‘KAABIL’ OF BEING FORGOTTEN! (KAABIL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rajesh Roshan & Gourov-Roshin
♪ Lyrics by: Nasir Faraaz, Manoj Muntashir, Anjaan, Anand Bakshi, Kumaar & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd December 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 26th January 2017

Kaabil Album Cover

Kaabil Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Kaabil is an upcoming Bollywood action/romantic film starring Hrithik Roshan, Yami Gautam and Ronit Roy. The movie is directed by Sanjay Gupta, and produced by Rakesh Roshan. The movie is about two blind people who fall in love (God knows how…). And then dishoom dishoom happens and then it probably ends happily. Moving on to the music. The music has been composed by yesteryear hitmaker Rajesh Roshan, who has given quite a number of great songs in the olden days, but seems to have lost his charm with his last outing, ‘Krrish 3’. I mean, I don’t even know how it is possible that his music in ‘Kites’ (2010) sounded so much with the music of the time, and so modern and all, while three years later in 2013, when ‘Krrish 3’ released, his music sounded dated. You would think that’s impossible! Well, all we can hope is that he has composed great tracks for this album. Again, as always, T-Series gives us a shock by adding a composer duo in the music directors panel for the album. The duo is Gourov-Roshin, the go-tos for remaking and spoiling old songs. This time they have been given charge of two of Rajesh Roshan’s hits from the 70s and 80s respectively — ‘Dil Kya Kare’ (Julie) and ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana). So technically, Rajesh Roshan has composed the songs. Smart. Expectations are a bit more than zero, and given that the songs to be remade are of such a high standing, the remakes have to be good or else T-Series wouldn’t have added them.. or at least that’s what I think.. 😛 Anyway, since I have such less expectations from the first album of 2017 to release, I’m just diving into it very cautiously and sceptically.

Note: Before you start off, you might want to check out the new rating scheme with effect from 2017..


1. Kaabil Hoon / Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Nasir Faraaz

“Tere mere sapne sabhi, band aankhon ke taale mein hain,
Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa, woh Chaand ke pyaale mein hai,
Phir bhi sapne kar dikhaaon Sach toh kehna bas yehi…
Main tere kaabil hoon ya, tere kaabil nahi!”

– Nasir Faraaz

So this was the first song of 2017 to release, releasing in early December or so. You’d think that the makers had some reason behind releasing the song so early, but after hearing the song, you understand that the only reason was to get the songs released and aside, so the makers can concentrate on other ‘important’ stuff, like getting bad reviews. Veteran Rajesh Roshan offers nothing new in terms of composition. One might argue that he just tried to compose in his trademark style, and I agree, but it just doesn’t suit in today’s times. The mukhda is quite bland, but you start liking it after you hear the dreary hookline. And what’s more, it plays four times throughout the song! (Not the hookline, but the WHOLE mukhda!) The antaras are two very ear-splittingly high-pitched stanzas that irritate more than pacify. Look Mr. Roshan (and I hope you aren’t reading this..), we really appreciate you bringing forth the music of yore, but at least modernize it like Vishal Bhardwaj & Sanjay Leela Bhansali do! Yes, after a few listens, it gets listenable, but that’s only because we are so much rooted to our beautiful 90s music. 🙂 The arrangements are as typical and predictable as typicality and predictability can get. I don’t know if music programmer Abhijit Vaghani has chosen the beats (or maybe arranger Dhrubajit Gogoi), but whatever it is, it sounds like a desperate attempt to modernize the stale composition, by adding beats similar to Major Lazer and Justin Bieber’s pop single ‘Cold Water’. The dafli makes the arrangements sound sooooooo old-school. And whoever has arranged the song, has put in a mishmash of synth sounds as if his life depended on it, and horns wherever they shouldn’t have been. That guitar riff which the song starts off with resembles that hook tune of the aforementioned ‘Cold Water’ so much. And same with the trumpet. And the first time Jubin sings “Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa…”, there is an unexpected outburst of noise that wasn’t required. However, in the first antara’s beginning, there is a nice trademark Rajesh Roshan percussion, which pleases the ears. The composer ditches his recent regulars for such songs, Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal, to bring in two supposedly ‘modern’ voices, Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal, but Mr. Roshan! Songs don’t sound modern because of singers! You need a modern tune for that…! Jubin sounds suppressed for some reason, and drawls out the lines like he’s bored, making you miss Arijit’s voice for once. And Palak is hands down off tune. Everything she sings is way too high-pitched for her to carry off perfectly, and her voice comes across as cheap. Especially when she sings the hookline after the first antara. And both of their voices have been kept raw, as they were recorded, making it sound more like a scratch version of the song. And at the end, the singers are made to sing “la la la…” and “hey hey hey...”, as if they are from the 80s! Nasir Faraaz’s lyrics ooze of the 90s! What is “Tere Naam ko hi pukaarke, khanakengi meri choodiyaan“??? I highly doubt she’s wearing bangles in the song.. unless the second antara is shot at their wedding. In the sad version, Rajesh Roshan slows down the pace so much that it is tough to discern that it is the same song. Not that it sounds any better though. The arrangements there are minimal except for some strings. And it is just one and a half minutes long, so it is clearly made only for the background score. The lyrics have been tweaked too, with no better result. A song that would’ve created waves, had it been included in ‘Krrish’! Heck, even the ‘Krrish’ album sounds better!

Ratings: 2/5 for Original Version, 1.5/5 for Sad Version

 

2. Haseeno Ka Deewana

Singer ~ Payal Dev, Rap By ~ Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

“Sara zamaana, haseeno ka deewana,
Zamaana kahe phir kyun, bura hai dil lagaana!”

– Anjaan

Before the song released, I was having a tough time wondering how Rajesh Roshan would remake his own old song! And then it hit me, and my worst fears came true. T-Series had conveniently handed over Rajesh Roshan’s two old songs in the album to Gourov-Roshin! Unfortunately, there was no choice for us listeners but to hope the song would be remade well. The result, however, is atrocious. Gourov-Roshin follow the path they paved for themselves when they remade ‘Kaate Nahin Katte’ (Mr. India) in ‘Force 2’. They spoil this song, ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana) as well and present in front of us a bad mix of noises and horrendous singing. The mukhda and antara have been recomposed, and they sound horrible, nothing else. Even the original hook, which could’ve been the best part of the song, is spoiled by singing which is supposed to sound cool. The arrangements are nothing but a lot of unbearable noises, supposed to be club sounds. I don’t know if they want the clubbers to enjoy or die of some undiscovered ear disease. Random techno sounds grace the whole song, and it just sounds BAD! Payal Dev sings in her ‘Veerappan’ voice — an extremely harsh, cutting voice that does nothing but grate your eardrums. I don’t know what she’s up to.. on one side she sings gems like ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani) and on the other hand, bleats out songs like this. She also mauls the hookline, the hookline that anybody raised in a Bollywoodish background has grown up listening. And the last straw is when she sings the antara. (“Yeh kaaauuuuun keh raha hai..”) Raftaar, after his successful stint in ‘Dangal’s ‘Dhaakad’, reverts to his original form, and delivers a rap that proves that it was a mistake that he bagged ‘Dhaakad’. The lyrics by Kumaar are just your normal Bollywood item song fare, with the lady praising her flaws. And the boy agrees, somehow. Now that everyone must have heard it, I can’t even tell you to skip it. A horrific remake.

Rating: 1/5 (and that’s being generous)

 

3. Kuch Din

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Aksar ataa pataa mera, rehta nahin, rehta nahin,
Koi nishaan mera kahin milta nahin, milta nahin,
Dhoondha gaya, jab bhi mujhe, tere gali mein mila..
Kuch din, se mujhe, teri aadat ho gayi hai,
Kuch din se meri, tu zaroorat ho gayi hai!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The next song is a romantic song, with a lulling melody. It starts off well enough, with dreamy music on the piano and something like a church organ. But then Jubin starts singing and you realise the blaring problem in the song — Bad recording. The vocals might be good, but bad recording and mixing help to steal all credit from Jubin. The voice is all muffled; even songs recorded in the 1970s sound better! The composition is better this time, because of that lilt in the melody. Again, it is a signature Roshan tune, and reminds you of the beautiful music of ‘Kaho Naa Pyaar Hai’. The mukhda plunges right into the hookline, and succeeds in the mission of soothing you. The antaras are a nice extension to the already nice tune. At least it pleases the ears. The high notes in the composition are pleasant this time, and the composition as a whole is hummable. Arrangements are nice and soothing, but muffled due to that flawed recording. Strings and brass instruments bring a nice 90s flavour to the song. Again, Roshan takes the help of techno beats, but this time it is a bit toned down, and hence doesn’t bother much. The second interlude has a nice guitar portion, which sounds good in spite of being a bit dated. Jubin, as mentioned before, sings well here, adhering to Roshan’s tune loyally, and evoking memory of Abhijeet’s songs with Shah Rukh Khan, at places. As mentioned above, that recording spoils the feel. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are good, but nothing extraordinary. He sticks to the 90s style of lyrics-writing. A good, pleasant melody, with good vocals and arrangements, is spoiled by the bad recording and sound mixing!

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Mon Amour

Singer ~ Vishal Dadlani, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Kadam se kadam jo miley, toh phir saath hum tum chale,
Chale saath hum tum jahaan, wahi pe baney qaafiley!
Mon Amour!!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rajesh Roshan’s last song on the album takes the form of an upbeat Latino-flavoured song, that’ll surely get you up and dancing. The song starts off with a nice intro, taking the one of the repeating lines from the song having Vishal Dadlani sing it in a slow tempo, and it serves as a good buildup for the upbeat song that follows. The composition by Roshan this time too, is enjoyable. The hookline starts off the song, when the intro is over, and gets you ready for a nice dance song. The mukhda is what Vishal had sung in the intro, and it has a nice Spanish flavour to it, carried out very efficiently by Roshan. The antaras are as enjoyable as can be. They don’t seem like antaras, more like continuations of the mukhda, giving the effect that the whole song is a single stanza. All I can say is that they have been composed wonderfully. In the process, Rajesh Roshan tries to make a ‘Senorita’ (Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara) for this album, and succeeds to an extent. The arrangements remain loyal to the Latino flavour of the song, with guitars leading the way for some time, before handing over first command to the trumpets, which infuse life into the song after that short introduction is over. Percussion is topnotch, and it gives the Salsa feel very nicely. The xylophone that comes in the antara’s last line is so playfully awesome! I like how the title of the song stands alone in the song, with nothing to support it. It makes the song progress seamlessly from line to line. Vishal’s energy seems a bit diluted here, but nevertheless, the song sounds quite energetic still. Recording seems a problem here too, but it is ignorable because of the song being good. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here, are probably the only moderate lyrics on the album — not too old-fashioned (‘Kaabil Hoon’ and ‘Kuch Din’) and not toooooo modern (‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’). They are enjoyable though, making use of sounds like ‘Da ra di da ra’ and ‘Baila baila’ to make it sound more Latino-flavoured! A nice upbeat number, but I’m not sure whether it will be promoted enough to create an impact on the public!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Muusic Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si, iss duniya ki rasmein,
Na kuchh tere bas mein jaana, na kuchh mere bas mein!”

– Anand Bakshi

Another remake. Once again, a Rajesh Roshan melody of the golden era, and again, remade by Gourov-Roshin. This time, Roshan’s beautiful melody from ‘Julie’, ‘Dil Kya Kare’. Expectations were zero, and maybe that’s why I was pleasantly surprised by this one! The main reason I liked it was that the composers have tried to retain the flavour of the original, and not tried to change everything. The mukhda has been changed, and that’s about it. This tracks starts with a nice modern touch, similar to so many (good) English songs you hear nowadays, to such an extent that that person singing ‘Woah’ or whatever at the beginning sounds like Justin Bieber. :\ Is this soundtrack inspired by Bieber or what? Anyway, the new mukhda is a nice addition to the song, it just takes time to get used to it. The hookline follows the new mukhda, and the mukhda of the old song (“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si…”) takes the form of the first antara, as it is (except the ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein Julie‘ is changed to ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein jaana‘) and the hookline returns, bridged to the antara by one of the lines of the new mukhda. The first antara of the old song appears as the second antara in this track, and it sounds good in Jubin’s voice! And this time, the programming is good too! The duo’s arrangements are pleasant, surprisingly, and they don’t bombard the ears with a fusillade of unwanted noises. Instead, they’re quite calm club beats. Now these are club beats! Piano graces the second interlude with its presence, to a great effect. The finger snaps are intriguing throughout the song. However, what I missed is that drum which Rajesh Roshan had added in the background of the old song (which he has also used in the title track of this album, if I’m right). Jubin perfectly takes over from Kishore Kumar, but of course the original always is better. Now that we have to deal with it though, I must say Jubin has done a good job. He sings the “oonchi oonchi..” part exceptionally well. I don’t know whether it is autotune or not, but here, his high notes sound good. At least it doesn’t sound like a scratch version. The additional lyrics are quite functional, if not great. I’m still in love with the original ones! 😍 A pleasant redux. That’s a remake for you. I think Gourov-Roshin are better at romantic songs (except ‘Maahi Ve’ from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’) than idiotic item numbers that are remakes.

Rating: 3.5/5 


In Kaabil, Rajesh Roshan actually delivers better than his last ‘Krrish 3’. Out of three songs, two are pleasant and sound much better than what he had offered in his last album. Gourov-Roshin with their two remakes of his old songs, do a mediocre job in one, and better in the second. However, as a whole, the albums seems extremely dated and behind its time. Had the album released somewhere around 2005 or so, the songs might’ve gained more momentum and more hearts. But now, it just seems like another average album. A middling start to 2017!

 

Total Points of the Album: 2 + 1.5 + 1 + 3 + 3.5 + 3.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 48.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mon Amour = Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye > Kuch Din > Kaabil Hoon > Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version) > Haseeno Ka Deewana

 

ALERT! ANOTHER NEW SECTION!

Here is a remake counter, counting the number of remakes this year. :p Just for fun. 😉

Number of Remakes: 02

 

Which is your favourite song from Kaabil? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “‘KAABIL’ OF BEING FORGOTTEN! (KAABIL – Music Review)

Leave A Comment...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s