A DISHOOM LACKING PRITAM’S USUAL PUNCH!! (DISHOOM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Ashish Pandit & Mayur Puri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 15th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 29th July 2016

Dishoom Album Cover

Dishoom Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dishoom is an upcoming Bollywood action/adventure/thriller film starring John Abraham, Varun Dhawan and Jacqueline Fernandez in leads, while Akshaye Khanna plays the baddie. The film is directed by ‘Desi Boyz’ director, Varun Dhawan’s brother, Rohit Dhawan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala and Sunil A. Lulla. The film is about two cops, Kabir (John Abraham) and Junaid (Varun Dhawan) who are on a case to find a missing cricketer, who happens to be India’s top batsman and whom the makers have cleverly named as Viraj Kohli (played by Saqib Saleem). The two cops have 36 hours before an ‘India vs. Pakistan’ match (come on, how clichéd can you get!!) to find the man. The only reason I’m following this movie is — no, not the energy of Varun Dhawan or the action by John Abraham. And no, not because Akshaye Khanna is returning in a ‘villainous’ avatar after doing ‘Gali Gali Chor Hai’ in 2012 and disappearing. But the reason is because of the music. My personal favourite, Pritam Chakraborty is in charge, and I’m so excited to hear it, because he had given enjoyable songs for ‘Desi Boyz’ as well, and I’m hoping he has done so in his second collab with Rohit Dhawan too! The movie is expected to have some dance tracks, which I know Pritam does very well! So, here goes! Let’s explore the music album of ‘Dishoom’!!


1. Sau Tarah Ke / Sau Tarah Ke (Revisited)
Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Amit Mishra / Aditi Singh Sharma & Abhijeet Sawant, Backing Vocals by ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Himanshu Shirlekar & Akash, Arabic Choir by ~ Maher Al Halabi, Karim Khayat, Youmni Abou Al Zahab, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Hookline Lyrics by ~ Ashish Pandit

Pritam starts off the soundtrack with an energetic dance track just as expected, and really makes you dance with this one. The song starts off with a very unusually addictive vocal break, which just lures you into the composition so effectively. Pritam sure knows how to attract his audience in a classy way, and he does it here. That vocal break is toooo innovative, and also my favourite part of the song — fortunately for me, it plays everywhere throughout the song. Pritam’s composition is a fun one, with a few grey shades that add the mystery and shadow of the thriller/action film to the song. It is an item-song-ish composition, and you can almost call it one, but of course, everything is done so classily that you can classify it as a club song. The hookline has that folksy feel to it, that tells you that the movie (or at least the song) is set in the middle east. The mukhda doesn’t stand out too well during the first couple of listens, but later on, it grows tremendously. It repeats once more after the antara, to end up the song. The antara itself is a nice portion of the song, with a sensuous tune to it. Pritam conveniently uses club beats to enhance the reach of the song, and the booming bass in the song really helps to propel it ahead in the playlist of the listeners. And again, that wonderful vocal break! He uses EDM at places too, and towards the end, the hookline is played with the EDM sound, and sounds so dynamic! In the beginning, a very thrilling oud invites you into the song with that Arabic flavour. The ney by Sahi Shamat is wonderful as well. Both versions have only the vocals different, and everything else exactly, or almost exactly, the same. In the first version, Jonita startles with her performance — it being her first song of this kind. She has brought a naughtiness into her voice, which always used to sound so pure and innocent. It has that sharp texture to it, which it didn’t in her other songs. Amit Mishra, on the other hand, works well as a replacement for Nakash Aziz, sounding quite like him, but impressing nevertheless. In the second version however, Aditi Singh Sharma’s overstylised vocals are a pain to the ears. She hasn’t modulated her voice well and it comes across as too soft where it should’ve been more confident like Jonita’s! Jonita, who sang such a song for the first time, performed better than a singer who is known for such songs, and that’s pretty shocking! Abhijeet Sawant too, doesn’t work well with the composition. He seems to be trying to hard to sing in the way he’s required to. In both versions there’s this awesome Arabic hookline, sung by the Arabic choir I mentioned above. Kumaar and Ashish Pandit together have come up with quite enjoyable lyrics, that suit the theme as well as appeal to the audience. Nothing seems put of place according to Bollywood standards, and so I’m accepting the lyrics! 😂 Pritam opens the album with a great club song, that has the potential to be a chartbuster and also the club anthem of the year! The first version is definitely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Toh Dishoom
Singers ~ Raftaar & Shahid Mallya, Lyrics by ~ Mayur Puri

Next up, we have the title track for the movie, a theme song that is composed on sinister lines, with dark shades predominating in the composition. The composition is actually very less; it is mostly made up of Raftaar’s rap, which is in a tune that keeps repeating whenever the hookline isn’t playing, so in the mukhda and antara. Actually there is no mukhda and antara, as it is the Punjabi rap-styled tune that keeps playing on loop until the hookline comes to rescue it. 😀 The hookline, which is sung by Shahid Mallya and actually has a tune, is pretty good, and has kind of a sinister tune to it. It is actually the backing music that has the mysterious tone to it; the guitars which play in the background. Pritam has not impressed as such with the composition, as the song is very simple, and not of his level. Also, the credits in the jukebox read “Melody based on generic traditional punjabi folk progressions.” I don’t know how to interpret that! The rap is the most prominent part of the song, and that too, gets kind of irritating towards the end. However, as I said, the hookline is good. There is a rapid rap in the second interlude, and at that part I just completely zoned out of the song; it was so tedious to hear. Raftaar’s voice is not too impressive, of course, as he isn’t a singer. Shahid, on the other hand, tries his best to save the song, and manages to do so to a good extent. It is his “Toh dishoommm… Toh dishoommm” parts that I keep waiting for in the song. Pritam’s arrangements are good, and stick to the action theme of the movie, and perfect for a theme song for a heroic character. Especially those guitars and club beats. Some places, it sounds a lot like the ‘Desi Boyz’ title track too! Mayur Puri is back after ‘Bajrangi Bhaijaan’s ‘Selfie Le Le Re’ and ‘Chicken Kuk-Du-Koo’, and writes words that hardly make any sense. After impressing so much with so many songs, he disappoints very badly with this one, literally writing whatever comes to mind and adding a “Toh dishoom” at last to make it sound related to the movie. Lines in the rap sound pretty unbelievable as well. It’s pretty much how the person has a very bad personal life, but in a mock-heroic style, tries to explain how he will punch people when they do stuff he doesn’t like. All in all, a disappointing offering, with just the hookline being the saviour of the song!!

 

3. Jaaneman Aah (Version 1) / Jaaneman Aah (Version 2)
Singers ~ Aman Trikha & Antara Mitra / Nakash Aziz & Antara Mitra, Backing Vocals by ~ Ashwin, Akashdeep & Himanshu, Lyrics by ~ Mayur Puri

Claps, percussion and guitars start off the third song of the album, quire resembling ‘Afghan Jalebi’ (Phantom) in its overall treatment. After that, a bazooka-like instrument plays a tune that is what makes the starting interesting, and alluring. But from there, the song suffers a number of ups and down, never being consistent in its catchiness. The composition by Pritam is pretty bland and tasteless, and it is that kind of composition that depends on its arrangements to do its work of attracting the listeners to it. There is a line however, that really impressed me, in all its oddness and though it is kind of a misfit in the song. The line I mention, is the line just before the hookline, which, in the mukhda goes like “Ishq mein saare, ilzaam hai sacche.. “. The tune of that line is an oddball in the song, which is predominantly of a happy tune. But that line has a darker shade to it, which is why I loved it! The rest of the tune follows a really Sajid-Wajid-ish template of item songs, which I didn’t exactly expect from Pritam, after great songs of this genre like ‘Dhating Naach’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), ‘Gandi Baat’ (R…Rajkumar) and ‘Afghan Jalebi’ (Phantom). It is the arrangements that makes the song at least listen-worthy. The exciting dhols (Percussion by Dipesh Varma, Keyur Barve and Shikhar Naad Qureshi) help the song get the required energy, while that bazooka tune keeps playing throughout. Aditya Benia is great with the guitars, too. On the vocals front, again, we have two choices to choose our favourite from. In the first place we have Himesh Reshammiya’s blue-eyed boy, Aman Trikha. Singing for Pritam for the first time, it was bound to be a powerpacked rendition from his side, and that’s what we get, but we can’t help but miss Nakash. Pritam saves us the time that we would spend in brooding over Nakash not being there, and actually records the “Film Version” or “Version 2” of the song in Nakash’s voice. His infectious energy is unmatchable, and he sings well, putting in the punch that was lacking in the first version! 😀 The female voice in both versions is Pritam’s own blue-eyed girl, Antara Mitra. You can’t believe it is the ‘Gerua’ girl who’s sung it, but then you remember she sang ‘Saree Ke Fall Sa’ and ‘Kaddu Katega’ from ‘R…Rajkumar’ too, and then realize it isn’t such a big deal. She sings with the right vocal texture, but I’ve said this many a time jokingly and will say it again — she needs to find a comfort zone for herself in the industry! I can’t help but think she keeps changing her voice too many times and it is getting irritating now!! 😀 Jokes apart, her versatility is really commendable. It is Mayur Puri, the lyricist, who disappoints gravely. His lyrics in this song are nothing like what I like his lyrics for! The whole song is full of lines that a man sings to a lady, trying to convince her to marry him! Lines like “Do saal mein hinge tere bacche, mere bachhe” really make you cringe and think where Mayur’s splendid writing has gone in that one year! 😦 The song starts with the two characters playing ping-pong with names of relatives. I didn’t get that part of the song, either! Though Pritam has scored very well in the past with these songs, this time, he doesn’t really make the cut! Most of the credit for it goes to the disappointing lyrics!

 

4. Ishqa
Singers ~ Abhijeet Sawant & Antara Mitra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The album ends on a very celebratory note, with an Arabic-styled party song that has distinct shades of Pritam’s typical composition styles. The composition is really enjoyable though! The song, standing at a duration of just less than three minutes, 2:47 to be precise, is too short, and too catchy; I wish there was more! There is no distinct demarcation of hooklinebut there is one loop of a line, sung by Antara, which goes like “Zyaada main toh nahi kehti…” and that line is so insanely catchy!!! Pritam has composed the song very beautifully, given that it is so short. The mukhda and antara are both by Abhijeet, and he sounds way better here than he did in the second version of ‘Sau Tarah Ke’. Antara has just that one line which repeats many times, but as I said is really well sung by her, and really well composed by Pritam too. Another great thing is the arrangements. The Spanish guitars are the highlight of the song, while the Arabic percussion is really great. The Arabic strings are stunning as well! There is a great electronic interlude that is so insane! The whole thing together sounds very catchy and groovy. Kumaar’s lyrics are good, as well, again, without being cheap or anything. A finale that actually delivers what was expected throughout the album!! #5StarrHotelSong!!


Dishoom is definitely not what I expected. I rarely say this, but this time, Pritam did not deliver as much as I was expecting. He has composed all four songs as per the requirements to make a fun album, but I know he can do way better than this. Two songs, ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ and ‘Ishqa’ actually deliver what I expect when I hear the name ‘Pritam’. The other two seem very templated songs, with very less composition and more of a dependency on lyrics, which are bad, and arrangements, which excel. So, I would say, the Pritam Punch in this ‘Dishoom’ was lacking!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sau Tarah Ke > Ishqa > Toh Dishoom > Jaaneman Aah (Version 2) > Jaaneman Aah (Version 1) > Sau Tarah Ke (Revisited)

 

Which is your favourite song from Dishoom? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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2 thoughts on “A DISHOOM LACKING PRITAM’S USUAL PUNCH!! (DISHOOM – Music Review)

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