MULTICOMPOSERS KE BIN… (TUM BIN 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ankit Tiwari & Nikhil-Vinay
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Shakeel Azmi, Faaiz Anwar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Raool
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th November 2016

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Tum Bin 2 is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama, starring Neha Sharma, Aditya Seal and Ashim Gulati. The movie has been directed by director of the first instalment (Wow, that’s like an achievement for T-Series, to have the same director direct the sequel, even though the sequel is releasing like 15 years after the first movie!) Anubhav Sinha, who was trying his luck at other things like thrillers (‘Dus’, ‘Tathastu’ and ‘Cash’), sci-fi (‘Ra.One’) and also a social drama (‘Gulaab Gang’) and faring quite well at these genres too, until he came back to his first genre, romance, with this film! The movie has been produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Anubhav Sinha. The movie is another addition to the many quasi-sequels that T-Series has been churning out over the past three to four years, and, since T-Series is producing the film, we can expect a good soundtrack for this movie too! The music for the first film had been given by duo Nikhil-Vinay, and as was expected, a song ‘Koi Fariyaad’ has been remade for the sequel. The original soundtrack, as well as the remake, have been done by Ankit Tiwari, who gets his next solo album after exactly one year (Last was ‘Yaara Silly Silly’ last November). Hopefully, he gets out of his typicality, and seeing that he has given some quite different songs this year, I’m sure he’ll make that happen too. So, without further ado, let’s see how good this album is!


1. Teri Fariyad / Teri Fariyad (Extended Version)
Singers ~ Late Jagjit Singh & Rekha Bhardwaj (Both Versions), Original Composition by ~ Nikhil-Vinay, Music Recreated by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Original Lyrics by ~ Faaiz Anwar, New Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

The first song on the album, is a rework of the iconic ghazal from the first film, ‘Koi Fariyaad’. The name of the song and hence, its hookline has been changed from ‘Koi Fariyad’ to ‘Teri Fariyad’. Nikhil-Vinay, the composers of the original song, have done a marvelous job composing it, and I must say, Ankit Tiwari has recreated it beautifully. The song appears in two versions on the album, out of which the normal version is just a cropped part of the ten-and-a-half-minute long “Extended Version”, so I’ll just speak about the Extended Version. The song’s mukhda is an original composition by Ankit Tiwari, and it fits beautifully with the hookline that the composers of the original song had made. And whenever that happens in remakes, you know that the recreator has done half of his job right. The antaras too, start off with a new, utterly fabulous tune, which later connects seamlessly with the other half of the antara of the original song. The song has as many as five antaras, but (surprisingly) you don’t get bored at all throughout the song. Ankit’s arrangements are heavenly. The song starts off with the wonderful sound of the Kanoon, a Turkish/Arabic instrument that sounds oh-so-heavenly. As soon as the guitar tune (Guitars played by Rhythm Shaw) takes over though, the heavenliness just magnifies manifold. The sounds of the clarinet and saaz grace the song throughout, and help to male it sound more rustic and not too boring, either. The guitars play wonderful rhythms throughout the song, not to mention the beats taken care of by finger snapping sounds. And the interludes, are pure bliss! The clarinet seems to be the common instrument in all of them. The third interlude has the sweetest clarinet solo I’ve ever heard, which later simmers down to a very slow, and calmingly haunting musical piece led by the clarinet, and held up by finger snaps, and later joined into by a heavenly chorus. The fourth one has more going on in terms of guitars that help elevate the bliss that the clarinets provide. The kanoon once again makes an appearance in the fourth interlude, and touches your heart. The fifth interlude, which is what plays after the mukhda in the cut version of the song (the one they’ll probably use for radio promotions), is yet another beautifully arranged one, with the clarinet starting off yet again, only to give way to a calm and soothing church-like female chorus with bells jingling t keep the beat, and another wonderful kanoon piece. Strings throughout the song make it a ravishing listening experience. Vocals are top-notch, with Rekha Bhardwaj joining to add the newly composed female portions to the song, and executing them brilliantly, in her pleasantly high-pitched voice. The Great, Late Jagjit Singh’s portions, have been retained from the original song, and the cut-paste work has been done extremely diligently by Ankit Tiwari. I applaud him for choosing the right parts to retain from the old song and connecting with his composition. Also, I appreciate that for once, the makers have let the old voice be retained — they finally understood that nobody else can render such timeless classics. After ‘Hungama Ho Gaya’ (Queen) this is a pleasant surprise that the original singer’s voice has been retained (that too, by T-Series!) The lyrics are such that I can’t really say anything about them, can I? The new ones by Shakeel Azmi kind of suffer amidst the original poetry by Faaiz Anway, but it turns out to be a nice piece as a whole. Long song, long review! 😀 Beautiful recreation, and an apt start to the album! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Ishq Mubarak
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals ~ Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra & Anas Ahmad, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit’s first completely original composition makes its way into the soundtrack after the mammoth of an opening song. The song is a wonderful Sufi love song, composed on the lines of the usual Ankit Tiwari template, but still striking a chord with listeners anyway. The composition starts off with a mukhda that screams Ankit Tiwari right away, because of all of its melancholia and sleepy notes. Thanks to the dreamy hookline that very gentlemanly comes to its rescue, though, the song just goes uphill from there onwards. The hookline has a very catchy Qawwali/Sufi feel to it, and you instantly develop a liking for it, in the bargain, forgiving everything that was wrong with the mukhda. The title of the song actually comes along in the interludes, where the backing vocalists nicely give it its own place in the song, without making it too obvious that this is the title of the song. The antaras, quite unlike the mukhda, are better behaved children of the composer, as they get all their notes right, aiming straight at your heart and mind, where they get stuck. The antara also has a very distinct Rahman-ish feel to it, which makes it sound all the more beautiful. The arrangements are elegant to the core. The shehnaai starts off the song with a very graceful sound, while the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) sound awesome trying to be sitars. The Dholaks and Tablas (Raju Sardar, Sanjeev Sen, Musharaf Khan, Hafiz Khan, Manoj Bhati, Yusuf Khan) give the song a nice and grand feel to it, and they sound astounding in the dreamy hookline. The shehnaai continues to awe you in the second interlude, while an awesome sargam by the backing vocalists and harmonium embellish the first interlude. The harmonium (Firoz Khan) really becomes the essence of the song by the end of it. Vocals by Arijit Singh were frankly not required. The song ultimately sounds like an Ankit Tiwari song, and just to mitigate that feeling, if Ankit has employed Arijit to sing this one, it really didn’t help, as I keep imagining Ankit anyway when the song plays. Notwithstanding, Arijit carries the dreamy composition with finesse. The smile on his face can be heard through his voice in some places. And that is just so pleasant to hear every time!! Backing vocalists Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra and Anas Ahmad, do an extremely good job, and half of the beauty of the whole song, would be credited to them, since the’ve done their job so well!  Lyrics by Manoj Muntashir, I really enjoyed, maybe not so much because they’re nicely written and stimulate my brain to decipher their metaphors, but because they’re just cute and I simply liked them! HEAVENLY! Ankit scores with the very first original composition! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Dekh Lena
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Tulsi Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

The next song of the album starts off with a very feel-good tune, slightly reminiscent of Ankit Tiwari’s song ‘Behki’ from his last solo album ‘Yaara Silly Silly’. The starting tune does refresh you, and gives a good indication of what’s to be found in the song. The composition is hummable and also breezy and feel-good, though I couldn’t help but notice how very ordinary it was. The mukhda starts off in a way that makes you think, “Okay, so it’s playing.. Let it play”, and you keep waiting for the point when the music will make you drop your jaw in awe, but that never comes, sadly. The hookline fares better in that it at least gives a tune that get stuck in your head, though again, very run-of-the-mill and 90s. The antara has been composed in a more matured way that fares better than both the mukhda and the hook, but more on why it doesn’t work later. The arrangements rely on the tabla and dholak beats (Sanjeev Sen) to accentuate the romance in it, which just ends up sounding sappy. The guitars are very ordinary, but functional, and surprisingly, three people (Rhythm Shaw, Pawan Rasailly and Roland Fernandes) are behind them. The flute (Naveen Kumar) too, fails to raise eyebrows, sadly. Vocals by Arijit and Tulsi male for a good romantic song, but they don’t really match. First of all, Ankit seems to have composed the entire song under some order by the makers of the film, that it has to sound like ‘Hum Mar Jayenge’ (Aashiqui 2), and so, those two singers seem to have been forcefully fitted into this song. I mean, the song is tailor-made for Arijit, but also sounds like a song recorded in the 90s from which Sonu Nigam was kicked out of, under the decree that “times have changed”. Arijit renders it nicely though. Tulsi comes in the antaras, with a horribly high-pitched rendition of the matured tune, destroying its essence completely. It sounds nice initially, but the feeling lessens gradually. By the time she reaches the end of her lines, the notes reach some pitch that nobody has ever heard yet! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics too, fail to satisfy, and struggle with their ordinariness. A song that is killed under the weight of the word ‘ORDINARY’. Also, too sugary for me!

 

4. Tum Bin
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Quite late into the album, comes the title track, sung by the composer himself. (Also the only song he sung in the whole album, so hats off to his self-control!) The song is not a remake of the title song of ‘Tum Bin’, which was already remade earlier this year by Jeet Gannguli, in ‘Sanam Re’. Rather, this one is an original composition by Ankit, and I must say, it is very grand. The only problem is in the complexity of the composition. Ankit seems to have gone overboard in making the song sound Rahman-ish, and adds many twists and turns in the composition, making it very hard to catch hold of, let alone find it catchy. The mukhda arrives after a prelude of piano and strings, that hooks you instantly. The composition of the mukhda is yet another sleepy one, but at least it has you wondering “what next?” The hookline too, fares well, with a pleasantly melancholic tune that doesn’t bore, except for when Ankit characteristically stretches the words out for like a gazillion seconds. The antaras are where the turmoil is created; an overtly convoluted tune doesn’t really help in a song that is already so melancholic. The tune did remind me of that awesome song ‘Do Pal’ from ‘Veer-Zaara’, however, and that provided a bit of respite through the tedious composition. Special mentiom to the point where the interludes meet the antaras though, such a wonderful transition, even though it is so abrupt. The magic of the song, completely lies in a different section of the song, which is, the arrangements. Ankit has provided a very ravishing strings orchestra (Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra, conducted by Oleg Kondratenko) along with the laidback tune, and that makes the listening experience all the more exquisite. The strings reminded me of so many timeless Bollywood songs, like the one from ‘Veer-Zaara’ which I mentioned above. They help to propel the listener through the song, and it is the strings, that make for at least a couple of listens to the song before you dismiss it completely. Piano too, has been played very beautifully throughout the song. Songs like ‘Tere Liye’ (Sanam Re; Mithoon) and ‘Junooniyat Hai Yehi’ (Junooniyat; Meet Bros. Anjjan) which released earlier this year, created this whole melancholic-yet-grand experience better than this song here, because the composition was a bit more ear-friendly. This song reeks especially the former song I mentioned, because that one too, was sung by Ankit, though composed by Mithoon. The vocals by Ankit surprisingly didn’t get to my nerves here, and I sat patiently through the song. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are easy to just ignore, but even if you hear them, they are pleasant. A ravishing orchestral arrangement makes this song worth a couple of listens, but the complexity in its composition reduces its playlist lifetime drastically.

 

5. Masta
Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani & Neeti Mohan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

After all that melancholia and romance, Ankit Tiwari decides to bring some fun and frolic into this album. And just as well as he does with the emotional and romantic part of the album, he does with the fun part. The composition is an upbeat, breezy one, that instantly hooks you to its lovely and lovable tune. The composer has left no stone unturned to bring every fun element into the song — right from a very catchy and upbeat tune, to an unmatchable rendition by Vishal Dadlani. The mukhda is a nice and fresh line, which, though abruptly, but nicely drives the listener into the fun song. The hookline blends in with the mukhda, and it is quite nice for a line that consists of only one word. The first antara treads on more mellifluous and subtle territory, with Neeti executing it brilliantly, with her bright and fresh voice that never seems to run out of magic. The second one, however, is yet another place where Vishal displays his energy. The  arrangements have a nice countryside feel to them, with the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) stealing the show with their breeziness, while the strings, with strong, fervent strokes, intensify the European-ness of the arrangements. The mandolin (Jatantilal Gosher) wonderfully supports the composition with its playful nature. The drums (programmed by Bitopan Phukan) provide the nice upbeat tempo to the song. During Neeti’s antara, acoustic guitars (Jatantilal Gosher) give a pleasant quality to the music. Interludes are splendid, with the second taking one by surprise at the wonderful Irish jig that it breaks into, complete with the claps and what I think is the keyboard playing in a strings sound. Towards the end, a wonderful bagpipe ends the song on a wonderful note, amidst Vishal’s energetic vocals. Which reminds me of Vishal’s flawless performance on this track. His indefatigable singing really takes me aback every single time. Neeti’s feathery voice leads the first antara beautifully. Her rendition here is another reminder to what a lovely singer she is, and how badly her voice is utilized sometimes.  (Ahem, song-that-cannot-be-named from ‘Housefull 3’) Manoj Muntashir has written a nice song about being carefree, and all-in-all the words are a pleasure to hear. A fun and peppy track that really changes my views about Ankit Tiwari’s potential. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Dil Nawaziyaan
Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Payal Dev, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The next song takes the freshness quotient of the album to an even higher level. The song is a nice love ballad that fuses two beautiful genres — classical and contemporary. Ankit’s tune is another one that instantly hooks you because of its fresh sound. The mukhda starts the song off on a fresh note, surrounded and propelled by wonderful guitars. The mukhda has two parts, one sung by each singer. When the hookline arrives, it sounds pleasant to the ears, but it isn’t till Payal’s Hindustani classical part comes and blows your mind away, that you start thinking that the song is really magical. That part is something that boosts the song to some uncharted territory, and it is from then that you start to listen more intently. Ankit has composed that part very soulfully, and Payal has rendered with the most classical quoted voice I can imagine. In short, everything falls into its own place PERFECTLY. After that, Arko comes with another surprise package. He comes and sings an English stanza, which is so beautiful because of its simplicity. The composition is beautiful as well. What’s weird is that, though the song is composed by Ankit, and Arko has but sung it, I kept feeling that the composition has some Arko touches to it. Kudos to Ankit, not only for bringing that Arko flavour into the song, but also roping him in to sing it. 🙂 The arrangements are pure bliss. While most of the song is propped on a quite typical acoustic guitar riff background, the guitars (Rhythm Shaw) bring the freshness to the song, and that’s half the reason the song sounds so magical. However, in the short classical respite we get that is led by Payal Dev, pure Lucknowi baithak styled tablas (Sanjeev Sen) take over and just make things more intriguing than the rest of the song. These tablas also come towards the end of the song to conclude it on a beautiful and refreshing note. The vocals are awesome. Both Arko & Payal sing their parts wonderfully, Payal sounding a lot better than all her other performances (except the very mystical one in ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Doongi’ from ‘Bajirao Mastani’) and Arko sounding better than he does in most of his own songs too! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are nice and pleasant again, while Arko’s English ones are just as refreshing, and gelling well with the Hindi words. A great fusion becomes the center of attraction in this song, due to which the magic of everything else seems less, but it definitely is magical!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. Jaeger Bomb
Singers ~ Harshi Mad, DJ Bravo & Ankit Tiwari, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Raool

It looks like Ankit isn’t yet finished with the fun and wildness, because, looking at the mere title of the next and last song on the album, I can tell that the mandatory club song is not yet over. The composition of this one clearly shows that Yo Yo Honey Singh was in rehab, Badshah had prior commitments to look to, and Millind Gaba was irritated that nobody liked his music, when this sing was in the making. In the absence of these three, Ankit had to muster up enough courage and stoop down to those standards in order to make such a composition. As is evident from the result, he succeeded in imitating them. 😀 This song seems like some tribute to them, with a slightly more monotonous beat. (I thought that nothing could get more monotonous than Yo Yo’s ‘Aao Raja’ from ‘Gabbar Is Back’!!) Anyway, the song starts with yet another ruined nursery rhyme. This time, ‘Humpty Dumpty’ gets even more cracks, thanks to the song. The rhyme has been placed on a nice jazzy tempo, but sung by Harshi Mad in such a way that kids should strictly not listen to it! Or else, next time they picture Humpty Dumpty, he would be sunbathing at a beach and drinking lemonade…maybe! Jokes apart, Harshi Mad renders the rhyme spunkily, since it was supposed to be that way. After that, the EDM starts and there onwards, there is very less of a tune. Harshi gets some nice portions to sing, which are composed in a very jazzy way. And Ankit shoves in another one of his typical tunes, even into a club song! DJ Bravo’s portions are proof that they were inserted as a merepublicity stunt, because nothing he says can be made out.. Maybe because he’s singing in Hindi.. Or what is supposed to be Hindi. The arrangements are mostly EDM, with some nice jazzy portions in occasional places. Manoj’s Hindi lyrics are the usual Hindi cabaret style lyrics in Harshi’s parts, while the usual Ankit sobbiness in Ankit’s part. The English portions by Raool are barely audible, so I don’t know about them. The grand finale turns out to be the worst song on the album. A bad attempt at making a club song that will accommodate Ankit Tiwari’s sobs and yawns, DJ Bravo’s spunk, Harshi’s debutant-ness, and Humpty Dumpty!


Tum Bin 2 really turns out to be quite a good album. Ankit Tiwari gets a whole album to compose to his credit, not for the first time, but he still makes good use of the opportunity. The album is surprisingly full of variety, with songs ranging from a nice Sufi love song, to a melancholic and grandly orchestrated title track, to a club song that barely works, to a fun-filled peppy number and many more. The ones that will stand out and be lapped up by the masses, are definitely the first two tracks of the album. The remake has been done indescribably well, while ‘Ishq Mubarak’ will connect with the masses a lot. The rest seem like tracks with a more situational effect, but which will be liked by the niche music lovers anyhow, especially ‘Masta’ and ‘Dil Nawaziyaan’. And ‘Jaeger Bomb’ stands out in that it will find it difficult to find takers. Though not matching the greatness of Nikhil-Vinay’s soundtrack to the first film, Ankit does a nice job with this quasi-sequel, proving that the multicomposer theory is wrong, once again. An album that does good WITHOUT having multiple composers.

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Fariyad (Extended Version) > Dil Nawaziyaan > Ishq Mubarak > Masta > Teri Fariyad > Tum Bin > Dekh Lena > Jaeger Bomb

 

Which is your favourite song from Tum Bin 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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3 thoughts on “MULTICOMPOSERS KE BIN… (TUM BIN 2 – Music Review)

  1. I remember,I was listening to Dekh Lena using earphones,and just as you said,as Tulsi’s portion came to an end,my ears were hurting like hell!! 😒😭 And I loved Jaeger Bomb’s beats 😜

    Another awesome and detailed review by you bhau 😁

    Liked by 1 person

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