starts (it is weird to say ‘starts’ when it is one-half of the album! 😂) with just that. With Vishal Bhardwaj {from now on in this song’s review, VB, to differentiate between the Vishals} in charge of the music and arrangements, and Vishal Dadlani {VD} behind the mic, nothing can go wrong, if we look at their past collaborations — ‘Dhan Te Nan’ (Kaminey) and ‘Aao Na’ (Haider). VD is like fluid — give him any container, he’ll take its shape. That’s evident here as well. Though he may have sung many satirical songs before, he sounds really good singing this one, and the sarcasm and mocking tone in his voice really stands out, as it should. His husky voice is perfect, and brings out the satire in Irshad’s words very well. VB however, disappoints with a tune that is not so gripping. In ‘Talvar’, he had treated us with a similar political satire, ‘Patli Gali’ sung by Sukhwinder. That had a catchy tune, and that made it work. These songs really need a catchy tune to work, and though the composer has tried to come up with a catchphrase, ‘Dama dama dam dam dam dam dam doo’, it comes across as weird, kiddish and kind of over the top. Arrangements are good, with great percussion, and the dumroo giving great beats throughout the song. That was expected given the name of the movie and the song. 😂 But the dumroo is hidden amongst other techno beats, rock guitars and a bit of EDM/dubstep tried by VB. The interlude houses a very nice and enjoyable rabaab-ish instrument tune, that is so beautiful. The tune of the antara is complex, which makes it sound better than the rest of the song. Towards the end, a slow-paced portion gets the hookline sung in chants by VD. And the claps in the background make it feel even more genuine. Irshad Kamil writes good and sarcastically funny satirical lyrics, with great use of metaphors, and makes it worth listening. The tune plays the spoilsport of this song, that would’ve become totally enjoyable if it hadn’t been so!

 

2. Masoom Sa
Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Music by ~ Sunny Bawra-Inder Bawra

A haunting harp loop starts off the song, with a flute and xylophone combination joining it later on. Low-pitched humming starts off, with low-pitched cello strings adding depth to the ambience. Sukhwinder starts off in a voice quite different from what we imagine him singing in usually. The song is an emotional song, and Sunny-Inder, who gave another wonderful emotional song ‘Aye Khuda’ in their debut ‘Rocky Handsome’, are experts in haunting us with their melancholic music. Their composition is top-class and probably one of the most haunting sad songs I’ve heard after those in ‘Sarbjit’. The emotion is not just superficial, but it actually goes and touches your heart. It starts off softly, but quickly gets to its peak, and drops down from the peak at the hookline, which is also the best line in the whole song. Mukhda and antara, both have this wonderful vibe surrounding them, though melancholic. Coupled with a lavish blend of traditional instrumentation, the composition sounds even more deep and touching. The opulent orchestration consists of grand and authoritative strings, duff percussion that oh-so-cordially invites those goosebumps to come and have a look at what’s going on outside the body, and luxurious flutes, which always put the sugar into the bitterest of arrangements. However, here’s the sugar in the sugar, so don’t be surprised if you get Diabetes due to the arrangements! Sunny-Inder, who had arranged ‘Aye Khuda’ (Rocky Handsome) on very, very minimal instruments, making it practically unplugged, rectify that mistake here, by using the grandest of instruments there are. All of those put together give the song a template that is purely unbeatable! And coming to Sukhwinder (my keypad who is an expert at spelling just suggested to me to spell his name as ‘Sikh Wonder’, and I’m like, wow, he is a Sikh wonder indeed! The autocorrect is right for the first time! :P) Anyway, coming to Sukhwinder, he renders the song with such ease that it is almost impossible to believe it without hearing! The song has a vast range of highs and lows, and dynamics differ on each line, but Sukhwinder manages them all effortlessly, being the living legend that he is. He doesn’t seem to be bothered by transitions like those; he does it so seamlessly. Irshad’s lyrics are just stupendous. It is definitely describing the feelings of the father who lost his son. Sukhwinder gets a song worthy of his caliber after a LONG time! Sunny-Inder take you on a very emotional ride in this song, each and every moment of which gets encrusted into your brain!! A song to hear on loop! #5StarHotelSong!!


Madaari was not exactly supposed to have songs, and if it did, they were supposed to be situational and instrumental in carrying the story forward. Here, we get exactly such two songs, which help the story of the film. Vishal Bhardwaj, though upsets with his composition, gets everything else perfect in his song, while Sunny-Inder just ace their song. Making great use of their opportunity to create an emotional song, even when a stalwart like Vishal Bhardwaj was on board, they deliver a song that I will definitely cherish for long. Considering the genre of the movie, this ‘Madaari’ (meaning, street performer) show was supposed to be short, but though it’s short, it turns out to be quite enjoyable!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Masoom Sa > Dama Dama Dam 

 

Which is your favourite song from Madaari? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂