TRIVEDI’S CUTE ZINDAGI! (DEAR ZINDAGI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi & Ilaiyaraaja
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir & Gulzar
♪ Music Label: Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 15th November 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th November 2016

Dear Zindagi Album Cover

Dear Zindagi Album Cover

 

To hear the songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dear Zindagi is an upcoming Bollywood comedy drama starring Alia Bhatt, Shahrukh Khan, Kunal Kapoor, Ali Zafar and Ira Dubey. The film is directed by ‘English Vinglish’ fame Gauri Shinde, and produced by Gauri Khan, Karan Johar and Gauri Shinde herself. This is a story of Kaira (played by Alia) and Jug (played by Khan). Kaira is a budding cinematographer looking for a perfect life. Enter Jug, an unconventional thinker, who gives her a new perspective of looking at life. So, the storyline has Gauri Shinde as we know her, written all over it! Gauri’s last film also touched upon the small beauties of life, and I’m sure this will delve more into that. The director chooses to compose for this film, the person that had made her first film’s album such a success, and that is, as we all know, Amit Trivedi. Who, by the way, gets to compose for SRK for the first time in his career in the bargain! (And Alia for the third!) Looking at the film’s teasers and promos, fresh music is expected, and who better than Trivedi to get in that freshness? His track record this year has been amazing, but he didn’t really get to compose in his comfort zone, what with the grand music that ‘Fitoor’ called for, or the extra-dark and unconventional music that was required by ‘Udta Punjab’. With this film, I’m sure he’s going to be back in his comfort zone, which is fresh, feel-good music! So let’s get into this album right away!


1. Love You Zindagi / Love You Zindagi (Club Mix)
Singers ~ Jasleen Kaur Royal / Alia Bhatt, Backing Vocals ~ Rajiv Sundaresan, Suhas Sawant & Joell Mukherjii

So, the album starts off with what I would like to call the title song of the album, but I clearly can’t. The song appears in two versions, so let me speak about them one by one. The first version is definitely the song that is doing the rounds these days, what with Alia who can be seen embracing the small joys of life in its video, which really looks cute! On the music front, too, this one scores pretty well. Amit’s composition for this song is easily his signature style of composition, and a layman can easily guess at this stage of Trivedi’s career, whether a song is composed by him or not. The mukhda is full of sugary-sweet notes that really appeal to you at once, not to mention the cute way those “Hi Hi Hi”s and “Bye Bye Bye”s have been composed! And the hookline is just fabulous! 😀 The antara follows the same kind of template, starting off gracefully and then going into a fun staccato. The hookline is what will attract more listeners though for sure. The arrangements in this version, though, are heavenly. A wonderful flute (Inapakurti D Rao) starts the song off, and then breezy guitars (Joell Mukherjii) take over for the most part of the song. And then wonderful trumpets (Ketan Sodha) and a nice mandolin and banjo (Tapas Roy) provide the breeziness factor a boost. Darshan Doshi’s drums give a nice upbeat nature to the song. It is the vocals that make the song sound even more cute, as Jasleen does her wonderful small baby thing yet again. However, that admiration of her rendition lasts only as long as you don’t hear Alia’s rendition. In the club mix, amidst a cool chivda of techno sounds, her voice sounds soooooo beautiful! And then you just can’t help but compare her to Shraddha and discover who is clearly the better singer. (Alia!) In the song, she sounds like Jonita Gandhi a bit at some places, especially during the “Hi Hi Hi” and “Bye Bye Bye“. Amit has conveniently increased the tempo for this one, succeeding in living up to the ‘Club Mix’ title. Backing vocalists Rajiv Sundaresan, Suhas Sawant and Joell Mukherjii are the magicians behind that beautiful hookline, and had they not been there, the hookline wouldn’t at all have stood out so well! And then, we come to Kausar’s lyrics, which are another breath of fresh air! Talking about having an affair with life, it is very fun and cute to the ears! The soundtrack starts off with a song that is fun in all, but one version falls flat because of the singer, while the other is more of a remix. Anyway, enjoyable but not great great great. 🙂

 

2. Tu Hi Hai
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals ~ Joell Mukherjii

The next song is yet another fresh song. Amit’s composition is one of the cutest things I’ve heard this year, and that cuteness is alleviated thanks to Arijit’s feathery voice. The mukhda instantly grabbed my attention and pulled me into the song, and it won’t take time for anyone to love this song. The hookline falls into the category of hooklines which I love — the ones that don’t proclaim themselves as the rulers of the world. It blends into the mukhda and you hardly notice when it’s over. Also, after Arijit sings “Tu hi hai“, I felt like doing the Shammi Kapoor Shimmy, for some reason — maybe there’s some retro touch hidden somewhere in the song! The hookline is followed by a nice line that goes “Door yeh kaun hai..” That right there, is my favourite part of the whole song. The antara takes the tune of the mukhda itself, and that is Trivedi’s usual style, and I loved it especially in this song, because the tune is so good, that it deserves a double repeat. As a conclusion, Trivedi adds a nice little stanza that goes “Mere sheron mein yeh kaun hai” which goes on to even ask who is in his diary, guitar, balloons and whatnot. The entire composition style reminded me of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s ‘Kuch Toh Hua Hai’ (Kal Ho Naa Ho) — NOT ANKIT TIWARI’S ‘KUCH TOH HUA HAI’ FROM ‘SINGHAM RETURNS’ PLEASE!! The freshness is quite similar to the freshness to the freshness of that song, and it just shows you how ahead of their time Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy were at that time. Amit’s arrangements are perfect. Breezy acoustic guitars (Joell Mukherjii) coupled with nice drum beats make for a nice and soothing arrangement. The guitars, as they start the song off, reminded me of another Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy song ‘Dil Kya Kare’ (Salaam-E-Ishq)! The interludes are well embellished with Tapas Roy’s wonderful mandolins. But the star of the arrangements is the vintage spoon-on-a-glass chink sound, and Amit has really overdone himself by using that in such a wonderful manner here. Backing vocals (Joell Mukherjii) in the mukhda constitute the chorus going “Oooohh oooohh” in a wonderful harmony. Sony Music, however, doesn’t reveal the musician credits until the song promos are released, so I can’t really speak about the musicians and backing vocalists. 😦 Arijit’s vocals are the perfect match for this cite composition, and he renders it with ease, and the right amount of cuteness. Kausar’s lyrics are wonderful, a bit in the Gulzar style of writing. Very cute!! Signature Amit Trivedi meets Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Taarefon Se
Singers ~ Arijit Singh

{Looks like Sony Music has misspelled ‘Taareefon’ 😅}

As soon as the next song starts, you can’t help but scream out the name of one of Amit Trivedi’s most famous albums, the one that actually brought him his first huge acclaim in the commercial style of music, ‘Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu’. The composition is a nice, soothing one, done in the traditional jazzy style. But don’t get me wrong. Amit’s jazz in ‘Bombay Velvet’ and this jazz is not the same at all. Over there, he had to compose according to the 1960s Bombay theme, but here, he composed a traditional modern jazz song, no matter how confusing that sounds. 😀 The composition reminded me particularly of ‘Gubbare’ (Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu) but also reminded me of all the songs in that album in general. The soothing tune provides a nice relief to the ears, and works in its intentions. The way the mukhda starts, you would feel that the song won’t really get so catchy, but as it progresses, it grows on you like slow poison, reminding me of yet another such song, Rahman’s ‘Aise Na Dekho’ (Raanjhanaa) which started off sounding like the black sheep of the album, but ending up being at par with the rest of the songs. The hookline of this song has been composed beautifully by Amit, and it just sounds so intoxicating and cute. The antara keeps the intoxication in the song continued, with its nice and easy-going tune. The line “Maana sabse tu, haseen hai nakhrewaali…” in the mukhda is just mind-blowing! Arrangements, are fabulous here too. A perfect result is obtained by Amit’s trumpet+drum couple. Additionally, piano provides the soothing effect in the jazz, while a backing chorus gives the required harmonies. About the vocals, I really can’t say anything except praise Arijit yet again for his brilliant rendition!! Every note of his touches the ears with a nice feel, hence making the already dulcet composition sound even more calm. Kausar Munir just writes yet another set of amazing lyrics, cuteness overloaded! A song that seems to be rejected from ‘Ek Main Auar Ekk Tu’, and placed here, but shines in this album nevertheless! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Let’s Break Up
Singer ~ Vishal Dadlani

The next song is a booming, fun track that brings in to the album a peppy aspect. The composition is a nice and upbeat one which instantly hooks you, and has you listening the whole time. The style of composition which Amit has used here, too, is quite retro. It reminds you of that MJ hip-hop music that Vishal-Shekhar had used in the ‘Bang Bang’ title song. The mukhda starts off the song very ebulliently and makes the listener ready for a fun song to follow. The hookline is where the song falters a bit, looking like Amit has stuck some other song’s hookline to the song’s mukhda, making things sound quite odd. Both parts are good in their own places, but do not go together too well. The first antara is also in the same tune as the mukhda (Amit seems to have taken this style very seriously!) and provides more cheeriness in the song! The second antara is also nice and innovative with a trance-y touch to it thanks to the arrangements that sound unplugged with nothing but claps accompanying the melody. In short, the tune is good except for the mistake that the hookline is. Arrangements are nice and euphoric, with those MJ hip-hop beats overpowering everything else. Drums and fantastic brass instruments provide more attractive music. The second interlude is a typical Amit Trivedi quirky musical piece. Those digital beats are just insane!! Vishal Dadlani was the perfect choice for this song, if not Benny Dayal. He renders the composition with the required effervescence. I just love the way he sings “Basically, basically, basically”. He is the saving grace of the hookline, along with the trumpets. Kausar Munir writes a better piece about breakups than Amitabh Bhattacharya did in ‘The Breakup Song’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil). However, due to lack in the catchiness of the hookline, they don’t stand out much! Fun, but won’t stay around for too long!

 

5. Just Go To Hell Dil
Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Backing Vocals ~ Rajiv Sundaresan, Suhas Sawant, Arun Kamath, Crystal Sequeira & Bianca Gomes

The next song brings in the much-awaited melancholia in the album (Though I don’t like the melancholia of those typical romantic songs, I await the melancholia that people like Rahman, Vishal-Shekhar, Pritam, Trivedi and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy offer!) The song is a sombre melody that, yet again, grows on you like slow poison. The composition is not really one that I would expect from Trivedi, I would expect such a composition more from Pritam. And I say that because it sounds a lot like Pritam’s ‘Life In A… Metro’ songs and his ‘Yaariyan’ (Cocktail). The composition is nonetheless beautiful. It has all shades of emotion, and doesn’t bore for even one of its five and a half minutes. The hookline is something that will instantly hook you, and that is also where the song starts sounding like a trademark Pritam composition. The mukhda is essentially a beautifully woven piece, with notes strung in line one after the other in a beautiful fashion, making he result phenomenal. There is always a part which takes the song up in such songs, and here, that part is the wonderful “Oh Roothe Dil, Roothe Dil, Roothe Dil…” line. It is from there, that the song starts working its magic on you. Though I don’t always love English hookline in essentially Hindi songs, the hookline in this song blends in well, and turns out to be a success. The antara again, resembles the mukhda and now I’m 100% sure that this is now Trivedi’s style. The second antara gets the composition treading on nice high note that instantly strike a chord with the listener. The provide a kind of climax to the song. The whole composition in all, makes this song the cranked-up equivalent of ‘Gustakh Dil’ from Gauri Shinde and Trivedi’s last album ‘English Vinglish’, which was another “addressing-the-heart-and-accusing-it-of-its-infinite-faults” song. The arrangements win half the battle for the song. A wonderful piano starts off the song, followed by a graceful violin (Jitendra H. Thakur). The guitars (Rushad Mistry & Warren Mendonsa) set in and make the atmosphere of the song even more beautiful. That electric guitar loop playing in the hookline is what actually reminded me of Pritam’s guitar loops in ‘Yaariyan’ (Cocktail) and ‘Kabira’ (Yeah Jawaani Hai Deewani). Drums (Darshan Doshi) are another quintessential but fabulous addition to the song. Sunidhi’s effusive vocals are enough to take the song to sky-level. She sings the whole song with such conviction, it doesn’t make Amit’s emotional composition sound hollow. Backing vocalists support Sunidhi very well, and I loved how the male backing vocalists and the female ones have distinct parts. Kausar Munir’s lyrics are wonderful, and add the pain and angst to the already angsty composition. This one is a sure shot winner! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Ae Zindagi Gale Laga Le (Take 1) / Ae Zindagi Gale Laga Le (Take 2)
Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Alia Bhatt, Composition by ~ Ilaiyaraaja, Music Recreated by ~ Amit Trivedi, Lyrics by ~ Gulzar

 So, for the grand finale to the album, that has done quite good till now, we get a classic song remade by Amit Trivedi. It seems like Sony Music made the makers of the film rummage through the very short list of classic albums they had under their label (almost all went to Saregama-HMV!) and the makers finally found the gem they wanted in that short list. The song was ‘Ae Zindagi Gale Laga Le’ from ‘Sadma’. And, very appropriately, going with the film’s theme (Alia is a cinematographer), Sony Music names these two versions of the remake as “Take 1” and “Take 2”, indicating that it is just their take on the classic, and not an ambitious thing that we call a ‘remake’ nowadays! 😀 The best part about this ‘take’ of the wonderful classic, is that the original composition has been kept intact! Nothing at all has been changed in Ilaiyaraaja’s heavenly composition, and I really appreciate the makers for that! So might Raaja himself! 😀 Even the lyrics by Gulzar saab have been kept as they were in the old song. All that has changed are the vocals and arrangements. So let’s go version-wise. The first version has Arijit behind the mic, with his third song in the album. Who better than Arijit to recreate the magic that Suresh Wadkar had infused into this composition? He sings the song with a nice nasal twang to his voice, and makes sure the glory of the composition remains intact. Amit’s arrangements for this take of the song are wonderful. A nice rock aspect has been given to the song, and the guitars and drums help in making the song appeal to new-age listeners. In the second version, actress Alia Bhatt takes over, and with her sweet voice, renders the haunting composition very effectively, except in the occasional slips here and there. You can tell that her vocals have been incorporated into the track without any tinkering with them. The arrangements here are more of an internationally-appealing type. Such arrangements are getting popular worldwide now, and it is really nice to know that Amit has done this without spoiling the song too much. The EDM sounds nice, and it even goes into a kind of dappankuthu towards the end. These arrangements are definitely more techno than the ones in the first version. What a brave step to recreate this classic, which could’ve gone very bad, hahd Trivedi not used such intelligence! The result is quite safe and amazing! #5StarHotelSong!!


Dear Zindagi turns out to be one of Amit Trivedi’s safest albums till date. He has never tried to get his unconventional touch to such commercial films. Though the film is also not one of SRK’s usual films, I wouldn’t actually be expecting so many songs in the film after seeing the promos. Yet, Trivedi comes up with 8 tracks for the film, and none of them actually have anything going against their favor. Yes, the title track and ‘Let’s Break Up’ do have some minor glitches, but all in all, the album turns out to be a very safe album in that it sounds great, but I’m not really sure about its playlist life! All the songs are very cute and fun to hear, though. Hereby declared: Amit’s cute music makes for a very cute “zindagi“! 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tu Hi Hai > Taarefon Se > Just Go To Hell Dil > Ae Zindagi Gale Laga Le (Take 1) > Ae Zindagi Gale Laga Le (Take 2) > Love You Zindagi = Love You Zindagi (Club Mix) = Let’s Break Up

 

Which is your favourite song from Dear Zindagi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE LITTLE FORCE OF TECHNO MUSIC!! (FORCE 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Amaal Mallik
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Javed Akhtar & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 27th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th November 2016

Force 2 Album Cover

Force 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Force 2 is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film, starring John Abraham and Sonakshi Sinha in lead roles, and Tahir Raj Bhasin in a negative role. The film has been directed by ‘Game’ and ‘Delhi Belly’ fame Abhinay Deo, and produced by Vipul Amrutlal Shah, Viacom18 Motion Pictures, and John Abraham himself. The film is a sequel to Nishikant Kamat’s directorial, ‘Force’, which released in 2011. The music of ‘Force’, by South composer Harris Jayaraj, was quite nice, with many romantic songs being the best ones, and ‘Khwaabon Khwaabon’ being the thrilling USP of the album. With only one underwhelming song in that album, ‘Dum Hai Toh Aaja’, it turned out to be one of the most underrated albums of the year. This time, though, composers Gourov-Roshin take hold of the music. Earlier this year, along with Shaan, they had composed a song for ‘Great Grand Masti’, under the name Superbia. For this movie, Gourov Dasgupta and Roshin Balu, without their partner Shaan, have been roped in. The song from ‘Great Grand Masti’, I didn’t like much, so I can’t say much about my expectations from the duo. However, a guest composer in the form of Amaal Mallik also increases the chances of the album being a success. With just four songs, three by the duo and one by guest composer Amaal, I am sure the makers of the movie are more interested in the storyline than the music, but still hoping with crossed fingers that the music lives up to the music of the first film nevertheless! So let’s get ready to measure the force in the music of ‘Force 2’!


1. Rang Laal
Singers ~ Dev Negi & Aditi Singh Sharma, Voiceover by ~ John Abraham, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The first song on the album shouts patriotism right in your ear. The way it gets there though, is quite mediocre and average. Let me explain. The song starts off with a voiceover by John, after which comes a rap by Dev Negi. The actual melody composed by Gourov-Roshin comes after the rap, and it is good till there. I don’t deny it. But then the hookline comes and takes away whatever goodness the son had established. The hookline sounds so outdated and worn-out, and on top of that, it arrives so abruptly. The mukhda and hook don’t really blend in well with each other. There is practically no antara, and if I were to call some part of the song as one, it would be a part that consists of only a rap portion and the same tune that comes before the hookline in the mukhda. It all gets so predictable after a certain time. The song seems to rely mostly on the rap, and the patriotic voiceovers by John Abraham. The arrangements are techno sounds, that have fortunately been kept not so loud. The rock guitar that plays occasionally is impressive though. The vocals are just fine. Dev Negi impresses with the rap, but due to the very short part that he actually has to sing, he can’t shine in those parts. In the hook, he is joined by Aditi Singh Sharma, who can hardly be heard. John Abraham’s voiceovers sound out-of-place in an audio song. They could’ve just added it in the promos if they’d wanted. I really don’t like this method of including dialogues in songs. Kumaar’s lyrics are good, full of patriotism, and might be the only thing on the song meeting the requirements and expectations from this patriotic track. A disappointing start to the album.

 

2. O Janiya
Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Laxmikant-Pyarelal, New Composition and Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Javed Akhtar, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The second song on the album is a remake of ‘Kaate Nahin Kat Te’ (Mr. India). The song gets a club makeover from Gourov-Roshin, and as it starts, you get to know that it isn’t going to work out well, and it isn’t going to do justice to the original. The song starts off with some weird Arabic, (??) French (??) Or Spanish (??) lyrics that seem to be aping the way ‘Lovely’ (Happy New Year) started, with some similar Arabic words. (Or maybe gibberish). It is a horrible starting, with some lady sounding like she’s saying “serret lekhh baybee“, with too much emphasis on the “baby“. After that, it is pure techno music that follows. Thankfully, the duo has only used the hook of the old song, and tried to form a new song around that. Sadly, that seems to have failed. The mukhda is a typical club song composition, which fails to really create any interest. Cleverly, T-Series have named the song after the first line of the mukhda, so that no old song aficionados judge the song by its name and thereby proclaim that they’ve ruined the original. Which they have, anyway. The hookline is the same hookline that so many of us already love, but it doesn’t even sound good in the song, much less, sound good with that mukhda. The antara is a bit better in terms of composition, but you really can’t do anything when half the song engages you and not most of it. Neha Kakkar was practically expected to sing this song. She provides the little relief in the song, singing it with the required spunk. But she spoils the hookline, adding too much of nuances into it, and trying to sound a bit too cool. The last time the hook repeats, her love basically overflows, and she sings “I looovvve you love you love you love you” (at 4:03 in the song), which is enough to spoil the hookline for one last time. The arrangement is mainly techno music, that depends on a loop, to make itself noticeable. That tune plays all throughout the song, and it is quite an annoying tune. The techno music in the hookline spoils the sound of the hook as well. It all seems like such an overdose of techno music. Kumaar’s new lyrics are quite unbelievable. “O janiya, Tu nahin tha, Teri yaadon Se kiya Maine pyaar“. 😂 A song that could very well have been remade into a good romantic song, gets a club makeover and gets spoiled forever.

 

3. Ishaara
Singer ~ Armaan Malik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Rashmi-Virag

Amaal Mallik finally enters the album, after the duo Gourov-Roshin fail to create any magic. I expected Amaal to make up for the missing magic, but I must say, the result is quite underwhelming here too. Don’t get me wrong, I really love Amaal’s music. The composition this time around, too, is very soulful and emotional. Perfect for a romantic song that will grow on you like slow poison. However, I also couldn’t help but feel it was quite similar to many of his previous songs, like ‘Kuch Toh Hai’ (Do Lafzon Ki Kahani) and ‘Kaun Tujhe’ (M.S. Dhoni). The humming, he has used many times, and that particularly, was the setback for me. The mukhda is beautiful, while the hookline is so mellifluous that it just gets stuck in your head. The antara sounds very similar to the mukhda, it is hard to differentiate between the two, but it is well composed. The arrangements are minimal, with the acoustic guitars and strings really doing a great job. In an interlude, a rock guitar with a muffled voice, sounds like a lounge treatment has been given to it, and it sounds great! The star of the song, though, is definitely the mandolin. Every time it plays, it sends a chill down your spine. The entire feel of the song is all in all, quite haunting, and I would’ve enjoyed it more, had it been a bit different-sounding from Amaal’s earlier compositions. Armaan is a star, and he proves again how merely his voice can elevate a composition to another level. He adds little nuances to the composition which really make it stand out in those parts. Rashmi-Virag, as always, write awesome lyrics, and become yet another reason to listen to the song. Their writing is always full of soul and emotion, and that’s proved here too. One of Amaal’s weaker songs, due to the overlap with his previous songs. However, his arrangements, Armaan’s voice and Rashmi-Virag’s inexplicable writing, make this worth hearing at least a couple of times!

 

4. Catch Me If U Can
Singer ~ Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Gourov-Roshin come back into their album, with yet another overdose of techno music. The song is suitable for the thriller genre, and with the pacy techno arrangements, it has its things right. However, it falls flat in the composition. The mukhda starts off very flatly, so much so, that the listener can even get bored right away. It actually sounds like something composed just for the fun of it, and not meant to feature in a major motion picture soundtrack. The duo’s composition is painfully non-creative, and follows the path of many previous failed techno thriller songs. The hookline is just plain bad, I can’t put it any other way. The antaras have just as much in their favour as a child who hasn’t studied for the Maths exam. The duo try to cover their mediocre composition with some techno music, but it only sounds good at the beginning, where it does some nice little disco thing that is impressive and reminiscent of the 80s disco era. All throughout the rest of the song, are stale and boring techno sounds that fail to interest the listener. Some occasional Arabic drums do the trick though, being the only catchy sounds in practically the whole album. Amaal’s vocals haven’t been tuned properly, and firs of all, he shouldn’t have sung this song. Someone with a more strong voice like Suraj Jagan or the like should have been approached. Even Amaal seems uninterested in singing the song, as I can make out from his voice. The duo could’ve done some autotuning there, because other people even use it for singers who don’t even require it. Kumaar’s lyrics are pretty mediocre. SKIP!


Force 2 seems to be one of the worst albums of the year. With not even one track being completely lovable, the album falls short of expectations from every which way. What Harris Jayaraj did in the first installment, and what Gourov-Roshin give in the second, have many miles’ difference between them. Amaal’s guest song does become the best song of the album, but could’ve been better in itself too. But with T-Series relying on what the audience wants and depending on old songs remade to do the trick, I doubt that could’ve been possible. A FORCELESS ALBUM, WITH AN OVERDOSE OF TECHNO MUSIC!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishaara > Rang Laal > O Janiya > Catch Me If U Can

 

Which is your favourite song from Force 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

LAIDBACK BREATHS! (SAANSEIN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vivek Kar
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th November 2016

Saansein Album Cover

Saansein Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Saansein is an upcoming Bollywood horror film, starring Rajneesh Duggal, Sonarika Bhadoria and Hiten Tejwani. The film has been directed by Rajiv S. Ruia, and produced by Goutam Jain and Vivek Agarwal. The story is about a club singer, who, every night after her performance, disappears without talking to anyone or meeting anyone. She’s probably possessed.. Come on, Bollywood, we know you better than you do yourself! Anyway, the movie is a horror/romance film, and in such movies, I expect wither a chilling and spine-tingling score, or a sappy, romantic, typical Bhattish score. The music of the film has been entirely composed by Vivek Kar, which makes this his first solo album ever. He is fresh from the success of his song ‘Cycle Se Chalaang’ (Saat Uchakkey), and now he is here with a complete album of a horror film. Going by the songs he composed in his previous albums (‘Zindagi 50-50’, ‘Meeruthiya Gangsters’, ‘Direct Ishq’, ‘One Night Stand’ etc) I think he’s going to give the second category of music I expect for such films (the typical romantic songs), but I do expect a lot more as it is his first solo album. So, without further ado, let’s go through the music of ‘Saansein’, and see how horrific it is!


1. Mera Ishq
Singers ~ Ash King, Arijit Singh & Swati SharmaBacking Vocals ~ Dev Negi & Joi Barua

Vivek Karta presents, as the first song on the album, a fresh and pleasant romantic number, that does impress, but fails to bring that climax point throughout its whole length. I’ll explain. So, the song starts off, with a soothing English verse, that has the backing vocalists Dev Negi and Joi Barua pronouncing words in a quite hilarious way. However, as soon as the main melody kicks in, you starts finding the song to be not as bad as you thought it would be. The mukhda starts with Swati singing some lines in a very soothing but heard-before-ish tune, which sounds a lot better than the songs she sang after her launchpad ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns). Then Arijit enters with a nice, goosebumps-giving tune, that I think would have sounded quite ordinary had he not sung it. And then, the whole song is passed over to Ash King. It is like Arijit & Swati are backing vocalists like Dev and Joi. Anyway, the hookline sounds brilliant, until you remember the antara of that old song, ‘Yunhi Kat Jaayega Safar’ (Hum Hain Raahi Pyaar Ke), after which the hook sounds like a direct lift-off from the old song. The antaras of this song are soothing, and probably the best part of the song, but what I don’t understand is, why Arijit keeps singing only the same line. He sings it so beautifully that I don’t know why Ash has been given the other parts, which seem tailor-made for Arijit! We saw Ash overshadow Arijit earlier this month in ‘Alizeh’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), but here, Arijit overshadows Ash with just his one line against Ash’s almost-entire song. The English verses just sound bad and quite laid-back. Arrangements are soothing too, until you delve deeper and understand how normal they are. The rhythm is nice, with the digital sounds sounding great occasionally, but the programming is horrendous. The sound isn’t clear, resulting in the instruments seeming to be mixed into each other. The flute though, is beautiful! 🙂 Kumaar’s lyrics are more ordinary stuff in an already ordinary song. Seems harmless at first, but the faults start popping up as you delve deeper. A good way to spoil a nice composition.

 

2. Tum Jo Mile / Tum Jo Mile (Unplugged) Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Amit Gupta & Pratap Dodla

The next song on the album fares a lot better than the first one, in that it gets the composition just as right as the first song, but that composition is also carried forward well, and embellished with good recording. The composition, though it might sound very heard-before, just like the previous song, does interest the listener, if not fascinate. The mukhda starts the song off well on a mellow note, while the hookline works well. Though it is one of those self-proclaiming hooklines, I really can’t imagine how else the hookline could’ve been incorporated into the song. The initial notes of the hookline somehow reminded me of the line “Abb toh humein…” from ‘Kandhon Se Milte Hain Kandhe’ (Lakshya) but then rather quickly dissipates and changes course. The hookline also consists of a small line with the mandatory word, “Rabba” in it. That part is quite good too. The antara is pleasant too, and again, heard-before, but functional. There is a nice little conclusion stanza at the end, which I quite liked. The main reason the song seems to work, is the vocals, which have been done amazingly by Armaan Malik, who infuses his charm into everything he sings. His voice perfectly suits the composition, and I’m glad Vivek chose him as the singer. The unplugged version on the other hand (which, by the way, is not even unplugged — it has the same arrangements as the original version for the most part of it, just starts off a bit unplugged) doesn’t fare as well, because the lead singer Amit Gupta seems misplaced there. He doesn’t sing the very formulaic song with as much charm as Armaan, thereby exposing the genericness of it. Pratap Dodla joins Amit in this version for backing vocals, I suppose, as I can’t really make out who’s voice is which. The arrangements in the first version are quite typical digital beats, with a nice piano intro to it, while strings shine throughout. However, in the ‘unplugged’ version, the violin gracefully forms the prelude, and interludes, and how I wish that this arrangement had been given to Armaan’s version of the song! Lyrics by Kumaar are quite formulaic as well, with him making note to include ‘humsafar’, ‘Dil’, ‘pal do pal’, ‘Dil’, ‘rabba’, ‘Dil’, and maybe more ‘Dil’, a good many times. After all, they’re the mandatory, quintessential words! Generic-sounding, but the first version is nevertheless a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tum Ho Mere
Singer ~ Najam Bajwa

The next song doesn’t start off too promisingly, with many melancholic ‘Woahh’s making up your grand welcome into it. And after that, the song barely fails to interested you even a bit more. The whole composition is lazy, and terribly slow-paced, with nothing interesting ever happening. The hookline is painfully complicated, with the singer just repeating the line “Tum Ho mere yaa ho nahi?” a gazillion times. By that time, the girl must already have even given her answer! The arrangements don’t help at all, to make the listener like the song. The beats are outdated, and there is no instrument that stands out amidst the dusty and laidback feel of the song. I could hear the piano and strings, but it is too plain and also buried too deep inside the arrangements. The guitars are audible mostly, but they are played so slowly, that you question whether they are guitars or sloths. The vocals are another reason to not listen to the song. Debutant Najam Bajwa doesn’t seem like he was fit for a solo song, but he nevertheless drawls his way through this. Kumaar’s lyrics have already been talked enough about, I guess. Easily skippable!

 

4. Dil Yeh Khamakha / Dil Yeh Khamakha (Reprise)
Singers ~ Dev Negi / Nikhil D’Souza

The next song too, starts off in such a way that you get frightened whether it isn’t the same melancholia of the previous song repeating itself all over again in this one. But to be honest, this song gets lots and lots better as it progresses. The composition does start off on a faltering note, but then steadies itself, and by the time it reaches the hookline, you happily keep listening to it. It is the first time I have witnessed such an improvement from the initial notes to the hookline of a song! The hookline is beautifullyand hauntingly amazing. The composition sounds even a bit of something Rahman would compose. The antara continues what the hookline started off, making the song actually sound complete and wholesome in itself. The song appears in two versions and I must say, both singers have done a great job at it. Dev Negi, with a more newbie approach to it, sounds innocent in his rendition of the pleasing composition, whereas Nikhil D’Souza brings more of a professional approach to it, singing in his trademark style, which he used to sing in for Pritam and the Bhatts. Both singers provide a fulfilling touch to the song, though. The arrangements remain the same in both versions. The unexpectedly brilliant electronic tabla beats amazed me, while the nice digital sounds in the hookline reminded me of Viju Shah’s excellent arrangements, which were quite similar, and way ahead of their times in the 90s. (‘Mushkil Bada Yeh Pyaar Hai’ from ‘Gupt’ being one of my most favourites!) The whistle is nice, and the chimes bring in a fresh factor to the song. Piano was expected, and it does a nice job here. Kumaar’s lyrics again, are very typical. One of the better song of the album, maybe the best too! Both versions are a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Royi
Singer ~ Shibani Sur

The last song on the album is what actually blew me away. Rightly kept as the album’s last song, this song has everything that a song should, in order to impress my musical sensibilities. The composition again, starts off very slowly, but this one hooked me from the start — perhaps the introduction of a female solo singer provided the necessary change in the album. Whatever it is, the composition is great. The mukhda, the hookline and the antaras are inexplicably finely crafted. The slow composition did the trick here, which didn’t quite work in the other songs. Also, the nice little semi-classical touch was enough to blow me away. The arrangements, with nothing much happening, gave a nice lounge-ish feel to the song. Whatever does happen though, is attractive enough for the listeners to enjoy. The digital beats, for one, are really cool! The vocals by débutante Shibani Sur, a trained classical singer, are awesome, and her husky voice is a perfect match to the quite drowsy feel of the song. The little nuances she performs in the antara lines, is to fall for! She handles her high notes, as well as the low ones, very well. Hoping to hear more of her in Bollywood in the future, and kudos to Vivek for presenting her beautiful voice in front of us all. Kumaar’s lyrics are quite better here, and have some meaning, other than the usual melancholia he wrote in the album. The best took long enough to arrive. A perfect grand finale to a not-so-perfect album! #5StarHotelSong!!


Saansein kind of meets my expectations. It certainly met my expectation that it would consist of typical Bhatt-style romantic songs under the name of spooky songs, but it didn’t quite meet the expectation I kept towards it being Vivek’s first solo album and chance to score a nice soundtrack. The tracks are nice, no doubt, but the compositions in most of them seem very laidback, and that’s the turn off. Two of the tracks are fantastic, while the other three try to fiddle with the rapidly-disappearing genre of typical Bhatt romance, which even the Bhatts will move on from soon, as far as I presume! This album lacks fresh air…!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Royi > Dil Yeh Khamakha = Dil Yeh Khamakha (Reprise) > Tum Jo Mile > Mera Ishq > Tum Jo Mile (Unplugged) > Tum Ho Mere

 

Which is your favourite song from Saansein? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MULTICOMPOSERS KE BIN… (TUM BIN 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ankit Tiwari & Nikhil-Vinay
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Shakeel Azmi, Faaiz Anwar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Raool
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th November 2016

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Tum Bin 2 is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama, starring Neha Sharma, Aditya Seal and Ashim Gulati. The movie has been directed by director of the first instalment (Wow, that’s like an achievement for T-Series, to have the same director direct the sequel, even though the sequel is releasing like 15 years after the first movie!) Anubhav Sinha, who was trying his luck at other things like thrillers (‘Dus’, ‘Tathastu’ and ‘Cash’), sci-fi (‘Ra.One’) and also a social drama (‘Gulaab Gang’) and faring quite well at these genres too, until he came back to his first genre, romance, with this film! The movie has been produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Anubhav Sinha. The movie is another addition to the many quasi-sequels that T-Series has been churning out over the past three to four years, and, since T-Series is producing the film, we can expect a good soundtrack for this movie too! The music for the first film had been given by duo Nikhil-Vinay, and as was expected, a song ‘Koi Fariyaad’ has been remade for the sequel. The original soundtrack, as well as the remake, have been done by Ankit Tiwari, who gets his next solo album after exactly one year (Last was ‘Yaara Silly Silly’ last November). Hopefully, he gets out of his typicality, and seeing that he has given some quite different songs this year, I’m sure he’ll make that happen too. So, without further ado, let’s see how good this album is!


1. Teri Fariyad / Teri Fariyad (Extended Version)
Singers ~ Late Jagjit Singh & Rekha Bhardwaj (Both Versions), Original Composition by ~ Nikhil-Vinay, Music Recreated by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Original Lyrics by ~ Faaiz Anwar, New Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

The first song on the album, is a rework of the iconic ghazal from the first film, ‘Koi Fariyaad’. The name of the song and hence, its hookline has been changed from ‘Koi Fariyad’ to ‘Teri Fariyad’. Nikhil-Vinay, the composers of the original song, have done a marvelous job composing it, and I must say, Ankit Tiwari has recreated it beautifully. The song appears in two versions on the album, out of which the normal version is just a cropped part of the ten-and-a-half-minute long “Extended Version”, so I’ll just speak about the Extended Version. The song’s mukhda is an original composition by Ankit Tiwari, and it fits beautifully with the hookline that the composers of the original song had made. And whenever that happens in remakes, you know that the recreator has done half of his job right. The antaras too, start off with a new, utterly fabulous tune, which later connects seamlessly with the other half of the antara of the original song. The song has as many as five antaras, but (surprisingly) you don’t get bored at all throughout the song. Ankit’s arrangements are heavenly. The song starts off with the wonderful sound of the Kanoon, a Turkish/Arabic instrument that sounds oh-so-heavenly. As soon as the guitar tune (Guitars played by Rhythm Shaw) takes over though, the heavenliness just magnifies manifold. The sounds of the clarinet and saaz grace the song throughout, and help to male it sound more rustic and not too boring, either. The guitars play wonderful rhythms throughout the song, not to mention the beats taken care of by finger snapping sounds. And the interludes, are pure bliss! The clarinet seems to be the common instrument in all of them. The third interlude has the sweetest clarinet solo I’ve ever heard, which later simmers down to a very slow, and calmingly haunting musical piece led by the clarinet, and held up by finger snaps, and later joined into by a heavenly chorus. The fourth one has more going on in terms of guitars that help elevate the bliss that the clarinets provide. The kanoon once again makes an appearance in the fourth interlude, and touches your heart. The fifth interlude, which is what plays after the mukhda in the cut version of the song (the one they’ll probably use for radio promotions), is yet another beautifully arranged one, with the clarinet starting off yet again, only to give way to a calm and soothing church-like female chorus with bells jingling t keep the beat, and another wonderful kanoon piece. Strings throughout the song make it a ravishing listening experience. Vocals are top-notch, with Rekha Bhardwaj joining to add the newly composed female portions to the song, and executing them brilliantly, in her pleasantly high-pitched voice. The Great, Late Jagjit Singh’s portions, have been retained from the original song, and the cut-paste work has been done extremely diligently by Ankit Tiwari. I applaud him for choosing the right parts to retain from the old song and connecting with his composition. Also, I appreciate that for once, the makers have let the old voice be retained — they finally understood that nobody else can render such timeless classics. After ‘Hungama Ho Gaya’ (Queen) this is a pleasant surprise that the original singer’s voice has been retained (that too, by T-Series!) The lyrics are such that I can’t really say anything about them, can I? The new ones by Shakeel Azmi kind of suffer amidst the original poetry by Faaiz Anway, but it turns out to be a nice piece as a whole. Long song, long review! 😀 Beautiful recreation, and an apt start to the album! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Ishq Mubarak
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals ~ Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra & Anas Ahmad, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit’s first completely original composition makes its way into the soundtrack after the mammoth of an opening song. The song is a wonderful Sufi love song, composed on the lines of the usual Ankit Tiwari template, but still striking a chord with listeners anyway. The composition starts off with a mukhda that screams Ankit Tiwari right away, because of all of its melancholia and sleepy notes. Thanks to the dreamy hookline that very gentlemanly comes to its rescue, though, the song just goes uphill from there onwards. The hookline has a very catchy Qawwali/Sufi feel to it, and you instantly develop a liking for it, in the bargain, forgiving everything that was wrong with the mukhda. The title of the song actually comes along in the interludes, where the backing vocalists nicely give it its own place in the song, without making it too obvious that this is the title of the song. The antaras, quite unlike the mukhda, are better behaved children of the composer, as they get all their notes right, aiming straight at your heart and mind, where they get stuck. The antara also has a very distinct Rahman-ish feel to it, which makes it sound all the more beautiful. The arrangements are elegant to the core. The shehnaai starts off the song with a very graceful sound, while the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) sound awesome trying to be sitars. The Dholaks and Tablas (Raju Sardar, Sanjeev Sen, Musharaf Khan, Hafiz Khan, Manoj Bhati, Yusuf Khan) give the song a nice and grand feel to it, and they sound astounding in the dreamy hookline. The shehnaai continues to awe you in the second interlude, while an awesome sargam by the backing vocalists and harmonium embellish the first interlude. The harmonium (Firoz Khan) really becomes the essence of the song by the end of it. Vocals by Arijit Singh were frankly not required. The song ultimately sounds like an Ankit Tiwari song, and just to mitigate that feeling, if Ankit has employed Arijit to sing this one, it really didn’t help, as I keep imagining Ankit anyway when the song plays. Notwithstanding, Arijit carries the dreamy composition with finesse. The smile on his face can be heard through his voice in some places. And that is just so pleasant to hear every time!! Backing vocalists Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra and Anas Ahmad, do an extremely good job, and half of the beauty of the whole song, would be credited to them, since the’ve done their job so well!  Lyrics by Manoj Muntashir, I really enjoyed, maybe not so much because they’re nicely written and stimulate my brain to decipher their metaphors, but because they’re just cute and I simply liked them! HEAVENLY! Ankit scores with the very first original composition! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Dekh Lena
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Tulsi Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

The next song of the album starts off with a very feel-good tune, slightly reminiscent of Ankit Tiwari’s song ‘Behki’ from his last solo album ‘Yaara Silly Silly’. The starting tune does refresh you, and gives a good indication of what’s to be found in the song. The composition is hummable and also breezy and feel-good, though I couldn’t help but notice how very ordinary it was. The mukhda starts off in a way that makes you think, “Okay, so it’s playing.. Let it play”, and you keep waiting for the point when the music will make you drop your jaw in awe, but that never comes, sadly. The hookline fares better in that it at least gives a tune that get stuck in your head, though again, very run-of-the-mill and 90s. The antara has been composed in a more matured way that fares better than both the mukhda and the hook, but more on why it doesn’t work later. The arrangements rely on the tabla and dholak beats (Sanjeev Sen) to accentuate the romance in it, which just ends up sounding sappy. The guitars are very ordinary, but functional, and surprisingly, three people (Rhythm Shaw, Pawan Rasailly and Roland Fernandes) are behind them. The flute (Naveen Kumar) too, fails to raise eyebrows, sadly. Vocals by Arijit and Tulsi male for a good romantic song, but they don’t really match. First of all, Ankit seems to have composed the entire song under some order by the makers of the film, that it has to sound like ‘Hum Mar Jayenge’ (Aashiqui 2), and so, those two singers seem to have been forcefully fitted into this song. I mean, the song is tailor-made for Arijit, but also sounds like a song recorded in the 90s from which Sonu Nigam was kicked out of, under the decree that “times have changed”. Arijit renders it nicely though. Tulsi comes in the antaras, with a horribly high-pitched rendition of the matured tune, destroying its essence completely. It sounds nice initially, but the feeling lessens gradually. By the time she reaches the end of her lines, the notes reach some pitch that nobody has ever heard yet! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics too, fail to satisfy, and struggle with their ordinariness. A song that is killed under the weight of the word ‘ORDINARY’. Also, too sugary for me!

 

4. Tum Bin
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Quite late into the album, comes the title track, sung by the composer himself. (Also the only song he sung in the whole album, so hats off to his self-control!) The song is not a remake of the title song of ‘Tum Bin’, which was already remade earlier this year by Jeet Gannguli, in ‘Sanam Re’. Rather, this one is an original composition by Ankit, and I must say, it is very grand. The only problem is in the complexity of the composition. Ankit seems to have gone overboard in making the song sound Rahman-ish, and adds many twists and turns in the composition, making it very hard to catch hold of, let alone find it catchy. The mukhda arrives after a prelude of piano and strings, that hooks you instantly. The composition of the mukhda is yet another sleepy one, but at least it has you wondering “what next?” The hookline too, fares well, with a pleasantly melancholic tune that doesn’t bore, except for when Ankit characteristically stretches the words out for like a gazillion seconds. The antaras are where the turmoil is created; an overtly convoluted tune doesn’t really help in a song that is already so melancholic. The tune did remind me of that awesome song ‘Do Pal’ from ‘Veer-Zaara’, however, and that provided a bit of respite through the tedious composition. Special mentiom to the point where the interludes meet the antaras though, such a wonderful transition, even though it is so abrupt. The magic of the song, completely lies in a different section of the song, which is, the arrangements. Ankit has provided a very ravishing strings orchestra (Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra, conducted by Oleg Kondratenko) along with the laidback tune, and that makes the listening experience all the more exquisite. The strings reminded me of so many timeless Bollywood songs, like the one from ‘Veer-Zaara’ which I mentioned above. They help to propel the listener through the song, and it is the strings, that make for at least a couple of listens to the song before you dismiss it completely. Piano too, has been played very beautifully throughout the song. Songs like ‘Tere Liye’ (Sanam Re; Mithoon) and ‘Junooniyat Hai Yehi’ (Junooniyat; Meet Bros. Anjjan) which released earlier this year, created this whole melancholic-yet-grand experience better than this song here, because the composition was a bit more ear-friendly. This song reeks especially the former song I mentioned, because that one too, was sung by Ankit, though composed by Mithoon. The vocals by Ankit surprisingly didn’t get to my nerves here, and I sat patiently through the song. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are easy to just ignore, but even if you hear them, they are pleasant. A ravishing orchestral arrangement makes this song worth a couple of listens, but the complexity in its composition reduces its playlist lifetime drastically.

 

5. Masta
Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani & Neeti Mohan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

After all that melancholia and romance, Ankit Tiwari decides to bring some fun and frolic into this album. And just as well as he does with the emotional and romantic part of the album, he does with the fun part. The composition is an upbeat, breezy one, that instantly hooks you to its lovely and lovable tune. The composer has left no stone unturned to bring every fun element into the song — right from a very catchy and upbeat tune, to an unmatchable rendition by Vishal Dadlani. The mukhda is a nice and fresh line, which, though abruptly, but nicely drives the listener into the fun song. The hookline blends in with the mukhda, and it is quite nice for a line that consists of only one word. The first antara treads on more mellifluous and subtle territory, with Neeti executing it brilliantly, with her bright and fresh voice that never seems to run out of magic. The second one, however, is yet another place where Vishal displays his energy. The  arrangements have a nice countryside feel to them, with the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) stealing the show with their breeziness, while the strings, with strong, fervent strokes, intensify the European-ness of the arrangements. The mandolin (Jatantilal Gosher) wonderfully supports the composition with its playful nature. The drums (programmed by Bitopan Phukan) provide the nice upbeat tempo to the song. During Neeti’s antara, acoustic guitars (Jatantilal Gosher) give a pleasant quality to the music. Interludes are splendid, with the second taking one by surprise at the wonderful Irish jig that it breaks into, complete with the claps and what I think is the keyboard playing in a strings sound. Towards the end, a wonderful bagpipe ends the song on a wonderful note, amidst Vishal’s energetic vocals. Which reminds me of Vishal’s flawless performance on this track. His indefatigable singing really takes me aback every single time. Neeti’s feathery voice leads the first antara beautifully. Her rendition here is another reminder to what a lovely singer she is, and how badly her voice is utilized sometimes.  (Ahem, song-that-cannot-be-named from ‘Housefull 3’) Manoj Muntashir has written a nice song about being carefree, and all-in-all the words are a pleasure to hear. A fun and peppy track that really changes my views about Ankit Tiwari’s potential. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Dil Nawaziyaan
Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Payal Dev, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The next song takes the freshness quotient of the album to an even higher level. The song is a nice love ballad that fuses two beautiful genres — classical and contemporary. Ankit’s tune is another one that instantly hooks you because of its fresh sound. The mukhda starts the song off on a fresh note, surrounded and propelled by wonderful guitars. The mukhda has two parts, one sung by each singer. When the hookline arrives, it sounds pleasant to the ears, but it isn’t till Payal’s Hindustani classical part comes and blows your mind away, that you start thinking that the song is really magical. That part is something that boosts the song to some uncharted territory, and it is from then that you start to listen more intently. Ankit has composed that part very soulfully, and Payal has rendered with the most classical quoted voice I can imagine. In short, everything falls into its own place PERFECTLY. After that, Arko comes with another surprise package. He comes and sings an English stanza, which is so beautiful because of its simplicity. The composition is beautiful as well. What’s weird is that, though the song is composed by Ankit, and Arko has but sung it, I kept feeling that the composition has some Arko touches to it. Kudos to Ankit, not only for bringing that Arko flavour into the song, but also roping him in to sing it. 🙂 The arrangements are pure bliss. While most of the song is propped on a quite typical acoustic guitar riff background, the guitars (Rhythm Shaw) bring the freshness to the song, and that’s half the reason the song sounds so magical. However, in the short classical respite we get that is led by Payal Dev, pure Lucknowi baithak styled tablas (Sanjeev Sen) take over and just make things more intriguing than the rest of the song. These tablas also come towards the end of the song to conclude it on a beautiful and refreshing note. The vocals are awesome. Both Arko & Payal sing their parts wonderfully, Payal sounding a lot better than all her other performances (except the very mystical one in ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Doongi’ from ‘Bajirao Mastani’) and Arko sounding better than he does in most of his own songs too! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are nice and pleasant again, while Arko’s English ones are just as refreshing, and gelling well with the Hindi words. A great fusion becomes the center of attraction in this song, due to which the magic of everything else seems less, but it definitely is magical!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. Jaeger Bomb
Singers ~ Harshi Mad, DJ Bravo & Ankit Tiwari, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Raool

It looks like Ankit isn’t yet finished with the fun and wildness, because, looking at the mere title of the next and last song on the album, I can tell that the mandatory club song is not yet over. The composition of this one clearly shows that Yo Yo Honey Singh was in rehab, Badshah had prior commitments to look to, and Millind Gaba was irritated that nobody liked his music, when this sing was in the making. In the absence of these three, Ankit had to muster up enough courage and stoop down to those standards in order to make such a composition. As is evident from the result, he succeeded in imitating them. 😀 This song seems like some tribute to them, with a slightly more monotonous beat. (I thought that nothing could get more monotonous than Yo Yo’s ‘Aao Raja’ from ‘Gabbar Is Back’!!) Anyway, the song starts with yet another ruined nursery rhyme. This time, ‘Humpty Dumpty’ gets even more cracks, thanks to the song. The rhyme has been placed on a nice jazzy tempo, but sung by Harshi Mad in such a way that kids should strictly not listen to it! Or else, next time they picture Humpty Dumpty, he would be sunbathing at a beach and drinking lemonade…maybe! Jokes apart, Harshi Mad renders the rhyme spunkily, since it was supposed to be that way. After that, the EDM starts and there onwards, there is very less of a tune. Harshi gets some nice portions to sing, which are composed in a very jazzy way. And Ankit shoves in another one of his typical tunes, even into a club song! DJ Bravo’s portions are proof that they were inserted as a merepublicity stunt, because nothing he says can be made out.. Maybe because he’s singing in Hindi.. Or what is supposed to be Hindi. The arrangements are mostly EDM, with some nice jazzy portions in occasional places. Manoj’s Hindi lyrics are the usual Hindi cabaret style lyrics in Harshi’s parts, while the usual Ankit sobbiness in Ankit’s part. The English portions by Raool are barely audible, so I don’t know about them. The grand finale turns out to be the worst song on the album. A bad attempt at making a club song that will accommodate Ankit Tiwari’s sobs and yawns, DJ Bravo’s spunk, Harshi’s debutant-ness, and Humpty Dumpty!


Tum Bin 2 really turns out to be quite a good album. Ankit Tiwari gets a whole album to compose to his credit, not for the first time, but he still makes good use of the opportunity. The album is surprisingly full of variety, with songs ranging from a nice Sufi love song, to a melancholic and grandly orchestrated title track, to a club song that barely works, to a fun-filled peppy number and many more. The ones that will stand out and be lapped up by the masses, are definitely the first two tracks of the album. The remake has been done indescribably well, while ‘Ishq Mubarak’ will connect with the masses a lot. The rest seem like tracks with a more situational effect, but which will be liked by the niche music lovers anyhow, especially ‘Masta’ and ‘Dil Nawaziyaan’. And ‘Jaeger Bomb’ stands out in that it will find it difficult to find takers. Though not matching the greatness of Nikhil-Vinay’s soundtrack to the first film, Ankit does a nice job with this quasi-sequel, proving that the multicomposer theory is wrong, once again. An album that does good WITHOUT having multiple composers.

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Fariyad (Extended Version) > Dil Nawaziyaan > Ishq Mubarak > Masta > Teri Fariyad > Tum Bin > Dekh Lena > Jaeger Bomb

 

Which is your favourite song from Tum Bin 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

VENTILATOR (MUSIC REVIEW): KOLHAPURI TADKA (Marathi Special) 🎉🎊🎇

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rohan Rohan (Rohan Gokhale & Rohan Pradhan)
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Yadav & Shantaram Mapuskar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company (Marathi)
♪ Music Released On: 30th August 2016
♪ Movie Released On: 4th November 2016

Ventilator Album Cover

Ventilator Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE 

To buy “Baba (Female Cover)” on iTunes CLICK HERE

♪ Hear “Baba (Female Cover)” on YouTube:


Ventilator is a Marathi comedy drama film, starring Ashutosh Gowariker, Jitemdra Joshi, Sukanya Kulkarni-Mone, Usha Nadkarni, Nikhil Ratnaparkhi and Abhijeet Chavan, with Boman Irani in a special appearance. The movie has been directed by ‘Ferrari Ki Sawaari’ director Rajesh Mapuskar, and it is his second film, this time in Marathi. The movie has been produced by Priyanka Chopra and Dr. Madhu Chopra. The movie releases today, November 4th, and is likely to create a wave across Maharashtra. Meanwhile, since Priyanka Chopra just released the song sung by her, yesterday, I decided to review the album, which now comprises three songs. The music has been given by ‘Mumbai Delhi Mumbai’ fame duo, Rohan Rohan (Rohan Gokhale & Rohan Pradhan). Without further ado, let’s see how fresh a breeze the songs of this “Ventilator” are!


1. Ya Re Ya
Singer ~ Rohan Pradhan, Chorus ~ Rohan Gokhale, Vivek Naik, Rahul Chitnis, Nitin Karandikar, Sonal Tawde, Suchita Dalvi, Veena Joshi, Reshma Dhotre, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadab & Shantaram Mapuskar

The first song of the album is a Ganapati song, and you know how Ganapati songs always excite me! The composer duo composes this song in a very traditional Ganesha aarti style, and the tune doesnt really matter in such songs, because it always stands out no matter what. The chorus starts off the song with the hookline, which puts the song to a very heavenly and divine start. The mukhda sees Rohan Pradhan take over, and the tune of the mukhda is really sweet. After that, the chorus comes back with the hookline, which then gets its tempo increased, rather early into the song, because in such songs, the tempo usually goes up at the end of the song. Because of this premature tempo change, the would-be antara by the lead singer, sounds more like a conclusion to the song. The composition of that, too is very beautiful, with the high pitch taking over. The song, however, relies more on the hookline that repeats throughout the song, and becomes a winner because of that splendid backing chorus. On the arrangements front, the duo has decorated the composition with traditional instruments that always represent the Ganapati festival. Manjeeras, the tanpura and the dholaks start off the song wonderfully, and then it is the Dhol-Taasha Pathak (Swapnil Bhandare, Rohan Kasare, Anna Jadhav, Deepak Shiriskar, Kunal Shedge, Rohit Humane, Minesh Shelar, Rishikesh Korhale) that takes over with its boldness and catchiness. The Dhols and Taashas have been played very strongly and have the desired impact on the listener. Towards the end, the blowing of a conch shell is the harbinger of an even more fast-paced and hard-hitting conclusion with chants of “Ganapati Bappa Moraya” and “Mangalmurti Moraya” interspersed with the hookline. The vocals by Rohan Pradhan are great, reminiscent of Javed Ali a bit, but he gets hardly a total of one minute to sing throughout the song, due to the hookline overshadowing everything else, and the strong arrangements. The backing chorus is the star of the song, and it makes the song sound grand. Without them, the song would’ve sounded not even half as great. The lyrics by Manoj Yadav and Shantaram Mapuskar are good too, as a devotional prayer to Lord Ganesha. A showstopper, and something that will be played a lot next September in Ganeshotsav! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Jai Deva
Singers ~ Ganesh Chandanshive, Rohan Gokhale & Rohan Pradhan, Chorus ~ Nishad Chimote, Vivek Naik, Rahul Chitnis, Nitin Karandikar, Sonal Tawde, Suchita Dalvi, Veena Joshi, Reshma Dhotre, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

The next song, is another Ganapati song. And that just made me so excited as soon as the song started with the “Aala aala re Ganapati aala!!” in Ganesh Chandanshive’s rustic and strong voice. The song, in contrast to the first song, which was a traditional aarti piece, is the typical high-energy Ganesha song that you get to hear in literally every Marathi film. The composition has more dark shades than the all-goodie-nature of the previous one, and reminds you of Ajay-Atul’s Ganesha songs. The hookline especially, will be a rage in Maharashtra. The duo has even given a new tune to the Ganesha aarti  and also the Vitthala aarti, in the middle of the song. Ganesh Chandanshive, a name that all Bollywood lovers now know thanks to ‘Deewani Mastani’ (Bajirao Mastani), does his job as the lead singer very well, and ends up giving the song a very enjoyable touch. The arrangements follow closely, the arrangements of the previous song, but this time, the Dhol-Taasha Pathak gets to open up full-fledgedly, and hence the song ends up sounding more high on the energy quotient. The banjo (bulbultarang) does its job well, and the manjeeras and dholaks in the aarti portions sound divine. I liked how the subtle aarti portions give way so nicely to the high-energy hook portions. The strings towards the end are impressive, as are the brass band portions interspersed throughout the song. The backing chorus yet again, takes the song to a whole new level, and do justice to the duo’s composition. The lyrics this time around too, are fantastic, and though they’re typical Ganapati song lyrics, they sound good with the duo’s energetic composition, and Ganesh Chandanshive’s great singing. Ravishing! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Baba (Female Cover)
Singer ~ Priyanka Chopra, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

The next song, is the only song on the album that isn’t about Ganapati. This one however, is an ode to fathers. The composition by Rohan Rohan is enough to compete with any emotional song that Bollywood produces nowadays; in fact, it is better than most! The composition just touches your heart with its simplicity. The mukhda starts the song off on a very touching note, while the antaras take it to another level on the emotions scale. The second antara is the most emotionally touching, with the high notes, rendered impressively by Priyanka directly entering your heart. The hookline is subtle and that’s what I loved about it. The song is a wonderful piece sung by a daughter for her father. The arrangements are beautiful, with the piano leading the way through the mukhda, accompanies by wonderful guitars (Shon Pinto). Towards the end of the mukhda, the strings (Jitendra Thankur) kick in, and bring to the song, more emotion with their gracefulness. The first interlude takes a brilliant turn with the flute (Shashank Acharya) topping everything else, while the second interlude has a wonderful tinkling xylophonic sound giving the beats to a scintillating violin piece. Vocals by Priyanka are very impressive, and her Marathi diction is spot-on! Throughout the song, I found her diction and pronunciation perfect! The amount of hard work she must’ve put in for this one, really has to be saluted! About her singing, she hits each and every note with a perfection that I could not hear in any actor who has attempted to sing a song till now. She aces he brilliant composition with ease and a certain finesse. Manoj Yadav’s lyrics are very touching, and just leave you awestruck! A magical finale to the short album! #5StarHotelSong!!


Ventilator is an impressive album, and I’m glad I decided to hear it out and review it! I would have missed something great! The three songs hit the bullseye with their composition and above all, their arrangements. The duo Rohan Rohan, who couldn’t really make it big in Bollywood, can now surely rest assured that they will do great in the Marathi industry after this album! A breeze of fresh air!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hear them all! 🙂

 

Which is your favourite song from Ventilator? Please vote for it below! Thanks!!