ROCK MODE: OFF 😞 (ROCK ON 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy & Summersalt
♪ Lyrics by: Javed Akhtar & Kit Shangpliang
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company [“Rock On (Revisited)” on T-Series]
♪ Music Released On: 20th September 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th November 2016

Rock On 2 Album Cover

Rock On 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To hear “Rock On (Revisited)” on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy “Rock On (Revisited)” on iTunes CLICK HERE

♪ Listen to “Rock On (Revisited)” on YouTube:


Rock On 2 is an upcoming Bollywood musical drama starring Farhan Akhtar, Shraddha Kapoor, Arjum Rampal, Purab Kohli, Shashank Arora, Prachi Desai and Shahana Goswami. The film has been directed by Shujaat Saudagar, and produced by Farhan Akhtar and Ritesh Sidhwani. The film is a sequel to the 2008 hit film, ‘Rock On!!’ which was like the pioneer for rock music in India, giving a whole new genre for the nation to like, love and perform for themselves. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy had given a brilliant soundtrack for that movie, and after that rock became an integral part of Bollywood music as well. However, times have changed, and now, after eight years, the rock scene in India has changed a lot! What Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy did in ‘Rock On!!’ now seems very ordinary (in that rock has evolved over the years) and now many composers have started using rock as a way of conveying both angst and fun, in almost all movies. Now, in 2016, the sequel to that movie is releasing, and the trio yet again, have to live up to expectations, but not necessarily live up to the standards of the first album (because rock has changed!) Though comparisons will definitely take place, I will try my best not to, because of the time that has lapsed, and also, because of the change of director for the second film. (The first one being directed by Abhishek Kapoor). Since Shraddha Kapoor and Farhan Akhtar are the female and male leads, it goes without saying that they’re going to sing songs in the album, and hopefully, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy use their limited abilities to bring out the best in both! 🙂 After that epic album to ‘Mirzya’, I’m kinda sure this one will sound less impressive, but you really cant blame the trio, because the genres are miles apart! Also, there is one song where Meghalayan band Summersalt collaborates with the trio, which is the seventh song of the album. So let’s see whether this album rocks on or not! 😛


1. Jaago
Singers ~ Farhan Akhtar & Siddharth Mahadevan

Sure enough, the album starts off with a song sung by none other than Farhan Akhtar, the lead actor of the movie, and lead singer of the Magik band (the band in the movie, in case anyone forgot). The song kicks off with a very groovy, and catchy rock guitar riff, and Farhan’s voice takes over to start off the melody of the song. The composition is quite bland, however. The mukhda is very low-key, and doesn’t scream in your face, “Hey, I’m a rock song, so you better cringe!” I liked that. Even the hookline is very catchy, and especially that line before the hookline which goes, “Sab jaan jaaye tumko…” is very catchy, and I like the way they drop down the scales one by one, in that line. Though the hookline has the singers scream in your ears, you end up liking it, because it is done very well, just like a professional rock song. It is the antaras, that cause the problem in the song. Well, at least the first antara is fine, it is just a repetition of the mukhda. However, once the second antara arrives, you can’t help but notice how long the song has been stretched, and on top of that, the quite sublime composition of this antara doesn’t help. It just gets you wanting the song to end soon, which i believe shouldn’t happen at all in a rock song! The composers do many great tricks with the arrangements though. The vibrant guitars are the main attraction of the song, especially that aforementioned riff. It plays throughout the song, and really helps in keeping you glued to the song. The drums (Jai Row Kavi) wonderfully supplement the guitars, and take the okay-ish melody to a different level. The interludes are full of great electric guitar solos, especially the second interlude, where the guitar first does a very awesome solo, and after that is broken down, making a sound like a machine gun does in video games. 😛 (I didn’t know how to describe that!) That part is electrifying! The vocals by Farhan are surprisingly full of zest, but (obviously because of the high notes) Siddharth has to give him a little help (which is okay with him, as long as it is something to do with screaming, that too, in perfect tune!) with the hookline, and Siddharth just rocks the hookline. Farhan doesn’t sound too husky in the song, and that’s a pleasant surprise. Javed Akhtar has written a good song about standing up to any wrongdoings and standing up for our rights. So, this song is two-in-one: entertainment plus awareness campaign! A good opener for the album, but if only the composition were a bit more well-polished, the song would’ve been awesome!

 

2. Udja Re
Singer ~ Shraddha Kapoor, Additional Vocals ~ Shankar Mahadevan

Shraddha, as expected, gets her first song for the album right away, and the song starts off with an entrancing and weird semiclassical piece, with Shankar (in a very chipmunkish, nasal voice that is obviously tweaked) singing a very nice aalaap. The composition starts off very mildly, with a quite ordinary mukhda, which is thankfully graced by Shankar’s weird nasal voice, which serves a great attraction, seriously! The composition only picks up in the midst of the mukhda, when Shraddha starts to sing the “Yeh jeena bhi socho koi jeena Hai..” verse. And then she sings the hookline in a very low scale, and that’s when you start loving the composition, which then goes nowhere but uphill. Shraddha repeats the hookline in a high scale, and that’s when the rock guitars and drums start off too, and from that moment onwards, the song is just energizing and catchy. However, it takes like two minutes to get to that part. Nevertheless, the wait is really worth it. The antara comes three and a half minutes after the song starts, and it is quite angsty, and very well-composed, and just as well-rendered by Shraddha. Overall, the composition is catchy and memorable, if not fast to start off. The arrangements by the trio are beautiful yet again. The guitars and drums (Jai Row Kavi) as always provide the perfect background to the song, while Shankar’s AALAAPS provide a nice semiclassical and also alien touch to the song. The drums are really energetic and energizing, and are enough to give you music to a nice morning workout. Shraddha’s singing, be it the miracle of some autotune or natural, is marvelous. She hits every note with perfection, and doesn’t falteer at any step, as I thought she would. (Like she did in ‘Sab Tera’ from ‘Baaghi’ where she was quite too high-pitched). Javed Akhtar’s lyrics are good here too, and motivational. A show-stopper of a song, mostly because of the arrangements and vocals, while the composition yet again, falls a bit flat. Nevertheless this one is a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. You Know What I Mean
Singer ~ Farhan Akhtar

A very happy-go-lucky guitar riff starts off the next song, which instantly reminds you of ‘Socha Hai’ from the first movie. The composition here too, is quite bland, though being so upbeat. The mukhda repeats twice in the song, while the hookline is just plain said, not sung. The antara is better than the mukhda, in that it has a more mellifluous composition. The arrangements are spunky, led by guitars and drums (Aatur Soni) again, and with the 2008 style of rock all around them. Theres not much more to talk about the composition and arrangements, because they are quite ordinary! In the interludes, however, there’s the usual nice rock guitar solos, that still sound impressive (that’s just because this is just the third song in the album) :p The hook where the backing vocalists sing “Oh-ohhh” sounds very clichéd, and also outdated. Farhan’s voice doesn’t help to elevate the pallidness of the song, because here, it is husky and very tedious to hear. Thankfully, the makers have kept the song short. Javed Akhtar’s lyrics are so conversational, that it seems awkward at a point. When you experience déjà vu in such a youthful song, it means things are wrong, because the song is so plain!… You know what I mean! 😉

 

4. Manzar Naya
Singer ~ Farhan Akhtar

Here comes Farhan yet again, with another song, this time, a dulcet romantic melody. The composition is very pleasant and breezy — something that normal people in the real world (not characters in Bollywood) would compose and sing impromptu. The pleasantness of the composition actually works for it this time, and the trio churns out a very plain, simple song that touches your heart. The mukhda hooks you in all its simplicity, while the hookline very nicely blends in with the song, though reminding you of a lot of other such songs. The antara has quite some high notes, which, surprisingly, Farhan manages to touch rather smoothly. At the end, the mukhda repeats, and the song ends just as calmly as it had started. Talking about the arrangements, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy have very beautifully employed a guitar riff that plays throughout the song, and is the USP of the song! (Do they need a riff to do that for them every time!? This is getting quite repetitive, but still wonderful!) But again, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy are the best at those small riffs, be it vocal riffs or guitar riffs or wonderful percussion riffs. Speaking of percussion, the wonderful percussion (Anupam Deghatak) of shakers in this song brings that nice soothing quality to the track. The whistle in the interlude, instantly reminded me of that tune from ‘Teen Gawah Hain Ishq Ke’ (Mirzya), but then it dissipated and changed paths smartly and quickly. Backing vocals are beautifully placed in the antara, and the second mukhda. A female voice that seems to have gotten lost in the song suddenly appears somewhere towards the end, and that was quite weird, because it didn’t appear anywhere else before or after. Stray voice unleashed!! The vocals by Farhan are husky and faltery here too, but nevertheless, perfect for this type of song, which needed a faltering voice, as it was supposed to emulate normal people, and not Bollywood characters. 😛 Jokes apart, Farhan sounded good here, and the high notes in the antara particularly sounded well polished. Javed Akhtar’s lyrics are just as simple and normal as anything else in the song. Pleasing, calm and above all, normal! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Tere Mere Dil
Singer ~ Shraddha Kapoor

So after three songs by Farhan and one by Shraddha, one more song by Shraddha pops up on the album, and this one is just pure bliss. The “Tu Tu Tu Ru Ru Ru” vocal loop wonderfully opens the song up, and likewise, this is the USP of this song, and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy once again rely on this loop to carry the song. The mukhda is very well-composed, and oh-so-melodious. Technically the title of the song is in the mukhda, while the hookline is different — “Saari Jo kahaaniyaan hain..” and both the a and the hookline sound great in their own place. The hookline takes the song to a high, from where it never drops down. The whole magic of the composition is just so magical and entrancing, and it is the only song on the album which instantly reached out and hooked me. The ANTARA is also very beautiful, with a great assemblage of notes that complement the hookline and the entire song very well. So, the trio scores full marks with the melody of this song, but they still resort to the vocal loop to carry it forward.. Why!! Anyway, the arrangements are beautiful. A wonderful sarod helps Shraddha to make the song sound even more magical, playing the tune of her vocal loop itself. The rock plays a very little role in this song, though I guess the digital beats in the hookline are supposed to resemble the rock sound. However, the electric sarod replaces the guitar really well. The whole song has a similar sound to that of ‘Udja Re’ and also ‘Tumhari Meri Baatein’ from the first film — entrancing and mystical. Shraddha’s vocals are mystifying as well, and here, though it is evident that she has been autotuned, the whole thing just appeals nevertheless. The programming does justice to her rendition, and the trio has spun magic with their technical touches. Javed Akhtar, yet again, writes a good song, this time with a more melancholic feel to it. ‘Tumhari Meri Baatein’s equivalent fares far better than ‘Socha Hai’s equivalent. Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy bring a quite otherworldly feel to this one! Mystical! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Woh Jahaan
Singers ~ Farhan Akhtar & Shraddha Kapoor

So here comes the long-awaited duet between the two lead singers. Now, even though these two have sung enough songs on the album already, I am not feeling any tedium, because the film actually calls for it.. So we can’t really complain. At least the lead actress isn’t Tulsi Kumar, and the lead actor isn’t Abhijeet. This time too, the composition is very mystical, and a kind of melancholia surrounds the whole song, but not the kind of tedious melancholia that gets you bored right away. This time, the melancholia actually works. The mukhda sees Shraddha start off the song, on a beautiful note, with the trio’s low notes working nicely to attract your attention. However, it is only when the hookline arrives, that you actually start getting the hang of the song and grooving to it. This time, the trio doesn’t rely on any instrumental piece to carry forward the song, and this one has pure melody taking it forward. The hookline has a mind-blowing composition. As Farhan takes over with the second stanza, which has the same composition as the first, you start drifting away a bit from the song. His portions aren’t as interesting as Shraddha’s and his voice (in this song) doesn’t really have that capacity to keep listeners listening. His part starts off the same way that Shraddha’s does, but then takes a different turn, as the tune changes as he progresses towards the hookline. After that, it is merely an instrumental piece to listen to, which ends the song on a high. More about that later. The arrangements are impressive in this song. A wonderful sarod (Soumik Dutta) takes centre-stage here too, while the rock elements keep entrancing you. The guitars are impressive as always (here taking a number of impressive variations), while the drums (Darshan Doshi) are just as intriguing. The interlude between Shraddha’s and Farhan’s stanzas, has that wonderful sarod piece, accompanied by piano, as well as a nice shaayari by Shraddha. The piano accompanies the singers well in the stanzas, and then hands over things to the rock instruments. At the end, as I said before, there is a wonderful instrumental piece which just keeps you hooked. There is another wonderful electric guitar solo there, which makes sure you don’t go anywhere. The backing chorus with their chants nicely helps the instrumental piece get more interesting, and it ends with a striking guitar strum. Javed Akhtar’s lyrics are at their philosophical best, and he really weaves up a thought-invoking poem. Another mystical composition, which unfortunately gets highly tedious in the middle. Arrangements propel the listener through the tedium.

 

7. Hoi Kiw / Chalo Chalo
Singers ~ Usha Uthup, Kit Shangpliang & Pynsuklin Syiemiong, Co-Composers ~ Summersalt, Khasi Lyrics by ~ Kit Shangpliang

The next song finally sees some other singers taking the mic. And who else it is but the bold-voiced Usha Uthup? Along with a North-East Indian band called Summersalt, two of whose members accompany Usha on the vocals front. The composition for this one is quite fun and upbeat, but again, just as ‘You Know What I Mean’, I couldn’t quite catch hold of it. It might sound stupid, but I felt that the composition was just too typical, and reminded me of some European folk song. I found nothing in the composition that was hooking in any sense, and the hookline seemed very passable. The Khasi portions were fun to hear, but then it is not something I would hear again and again, either. The vocals by Usha Uthup seemed overshadowed by the Khasi band, whose lead male singer, Kit Shangpliang really excelled in the vocals. Usha seemed sidelined like a side attraction in the song, while the female Khasi singer barely had much of a scope to open up. The arrangements were pleasant, with the folksy duitara (Adorbha C. Shangpliang) sounding very nice and groovy. The rock arrangements in this song were quite similar to those in ‘You Know What I Mean’, and I found it quite boring. The Hindi lyrics were good, and depict a very free nature, while it was fun to hear the Khasi lyrics and not understand them. Very mixed feelings about this song…

 

8. Ishq Mastana
Singers ~ Digvijay Singh Pariyar & Shankar Mahadevan

This next song seems like such a misfit in this album.. But I’m still gonna review it as if I am a robot who can’t really make that out. The composition seems like a song that just ran away from the ‘Mirzya’ album and made a home for itself in this album — maybe a rejected song that was supposed to be there before ‘Hota Hai’. 😛 Or maybe an unused song that was lying around since the days of ‘Mission Kashmir’. The angsty feel in the song makes me feel this song isn’t going to be one that the band in the movie performs, but it might be a background song, which plays at a critical point in the storyline. The composition is quite interesting, a typical Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy Punjabi folk composition, which has a very catchy hookline. The rest of the composition is quite low-key and ordinary, something that didn’t really compel me to listen to it over and over again. The arrangements are fantastic here as well (tired of saying this so many times!) The keyboard (Gulraj Singh) which very professionally tries to imitate the tumbi, is the USP of this song, and it does a good job too. The rock element, though, is surprisingly the best part of this folk misfit. The rock guitars (played here by Ehsaan Noorani) and drums (Aatur Soni) always go well with a nice Qawwali-esque folk composition, and that is evident here too. The bass (Dibyajyoti Nath) really stands out here, which it didn’t in the previous songs. The percussions (Anupam Deghatak), mainly tabla, stand out well, but sound very clichéd and heavy. The dhols (Hanif Dafrani & Aslam Dafrani), which seem to be remnants of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s ‘Hulla Re’ (2 States), really do a great job in catching the listener’s attention. Meanwhile the dholaks (Prasad Malandkar) fail to reach out in the hard-hitting rock. The vocals are amazing too, with Digvijay Singh (the one from ‘Jaago Mohan Pyaare’ from ‘Katti Batti’) overshadowing Shankar! His voice is simply magical! However, Shankar shows his finesse in the high notes and aalaaps. Javed Akhtar’s lyrics are not excellent, but they’re good here. A song that doesn’t fit into the album, but even if I judge it without knowing that, a song with a very underwhelming composition for a Punjabi folk song! The only great thing here is the arrangements, AGAIN!

 

♪ Extra Song – released by T-Series

9. Rock On (Revisited)
Singers ~ Farhan Akhtar & Shraddha Kapoor

Since the first album was on the T-Series music label, of course T-Series retains the rights for the remake to the title song, and so this track released separately later on. This could well have been the first promotional song of the album, but the makers chose ‘Jaago’ instead. On a whole, the overall sound of both the songs is the same, and the electric guitar riff that is the USP of the original song, gets a makeover here. It was broken down like staccato in the original song, whereas here, it is a complete, flowing guitar piece. I liked the change, it sounds fresh. The new composition is good too, especially the mukhda, which instantly drew me into the song. The hookline is already a favourite of the nation, and I can’t really comment anything else on that, as it is wonderful. The antara is beautifully composed as well, and continues the original hookline, not to mention supports it, well. The arrangements are, as in the rest of the album, electrifying. The electric guitars and drums (Darshan Doshi) yet again, provide the awesome rock feel to the song, without making it too boring. Again, a nice guitar solo graces the interlude. The vocals though, is where the song could’ve been a bit (a lot???) better. Farhan sings well, and I can’t really say much since he sang the original song, but I couldn’t help feeling that after the “Zindagi milegi na dobaraaa”, he sounds as of a ghost has suddenly possessed him or he is suffering from a sudden chill. I don’t know..! Shraddha has sung her parts very flatly, and it could’ve been way better. Well, yes, it kind of brought the raw feel to the song, but I would’ve enjoyed it if it were technically right as well. Javed Akhtar’s lyrics suit the youthful craze of the song, and will do well. A good revamp of the title song, and I really can’t expect more than this for this remake, so it is a #5StarHotelSong!!


Rock On 2 is a very underwhelming album. I started listening to it with a lot of hopes, thinking Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy would repeat the magic of the first album, and also because of their recent release, ‘Mirzya’, which was beauuuutiful. However, the trio seems to have delivered some quite stale songs. When an album I expected so much out of, disappoints in this way, I start doubting myself. 😬 The songs really fail to strike that chord, barring a few of them. The others rely on gags like a repeating guitar riff to propel them forwards. On a brighter note, a thing I noticed about the album is how Shraddha’s songs (except the title track) are mostly the mellow, sobre and melancholic types, while Farhan’s are the upbeat ones. Maybe it has something to do with Shraddha’s character in the movie, who isn’t allowed to explore herself as a musician owing to her parents’ restrictions. But I noticed that and found it worthy to be pointed out. Also noticed that Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy seem to be struggling with modern-day and normal-life-movies albums after their comeback. ‘2 States’ and ‘Dil Dhadakne Do’ being an exception, their other albums for rom-coms and other urban-themed movies have been underwhelming, like ‘Katti Batti’, ‘One By Two’, and ‘Ghayal Once Again’, and now this. On the other hand, they composed awesome music for period films and films with a different theme. So I guess that that has become their weak point over the years. Anyway, when such a talented trio disappoints you can’t really do anything (because you know it is not going to happen again and again) but wait for their next album in the hope of it being better than the last! Rock mode is definitely ‘off’ for this one!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Mere Dil > Udja Re > Manzar Naya > Rock On (Revisited) > Jaago > Woh Jahaan > Ishq Mastana > Hoi Kiw / Chalo Chalo > You Know What I Mean

 

Which is your favourite song from Rock On 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Tum Bin 2, Chefs: Ankit Tiwari & Nikhil-Vinay 

24th MUSIC MASTANI MONTHLY AWARDS (OCTOBER 2016)

Yayyyy! I probably made a record for myself! I finished all the October albums within a week! 😛 Woohoo! Well, I know that’s just because there were only five of them, but still! Woohooo!

So, here are the awards for October 2016.. And the contenders are ‘Mirzya’, ‘Saat Uchakkey’, ‘Tutak Tutak Tutiya’, ‘Shivaay’ and ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’.

24th Music Mastani Monthly Awards

♪ MAIN AWARDS

• Singer of the Month (Female) : The Nooran Sisters for Ek Nadi Thi, Hota Hai & Mirzya Title Track (Mirzya)

• Singer of the Month (Male) : Shankar Mahadevan for Aave Re Hitchki (Mirzya) AND Arijit Singh for Channa Mereya (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil)

• Composer of the Month (Song) : Mithoon for Darkhaast (Shivaay)

• Composer of the Month (Album) : Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy for Mirzya AND Pritam for Ae Dil Hai Mushkil

• Album of The Month: IT’S A TIE!

Mirzya (Music by: Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy; Lyrics by: Gulzar; Singers: Daler Mehndi, Saieen Zahoor, Akhtar Channal, Jyoti Nooran, Sultana Nooran, Mame Khan, Siddharth Mahadevan, Shuchismita Das, Shankar Mahadevan, K. Mohan, Kaushiki Chakraborty; Music On: T-Series)

AND

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil (Music by: Pritam; Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya & Badshah; Singers: Arijit Singh, Amit Mishra, Shilpa Rao, Jonita Gandhi, Nakash Aziz, Badshah, Pardeep Singh Sran, Ash King & Sashwat Singh; Music On: Sony Music)

• Musical Jodi of the Month (Best Duet) : Amit Mishra & Shilpa Rao for Bulleya (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) AND Sunidhi Chauhan & Arijit Singh for Darkhaast (Shivaay)

• Lyricist of The Month: Gulzar for Ek Nadi Thi (Mirzya) AND Amitabh Bhattacharya for Channa Mereya (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil)

 

♪ SONG AWARDS

• Best Romantic Song: Alizeh (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) AND Teen Gawah Hain Ishq Ke (Mirzya) AND Darkhaast (Shivaay)

• Best Dance Song: Tutak Tutak Tutiya (Tutak Tutak Tutiya) AND Chakora (Mirzya) AND Cutiepie (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil)

• Best Sad Song: Channa Mereya (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) AND Doli Re Doli (Mirzya)

• Best Club Song: The Breakup Song (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) AND Bolo Har Har Har (Shivaay)

• Best Classical-Based Song: Kaaga (Mirzya)

• Best Song With A Western Influence: Alizeh (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil)

• Best Song With A Folk Influence: Mirzya Title Track (Mirzya)

• Song With The Best Use Of Fusion: Doli Re Doli (Mirzya)

• Best Backing Vocals: The Salvation Singers in all their songs in Mirzya

• Best Sound Effects in a Song: The Breakup Song (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil)

• Best Humorous Song: Cutiepie (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil)

• Best Rap in a Song: Bolo Har Har Har (Shivaay)

 

♪ SPECIAL AWARDS

• Bandar Kya Jaane Adrak Ka Swaad (Best Album That Went Pretty Much Unnoticed / Most Underrated Album) : Mirzya (T-Series)

• Newcomer(s) of the Month:

– Newcomer of the Month (Composer) : Vishal Mishra for Chalte Chalte and Ranga Re (Tutak Tutak Tutiya)

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Female) : N/A

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Male) : Mame Khan for Chakora (Mirzya) [Newcomer to Bollywood]

• Music Label of The Month: T-Series (Mirzya, Tutak Tutak Tutiya, Saat Uchakkey & Shivaay)

• Most Unusual, But Awesome Choice of Singer: Badshah for Bolo Har Har Har (Shivaay)

 

Phew! So almost everything is tied this month! Two biggies like ‘Mirza’ and ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’, each having stellar music albums pitted against each other, so what else to expect! 😀 Anyway, hope you agree.. If you don’t, leave your choices below in the comments! Thanks! 🙂

 

Reviews Next Month: Rock On 2, Saansein, Tum Bin 2, Force 2, Dear Zindagi, Kahaani 2, Wajah Tum Ho, Befikre, Dangal and more!!!

NA PASAND AANA HAI MUSHKIL! (AE DIL HAI MUSHKIL – Music Review)

So, like two days before the movie releases, Sony Music decides to finally release this album! Good job, Sony and Keep it Up! 😠


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya
♪ Music Label: Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 26th October 2016
♪ Movie Releasees On: 28th October 2016

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil Album Cover

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Ae Dil Hai Mushkil is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy / drama, which stars Anushka Sharma and Ranbir Kapoor in lead roles, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Fawad Khan in cameos, and special appearances by Shahrukh Khan, Lisa Haydon, Alia Bhatt and Imran Abbas. The film has been directed by Karan Johar, and produced by him along with Hiroo Yash Johar, his mom. The film’s storyline has been well debated on throughout the days of its promotions, and that leaves me with nothing to write about it here, and since the album has been released so “early”, I need to get on with the review like right away! So as you all may know, Karan Johar’s movies have always had awesome soundtracks that become the definition of his films. Be it ‘Kuch Kuch Hota Hai’ by Jatin-Lalit, ‘Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham’ by Jatin-Lalit, Sandesh Shandilya & Aadesh Shrivastava, ‘Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna’ & ‘My Name Is Khan’ by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, or ‘Student of The Year’ by Vishal-Shekhar, Karan has struck a great rapport with each music composer he’s worked with and the results have always turned out to be outstanding. This time, he chooses the hit machine Pritam Chakraborty to do the honors, and I think that was a great decision after the music of his production ‘Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani’ which had music by Pritam, became such a blockbuster. I also suspect that that was when he roped in or started thinking about Pritam scoring for his next film, that turned out to be ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’. Well, five of the music videos have already released, and from the last two months, the songs of the movie have been all over, literally! Pritam has scored six songs for the movie. So without further ado, let’s see how mushkil (difficult) it is to like this album! 😀 Or rather, how difficult it is not to like it! 😉


1. Ae Dil Hai Mushkil
Singer ~ Arijit Singh

The album kicks off with melancholy galore! And I really don’t usually like melancholy with a typical Bhatt wrapping in Bollywood music, but this song, is so different! First of all, forget about that Bhatt wrapping! Because this time, the Bhatt wrapping itself, has been given a very different touch! Pritam uses the same style he would use to compose songs for the Bhatt movies, but in the process, sheds all typicality. The melancholy represents the Bhatt style so much, but the arrangements all scream “Grand!!” The song seems like a put-together of ‘Janam Janam’ (Dilwale), and a very Bhatt-ish sound to it. I’m not complaining! The result is fantabulous! The composition is wonderful. Pritam starts off with an enticing mukhda that just screams at you to jump into the song, just as your grandmother tells you to jump into her house when you visit! 🙂 Everything about it is so alluring and convincing, that nothing could go wrong. A grand opening makes way for the very mellow hookline, which has become the daily food of most of the nation’s population over the two months since it has come out. The high-pitched line “Mujhe aazmaati hai teri kami…” is so fantastic, that it hurts to wonder how Pritam put together such contrasting lines as this and the starting line and the hookline. The first antara follows the high-pitch and angst and takes it to a whole new level, where it seems that Arijit seems uncomfortable touching those notes, but the result still sounds amazing. Pritam’s vision can’t go wrong, can it! 😀 The second antara follows a more sombre approach to being angsty, and the different, low-pitched composition is sooooooo beautiful, that it just immediately grows on you. The low pitch eventually gives way to more high-pitched lines, this time also, very magical. The hookline, which has different lyrics each time, is so wonderful, that you just can’t forget any of its versions. Pritam’s arrangements surpass everything else. The reason the song reminded me of ‘Janam Janam’ (Dilwale) was solely because of the arrangements. The nice little piano loop at the beginning of the song are so, so grand! On top of that, the grandeur is accentuated even more by wonderful, ostentatious, orchestral strings. The string orchestra consists of violins (Rolf Wilson, Morvin Bryce, Natalie Klauda, Ian Humphries, Raja Halder, Jan Regulski, Charles Sewart, Michelle Fleming, Debbie Widdup, Kate Robinson), violas (Meghan Cassidy, Timothy Grant, Eoin Schmidt Martin) and cellos (Ashok Klauda, Will Scholfield, Peter Gregson). The whole orchestral recording has been produced by Nikhil Paul George, and I must say, he has done a brilliant job putting together those wonderful sounds of the orchestra, not to mention the awesome job that Pritam did in composing them! The trumpet (Neil Brough) in the first interlude is so wonderful, and it imparts a kind of jazzy feel to the song. The oboe (Alison Teale) has been done very nicely, and it plays in the second interlude. Throughout the second antara, wonderful digital beats give the beats, and it sounds so otherworldly! Arijit’s vocals are amazing. He might be struggling a bit with the high notes, but manages to pull it off, and leave us spellbound with the magic of his voice. The way he mellifluously goes through the composition, both low and high portions, is commendable. Amitabh’s lyrics are quite ordinary, not bad and not excellent. They are, however, nice on the ears, due to a good use of Urdu. 😀 grand beginning to the album! Arijit is going to get his second career boost after ‘Tum Hi Ho’ with this one! And Pritam’s melody is just so… PERFECT!! 😀 #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Bulleya
Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Shilpa Rao, Backing Vocals ~ Arjun Chandy, Himanshu, Ashwin & Geet

The second song in the album is a more upbeat, fast-paced, rock-Sufi ballad. Pritam starts it off with a wonderful guitar strum, and then that strum breaks into a very impressive riff, which makes you groove to it right away. The dynamic nature of this composition perfectly contrasts the mellow nature of the previous one, and while that one was perfect as a soother, this one works as an energizer, in a very heavenly way. The composition instantly gets stuck in your head, with Pritam very nicely constructing it with traditional Sufi songs in mind. The mukhda is immensely catchy, and the magic of Pritam is infused into it in such a way, that it doesn’t take long for you to get tripping over it. Right from the beginning, Pritam might have been using some kind of telepathic connection, and as the song progresses, you’ll find that it unfolds just as you want it to, and that’s because you really love what’s going on! 😀 The mukhda is quite sober, but it’s not until the hookline when the composition gets really intoxicating. It reaches its peak there, and rises up to the mountain of high notes so easily, that you have no option but to listen with your jaw open in surprise and wonder. The first antara, sees the song get even better, with a very freely flowing tune that is something to fall for. This is definitely my favourite part of the song, and the way Amit Mishra brings a smile into his voice while singing it, is so cool! It gives way to the hookline perfectly. The second antara, is composed on a different set of notes, and is sung by Shilpa Rao very beautifully. The composition of this stanza is so heavenly, and perfectly suited for a female voice, especially that of Shilpa. I just loved the way it makes the energy of the song come to a complete halt for a while and the way it lets us in on a glimpse of heaven. The vocals by both singers are amazing. Amit Mishra is slowly emerging as a very versatile and well-ranged singer, with his voice perfectly acing those high notes in the hookline as well as the more mellow notes in the first antara. The vibe that his voice sends out while singing the words ending with “aaaar” like “yaar“, “pukaar“, “parvardigaar“, is just soooooo applause-worthy!! Shilpa Rao, who Pritam has made to sing after quite some while now (last being ‘Malang’ from ‘Dhoom 3’) sings the second antara angelically. Amit also ends the songs brilliantly with a portion that gives you goosebumps. The backing vocals by Ashwin, Himanshu, Geet and Arjun Chandy are great, and they complement Amit superbly in the main hook of the song – “murshid mera, murshid mera“. Amitabh’s lyrics are wonderful here as well — romantic and a hint of devotion. Pritam’s arrangements though, are the star of the song. That rock guitar (Roland Fernandes) is the biggest attraction of the song, and it plays almost everywhere! It is what makes the arrangements sound so energetic and dynamic. The drums, of course, are there, and can very well be missed due to everything else happening, but make their presence very well felt during the beginning of the hook every time, when they do a kind of rapid beat which is something to die for. The dholaks, on the other hand, sound very calming and soothing — resulting in a very smart fusion of rock and Sufi. Energetic, dynamic and something of an extravagant nature. Amit becomes the new rockstar of bollywood music, as Pritam presents this wonderful rock and Sufi clash! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Channa Mereya
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals ~ Keshia Braganza & Gwen Dias

It is the next song, that keeps up the emotional quotient of the album, with which we had started off the album in the title song, but this one takes that emotion to a whole different level. The composition has the capability to touch the strings of your heart and how! ❤ The song has been composed on a very trademark dholak beat, which can be heard in many such songs, and which instantly reminds me of Pritam’s own ‘Kabira (Encore)’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani). The composition is very sweet and heart-touching, and though it seems like it has been heard many times before, it still refreshes you quite magically from the inside, along with giving you this weird sense of sadness as it ends. The song starts with the mukhda sung by Arijit in an unplugged style, with nothing but the guitars supporting him, and then it gives way to that very touching dholak backing loop. The mukhda has a very emotional tune, and it just makes you want to sit and listen to it in peace, without any disturbances. Such songs are always masterpieces. Pritam did it last time in ‘Kabira’ and now here he is, at it again. The hookline is sooooo enchanting, that it just doesn’t get out of your head after hearing it for just one time. It is so immensely catchy, that it just sticks in there and all you can do about it, is to pamper it by singing it and humming it all day. You might not even realize when you start singing this song, it just comes so spontaneously to me. Now that’s a sign of a masterpiece. The first antara too, has such a sweet and lovable tune, that it is hard to ignore or forget, on hearing. The second antara actually takes the form of a kind of traditional style of singing folk Punjabi songs, and Arijit kills it! Pritam’s arrangements are masterclass. The dholak rhythm (Played by Iqbal Azad & Sanjiv Sen) keeps you listening, while the acoustic guitars (Roland) support the dholaks very well. Rock guitars (Roland & Amandeep) infuse the pathos into the song, making it sound trademark Pritam. In the first interlude, a very soul-stirring shehnaai (Omkar Dhumal) just connects with your heart, and the tune gets stuck in your head. Pritam employs some very sweet and angelic voices (Keshia Braganza & Gwen Dias) to sing the backing vocals, and you can hear them sing the hookline in a very heavenly tone. In the second interlude, they rule, and while they’re at they’re hookline, working to pave their way into our hearts with their awesome voice, there’s a very short and wonderful sarangi (Ghulam Ali Khan) in the background, which you would miss unless you’re hearing very carefully. It comes back during Arijit’s second antara, and once again, is very soft, so you have to strain your ears to hear it! Arijit’s vocals are fabulous, with each and every note making itself a home in your heart (God, your heart must be full now.. How will the blood enter and exit? 😦 ) With each of his variations, you can’t help but let out a “Waah“, and during that conclusion paragraph of his, well, he just aces it! The lyrics by Amitabh are mostly in Punjabi, but they are veryyyy touching. With lines like “Andhera tera, maine le liya, mera ujla sitaara tere naam kiya” (I took your darkness, and gave you my bright star, in exchange) and “Kitni dafaa, subah ko meri, tere aangan mein baithe, maine shaam kiya” (I turned so many of my days into evenings, waiting in your yard), Amitabh proves his mettle as a songwriter. Each line just makes its way so gracefully into your lungs. (Remember, your heart is full!) Heart-touching, and a masterstroke by Pritam! One of the best songs of the year for me! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. The Breakup Song
Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Badshah, Jonita Gandhi & Nakash Aziz, Rap by ~ Badshah

After those three songs that constitute the heartrending, emotional and cry-worthy songs of the album, things become lighter with a song that is another emotional, sobby song, disguised in a sweet, upbeat, club number. Pritam is an expert at such club numbers, and just two months ago, he gave us ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ (Dishoom) which was more of a sensuous song. This one here, is completely clean and sanskaari so much so, that the girl is actually happy about breaking up with her so-called ‘saiyaan ji‘! Pritam brings together his arrangements for songs like ‘Blame The Night’ (Holiday) and ‘Hey Mr. DJ’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and adds to it, a very desi melody, reminding one of the Kishore Kumar-Asha Bhosle duets of the 50s and 60s, where all the nok-jhok and cute teasing would please the listener. The song starts off very quirkily, with Nakash Aziz singing an introductory couplet in the voice of a chipmunk. And then the chipmunk, thanks to the clever vocal programming done by Pritam, goes on to sing a very funny and catchy tune, which turns out to be the characteristic tune of the song. (The one that starts at 0:18 and keeps playing occasionally throughout the song) After the froggy/duck-y tune in “Premika” (Dilwale), Pritam makes this chipmunk tune very nicely. 😂 And then we are introduced to the main character, a girl who’s just broken up with her saiyaan that morning, and she recites a quite interesting couplet, about how her boyfriend left her for a foreigner. And then, the tune that follows, is why I love Pritam so much! 😀 It is a very attractive tune that just lures you into the song right away. The mukhda is very catchy, and it plays entirely after every antara, too. The hookline is the best part of the song though. That tune!! The antara is a good continuation of the sweetness of the song, and keeps up the catchiness very well. There is a rap by Badshah in between the two antaras, and that, however, is so mediocre, that you don’t really pay attention to it. It seems like a forced addition into the song. The arrangements by Pritam are signature Pritam club song arrangements, with the EDM working its magic on you very strongly. The techno sounds become quite entrancing at certain points. The folk percussion is what infuses that wonderful desi feel to the arrangements, and Tapas Roy excels with that. The dholaks (Iqbal Azad & Yusuf Sheikh) are wonderful, and at places, wonderful jugalbandis of the dholaks and Techno sounds give birth to very impressive pieces of music. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are funny, and give you a nice entertainment throughout the song. His clever Hinglish gives your brain something cool to chew on, after all those philosophical and emotional lyrics in the previous three songs. I personally loved the part where he writes “Kalti hua jo saiyaan stupid tera, jeevit hua hai phir se cupid tera!” 😀 Unfortunately, Badshah’s rap becomes the only vulgar (or on the border of vulgar and profane) stuff in what would have been a very clean club number! :\ Last but definitely not the least, the vocals. Jonita wonderfully carries herself throughout the song as a girl who’s happy telling the world about how she got over her breakup, while Arijit very cutely essays the role of the boy who was clearly waiting for this breakup to take place! 😀 The way Arijit sings “Humko bin bataye toone yeh kab kar liya“, girls and ladies will die for him all over again! Jonita, once again, shows a different side of her voice, this time, a very sweet voice that we would fall for anytime! A sweet melody carried very impressively by Jonita and Arijit, whose chemistry turns out to be just amazing! And Pritam, please don’t stop experimenting like this!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Cutiepie
Singers ~ Pardeep Singh Sran, Nakash Aziz, Meenal Jain & Antara Mitra, Backing Vocals ~ Neetu Bhalla, N.K. Deep Kaur, Bhabita, Sunny, Himanshu, Ashwin, Kaushik & Sachin

The next song of the album, at first listen, seems like your everyday, typical KJo, Punjabi wedding song. But it is so much more than just that, which I understood by listening to it again and again. Pritam uses the Punjabi bhangra style to make this the most templatized song of the album, but the way he has played with the notes, is just too entertaining, enjoyable and outright fun! The song starts wonderfully with very typical Punjabi beats, a very fun ukulele loop, couple with the beats of a dhadd-like instrument. The composition is a fun-filled, energetic one, that reminds you of the craziness that Pritam is capable of infusing into his songs and subsequently, into us. This composition too, is a successor to his earlier crazy songs like ‘Saree Ke Fall Sa’ (R… Rajkumar), ‘Dhating Naach’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), ‘Badtameez Dil’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani), ‘Tukur Tukur’ (Dilwale), ‘Chor Bazaari’ (Love Aaj Kal) and sooo many others. The mukhda, which, as Pritam has generously written in the song credits, was based on a concept by the lyricist, Amitabh Bhattacharya, is very energetic and spunky, making a very effusive start to the song. The line just before the hookline, which goes “Boyfriend ki tujhe koi fikar nahin…” has been composed in such a fun way, that it will get you up and dancing. The Punjabi ladies sangeet that starts off the song, is so sweet and catchy, and also reminds me of two of Pritam’s earlier hits, ‘Saj Dhaj Ke’ (Mausam) and ‘Nagada’ (Jab We Met). The hookline is also very differently composed, but it doesn’t stand out in the song, rather it blend in with the rest of the song, and that is very good! The antara is a bit weak, but since it is so short, and works as the antara to a dance song, you ignore it, and the awesome cross line comes back to take you to the hookline. The arrangements by Pritam are top class, and the omnipresent Punjabi flavour brings a different kind of sweetness to the song. At the same time, some strong techno sounds help to enhance the quality of the sound, and the keys (Firoz Khan) tune is an awesome tune to catch onto. The guitars & ukulele (Mohit Dogra & Dev Arijit) help to bring the missing tumbi feel to the Punjabi song. The percussion, probably some electronic dholaks and dhadd, is fascinating. Towards the end, a very high-energy dhol rhythm supports the composition. There’s a part in the song when the dholak is played so rapidly, and beautifully (hear it at 1:22 and 2:56 in the song) that it just makes you go “Wow!” The main vocals by Pardeep, former ‘Raw Star’ contestant and singer of ‘Allah Hoo Allah’ (Dharam Sankat Mein) are very extravagant (Loved the way he sings “aaaye haaaye“), while Nakash supports him well (I don’t even know if Nakash has his solo portions or backing vocals, but I don’t think he has sung any solo portions, because it doesn’t sound like him). Pardeep is very vivacious in his treatment of the song, but it is at times like this, when I can’t help but wish that Labh Janjua was still here with us; he would ace the song! The additional backing vocals by Meenal Jain and Antara Mitra are awesome. (that’s the ladies sangeet!) Other backing vocalists Neetu Bhalla, N.K. Deep Kaur, Bhabita, Sunny, Himanshu, Ashwin, Kaushik and Sachin, do a good job with the “haay“s here and there in the song. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are a laugh fest, right from the ladies sangeet, to the actual lyrics of the main body of the song. His quirkiness from ‘The Breakup Song’ just seems to have increased, and the DESI-ness in his lyrics perfectly complements the desi composition by Pritam. A song that will cater to the masses, but won’t be dismissed by the classes, either! Quirky! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Alizeh
Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Ash King & Sashwat Singh

The last song of this much-awaited album, is a very sweet and divine-sounding romantic track, sung by three men whose voices sound more or less the same! 😀 The song starts off with a brilliant vintage Pritam electric guitar riff, and then progresses very seamlessly to the melody of the mukhda, which is opened by Ash King, but a wonderful relay is played between Ash and Arijit as Ash hands over the baton to Arijit after one line! Anyway, the composition is heavenly, and the mukhda wonderfully provides a start to the song. The hookline just brings that magic forward, and the way Pritam has broken the word ‘Alizeh’ (Which is Anushka’s character’s name in the movie) is spectacular! The composition instantly grabs you and you start humming it immediately. Pritam brings back his old-world charm, that we heard in so many of his songs (the most prominent coming to my mind right now being ‘Mere Bina’ from ‘Crook’). The antara wonderfully brings the song forward. The antara is very simple and sweet, but appeals to you very pleasantly. At the end of the antara, Sashwat does a wonderful vocal piece, and he can be distinguished from the other two with his bold and clear voice (kinda like Nikhil D’Souza’s voice). Towards the end of the song, he does a very interesting rap portion, which is very attractive, and finally, some rap that makes sense and fits into the song. Pritam’s arrangements are grand and match the grandeur of the rest of the album, this time, bringing a pleasant Western / European touch to the arrangements because of the wonderful sound of a church-flavoured organ instrument. The beats are digital, and very attractive. The drums too, are quite beautifully played, while Pritam uses his typical Western choir to enhance the sound of the hookline, complete with claps and a Western chorus. The guitars of course, play throughout and don’t fail to let you down. The vocals are very intriguing, and I must say, Ash King overshadows Arijit here, and that can be very well heard when they sing the same lines one after the other in the antara. On the other hand, Sashwat seems to say a lot with his two portions, one Hindi, and the other an English rap. The way Ash sings the lines in the hookline that go “Tera hun main, tujhe yaad hai naa” is just mind-blowing. His mellifluous voice really does a different kind of magic in the song. Amitabh writes perfect romantic lyrics, which are sweet and simple to understand. With this, the album ends of the same grand note as it began, with a very opulently arranged, melodious piece! Arijit, Ash and Sashwat complement each other very well, and Pritam makes the track a pleasant listen, full of love. #5StarHotelSong!!


Ae Dil Hai Mushkil turns out to be an album full of variety. The album has Pritam, the hit machine, showing his various sides of composing, and with two very emotional tracks, one high-energy romantic track, one dulcet romantic melody and two upbeat dance tracks, the album ends up being one of the best commercial albums of the year! With Arijit being the voice of Ranbir in the movie, I was expecting myself to get bored with his voice after the album would end, but Pritam’s wonderful melodies and the ways he made him sing differently in each song, didn’t make me do so. Also, the two songs that are sung by other male singers are fantastic respites from Arijit, while the last track where two other singers accompany Arijit, is also mind-blowing. So, all in all, this is an album which makes it difficult for you to choose your favourite song, and also makes it difficult not to love it! Pritam is truly back with a bang now!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Channa Mereya > Everything else 😀

 

Which is your favourite song from Ae Dil Hai Mushkil? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE MUSICAL DIVINITY THAT WORKS ONLY PARTIALLY! (SHIVAAY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon & Jasleen Royal
♪ Lyrics by: Sandeep Shrivastava, Sayeed Quadri & Aditya Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th October 2016

Shivaay Album Cover

Shivaay Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Shivaay is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film starring Ajay Devgn, Erika Kaar and Sayyeshaa Saigal in lead roles. The film is directed and produced by Ajay Devgn himself. The film seems grand at every scale, and hopefully, Ajay’s direction proves to be fruitful and the movie becomes a success. The trailer makes everything looks so magnanimous, that I am really getting excited for the movie. For the time being though, all we can do to get close to the movie, is spend time with its music. The music of ‘Shivaay’ has been composed by Mithoon, a music composer who rarely gets to experiment these days because of the incessant demand of the public for more and more ‘Tum Hi Ho’s, and Jasleen Royal, who debuted just last month in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’. She is more of a guest composer as she has composed one song in the album, with one version, and Mithoon has composed the remaining three songs. Hopefully, the two have worked well to make Ajay Devgn’s directorial a good musical as well. Let’s find out! 😀


1. Bolo Har Har Har
Singers ~ Mithoon, Mohit Chauhan, Sukhwinder Singh, Badshah, Megha Sriram Dalton & Anugrah, Backing Vocals by ~ Parthiv Gohil, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Shrivastava

The album starts off on an epic, grand note, with a devotional song in a very innovative style. The song starts off with a couplet by Mohit Chauhan, who sings it with immense perfection and concentration. And then there’s Mithoon’s electrifying rock guitar riff, along with Sukhwinder Singh’s classical bols. The composition of Mohit’s part has been done in a very typically Mithoon style by Mithoon, and the rest of the song is actually rap. The only thing that has a tune, is the hookline (Sukhwinder’s part). Megha Sriram Dalton very effectively leads the way with a mystical Aghor Mantra throughout the song, and her parts are what I keep waiting for in the song. The lead singer is obviously Badshah, and with his raps, he praises Lord Shiva a lot. Mithoon’s electrifying arrangements are very attractive, and help to attract the new generation towards the song. The rock guitars really crank up things in the song, while club beats and a very striking EDM makes the song worthwhile. Percussion by Bobby Shrivastava gets full marks. The vocals by all singers are awesome, and the confidence with which Badshah performs the rap, is applause-worthy. There are many parts of the rap that stand out among the rest. One such line I loved was “Wohi shunya hai, wahi ikaay, jiske bhitar basa Shivaay”, and yet another was the climax line, “Ja ja Kailash, ja kar vinaash”. The way these lines are repeated in the song, is just awesome. Megha Dalton sings her mantras very convincingly, while Mohit Chauhan’s parts are haunting and Sukhwinder’s parts are the energy of the song — whenever you feel it going a bit weak, his parts come and lift it back up. Backing vocals by Anugrah and Parthiv Gohil are good as well. Towards the end, all the singers’ parts come together, and with the help of a strong backing rock template, Mithoon brings a very good end to the song. The lyrics are by the film’s scriptwriter Sandeep Shrivastava himself, and he’s also written the raps, which are merely performed by Badshah, fortunately, and fortunately, performed very well! His lyrics are very good, describing Lord Shiva gloriously. A strong opening to the album, and a song that will give the movie a strong opening too! 😀 Also, happy to see that Mithoon tried out something different!!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Darkhaast
Singers ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Arijit Singh & Mithoon, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sayeed Quadri

After the electrifying rock song, Mithoon mellows things down with a song that starts with a very comforting piano tune, and Sunidhi’s sweet voice. The song is a romantic one, and sees Mithoon back in the ‘vintage Mithoon’ mode, which is totally different from the Mithoon who gives endless ‘Tum Hi Ho’s. The composition is very pleasant, uplifting and calm, and gives you a sense of calm as well. The starting paragraph by Sunidhi is the mukhda, and it is a kind of unplugged start to the song, after which Arijit comes with the hookline, a very beautiful tune that Mithoon seems to have saved for a special movie, like this, for a superstar like Ajay. The line “Tu meri baahon mein duniya bhula de” hits you so hard (with love) that you just fall in love immediately. Arijit renders the hookline with a very happy tone, and makes you smile after hearing it. However, he has used his very bored, casual voice tone here sometimes, and sometimes, suddenly becomes interested in delivering a good rendition. 😀 I don’t know what that’s about, all I know is that the final result is amazing. He sounds awesome in the high notes, and a little less in the low notes, but it works anyway. Sunidhi is perfect as usual. Her notes are mostly on the high scale in this song, and she sings them gracefully. Her vocals here remind me of her vocals in ‘Yaaram’ (Ek Thi Daayan) where she went oh-so-gracefully from low notes to high notes and back! The first antara, sung by Arijit, has a very typical and heard-before tune to it, but Arijit delivers it so passionately, that it sounds awesome. Sunidhi, on the other hand, aces the wonderful, mellow composition of the second antara. After both antaras, there is a wonderful addition by Mithoon where he sings “Tu meri baahon mein duniya bhula de” in a very different, rhythmic way. At the end of the song, Sunidhi wraps things up with a very soft and gentle rendition of the hookline, just like she opened up the song. She does it so nicely, that she would impress anybody’s grandmother, as she places everything right where she takes it out from. 😀 😛 (Don’t worry if you didn’t understand that, it was ridiculous anyway) The arrangements are scintillating. Mithoon decorates the song with very lively percussion (programmed by Bobby Shrivastava) and that gives the song a quite pleasant, upbeat touch. Of course, Mithoon’s piano keeps impressing you throughout the song, and guitars (Kalyan Baruah) are very breezy. The singers complement the arrangements so well, that everything falls into place perfectly. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are mind blowing. Once again, he impressed with simple words, and Mithoon has taken them and woven a beautiful melody out of them. Romance at its simple best! Arijit and Sunidhi ace this one, and Mithoon should start giving more such songs!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Raatein / Raatein (Reprise)
Singers ~ Jasleen Kaur Royal / Jasleen Kaur Royal, Music by ~ Jasleen Kaur Royal, Lyrics by ~ Aditya Sharma

Jasleen steps into the album as a guest composer for this song, which appears in two versions in the album. The first version is a sweet, breezy composition that I would have liked, had it not been so, so, so similar to Jasleen’s ‘Kho Gaye Hum Kahan’ (Baar Baar Dekho). The composition style, the dulcet, calm and breezy melody, we’ve all heard before in the song from ‘Baar Baar Dekho’. It seems like Jasleen has modified some notes somewhere and presented this song after modification. The vocals too, are very similar to the way she sang in that song. Arrangements might be the only difference in both songs, but very slight. The guitars are here too, but it is joined by pleasant percussions that will sound awesome in the theaters. Strings do their job very well. At the end of the first antara, Jasleen has added a wonderful strings orchestra, with crisp strokes, which is worth hearing the song for! And at the end of the second, she adds a strings piece which is in one piece and not broken into strokes. The flute that she has placed in places throughout the song, is wonderful, while the banjo towards the end really makes the mood lighter. However, at the end there’s an “Oooooo-ooooo-oooo” which is a copy paste of the “Oooooo-ooooo-oooo” from ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ (Baar Baar Dekho). The “Hey-ya-hey-ya” effect that she has put in places around the song, is pleasing though. Aditya Sharma, who had written ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ too, writes this one quite nicely, but it gets boring after a while. The reprise is just as opulent in terms of arrangements. The reprise starts with a tune that Jasleen had used in the antara in the original version. This version is more of an unplugged version, with a slow pace and a haunting sound about it. Jasleen sings in a whispery voice for this one, and it turns out to produce a very haunting effect. In the first half, the song is unplugged, until a grand, striking percussion takes away the silence to gradually pull you into a more sinister land. The oboe very nicely conveys the sinister nature of the song. In the second half, Jasleen starts singing in a high pitch and louder, to make that sinister touch more evident. The ‘Hey-ya” tune is tweaked to make it sound more sinister, too! 😀 Basically, this song is just the original tweaked, to make it sound sinister. The arrangements are more opulent, with strong percussion and graceful strings bringing out the haunting quality of the song. The lyrics here have also been tweaked, and work for the theme of this version. Overall, both versions have great arrangements, but the first one is too similar to Jasleen’s previous song, while the second one is not soemthing I would take out time to listen to again and again — it will sound great in the theaters! A bit of a disappointment from the promising Jasleen Royal! 😦

 

4. Tere Naal Ishqa
Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sayeed Quadri

The last song on the album started off with a tune that resembles the opening tune of ‘Ji Huzoori’ (Ki & Ka) a bit, and I was so excited for a moment, because Mithoon with another ‘Ji Huzoori’ would be as fun as the world with another India. 😀 But to my disappointment, what followed was a composition that seemed to have worn out right away. The mukhda was so melancholic, that you get set back right away after it starts, and it just gets more boring after that. The hookline is decent, with the typical Mithoon trademark over it. The whole song reminded me of ‘Zaroorat’ (Ek Villain) instead of ‘Ji Huzoori’. 😦 And that isn’t good! The antara is quite slow-paced and hard to catch. The cross line which joins the antara to the hook, is also so outdated. The song has a very laid back tune in general. Kailash Kher’s vocals don’t help, as it just makes the song sound more outdated. He ends up boring the listener as the song progresses. The arrangements by Mithoon were a sort of a saviour for the mediocre composition, with rock livening things up a bit. The typical electric dafli-like beats just follow the tried-and-tested formula, which I’ve started hating after Vishal-Shekhar have overdone it in such songs. The length of the song is also a letdown. Such a melancholic composition, and six minutes, is a too long time! I really don’t like it when Mithoon takes such outdated tunes and stretches them for six minutes. On the other hand, I didn’t even notice how six minutes passed during ‘Darkhaast’. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are good here too, but could’ve done with better composition by Mithoon. A lacklustre melody that has worn away with time.


Shivaay partly lives up to expectations. The album offers a very electrifying song that will be the cracker for this Diwali, and a very sweet romantic song, but other than that, the other songs seem to suffer. Jasleen seems to be stuck in her comfort zone, and must get out of it, considering that this is only her third song and it smells so much of her first. Ankit Tiwari was different. He took so long to get out of ‘Sunn Raha Hai’ that all his songs started overlapping and then we got used to it, and got a pleasant surprise whenever he let go of it. But I don’t wish that to happen in Jasleen’s music, as she seems very promising a composer. Mithoon’s last song is just avoidable, as it reeks of the 2005-2007 era so much. At the end of the day, the musical divinity only partially works.

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darkhaast > Bolo Har Har Har > Raatein (Reprise) > Raatein > Tere Naal Ishqa

 

Which is your favourite song from Shivaay? Please vote for it below! Thanks 🙂

THE 6 MUSIC-ETEERS!! (SAAT UCHAKKEY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Jaidev Kumar, Bapi-Tutul, Vivek Kar, Niranjan Khound & Saket Singh
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Amir Khusro & Sahil Sultanpuri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2016
♪ Movie Released On: 14th October 2016

Saat Uchakkey Album Cover

Saat Uchakkey Album Cover

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Saat Uchakkey is a Bollywood comedy film starring Anupam Kher, Manoj Bajpayee, Kay Kay Menon, Annu Kapoor, Vijay Raaz and Aditi Sharma. The movie is directed by Sanjeev Sharma, and produced by Wave Cinemas, Crouching Tiger Films and Shital Bhatia. Since the film has already released, and not created much of a buzz among the public, there’s no use discussing the film, so I’m gonna dive right into what concerns me i.e, music. The music album for this film has four songs, each composed by different composers or composer duos. The first composer is Jaidev Kumar, who came into Bollywood with his ‘Nagin Dance’ (Bajatey Raho) and is still struggling to survive without making these weird party-sharty songs. The second song is by a duo, Bapi-Tutul, whose names I’ve seen in many RGV films like ‘Rann’, ‘Sarkar’, ‘Sarkar Raj’ and ‘Rakht Charitra’. Next up, there’s Vivek Kar, whose name too, I’ve seen in many films, the biggest one I remember being ‘One Night Stand’. And the last song is by another duo, Niranjan Khound Saket Singh. The ayre debuting with this song, and hopefully, they have something fun in hand. My expectations from the album? Quite a bit of nothing, along with some songs about drinking, and some more of nothing. Basically, I have no expectations. This is like a filler review for me while I wait for the ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ album to release. 😛 So can we get on with it? 😀


1. Neat Quarter
Singer ~ Late Labh Janjua, Music by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Jaidev Kumar starts off the album with his song that starts off with a tune oh-so-reminiscent of the ‘Nagin Dance’ (Bajatey Raho), which I guess was his only (though undeserved) hit song, though he did give that wonderful song ‘Das Dae’ in ‘Ishqedarriyan’. Anyway, let’s analyze Jaidev’s career graph later. So, the song starts off with the very generic tune that plays on that typical shehnaai/harmonium mix type of wind instrument. The composition that follows is just more typicality heaped up on top of typicality. The mukhda is another very generic tune, while the hookline is just irritating. Not that the antara is any good either. The arrangements by Jaidev Kumar are quite fun, with a nice Punjabi dhol rhythm throughout overshadowing the average composition. The shehnaai thing is irritating though. Vocals by Labh Janjua, who sadly passed away last year, right when we were all dancing on his ‘Dil Kare Chu Che’, are effusive and seem very lively. This is a song he recorded before his death, of course. The lyrics by Kumaar are those type of lyrics that revolve all around drinks and nothing else. And the line “Liver Ki hai ye demand” just makes you laugh. 😛 A bad opening to the album, with nothing good except the arrangements and Labh’s singing.

2. Chhap Tilak
Singer ~ Kirti Sagathia, Music by ~ Bapi-Tutul, Lyrics by ~ Amir Khusro

Next up, we have a very mystical rendition of the Sufi song by Amir Khusro, ‘Chhap Tilak Sab Chheeni Re’. And what can I say about this one?? It is pure bliss, this song! It starts with a nice aalaap by Kirti Sagathia, who is the go-to for Garbas usually. Here, though, he has clearly been approached by Bapi-Tutul for a Qawwali, arranged quite innovatively. The mukhda reminds you of A.R. Rahman’s ‘Naina Milaike’ (Saathiya). However, that is just a slight resemblance. The composition is very sweet, and the duo seems to have taken extra care to handle this song with care. The hookline is what does the magic. Whenever Kirti sings the word “Cheeen” or any word corresponding to the same tune, you should observe the ease with which he sings them, and the sweetness in the composition that that word imparts. Though the song is practically the same tune repeated over and over again, you never get bored and it never seems repetitive. The arrangements are one of the main reasons for this. The Qawwali arrangements are complete with harmonium, but the percussion is not done by the tablas, and it is done by something quite unexpected — bongos and congos! The ethnic folk drums really add something of a Caribbean touch to the song, and that’s what I loved the most about the song. The claps have been used perfectly and they’ve given a wonderfully catchy rhythm to the song. Kirti’s rendition is fabulous, and his backing chorus helps him really well and it sounds even more fabulous. The lyrics have not been touched, and Khusro’s immortal piece of writing remains as it is, thankfully. Innovative and catchy at the same time! A song that excels in every department! #5StarHotelSong!!

3. Cycle Se Chalaang
Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Vivek Kar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

After Kirti singing the previous song, we have Kailash Kher himself singing the next. The song has been composed by Vivek Kar, and he has really worked hard to make a quirky and catchy song, on the lines of Kailash Kher’s other quirky and catchy songs. The composition turns out to grow on you after just a few listens, and then it just takes over all the tunes in your head, until only this song is playing in your head all day! Believe me, it happened to me! Vivek Kar’s mukhda is amazing, with all the fun elements in the song appearing right from the beginning, and not from the middle of some line. And the best thing is, they remain throughout the song. Kailash Kher’s style of singing helps to make the song even more catchy, though it might become irritating for others. The antara too is quirky and catchy. The arrangements are tough to follow as there is so much happening everywhere. The harmonium and (again) that shehnaai thing (which sounds good here), and even a santoor help to give the song its fun elements. The percussion is strong and gives the song a catchy beat. Kailash is at his best trying to make us laugh but it is Kumaar’s lyrics that do the job at last. The satire is evident — “Mehnat Ki roti, pad gayi chhoti, isliye neeyat ho gayi khoti!” (What we earned by hard work wasn’t enough, so our intentions became evil!) The lyrics are a dig at the lifestyle of the uchakkey (thieves) of course. 😀 And the way it has been written really makes you smile, if not laugh. A good fun song after quite some time. Proof that you don’t need the mention of drinks to get people laughing in songs! #5StarHotelSong!!

4. Husn Wale Farebi
Singer ~ Saket Singh, Music by ~ Niranjan Khound & Saket Singh, Lyrics by ~ Sahil Sultanpuri

The last song on the album starts and right away, you can guess the genre. A very typical AdLib coupled with a bulbultarang gives it away right away. The disappointing thing though, is that, after the AdLib, the song jumps right into the Qawwali’s hookline! The composition is so outdated, and 90s, that there was actually no use of the makers asking for a Filmi Qawwali. The composers have tried to do it, but all they managed was to ape some old Qawwalis, probably by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, and the composition falls flat on its face. As it is, people in this generation are queasy when it comes to Qawwalis (Not me!) and so it was the responsibility of the composers to make the Qawwali sound catchy and not typical. Bollywood has given so many fun Qawwalis over the years. The arrangements offer nothing in terms of innovation, and we have the usual harmonium and tabla leading the way. The singer (and one half of the composer duo) seems bored halfway and seems to be singing for the sake of it. He also sounds like Wajid of Sajid-Wajid. I don’t know if that’s good or bad… 😛 The lyrics by Sahil Sultanpuri (that surname though! 😵) are obviously talking about girls and their ways of rejecting boys. The lyrics are so funny, that they might’ve been paid attention to, had the composition been attractive. But here, that’s doubtful. Nothing is intriguing here except the lyrics, which are funny.


Saat Uchakkey gives a bit more than I expected! I didn’t expect anything at all (which I didn’t get), and I expected a song about drinks (which I got). So my expectations are more than fulfilled as they were so minuscule. Bapi-Tutul, who have been in the industry for more than ten years, give a great interpretation of a classic Qawwali, while on the other hand, debutants Niranjan-Saket screw up a chance to compose a great and funny filmi Qawwali. I would’ve liked ‘Chhap Tilak’ even if it wouldn’t have been innovative and if it would’ve had a traditional arrangement, as it is a traditional song. But the filmi Qawwali has a scope to modify tradition, doesn’t it? The other two songs are supposed to be fun songs, out of which Vivek Kar’s excels, while Jaidev Kumar’s flops, save for Labh Janjua’s rendition. These six music-eteers give quite a mixed bag!

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Chhap Tilak > Cycle Se Chalaang > Neat Quarter = Husn Wale Farebi

Which is your favourite song from Saat Uchakkey? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SOUTH MEETS NORTH! (TUTAK TUTAK TUTIYA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Vishal Mishra, Gurinder Seagal, Dr. Bal Sidhu, Raaj Aashoo & Music MG
♪ Lyrics by: Irfan Kamal, Danish Sabri, Manoj Yadav, Pranav Vatsa, Shabbir Ahmed, Dr. Bal Sidhu, Lil Golu, Malkit Singh, Veer Rahimpuri & Music MG
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th September 2016
♪ Movie Released On: 7th October 2016

Tutak Tutak Tutiya Album Cover

Tutak Tutak Tutiya Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Tutak Tutak Tutiya is a trilingual horror comedy film, made as ‘Devi’ in Tamil and ‘Abhinetri’ in Telugu, starring Tamannaah Bhatia, Prabhudeva and Sonu Sood in lead roles, and Amy Jackson in a special appearance. The movie is directed by Vijay, and produced by Sonu Sood. The movie opened to mixed to positive reviews in all three languages, while the film’s music was creating a wave among masses, and I was writing my exams. 😛 So, heading directly towards the music. The music for the Telugu and Tamil films has been given by Sajid-Wajid and newcomer, Vishal Mishra, each having composed two songs each. These four songs have been included in the Hindi album, along with a bonus of three more songs that will cater to the Hindi audiences and increase the buzz of the movie in Punjab. 😛 They are all either Punjabi songs or by Punjabi artists, and added just to attract the Hindi audience. These songs are composed by Gurinder Seagal, who gave that great non-film single, ‘GF BF’ earlier this year. He has remade one of Dr. Bal Sidhu’s wedding numbers, ‘Rail Gaddi’. The next song is a remake of Malkit Singh’s ‘Tutak Tutak Tutiya’, also the namesake of this album, and that has been recreated by Raaj Aashoo. Lastly, Music MG comes with an original club number, which I’m not excited for. Let’s jump into this ‘Tutak Tutak Tutiya’!


1. Rail Gaddi
Singers ~ Navraj Hans, Swati Sharma & Lil Golu, Original Composition by ~ Dr. Bal Sidhu, Music Recreated by ~ Gurinder Seagal, Original Lyrics by ~ Dr. Bal Sidhu, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, Rap by ~ Lil Golu

The first track on the album is one that will really get those Hindi audiences attracted to the film like bears are attracted to honey. A remake of the hit Punjabi track ‘Rail Gaddi’, this one has already made people go crazy around the nation. As you guys know and must be thinking now, I do not like many of these remakes of Punjabi pop numbers. However, this one is different! The composition, which I found out was originally by Kuljit Bhamrah, but T-Series have credited Dr. Bal Sidhu, is good and catchy, and even Gurinder’s new additions are not bad, though a bit generic. The most generic it gets is in the antara, where the song sounds like a direct lift-off from the antara of the ‘Housefull 3’ song ‘Malamaal’. Or maybe all Punjabi songs sound the same to me. Anyway, the song starts with a hilarious dialogue said in a funny style, and then the quintessential tumbi makes its presence felt by playing the hookline tune. Navraj Hans’ programmed voice sounds good, and also sounds like Vishal Dadlani at places. I appreciate that Gurinder trued to get a big singer to sing the song, but the heavy programming done on his voice could’ve been cut down upon, especially after he sang with such finesse, that rock song ‘Raj Karega Khalsa’ in ‘A Flying Jatt’. Swati Sharma barely gets any scope to sing anything in the first antara, as she gets just one line, which sounds very bad. However, the second antara is all hers, and she spoils whatever fun the song was giving you by singing that. Again, the programming kills her voice, and makes it sound ridiculous. Lil Golu is back, without Yo Yo Honey Singh this time, and his rap might make you faint. He has a rap before both antaras, and both of them are ridiculously stupid. The hookline is definitely the best part of the song, and when the hookline is the best part of a REMADE song, you know things are wrong. However, the arrangements do help to make this one an enjoyable club song. Gurinder, who I think is very good at club beats (after hearing ‘GF BF’ that is) has made the pacy club beats overshadow his run-of-the-mill composition. The great electronic shehnaais really entertain. Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics are the usual random stuff that people ignore due to the pacy beats, so even I’m ignoring those. 😛 Quite entertaining and enjoyable, but a remake that could’ve been better in terms of vocals and composition. Not lyrics because this is the maximum level of IQ that I expect from such songs!

 

2. Chal Maar
Singer ~ Wajid, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Irfan Kamal

Sajid-Wajid enter the album for the second song, which is also the first song of the album that is from the Tamil/Telugu versions. And I understand why Prabhudeva must’ve chosen this song for the film! Last October, Sajid-Wajid and Prabhudeva had given us a treat called ‘Cinema Dekhe Mamma’ (Singh Is Bliing), which was a complete desi tune with desi music. This time too, though Prabhudeva isn’t the director here, Sajid-Wajid, two of his favourites, give a song that is at par with that one. The first time you listen to the song, you’ll be like ‘Where am I? Why am I even listening to this?” But after some listens (if you give it time, that is) the composition starts to unfold its magic. The upbeat, very desi composition starts growing on you, and finally, grabs you completely. That shehnaai-like loop just intrigues you and it plays so many times, that you just start loving it! Of course, Sajid-Wajid are experts in giving this kind of music. 😀 But this time, it just worked too well. The composition too, seems average at first, especially the line before the hookline (“Bheja hai kamar pe…. Bend it like Beckham baby!”) and the hookline itself, which consists of only two words, Chal and Maar, seemingly shouted out randomly. The line just before that though, is so sweet and attractive! It goes “Chakhne de, haaye chakhne de, tere ishq ka zaayaka”. Sajid-Wajid have composed that line so beautifully, I die every time I hear it! 😀 The antara, though it could’ve been better, does its job of keeping you glued. What is the reason? The arrangements, of course! You all know how I praise Sajid-Wajid so much for their amazing arrangements every time, and this time too, they have stunned with their magnificent percussion, the slow South-Indian style rhythms and the AMAZING brass band. Of course though, that shehnaai loop (which is actually played on a melodica) is supposed to be the USP of the song, and it definitely is for me! The guitars are wonderful as well. The Tamil and Telugu versions of the song have been sung by Benny Dayal and Nakash Aziz respectively, and at first I was frustrated because we got stuck with Wajid. However, after hearing the song, I can happily say that Wajid, one of the composers, has rendered the song very nicely. He sounds youthful as well as cool! When he sings that sweet line that I pointed out, I just start to sing along. He sings that line so nicely! 😀 And he sings the hook phrase with such attitude, that I concluded that he was the perfect choice for the song. Irfan Kamal’s lyrics too, are ignorable. Very enjoyable, and a perfect song for Prabhudeva to show off his moves onscreen! Hats off to Sajid-Wajid yet again for the arrangements! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tutak Tutak Tutiya
Singers ~ Malkit Singh, Kanika Kapoor & Sonu Sood, Original Composition by ~ Malkit Singh, Music Recreated by ~ Raaj Aashoo, Original Lyrics by ~ Veer Rahimpuri, New Lyrics by ~ Malkit Singh & Shabbir Ahmed

Yet another remake we have on the album. This one serves as the title track. This one is a remake of Malkit’s 80s hit, ‘Tutak Tutak Tutiya’, and Raaj Aashoo has got the chance to recreate this one. And he seizes the opportunity and makes gold of it. The song starts again, with the representative of Punjabi songs, tumbi, followed by dhadd and a wonderful flute that just makes you feel happy. The composition of the mukhda is basically the same as that of the original, with the first line revamped by Raaj Aashoo. The song mostly follows the same composition of the hookline, and it is a very strong and effective tune. Especially the “Haye Jamaalo!” The antara is short and catchy as well, and definitely a new addition. After that, the hookline takes over once again, until the song ends. The arrangements are basically insane club beats, along with mad flutes winning your heart, and EDM that makes you wanna dance. The vocals are good, with Malkit Singh having re-recorded the song with the new lyrics that he, along with Shabbir Ahmed, has written. Kanika Kapoor gets a very small scope to open up, but her portions sound cute as always. Sonu Sood does a rap portion that is entertaining for all that it’s worth. Raaj Aashoo also makes the vocalists sing “Tutak tutak” in the background at the beginning, and that effect is so cool! 😀 The lyrics are average again, and meant for fun. A foot-tapping remake of a classic pop song, with Raaj Aashoo’s flute standing high above everything else! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Love The Way You Dance
Singers ~ Jazzy B, Sonu Sood & Millind Gaba, Music by ~ Music MG (Millind Gaba), Lyrics by ~ Music MG (Millind Gaba)

The way this song starts, your mind suddenly cries out “West!” 😛 The shameless aping of the West that happens in so many Bollywood club songs, is evident in this song as well. And guess what? Millind Gaba is back, after his epic fails in Bollywood, from that ‘Welcome Back’ title song, to the most recent ‘Housefull 3’ song ‘Malamaal’. The composition, I admit, is quite decent, as it tries to keep you hooked. However, it just doesn’t work out. The club beats are a direct lift of Millind Baba’s own ‘Welcome Back’ title song. Also, the hookline is so pathetically composed, that whatever you feel about the start of the song, all evaporates because of the hookline. The generic composition has nothing to offer in terms of variation or innovation. This Music MG has a unidimensional thought and composition style. The vocals by Jazzy B are just irritating, and the overdone Punjabi lyrics by Millind are too much to handle. Sonu Sood’s rap sounds horrifying. Of course, this is a horror comeda, isn’t it! 😀 Terrible attempt to ape the West!

 

5. Chalte Chalte
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

The next song marks the entry of another composer into the album, this time, a debutant – Vishal Mishra. Now this is the same Vishal Mishra who sang a song in ‘Shorgul’ as well. He steps into composing with this film, and with such a composition, you know he didn’t just foray into composing just for the sake of it! The composition is extremely pleasing and calming, as well as groovy at the same time. The mukhda has the power of pulling you in instantly, and the hookline is so, so cute, that you just cat ignore it. What’s more, it doesn’t force itself on you, and rather, plays on its own will, and you don’t even get to know. The antara is just a continuation of the sweetness. Both the times it plays, you are reminded of those sweet songs where the boy is just preoccupied with thoughts of some girl he’s seen somewhere in the middle of nowhere, that always play in Bollywood films. One of them is ‘I Love You’ (Bodyguard), and this song reminded me a lot of that, as well as the recent ‘Purza Purza’ (Akira). Vishal’s decision to get Arijit to sing this song turns out to be a very efficient one. Arijit, with sweetness ozzing out of his voice, delivers it with the same cuteness as it was meant to be delivered. His high notes leave you stunned, while he is, as it is, a master at low notes. The arrangements are awesome as well, with a cool jazzy touch to them. The guitars throughout provide a foot-tapping rhythm, while electronic beats are at their best in the song. A rock guitar interlude steals the show when it plays, even though it plays for about less than 10 seconds. Manoj Yadav’s lyrics are the first good lyrics in the album, and they do suit the romance theme, as well as give you some good words for your ears to chew on. Trippy! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Suku Suku
Singer ~ Shivranjani Singh, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

The next song turns out to be Sajid-Wajid’s second and last song in the album, and it starts with very, very impressive hip-hop beats through which they really prove their mettle at making music of so many different styles yet again. The impressive introduction, though, gives way to something that just falls downhill until the antara. The mukhda is such a weakly composed one, that I’m surprised Sajid-Wajid couldn’t get a better opening line to such a wonderfully opened song. The tune sounds sappy and something that goes in very low status movies. I mean, what is “Dance karle aiissaaaa, Sridevi jaiiiisaaaa!”!? The hookline too, is not impressive at all. However, the antara is composed so nicely and sweetly, in a pleasant desi tune, that you wonder how the duo could get this tune after such a bland opening. The composers have paid too much attention, as always, to giving a very great auditory experience to the listeners. The arrangements are just mind-blowing. With very cool EDM and techno beats, the composers score high with the arrangements. A very entertaining and professional African percussion piece plays in one of the interludes, and that is just not to be missed. Backing vocalists going “Yeah!” at random places also qualifies as good Western-styled arrangements. 😛 And the composers have aced that as well. The vocals by Shivranjani Singh, who seems to have become the composer duo’s favourite now for item songs, instead of Mamta Sharma, sings the composition well, but the texture she gives to her voice, makes her sound drunk like always. (Like she sounded in ‘Lalla Lalla Lori’ from ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’) She sings that antara very cutely though. 😀 And the hookline, sounds very obnoxious in her voice. WHAT IS A SUKU SUKU?! HOW DO YOU DANCE LIKE A SUKU SUKU?? These are the questions I would like to ask Danish Sabri, who, when the time comes, very nicely gives only backing vocals to Qawwali-esque songs, but when it comes to writing, writes all this ‘Suku’ stuff. :/ At least write something we understand? How do you expect us to dance like a Suku Suku if we don’t know what a Suku Suku is? Is that some new species discovered by you, Mr. Danish Sabri? Please enlighten us then! This song is suitable only for Suku Sukus. Barring the splendid arrangements, and the composition for the antara, this song is a Suku Suku!

 

7. Ranga Re
Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Pranav Vatsa

For the grand finale of the album, we have a very dulcet melody to mellow things down after all that Suku Suku. Vishal Mishra is back to give this grand finale to the album. The composition is a very peaceful and soulful one, with touches of classical oriental Asian music. The melody is something that seems to be the only one on the abum that has been planned out before and made in a good amount of time, as it has turned out rather perfect. The mukhda has the low notes appealoung to you and luring you into the song, while the hookline takes things to a more lively scale, and it ends up chilling you with its majestic qualities. The antaras are just as beautiful, and deserve to be paid more attention, if you ask me. On a whole, the composition is very scintillating. In some places, it has shades of ‘Sapna Jahan’ (Brothers) and in others it also coincidentally sounds like ‘Rangaa Re’ (Fitoor). The arrangements are sparkling. First, we have mellow piano, along with flute (Varad Kathaurka) and a wonderful entrancing rhythm in the background. After that, things elevate to an all-out rock song, with guitars, both electric and acoustic (both by Vaibhav Pani) leading the way. In the interludes, Vishal Mishra weaves magic with the instrumentation. The first interlude has a dulcet flute solo, ranging from low to high notes. In the second, things are exactly opposite, with a lively and charismatic rock guitar giving a very electrifying performance. Vocals by Shreya Ghoshal are beautiful, but definitely not her best. At places, I thought she was singing like Shilpa Rao too! 😀 There is a particular part in the song where I loved her variations, and that is the last time she sings the word ‘Banjaaaraaa’, at 4:55 minutes into the song. Pranav Vatsa’s lyrics are good, and inspirational. A grand finale indeed! The only matured composition on the album, and sung by the Nightingale. #5StarHotelSong!!


Tutak Tutak Tutiya gives whatever it has promised, with songs catering to both masses and classes (with Vishal Mishra catering to the classes and the rest to the masses :P) The seven songs compiled for the Hindi version of the film are a great mix of the North Indian and South Indian flavour. Though Vishal Mishra’s songs sound more like Bollywood songs, the fact that they were originally for the Southern versions of the film, makes you look at it from a whole new light. The two remakes have been done good, and revamped so that the new generation will like them, with the title track faring slightly better. The four tracks that are also in the Tamil & Telugu versions of the album, are good, with ‘Suku Suku’ being the only disappointing one, but that one too has amazing arrangements. At the end though, it is Vishal Mishra who creates the most magic in the album, with both his songs working perfectly, and I’m sure, instrumental for the film. A perfect comedy film album, with a good mix of South and North India!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ranga Re > Chal Maar > Tutak Tutak Tutiya > Chalte Chalte > Rail Gaddi > Suku Suku > Love The Way You Dance

 

Which is your favourite song from Tutak Tutak Tutiya? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

23rd MUSIC MASTANI MONTHLY AWARDS (SEPTEMBER 2016)

Yes, I had finished the September reviews long ago, like long, long, ago, but didn’t get time to come to my blog to write the awards.. So here it is.. Quite late!

The albums included in this month’s awards are, ‘Akira’, ‘Baar Baar Dekho’, ‘Freaky Ali’, ‘Pink’, ‘Raaz Reboot’, ‘Banjo’, ‘Days of Tafree’ and ‘M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story’.

So here we go!

23rd Music Mastani Monthly Awards

♪ MAIN AWARDS

• Singer of the Month (Female) : Palak Muchhal for Kaun Tujhe (M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story)

• Singer of the Month (Male) : Hriday Gattani for Udan Choo (Banjo)

• Composer of the Month (Song) : Jasleen Royal for Nachde Ne Saare (Baar Baar Dekho) AND Arko Pravo Mukherjee for Dariya (Baar Baar Dekho) AND Shantanu Moitra for Kaari Kaari (Pink)

• Composer of the Month (Album) : Amaal Mallik for M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story

• Album of The Month: M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story (Music by: Amaal Mallik; Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir; Singers: Armaan Malik, Palak Muchhal, Arijit Singh, Siddharth Basrur, Ananya Nanda & Adithyan A. Prithviraj; Music On: T-Series)

• Musical Jodi of the Month (Best Duet) : Neeti Mohan & Armaan Malik for Sau Aasmaan (Baar Baar Dekho)

• Lyricist of the Month: Manoj Muntashir for Kaun Tujhe (M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story)

 

♪ SONG AWARDS

• Best Romantic Song: Jab Tak (M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story) AND Yaad Hai Na (Raaz Reboot)

• Best Dance Song: Nachde Ne Saare (Baar Baar Dekho)

• Best Sad Song: Kaun Tujhe (M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story)

• Best Club Song: Rada (Banjo)

• Best Classical-Based Song: Rehmo Karam (Banjo)

• Best Song With A Western Influence: Pink (Pink) AND Kho Gaye Hum Kahan (Baar Baar Dekho)

• Best Song With A Folk Influence: Ya Ali Murtaza (Freaky Ali)

• Song With The Best Use of Fusion: Kaari Kaari (Pink) AND Udan Choo (Banjo)

• Best Backing Vocals: Vishal Dadlani for Rajj Rajj Ke (Akira)

• Best Sound Effects in A Song: Nachde Ne Saare (Baar Baar Dekho) AND Udan Choo (Banjo)

• Best Humorous Song: Din Mein Karengey Jagraata (Freaky Ali) AND Pee Paa Ke (Banjo)

• Best Rap In A Song: Vishal Dadlani for Pee Paa Ke (Banjo)

 

♪ SPECIAL AWARDS

• Bandar Kya Jaane Adrak Ka Swaad (Best Album That Went Pretty Much Unnoticed / Most Underrated Album) : Akira (T-Series)

• Newcomer(s) of the Month:

– Newcomer of the Month (Composer): Jasleen Royal for Kho Gaye Hum Kahan & Nachde Ne Saare (Baar Baar Dekho)

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Female): Nahid Afrin for Rajj Rajj Ke – Version 2 (Akira) AND Ananya Nanda for Padhoge Likhoge (M.S, Dhoni – The Untold Story)

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Male): Adithyan A. Prithviraj for Padhoge Likhogr (M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story)

• Music Label of The Month: T-Series (M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story, Akira, Freaky Ali, Raaz Reboot, & Days Of Tafree)

• Most Unusual, But Awesome Choice of Singer: Nahid Afrin for Rajj Rajj Ke (Akira) [Coz a young girl singing such a mature composition so well, is mind blowing!]

 

That’s it! Hope you agree/like it/ whatever. 😀

 

Reviews this month: Shivaay, Ae Dil Hai Mushkil, Rock On 2, Force 2, Tum Bin 2, Kahaani 2, Wajah Tum Ho and many more.. 🙂