LAIDBACK BREATHS! (SAANSEIN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vivek Kar
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th November 2016

Saansein Album Cover

Saansein Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Saansein is an upcoming Bollywood horror film, starring Rajneesh Duggal, Sonarika Bhadoria and Hiten Tejwani. The film has been directed by Rajiv S. Ruia, and produced by Goutam Jain and Vivek Agarwal. The story is about a club singer, who, every night after her performance, disappears without talking to anyone or meeting anyone. She’s probably possessed.. Come on, Bollywood, we know you better than you do yourself! Anyway, the movie is a horror/romance film, and in such movies, I expect wither a chilling and spine-tingling score, or a sappy, romantic, typical Bhattish score. The music of the film has been entirely composed by Vivek Kar, which makes this his first solo album ever. He is fresh from the success of his song ‘Cycle Se Chalaang’ (Saat Uchakkey), and now he is here with a complete album of a horror film. Going by the songs he composed in his previous albums (‘Zindagi 50-50’, ‘Meeruthiya Gangsters’, ‘Direct Ishq’, ‘One Night Stand’ etc) I think he’s going to give the second category of music I expect for such films (the typical romantic songs), but I do expect a lot more as it is his first solo album. So, without further ado, let’s go through the music of ‘Saansein’, and see how horrific it is!


1. Mera Ishq
Singers ~ Ash King, Arijit Singh & Swati SharmaBacking Vocals ~ Dev Negi & Joi Barua

Vivek Karta presents, as the first song on the album, a fresh and pleasant romantic number, that does impress, but fails to bring that climax point throughout its whole length. I’ll explain. So, the song starts off, with a soothing English verse, that has the backing vocalists Dev Negi and Joi Barua pronouncing words in a quite hilarious way. However, as soon as the main melody kicks in, you starts finding the song to be not as bad as you thought it would be. The mukhda starts with Swati singing some lines in a very soothing but heard-before-ish tune, which sounds a lot better than the songs she sang after her launchpad ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns). Then Arijit enters with a nice, goosebumps-giving tune, that I think would have sounded quite ordinary had he not sung it. And then, the whole song is passed over to Ash King. It is like Arijit & Swati are backing vocalists like Dev and Joi. Anyway, the hookline sounds brilliant, until you remember the antara of that old song, ‘Yunhi Kat Jaayega Safar’ (Hum Hain Raahi Pyaar Ke), after which the hook sounds like a direct lift-off from the old song. The antaras of this song are soothing, and probably the best part of the song, but what I don’t understand is, why Arijit keeps singing only the same line. He sings it so beautifully that I don’t know why Ash has been given the other parts, which seem tailor-made for Arijit! We saw Ash overshadow Arijit earlier this month in ‘Alizeh’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), but here, Arijit overshadows Ash with just his one line against Ash’s almost-entire song. The English verses just sound bad and quite laid-back. Arrangements are soothing too, until you delve deeper and understand how normal they are. The rhythm is nice, with the digital sounds sounding great occasionally, but the programming is horrendous. The sound isn’t clear, resulting in the instruments seeming to be mixed into each other. The flute though, is beautiful! 🙂 Kumaar’s lyrics are more ordinary stuff in an already ordinary song. Seems harmless at first, but the faults start popping up as you delve deeper. A good way to spoil a nice composition.

 

2. Tum Jo Mile / Tum Jo Mile (Unplugged) Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Amit Gupta & Pratap Dodla

The next song on the album fares a lot better than the first one, in that it gets the composition just as right as the first song, but that composition is also carried forward well, and embellished with good recording. The composition, though it might sound very heard-before, just like the previous song, does interest the listener, if not fascinate. The mukhda starts the song off well on a mellow note, while the hookline works well. Though it is one of those self-proclaiming hooklines, I really can’t imagine how else the hookline could’ve been incorporated into the song. The initial notes of the hookline somehow reminded me of the line “Abb toh humein…” from ‘Kandhon Se Milte Hain Kandhe’ (Lakshya) but then rather quickly dissipates and changes course. The hookline also consists of a small line with the mandatory word, “Rabba” in it. That part is quite good too. The antara is pleasant too, and again, heard-before, but functional. There is a nice little conclusion stanza at the end, which I quite liked. The main reason the song seems to work, is the vocals, which have been done amazingly by Armaan Malik, who infuses his charm into everything he sings. His voice perfectly suits the composition, and I’m glad Vivek chose him as the singer. The unplugged version on the other hand (which, by the way, is not even unplugged — it has the same arrangements as the original version for the most part of it, just starts off a bit unplugged) doesn’t fare as well, because the lead singer Amit Gupta seems misplaced there. He doesn’t sing the very formulaic song with as much charm as Armaan, thereby exposing the genericness of it. Pratap Dodla joins Amit in this version for backing vocals, I suppose, as I can’t really make out who’s voice is which. The arrangements in the first version are quite typical digital beats, with a nice piano intro to it, while strings shine throughout. However, in the ‘unplugged’ version, the violin gracefully forms the prelude, and interludes, and how I wish that this arrangement had been given to Armaan’s version of the song! Lyrics by Kumaar are quite formulaic as well, with him making note to include ‘humsafar’, ‘Dil’, ‘pal do pal’, ‘Dil’, ‘rabba’, ‘Dil’, and maybe more ‘Dil’, a good many times. After all, they’re the mandatory, quintessential words! Generic-sounding, but the first version is nevertheless a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tum Ho Mere
Singer ~ Najam Bajwa

The next song doesn’t start off too promisingly, with many melancholic ‘Woahh’s making up your grand welcome into it. And after that, the song barely fails to interested you even a bit more. The whole composition is lazy, and terribly slow-paced, with nothing interesting ever happening. The hookline is painfully complicated, with the singer just repeating the line “Tum Ho mere yaa ho nahi?” a gazillion times. By that time, the girl must already have even given her answer! The arrangements don’t help at all, to make the listener like the song. The beats are outdated, and there is no instrument that stands out amidst the dusty and laidback feel of the song. I could hear the piano and strings, but it is too plain and also buried too deep inside the arrangements. The guitars are audible mostly, but they are played so slowly, that you question whether they are guitars or sloths. The vocals are another reason to not listen to the song. Debutant Najam Bajwa doesn’t seem like he was fit for a solo song, but he nevertheless drawls his way through this. Kumaar’s lyrics have already been talked enough about, I guess. Easily skippable!

 

4. Dil Yeh Khamakha / Dil Yeh Khamakha (Reprise)
Singers ~ Dev Negi / Nikhil D’Souza

The next song too, starts off in such a way that you get frightened whether it isn’t the same melancholia of the previous song repeating itself all over again in this one. But to be honest, this song gets lots and lots better as it progresses. The composition does start off on a faltering note, but then steadies itself, and by the time it reaches the hookline, you happily keep listening to it. It is the first time I have witnessed such an improvement from the initial notes to the hookline of a song! The hookline is beautifullyand hauntingly amazing. The composition sounds even a bit of something Rahman would compose. The antara continues what the hookline started off, making the song actually sound complete and wholesome in itself. The song appears in two versions and I must say, both singers have done a great job at it. Dev Negi, with a more newbie approach to it, sounds innocent in his rendition of the pleasing composition, whereas Nikhil D’Souza brings more of a professional approach to it, singing in his trademark style, which he used to sing in for Pritam and the Bhatts. Both singers provide a fulfilling touch to the song, though. The arrangements remain the same in both versions. The unexpectedly brilliant electronic tabla beats amazed me, while the nice digital sounds in the hookline reminded me of Viju Shah’s excellent arrangements, which were quite similar, and way ahead of their times in the 90s. (‘Mushkil Bada Yeh Pyaar Hai’ from ‘Gupt’ being one of my most favourites!) The whistle is nice, and the chimes bring in a fresh factor to the song. Piano was expected, and it does a nice job here. Kumaar’s lyrics again, are very typical. One of the better song of the album, maybe the best too! Both versions are a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Royi
Singer ~ Shibani Sur

The last song on the album is what actually blew me away. Rightly kept as the album’s last song, this song has everything that a song should, in order to impress my musical sensibilities. The composition again, starts off very slowly, but this one hooked me from the start — perhaps the introduction of a female solo singer provided the necessary change in the album. Whatever it is, the composition is great. The mukhda, the hookline and the antaras are inexplicably finely crafted. The slow composition did the trick here, which didn’t quite work in the other songs. Also, the nice little semi-classical touch was enough to blow me away. The arrangements, with nothing much happening, gave a nice lounge-ish feel to the song. Whatever does happen though, is attractive enough for the listeners to enjoy. The digital beats, for one, are really cool! The vocals by débutante Shibani Sur, a trained classical singer, are awesome, and her husky voice is a perfect match to the quite drowsy feel of the song. The little nuances she performs in the antara lines, is to fall for! She handles her high notes, as well as the low ones, very well. Hoping to hear more of her in Bollywood in the future, and kudos to Vivek for presenting her beautiful voice in front of us all. Kumaar’s lyrics are quite better here, and have some meaning, other than the usual melancholia he wrote in the album. The best took long enough to arrive. A perfect grand finale to a not-so-perfect album! #5StarHotelSong!!


Saansein kind of meets my expectations. It certainly met my expectation that it would consist of typical Bhatt-style romantic songs under the name of spooky songs, but it didn’t quite meet the expectation I kept towards it being Vivek’s first solo album and chance to score a nice soundtrack. The tracks are nice, no doubt, but the compositions in most of them seem very laidback, and that’s the turn off. Two of the tracks are fantastic, while the other three try to fiddle with the rapidly-disappearing genre of typical Bhatt romance, which even the Bhatts will move on from soon, as far as I presume! This album lacks fresh air…!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Royi > Dil Yeh Khamakha = Dil Yeh Khamakha (Reprise) > Tum Jo Mile > Mera Ishq > Tum Jo Mile (Unplugged) > Tum Ho Mere

 

Which is your favourite song from Saansein? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Advertisements

Leave A Comment...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s