SUPERBIA’S TASTELESS COFFEE! (COFFEE WITH D – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Superbia (Gourov-Roshin-Shaan)
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 2nd January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 20th January 2017

Coffee With D Album Cover

Coffee With D Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Coffee With D is an upcoming Bollywood satirical film directed by Vishal Mishra, and produced by Vinod Ramani. The film marks the debut of popular comedian Sunil Grover, who we all know as “Guthhi” from the defunct “Comedy Nights with Kapil”, and now as Dr. Mashoor Gulati on “The Kapil Sharma Show”. Supporting sarcastic includes Zakir Hussain, Dipannita Sharma and Anjana Sukhani. The film is the story of a news reporter, Arnab Ghosh (which Sunil Grover claims, isn’t based on Arnab Goswami, and when any actor or actress or director says this, we know that it definitely is based on that person) who is going through a rough phase in his career, until he gets the golden opportunity to get back his TRP ratings — an interview with an underworld don name ‘D’ and we all can only guess who that ‘D’ is. The music for the movie has been composed by Superbia, which (don’t get too excited; it’s no foreign band or anything) is just a fancy term for Gourov-Roshin when Shaan joins them. So Gourov-Roshin-Shaan are behind the music of this, whose discography boasts of films like ‘Balwinder Singh Famous Ho Gaya’ (one song) and ‘Great Grand Masti’ (One song). Now they get the full album for his movie, and have composed four songs for it. Gourov-Roshin as a duo had worked previously for four albums, with three songs in ‘Force 2’, one in ‘Tum Bin 2’, one in ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ and two in ‘Kaabil’. One song from ‘Kaabil’ and the song from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ was listenable; others were strictly atrocious. So now, let’s see if the addition of Shaan does any special magic to this duo. Not that their songs in ‘Balwinder Singh Famous Ho Gaya’ or ‘Great Grand Masti’ were excellent either!


1. Coffee With D

Singer ~ Anu Malik

(No line from the song is worth writing here!)

The first song takes the form of a kind of theme song for whatever show Sunil Grover’s is the anchor of in the movie. The composition is so bland and boring and dull and icky, that it just suits as a theme song to some talk show. Superbia do a good job in stringing together the most weird-sounding notes, trying to give it a gangster-rap touch, but it is the mukhda itself that sets you off. The song could’ve worked just as well with only the mukhda , and then it would actually sound like a theme song. What’s more, the way they’ve repeated the hookline for so many times, that it actually sounds like some stupid talk show on Doordarshan is going to follow. The two unnecessary antaras take away any interest the listener might’ve gained from the mukhda. The composers don’t add anything enticing as far as he arrangements go. A stale and outdated sound looms over the whole song like thunderclouds. The digital beats sound veryyyyy outdated. Anu Malik is at his obnoxious best with his vocals, though he doesn’t sound like he did in his earlier songs — it is a different kind of obnoxious. Also, Sameer’s lyrics are horrible. Not at all meant for repeat listening!

Rating: 1/5

 

2. Ali Ali

Singer ~ Shabab Sabri

“Hoke mayoos koi, maangne waala na gaya,
Hey tune itna diya, mangaton se sambhala na gaya”

The next song is a Qawwali, one which closely sticks to all the trademark Qawwali clichés used in Bollywood. It starts off with a long and almost neverending ad-lib, which, but for the good lyrics, just sounds sleep-inducing. After that ad-lib, though, the trio hopelessly resort to the very typical Qawwali beats (which they could’ve brought some variations into!) that we heard already in ‘Bhar Do Jholi Meri’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The exact same beats, along with quite tedious arrangements of harmonium and tablas, which usually sound great, if done perfectly or innovatively (Like the Qawwalis ‘Allah Hu Allah’s and ‘Meherbaan’ from ‘Sarbjit’), but sound tedious here. Shabab Sabri sounds different in this song; usually, his voice sounds low-pitched and booming (I still love his rendition of Sajid-Wajid’s awesome rock Qawwali ‘Jadoo Tone Waaliyan’ from ‘Daawat-e-Ishq’) but here, he sounds quite high-pitched. To his credit, he has rendered he composition with the right amount of perfection required. Just that the composition and arrangements are too tedious to support him. Towards the end, the composers go for that quintessential rise in tempo that any Qawwali is incomplete without. Something that could’ve been interesting, though, they make it a repetitive portion, and it leaves the song ending in such a way that listener feels incomplete. Sameer’s lyrics might be something that might be working for the song, but it’s not that lyrics are what a listener first pays attention to, to decide whether he will like the song or not! A tedious Qawwali! Still waiting for a great Bollywood Qawwali! My favourite folk genre is betraying me these days! 😦

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Nation Wants To Know

(Named as ‘Teri Duniya Di’ on Saavn)

Singer ~ Shaan

“Hazaaron ke taadaad mein karodo ke ghotale,
Paisa power se jab chaahe jisse jo karwaale,
Har ghante breaking news,
At least a million views,
Arey ainvayi faltu issues banaaye asli mudde taale!”

The next song follows with the mediocrity, but only in terms of composition. The trio’s composition once again falls into their category of below average tunes. There isn’t anything catchy in the composition, and the only part that’s supposed to be catchy (‘Teri duniya di bajj gayi band…‘) seems dated. The rest is like a rap song, so it has almost no tune. The arrangements are another miserable fail from the trio’s sound, mixing various club beats with Punjabi dhols and seeing whether they work. Well, they didn’t. It just seems like a song from 2006. At least they haven’t overdone the club beats and it isn’t a bombardment to the ears, like Gourov-Roshin did in ‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’ (Kaabil). The song has been sung by one of the trio’s members, Shaan. And he has sung the song in a very different way than his usual style. At least he got rid of that sugary-sweet image he had created in so many songs of his that released nowadays. I’m still waiting for a good song from Shaan since ‘Chaar Kadam’ (Pk), but he seems more interested in judging ‘The Voice’. 😦 Anyway, he sounds mediocre here. The lyrics by Sameer Anjaan might be the best part of the song, which, in all my boredom, I forgot to tell you, is a satirical song. He sticks to the satirical theme and gives some nice lines to ponder on. Especially the second stanza, which I’ve written up in the ‘Lyrics Showcase’ portion, was quite good. Another mediocre song, but saved by the lyrics.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Tumhari Mohabbat

Singers ~ Aakanksha Sharma & Shaan

“Mujhe din lagega, bhale raat ho, tumhari mohabbat agar saath ho.”

So not even this movie escapes from the ‘Romantic Song Bug’ that has infected all the filmmakers these days. The next song is a romantic song, and I wouldn’t say it is too impressive either, but it is quite pleasant. Again, the composition sounds very old-school, in neither a negative nor positive way. It really didn’t matter much to me this time, probably because it was the first pleasant and non-repetitive thing to hit my ears in this album. The composition is like a 90s Jatin-Lalit song, and does quite well in catching your attention too. Sajid-Wajid (‘Saanson Ne’ from ‘Dabangg 2’) and Himesh Reshammiya (‘Dhoom Dhaam’ from ‘Action Jackson’) occasionally give such old 90s-styled songs, and now Superbia follows their lead. The hookline pleases you, if not impresses and fascinates. You think, ‘At least it is better than everything else in the album!’ The mukhda doesn’t quite intrigue, but the antara is relatively better, as far as the composition goes. The arrangements are cool too, with a heard-before but pleasant tabla rhythm gracing the hookline. Harmonica is a prominent instrument used throughout the song, and that’s another main attraction of the song. The vocals are good, and Aakanksha gets to sing the mukhda and one antara, while Shaan sings only the last antara, so it doesn’t quite seem like a duet. Shaan is back to his mushy self, but tries not to be extra-mushy, while Aakanksha tries hard to imitate Monali Thakur. And even succeeds in places. Sameer’s lyrics belong to the 90s like everything else does, but like you did everything else, you overlook that too, just because. A ‘chalta hai‘ type of song.

Rating: 3/5


Coffee With D turns out to be even worse than expected. Not even one song adheres to today’s music sensibilities, and none of the songs proves for a pleasant respite. The songs may be situational, but I don’t think he movie too will excel too much with such dated tunes. An album that is best forgotten (if you hear it, that is)! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 1 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 = 8.5

Album Percentage: 42.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tumhari Mohabbat > Nation Wants To Know > Ali Ali > Coffee With D

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes This Year: 03 (from previous albums) + 00 = 03

 

Which is your favourite song from Coffee With D? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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2 thoughts on “SUPERBIA’S TASTELESS COFFEE! (COFFEE WITH D – Music Review)

  1. Another well written review. Not heard this album in detail as such but ur review compells me to listen it properly atleast once if i have to chk something new which i havent heard in the past. Good job yet again 🙂 👍

    Like

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