29th MUSIC MASTANI MONTHLY AWARDS (MARCH 2017)

Important Statistics

♪ Number of Albums Reviewed: 8

♪ Albums Reviewed: Badrinath Ki Dulhania, Commando 2, Machine, Trapped, Phillauri, Anaarkali of Aarah, Poorna & Naam Shabana

♪ Music Composers: Amaal Mallik, Akhil Sachdeva, Tanishk Bagchi, Mannan Shaah, Gourov-Roshin, Dr. Zeus, Alokananda Dasgupta, Shashwat Sachdev, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Rohit Sharma, Salim-Sulaiman, Rochak Kohli & Meet Bros.

Now on with the awards:

28th Music Mastani Monthly Awards

♪ MAIN AWARDS

• Singer of the Month (Female) : Rekha Bhardwaj for Badnaam Jiya De Gaari (Anaarkali of Aarah) AND Shreya Ghoshal for Rozana (Naam Shabana)

• Singer of the Month (Male) : Romy for Sahiba (Phillauri)

• Composer of the Month (Song) : Rochak Kohli for Rozana (Naam Shabana) AND Rohit Sharma for Badnaam Jiya De Gaari (Anaarkali of Aarah) AND Shashwat Sachdev for Sahiba (Phillauri)

• Composer of the Month (Album) : Salim-Sulaiman for Poorna

• Album of the Month: Poorna (Music by: Salim-Sulaiman; Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya; Singers: Arijit Singh, Raj Pandit, Vishal Dadlani & Salim Merchant; Music On: Zee Music Company)

• Musical Jodi of the Month (Best Duet) : Raj Pandit & Vishal Dadlani for Poori Qaaynaat (Poorna)

• Lyricist of the Month: Amitabh Bhattacharya for Poori Qaaynaat (Poorna) AND Manoj Muntashir for Rozana (Naam Shabana)

♪ SONG AWARDS

• Best Romantic Song: Rozana (Naam Shabana) AND Sahiba (Phillauri)

• Best Dance Song: Badri Ki Dulhania (Badrinath Ki Dulhania) AND Naughty Billo (Phillauri)

• Best Sad Song: Badnaam Jiya De Gaari (Anaarkali of Aarah) AND Roke Na Ruke Naina (Badrinath Ki Dulhania)

• Best Club Song: Tamma Tamma Again (Badrinath Ki Dulhania)

• Best Classical-Based Song: Badnaam Jiya De Gaari (Anaarkali of Aarah)

• Best Song With A Western Influence: Dheemi (Trapped)

• Best Song With A Folk Influence: Sahiba (Phillauri) AND Dum Dum (Phillauri)

• Song With The Best Use Of Fusion: Poori Qaaynaat (Poorna)

• Best Backing Vocals: Mansheel Gujral in Humsafar (Badrinath Ki Dulhania)

• Best Sound Effects in A Song: Tamma Tamma Again (Badrinath Ki Dulhania)

• Best Retro-Styled Song: Badnaam Jiya De Gaari (Anaarkali of Aarah)

• Best Humorous Song: Aashiq Surrender Hua (Badrinath Ki Dulhania)

• Best Rap in A Song: Anushka Sharma in Naughty Billo (Phillauri)

• Best Remake: Tamma Tamma Again (Badrinath Ki Dulhania) [Remade by Tanishk Bagchi from Bappi Lahiri’s original]

♪ SPECIAL AWARDS

• Bandar Kya Jaane Adrak Ka Swaad (Best Album That Went Pretty Much Unnoticed) : Poorna (Zee Music Company)

• Newcomer(s) of the Month:

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Female) : Shilpi Paul for Naughty Billo (Phillauri)

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Male) : Romy for Dum Dum & Sahiba (Phillauri)

– Newcomer of the Month (Composer) : Akhil Sachdeva for Humsafar (Badrinath Ki Dulhania) AND Alokananda Dasgupta for Trapped (album) AND Shashwat Sachdev for the four songs from Phillauri

{all three debutants of the month were unignorable! Beautiful!}

• Music Label of the Month: Zee Music Company (Poorna, Trapped & Anaarkali of Aarah)

• Most Unusual, But Awesome Choice of Singer: Nakash Aziz for Chatur Naar (Machine) {Mind you, this award is only for vocals; couldn’t find any other unusual but great choice…!}


Reviews Next Month: Noor, Begum Jaan, Baahubali 2: The Conclusion, Mirza Juuliet, Meri Pyaari Bindu

SHREYA + SUNIDHI = SHABANA!! (NAAM SHABANA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Meet Bros. & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 9th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 31st March 2017

Naam Shabana Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


P.S. The song ‘Dil Hua Besharam’ can be heard on Saavn, while its reprise ‘Baby Besharam’ can be heard on the YouTube audio jukebox. The Saavn link doesn’t have the latter whereas the YouTube jukebox doesn’t have the former. Thought it necessary to inform in case you get confused! 😀


Naam Shabana is a Bollywood thriller, starring Taapsee Pannu in the titular role, and Manoj Bajpayee, Prithviraj Sukumaran, Elli Avram and Taher Shabbir in supporting roles. The film has been directed by Shivam Nair, whose ‘Bhaag Johnny’ flopped in 2015. The film has been produced by Neeraj Pandey and Shital Bhatia. It is a spin-off to the 2015 super-hit film ‘Baby’, and shows the journey of Taapsee Pannu’s character Shabana from ‘Baby’, before she was roped in to be a part of the mission. The movie is definitely awaited, because of it being the first of its kind; Bollywood has been free of any spin-offs as such, and it is just wonderful that the first Bollywood spin-off is that of such a wonderful thriller. Anyway, let’s go over to the music, because we have a little more time to wait for the movie. We all remember that ‘Baby’ had been touted to be a songless film. Nevertheless, three songs had been included in its album — technically two, because one of the songs had a male and female version. Meet Bros. Anjjan had composed one promotional track, while M.M. Kreem, had composed the two-version track in question. The soundtrack was like an accessory to the film, and not something to cherish in your playlist for a long, long time. This movie seems to be different, in that it has four original tracks, with one having two versions, thus making it five songs. Rochak Kohli, who of late, just composed single additional songs that released after the albums of ‘M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story’ and ‘Wazir’ released, comes back with a substantial chunk of an album after a long time. He last composed three songs out of the five-track ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’ (which were quite ignorable) and before that, three out of ten in ‘Hawaizaada’ (which I still listen to!) So I am not quite sure what he can give in this album, where he has three out of five songs. The other two songs are two versions of the same song, composed by Meet Bros, without Anjjan. Hopefully, they don’t give something too-hard-to-grasp like ‘Baby’s ‘Beparwah’. So let’s see what kind of music this album to a much-awaited thriller, holds in hand!


1. Rozana

Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Inn aankhon se yeh bataa, kitna main dekhun tujhe,
Reh jaati hai kuchh kami, jitna bhi dekhun tujhe,
Rozana main, sochun yahi,
Ki jee loongi main besaans bhi,
Aise hi tu mujhe, milta rahe agar, rozana, rozana!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rochak decided to start the album off with a mellow, soothing song that would be enough to transport us to dreamland. The first song in the album is a romantic song that has a very beautiful composition; Rochak gets everything right in that he composes this one with the perfect Bollywood ideals of ‘romance’. Each and every note hits your heart and hits hard. The mukhda gives a nice headstart to the song, and the hookline is one which doesn’t care much about imposing itself on you but grows on you like slow poison just as I like it. The antaras hold all the magic of the song; the very powerfully lilting tune of the antaras just leaves you spellbound. The arrangements are quite minimal, but Rochak gives an impressive strings backdrop for most of the song, especially the strings in the interlude are very impressive. Guitars and piano soothe your senses like nothing else can. And also, Rochak has employed a kind of Marching rhythm to the antara. I don’t know why that’s there, but it doesn’t hamper the song in any way. The arrangements provide for a nice nighttime lullabyish listen. And the vocals are by none other than the melody queen, Shreya Ghoshal. She handles each word with utmost care, and the whispery way in which she sings the song proves yet again how wonderful she is as a singer. Unnecessary bouts of loudness can never be found when she is behind the mic. The lyrics by Manoj Muntashir are mind blowing, especially the paragraph I’ve showcased above! A MINDBLOWING start to the album, and it will definitely consolidate Rochak’s career in Bollywood.

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Zinda

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Ziddi raaston se paanv yeh, aaj bhi, jhagadna toh bhoole nahin,
Haare hain kayi dafa toh kya, aaj bhi, hum ladna toh bhoole nahin,
Aaj bhi dil baaghi hai, bas yehi kaafi hai,
Zinda hoon abhi, baaki hoon abhi,
Meri har saans mein thodi si zindagi hai abhi!”

– Manoj Muntashir

After the lulling romantic song, Rochak throws in a motivational kind of song next. This time, the composition is a bit weak. It sounds great in the first listen, but later on I found that it is quite typical and offers nothing new. The mukhda starts off the song on a slow pace, which only speeds up when the hookline arrives: the only portion of the song that remains with you after the song ends. Wonderfully composed on pensive sounding high notes, that part will definitely hook you on to the song and assure that you don’t leave it halfway. The antara that follows is also quite sombre, and doesn’t leave an impact on you, unless you hear it many times. On a whole, the song’s tune has nothing much to lap up. The arrangements also fail to offer anything different or innovative. The tune is already so laidback, but the arrangements refuse to make it more interesting, staying very minimal until, again, the hookline comes. Strings and guitars can be heard, but nothing stands out very boldly. Sunidhi Chauhan provides to the song, everything that the tune and arrangements could not. Her energy, though diffused in the song, manages to make the song repeat-listenable, even if only once or twice. Lately, she seems to have gotten stereotyped to these kind of songs. The lyrics by Muntashir, too, are good in their purpose of being motivational. A motivational song that fails to motivate a lot, but is functional to an extent. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Zubi Zubi

Singers ~ Sukriti Kakar & Rochak Kohli, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Rochak Kohli, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Mere dil, gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi,
Masti mein gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi!”

– Anjaan

Next up we have Rochak’s final song for the album, and it happens to be an upbeat club number. This one is a remake, of Bappi Lahiri-composed ‘Zooby Zooby’ (Dance Dance), and it is quite a decent remake too, at that. The composition, though faltering at the beginning, turns out to be quite catchy. The mukhda is what I have a problem with — it seems forced and a bit childish. But right from the first time the hookline is sung, till the end of the song, it is an enjoyable track! The great thing is that, like it used to happen before, only the hookline of the original song has been taken, while the rest has been composed afresh. The antara is a nice continuation of the sensuous dance song, but then that line from the mukhda, “humko hai jaan se bhi pyaari aashiqmizajiyaan“, comes back to irritate. The arrangements are fantastic discoesque arrangements, recreating the Bappi Lahiri era in today’s style. Rochak has added groovy beats, and that amazing programming effect he has added to his own voice when he sings the hookline, keeps me waiting for his parts to come! It makes him sound like an awesome robot. 😀 Sukriti also, has sung well, except the mukhda. (Again!) She sounded a lot like a fake Shefali Alvares there, and I found it quite irritating, as I would have if Shefali herself had sung it. The rest of the song, she shines. Kumaar reworks around Anjaan’s original hookline, and pens down aptly enjoyable lyrics. A good remake, spoiled by a mediocre first stanza.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Baby Besharam / Dil Hua Besharam

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas & Meet Bros / Aditi Singh Sharma & Meet Bros, Music by ~ Meet Bros, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

(Nothing to showcase, thanks to Kumaar’s lyrical masterpieces which you’ll read of later on in the passage)

The next song is yet another club song, this one by Meet Bros. The composition sticks quite close to Bollywood’s conventions of composing a ‘catchy’ club song. Right from the beginning Meet Bros “try” to get us caught on to the composition, which, unfortunately, is very staid. The mukhda is bad, and the hookline follows suit. The antara doesn’t provide much respite in this respect either. The arrangements are typical club beats, and it sounds like it should’ve released a year or two ago. Meet Bros have added this weird synthesiser tune, which sounds like the song is part of a comedy movie, an adult comedy to be precise. I wonder if this song was actually composed for some other movie before, and then moved over to ‘Naam Shabana’ Because it couldn’t find a place anywhere else. The vocals are what differentiate one version of the song from the other. It actually had released first in Jasmine’s voice, and that one is outright banal, sounding like it is trying to imitate ‘Yaar Na Miley’ (Kick). Aditi Singh Sharma, though not eligible to win a Best Singer prize or anything for her rendition, provides respite MERELY IN COMPARISON TO Jasmine Sandlas. At least her voice is more club-environment-friendly. Yes, she does spoil some lines with her unnecessarily stylish accent. Oh yeah, and she knows how to pronounce the “Baby” as “Bebe” (which you need to practise if you ever want to make it big in Bollywood as a club singer!), as opposed to Jasmine singing “Baby” as “Bebi”. The way they sing “beyyyyyysharam” is quite torturous. I guess it was first going to be included in ‘Besharam’ as the title track (that would explain the comedic arrangements), until Ishq Bector & Shree D saved us by stepping in. Kumaar’s lyrics feature lyrical masterpieces like “Rafaa dafaa sufi bandon ko karke nasha vasha karlo“, and “Thoda sa bigadne mein bolo na kya harz hai?“. *Slow claps*

Rating: 1/5 for Baby Besharam, 1.5/5 for Dil Hua Besharam


Naam Shabana is a decent album, but not great. Its predecessor had two songs, so it was okay that only one worked. This has four songs, out of which only one works perfectly, the others are decent, and one is bad. For a thriller, the album is apt, with a romantic song, a motivational song, and two situational club songs. However, it will have less of a connect with the audiences. Rochak has done a commendable job though! The only good thing I might remember about this album years later is that it has both Shreya and Sunidhi, modern stalwarts of the Bollywood music industry, lending their voices to the songs.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 1 + 1.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 58%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rozana > Zubi Zubi = Zinda > Dil Hua Besharam > Baby Besharam

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Naam Shabana) = 09

 

Which is your favourite song from Naam Shabana? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SARVAGUNA SAM’POORNA’!!! (POORNA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Salim-Sulaiman
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 3rd March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 31st March 2017

Poorna Album Cover

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Poorna is an upcoming Bollywood biopic, starring Aditi Inamdar and Rahul Bose, and the film is directed by Rahul Bose, and produced by the director along with Amit Patni. The film is a biopic on Malavath Poorna, who, at 13 years and 11 months, became the youngest girl to have scaled the highest peak on Mt. Everest on May 25th, 2014. The film is an inspirational one, and I’m sure it will win many hearts once it opens in theatres tomorrow. I mean, the indian cricket team has seen it and loved it, so aren’t we bound to, too? The music of the film has been composed by Salim-Sulaiman. The duo has been absent for quite a long time. There was a time when Salim-Sulaiman composing for a film had to mean it was 90% a rom-com. But their last five Bollywood projects have been ‘Jai Gangaajal’ (2016; an action flick), ‘Wedding Pullav’ (2015; a rom-com), one song from ‘Ungli’ (2014; a political satire), the song from ‘Mardaani’ (2014; an action film), and two songs from ‘Kaanchi’ (a political thriller). Out of five films over three years, they seem to have been consciously trying not to choose rom-coms, as they signed only one! Now they sign this movie which definitely isn’t a rom-com. And they give us three songs, one of which has a second version. Hopefully, like another three-song-wonder, Amit Trivedi’s ‘Kai Po Che’ (which is the epitome of ‘Quality over Quantity’) this one too has an amazing soundtrack. So let’s see how this short album turns out to be! 🙂


1. Kuch Parbat Hilaayein / Kuch Parbat Hilaayein (Intimate)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Salim MerchantBacking Vocalists in First Version ~ Raj Pandit, Crystal Sequeira & Gwen Dias

“Woh toofan kya, chattanein jisko mod de,
Woh udaan kya jo, unchaai pe dum tod de,
Khudpe hai bharosa rakhna tujhe,
Jeete jee nahi hai rukna tujhe!
Itihaas hai likhna tujhe!
Kuch parbat hilaayein, toh baat hai!”

The first song comes to us in two versions, so we will focus on each separately. The track is a wonderful motivational song, composed marvellously by Salim-Sulaiman. The tune does tread on familiar territory, and you can easily tell that it is Salim-Sulaiman’s composition. The mukhda is simple and sweet; though it sounds heard before, it doesn’t disappoint in its intention of being a motivational tune. Yes, in some parts the composition sounds a bit dreary, but everything can be excused when that liveliest hookline arrives, and takes away your breath. The first antara follows the same tune as the mukhda, while the second takes on a more pensive form, and aptly, given the motivational theme of the song, just like so many Bollywood motivational songs do. They all go serious for some reason, midway. But no complaints. Salim-Sulaiman have wrapped it up quite nicely by bridging it to the hookline in a grand way, making great use of the percussion. That brings us to the arrangements. The Northeast Indian arrangements are audible for like the first minute or so, and then later on they somehow get dissipated amongst a lively show of drums (Darshan Doshi) and guitars (Nyzel D’Lima). The percussion is amazing though, with Sulaiman’s trademark djembe. The backing vocalists (Raj Pandit, Crystal Sequeira, Gwen Dias) are amazing with their Northeastern inputs, and their little rhyme which they sing at the end is adorable. Arijit’s vocals are good, but I felt he could’ve used his lively voice here, instead of his droning voice. (If you have been following me since the inception of my blog, you will know the difference between the two Arijit voices.) Some places he gets very lively, while others, he falls flat, like that mukhda. On a whole though, it is enjoyable hearing him singing a non-romantic song! The “Intimate” version fares well in its own place, trying to be a mellowed-down version of the original, and succeeding. This time, the composition has been backed by wonderful acoustic guitars and occasional piano — providing the required intimate sound. Salim’s vocals are a good substitute because they are soothing and calm; Arijit’s were more suited to the first one. Again, the backing vocalists, in trademark Salim-Sulaiman style, provide a nice and majestic backing chorus. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are just magically motivational. A good start to this motivational album! 

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 5/5 for the Intimate Version

 

2. Poori Qaaynaat

Singers ~ Raj Pandit & Vishal Dadlani

“Chaahe talaashe, gehraaiyaan samandaron ki saari,
Chaand sitaaron, sooraj ki chaahe naap aaye doori,
Par Kabhi dhoondhein tere bhi andar toh jaane!
Hai poori qaaynaat tujhmein kahin,
Sawaalon ka javaab khud hai tu hi!”

For the next song, Salim-Sulaiman recycle their song “Chheene Re Mora Chain” from Coke Studio @ MTV Season 3, resulting in a makeover of a romantic semiclassical song, to a motivational one, again, so apt for the situation of the film. The composition is an amazing one, especially the hookline, which constitutes about 75% of the song! But since it is a semiclassical song, that is expected, just as phrases are repeated a thousand times in classical songs. The fusion is amazing, and I always like me a little rock with classical (Remember ‘Piya Tu Kaahe Rootha Re’ from ‘Kahaani’ by Vishal-Shekhar?) Here, too, Salim-Sulaiman ace it by interweaving the rock portions nicely in between two chunks of the classical parts. There is one antara, also falling into the classical part of the song, and it makes the ambience of the song a shade darker than the rest; the composition is already quite haunting in the way that classical songs always haunt you, pleasantly. The arrangements are ravishing! The rock guitars (Nyzel D’Lima) and drums (Darshan Doshi) do not leave the song even in classical parts, and that’s what makes it even more appealing to the senses. To bring a classical touch to the song, the duo has incorporated a wonderful sitar(Chirag Katti) loop that just blows your mind. In the interlude, a wonderful strings-tablas combination sounds amazing, and even part of the antara is backed by only wonderful tablas. The arrangements are very upbeat on a whole, and won’t leave you dissatisfied. The vocals are beautiful; Raj Pandit carries out the aalaaps effortlessly, and Vishal Dadlani, with his booming voice, aces the rock portions. The lyrics by Amitabh Bhattacharya, are motivational yet again, and save for the fact that they repeat many times, I enjoyed them! A scintillating fusion! 🙂

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Baabul Mora

Singer ~ Arijit Singh

“Baabul mora, mora, naihar chhooto hi jaye,
Din ka chola peeche chhoda,
Raat ki chadar odha chali,
Baabul more teri muniya,
Teri duniya chhod chali”

To call it an end to the album, Salim-Sulaiman present a very sombre, pensive classical song. It is a composition which is quite heavy to the ears, unless you really love classical music, which I do! The song starts with a heart-rending high-pitched part sung by Arijit beautifully. The composition that follows might bore some, but it will be a treat for, as I said before, classical music lovers. It is not a song you would hear on loop, but while it lasts, you would cherish it. The small nuances in the composition have been very well-rendered by Arijit. His voice goes straight out to touch the heart, and leaves an impact on you. The arrangements are minimal, with a constant beat going on in the background, intensifying it manifold. Arijit handles the aalaaps and nuances very carefully, and it results in a cherishable sad song. The lyrics are adapted by Amitabh Bhattacharya from Nawab Wajid Ali Shah’s thumri of the same name. The rest of the lyrics are new, and that makes it a non-remake in my eyes. Anyway, the song seems to be in a situation where the girl in the movie misses her home. A beautiful classical melody to end the album, but not something to listen to on loop.

Rating: 4/5


Poorna is a short and sweet album. All three songs and the one version are amazing and contribute something to the movie. They could be played at different situations in the movie, and fit well in with the narration. There are two motivational songs, one sad song, and one happy and pleasant one. Variety shows itself through just four songs. Salim-Sulaiman have done a great job, and though the number of albums they’re doing is diminishing, the quality seems to be increasing and increasing year by year. The duo has long since thrown off their rom-com stereotype, and has started achieving great musical feats, by climbing up the mountain of endless rom-coms, and choosing content-oriented films after reaching the peak! A short but wholesome album: in Hindi, ‘Sarvaguna Sam’POORNA’!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 5 + 4 = 18.5

Album Percentage: 92.5% {That makes it the top-scoring album of the year so far! 🙂 }

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Poori Qaaynaat = Kuch Parbat Hilaayein (Intimate) > Kuch Parbat Hilaayein > Baabul Mora

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 00 (from Poorna) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Poorna? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

CATCHY TUNES IN A COVER OF EARTH!! (ANAARKALI OF AARAH – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rohit Sharma
♪ Lyrics by: Ramkumar Singh, Ravinder Randhawa, Prashant Ingole, Dr. Sagar & Avinash Das
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 6th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th March 2017

Anaarkali of Aarah Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Anaarkali Of Aarah is a Bollywood film starring Swara Bhaskar, Pankaj Tripathi and Sanjay Mishra in lead roles. The film has been directed by Avinash Das, and produced by Sandiip Kapur. The film is about a singer in Bihar who earns a living by singing songs at village functions. As she gets entangled into a spat with the Vice Chancellor of a prestigious university, she seeks justice, and the movie is about her struggle for justice. The movie has opened to great reviews, but as usual, my writing speed has fallen behind, and so here I am. The music for the movie has been composed by Rohit Sharma, who is NOT a cricketer; you can find him over at @rohitdecomposer on Twitter. He has composed for a music album for a movie I was aware of, but didnt pay much attention to, Jimmy Sheirgill’s ‘Shortcut Safaari’, but now he comes with a definitely bigger album, and with ten tracks it is definite that the music will be completely situational and plot-oriented, which is to say, it will be quite rustic and earthy. Is it a problem for me? No! As long it is catchy, I will like anything! 😀 So let’s dive into this ten-track album!


1. Dunaliya Mein Jung (Anaarkali’s Umph)

Singer ~ Swati Sharrma, Lyrics by ~ Ramkumar Singh

The album starts with a song alternatively called “Anaarkali’s Umph”, which is probably a misspelled version of ‘oomph’, but I get the point. Anyway, the song is clearly for one of Anaarkali’s performances, and as soon as it starts, you get the situational feel of it radiating out of it. The composition is quite toned-down, with not much by way of catchiness, but goes on quite a clichéd route. I’m sure if you go to Aarah itself, this is the kind of folk songs you will hear. So it was a smart move to keep it simple. The tune does make you dance like crazy later on, but one problem is its duration. Over five minutes, the song is quite daunting to sit through because of its monotony. The arrangements are aptly folksy. The bulbultarang (let’s call it the ‘Indian banjo’ henceforth in the review because it is a common instrument in the songs and I’m too lazy to add the italics effect.) has been used gratuitously, as is the harmonium, and very aptly too, because it replicates the folk performances of the region. Swati Sharrma sounds very different from what she usually sounds like in songs, and it is nice to hear her powerful vocals yet again after ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), after which she hardly got any substantial songs. Again, she seems mellowed down in some places, and you wonder how the song is supposed to be so ‘oomphy’ because Bollywood has seen much more oomph that this. Maybe it is because of Ramkumar’s lyrics, which aren’t really creative. A decent start to the album; not-so-oomphy, but catchy to an extent.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Lahanga Jhaanke (Accidental Firing)

Singer ~ Indu Sonali, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

Now this song is alternatively titled ‘Accidental Firing’ and I wonder what that means, unless there’s some situation in the movie. The song starts abruptly with the nice pungi/shehnai sound followed by the Indian banjo played in a very catchy tune. The composition for this one is quite more ‘oomphy’ than the last song, and you instantly get caught on to the rhythm, especially the percussion which has been done wonderfully! The composition is quite sultry and catchy, and the various twists in it really help propel it forward. The “sarak sarak sarakaile” hook is catchy. The antara takes a different route than the rest of the song, and the percussion changes very nicely; the seamless transition from one rhythm to another is a marvel to behold in this song. From rapid, it goes to slow and sultry, just to go back to rapid in a while. I think I’ve given enough away about the arrangements, so now about the vocals. Indu Sonali, a Bhojpuri singer, is an apt singer for the song and her nuances give the song an interesting touch, fun to listen. The lyrics here too are quite the same as the previous track, and I think it’s going to go on like this till the end of the album. A catchier song, that excels especially in arrangements.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Aye Sakhi Ooh (Keh Mukri)

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Ramkumar Singh

Next up comes the ‘keh mukri‘, which is basically a song where a lady describes qualities that sound like she’s praising her lover, and then denies it and says that she is talking about something else. We heard it in ‘Raanjhanaa’ too, if you remember! 🙂 This one is more sensual however, than that one, which seemed as sanctimonious as sanctimonious can get. The composition is, relevantly to the theme of the movie, quite sultry and sensual. The mukhda gives a perfect start to the song, while the antaras just continue it, and the hookline does its job. The arrangements are similar to the previous song, with a lot of amazing percussion consisting of dholaks and tablas. The Indian Banjo works its way amazingly throughout the upbeat song. Pawni Pandey’s vocals here sound very impressive, and not fake like they did in ‘Laila Main Laila’ (Raees). Rohit Sharma has also very interestingly tweaked her voice pitch in some places, providing a comic touch in those places. The backing vocalists efficiently do their job as men who are smitten by Anaarkali. Lyrics are the same. 😀 I should tell you though, that it isn’t like I was expecting better lyrics; it is perfectly fine here given the movie’s theme! Another catchy one!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Badnaam Jiya De Gaari (Thumri)

Singer ~ Rekha Bhardwaj, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

Next up we have a thumri, and who better than Rekha Bhardwaj to pull it off!? So Rohit treats us with an aptly folksy, earthy and rustic Thumri, that, at the same time, pulls at our heartstrings. The composition is so beautiful, and has a very heavy old-world-charm to it. The melancholic notes hit the right part of your heart, and instantly. The mukhda has been composed on the common kaherwa taal, while, quite interestingly, the antara has been composed on the three-beat dadra. And the transition between the two different taals, which are individually so commonly (or were so commonly) used in Bollywood songs, is so seamless! It brings you shivering with goosebumps everytime that transition occurs. That brings us to arrangements. Of course, these taals have been played marvellously on the tablas. However, he interludes are something to watch out for, where the sitar will transport you back to Naushad’s music in ‘Mughal-e-Azam’. A wonderful sarangi interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. The harmonium gives a very light background music, and if you are listening carefully, you might catch it. Rekha Bhardwaj pulls off the thumri, with as much finesse as she always does. Nobody on today’s list of singers (and active singers) could’ve replicated what she did in this song. Her nuances are to die for, while the rest of the song, she carries with an aura of power and yet, sounds very simple. Here, the lyrics by Ravinder Randhawa are wonderful. A strong and powerful thumri that needs to be promoted!!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Mann Beqaid Huva (Anaarkali’s Adieu)

Singer ~ Sonu Nigam, Lyrics by ~ Prashant Ingole

A guitar strum which starts off the next song, immediately tells you that it is quite different from he other songs of the album! And sure enough, this one is quite different in theme and therefore stands out. It has very little by way of earthiness, but there definitely is a gentle caressing breeze in the song. The breeziness can be credited to Sharma’s sweet composition. I was reminded of Anu Malik’s and Sonu Nigam’s collaborations in the 90s and early 2000s by this song. The line before the hookline, and the hookline itself, are so calming, and accentuated by the ravishing instrumentation. Usually such songs have very little in terms of orchestration, but this one is backed by a heavy strings orchestra, wonderful sarangi and if course, the acoustic guitar. Still, wonderful percussion of tablas can be heard in a line hat goes marvellously high-pitched in the antaras. Shakers too, are scintillating additions to the arrangements. Sonu Nigam carries the song with a charming aura, and his old songs are brought to mind instantly; not the middling compositions he had started singing in the middle. This song could have easily fit into a rom-com set in a rural region, and had it had some more urban arrangements, it could have also passed in an urban love story, and that’s why it becomes the odd one out in the album! Prashant Ingole (after a long time) writes marvellous, poetic lyrics, and it is a pleasure to hear him after a long time! Charming!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar (Anaarkali in Studio)

Singer ~ Swati Sharrma, Lyrics by ~ Dr. Sagar

This song starts with a kind of sher, in Bhojpuri, and proceeds to form a rather staid melody, which only sounds impressive occasionally. The composition is not so innovative, and could’ve been better, if not excellent. The whole thing sounds very heard-before and hence, fails to raise eyebrows. The antara doesn’t make things quite better, and is quite dull. The only thing that can pass as catchy, might be the hookline. The arrangements take the form of heard-before Qawwali arrangements, the harmonium leading the way with dholaks following. The Indian banjo too, has been utilised in a very clichéd way. Swati Sharrma doesn’t sound as good as she sounded in her previous song, but still sounds better than all her other songs in other albums. The lyrics are cute, but you hardly have the scope to notice them, as the song won’t compel you to hear it again! A staid melody ruins everything.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Sa Ra Ra Ra (Anaarkali’s Revenge)

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

This track seems to be a crucial scene from the film, included in the music album. And it is a Reprise of “Lahanga Jhaanke”. The differences between the two songs are plenty though. This one aptly starts with dialogues, probably as they are from the movie. And it gives a better setting to the song, than the abruptly starting ‘Lahanga Jhaanke’. The premise of the song, we can easily gauge, thanks to the dialogue parts by the emcee of the event and Swara Bhaskar as Anaarkali. The composition, atleast for the first half of the seven-and-a-half minute long song, is the same as ‘Lahanga Jhaanke’ song, but the actual ‘Sa Ra Ra Ra’ part starts four minutes into the song, after a cutting outburst by Anaarkali at a particular man in the audience. And that part is savage! The tune is apt as ut sticks to the whole ‘revenge’ theme, and has a quite sinister feel. Rohit Sharma has added better arrangements in this version, than he did in the original. It is basically the same, but a wonderful backing chorus makes up for whatever void was left unfilled in the first version. In the new portion, booming percussion helps the Anaarkali’s anger come out even better, with the chorus supporting her very well. Strings work well to intensify that portion of the song, while Swara’s dialogues really work in favour of the revenge theme; of course, the great actress that she is, she has rendered the dialogues veryyyyy convincingly! The vocals by Pawni Pandey are very impressive! This is one of Pawni’s best performances, and she just infuses a lot of power into the rendition. The lyrics are well-written, and so are the dialogues. A nice song to go with the revenge situation!

Rating: 4/5

 

8. Mera Balam Bambaiya (Rehearsal Song) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Avinash Das

The next three songs have been titled as “Bonus Songs”, probably because they aren’t in the film, and if you notice, they haven’t been mixed, mastered and developed further than a mere scratch version. The songs do sound like scratch versions, and the makers seemed to have included them in the album just for the music lovers. Anyway, this particular song has a nice and catchy tune, another folksy tune that grips you instantly. It is a short song, and again, sounds like a scratch version, as is evident from the minimal arrangements, which makes the song sound raw. However, it doesn’t take anything from the song. Rohit’s composition nevertheless, is very catchy. The hookline is something everybody would enjoy at first listen itself. The arrangements, though minimal, with mainly a harmonium and tablas/dholaks, are enjoyable, giving a feeling as if you are actually at an event in a village, and the song is being sung there by the villagers. Pawni yet again, aces the vocals, sounding as fun as ever. She seems to be enjoying herself, and Rohit Sharma himself (I believe) accompanies her in some parts. The lyrics are functional, situational again. A catchy one, which is not hampered by the raw sound — I wonder why they didn’t develop it further!

Rating: 4/5

 

9. Hamre Jobna Pe (Anaarkali’s Swag) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Indu Sonali, Lyrics by ~ Avinash Das

The second “Bonus Song” has more of a generic tune, heard-before, and not-too-catchy either. The composition sounds quite like “Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar” in many parts; maybe this was its precursor, and not finalised. Again, it is very short, and hasn’t been developed further than a stanza. There’s not much to say about the composition, so talking about the arrangements, I must say that the synthetic sounds added to it actually make it sound like a Bhojpuri film song. And the dholaks and harmonium lead the arrangements here too. Indu Sonali sings the song aptly, in her husky voice. The lyrics are something I didnt quite understand for the most. Middling.

Rating: 2/5

 

10. Laal Laal Cheekwa (Anwar’s Intro) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Rohit Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

The last song of this long album starts off quite simply with a simple dholak rhythm, which I’m sure you’ve heard somewhere before. The composition again, is not up to the mark, and the song lasts for a short one minute. The dholak arrangements break into a digital beat halfway through the track, and I wonder why the song hasn’t been polished before that; it sounds odd to hear a song that has been only half polished. Rohit Sharma’s vocals sound like Udit Narayan in places. The lyrics are situational yet again, and nothing to rave about. Dissatisfying.

Rating: 2/5


Anaarkali of Aarah was an album that bravely stuck to it’s script’s demands. It didn’t feel the requirement to rope in a famous pop singer to make it commercially viable. And as it is, it impressed me because of it’s honesty. The tunes are catchy, and aptly rustic, and clearly stick to the script. Rohit Sharma must have done lots of hard work researching about this style of music from Bihar and U.P. Kudos to that. Last but not the least, kudos to the makers for keeping the tunes as they were needed. Of course, the rating might go down due to the three bonus tracks, but this album was one with catchy tunes, covered with a coat of earth! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 2 + 4 + 4 + 2 + 2 = 34

Album Percentage: 68%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Badnaam Jiya De Gaari > Mann Beqaid Huva > Sa Ra Ra Ra = Aye Sakhi Ooh = Mera Balam Bambaiya > Lahanga Jhaanke > Dunaliya Mein Jung > Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar = Laal Laal Cheekwa = Hamre Jobna Pe

 

Remake Counter
No. of remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 00 (from Anarkali of Aarah) = 08

Which is your favourite song from Anaarkali of Aarah? Please vote for it below! 🙂 Thanks!

THE ‘HAUNT’ AND SOUL OF PUNJAB! (PHILLAURI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Shashwat Sachdev & Jasleen Kaur Royal
♪ Lyrics by: Anvita Dutt, Shellee, Aditya Sharma & Neeraj Rajawat
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th March 2017

Phillauri Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Phillauri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic / comedy / fantasy film starring Anushka Sharma, Suraj Sharma and Diljit Dosanjh in lead roles. The film is directed by Anshai Lal, and produced by Anushka Sharma, Karnesh Sharma and Fox Star Studios. The film is about a man named Kanan who is born under an ‘unlucky star’, and has been told he needs to marry a tree before marrying his love, so that his soul can be cleansed. To his horror/amazement/shock/whatever you might feel if you were in such a situation, he finds a spirit who used to live in the tree following him, unable to go back to her own realm. He needs to help her go back there, but before that she needs to feature in a film and all, so you better watch it, or else she will have come out of the tree for nothing. :p Enough movie promotion, let’s steer on to the music. A newcomer (I believe; and every other website I checked says the same — they also only believe, nobody knows??) Shashwat Sachdev has composed the majority of the album, and the baby-fairy-like sounding girl Jasleen Royal has composed two more. Now, if such a well-known person like Anushka Sharma decides to launch a comooser with her movie, it must mean he has something in him. Clean Slate Films (Anushka’s production company) has previously produced ‘NH10’ and boy, was its music album phenomenal, and also full of composers who has never quite made it big in the industry. This movie seems to have more of a mass appeal, and Jasleen has made it big in the industry already, so the debutant must be really good at his job! Let’s see!!


1. Dum Dum / Dum Dum (Punjabi Version) / Dum Dum (Reprise) [Diljit Dosanjh Version]

Singers ~ Romy & Vivek Hariharan / Romy & Vivek Hariharan / Diljit Dosanjh, Backing Vocals ~ Anurag Sharma, Pawni Pandey, Vibha Saraf, Varsha Tripathi, Abhiruchi Singh, Gaia, Meera Chandy / Anurag Sharma, Pawni Pandey, Vibha Saraf, Varsha Tripathi, Abhiruchi Singh, Gaia, Meera Chandy / Vivek Hariharan, Pawni Pandey & Anand Bhaskar, Music by ~ Shashwat Singh, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt / Shellee / Anvita Dutt

“Aankhein kitaabi, tu khole toh padh loon,
Kaajal si likkhi chhaapi, kahaaniyaan teri mere saiyaan!
Baatein bataashon si zubaan pe rakh doon,
Halke se pighlengi, bole tu chakh loon main saiyaan!”

– Anvita Dutt

Shashwat starts off his Bollywood debut with one of the most soulful folksy numbers I’ve ever heard in recent times. ‘Dum Dum ‘ starts off like a purely soulful Punjabi / Sufi song, with amazing instrumentation giving the perfect introduction into the song. The composition is an aptly folksy one, with numerous twists and turns throughout the song. The hookline is catchy, but some might get a bit annoyed by the fact that it repeats too many times — in the true sense of a Sufi song, if you ask me. So that didn’t bother me too much. The mukhda follows a very lilting tune, and the high-pitched antara really helps to consolidate the listeners’ interest in the song. It is the conclusion of the song which is really impressive, and Shashwat slows the pace down there, only to increase it towards the end beautifully ending the song on a high tempo. The arrangements are fantabulous, as said before. The folk instruments have been put to great use — especially the tablas, dholaks, the plucked string instruments and the other folksy percussions. The first two versions have primarily the same arrangements, but it is Diljit who gsts to sing against the backdrop of an almost unplugged instrumentation in his version. That makes things lively and ‘different’ and innovative; it is a bliss to the ears to hear such a grounded composition backed by digital music. But towards the end of the Diljit version, there’s a wonderful sitar piece that is to die for!! That part is sheer brilliance on the part of the music programmer. The vocals in all three version are very impressive. Romy makes his Bollywood debut (Although I think I’ve read his name somewhere, he calls this his debut.) with this wonderful Punjabi song. His voice has been reminding everybody of Shahid Mallya’s voice, and I felt that too, with a tinge of Divya Kumar as well. He gets extremely loud at parts, but the soul of the song doesn’t diminish in any way. Vivek Hariharan effectively joins him in the latter part of the song which I earlier described as the ‘Conclusion’, and his voice texture is sooooo beautiful, it is hard to not love his portion. And of course, the “dum dum dum dum dum dum hai dua” part which everyone should love so much. The singers reprise their roles in the Punjabi version, except with different Punjabi lyrics penned by Shellee, as opposed to the Hindi ones by Anvita Dutt. It kind of reduced the appeal of the song, and I couldn’t make myself to love that version, with different lyrics, which i couldn’t understand nor sing along to. Save an extra ad-lib at the beginning by Romy, this one is a carbon copy of the first version as far as arrangements go. Diljit’s rendition of the same is a bit toned-down, and could’ve been better, but the arrangements by Shashwat make up for the little void that his voice couldn’t fill. Guitars in this version sound more of the modern acoustic guitars than folk instruments, and it gives a nice and modern touch to the song. (Which is clearly for promotional purposes). The disappointing part of this version is that it doesn’t have the “conclusion” which I loved! The lyrics of the Hindi version are amazing, and I’m sure the ones by Shellee in the Punjabi version are too, but I couldn’t understand them! Unusual, because I usually grasp most of the Punjabi in other Punjabi Bollywood songs! A soulfully folksy start to the album!

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Hindi Version, 3/5 for the Punjabi Version, 3.5/5 for the Reprise Version by Diljit Dosanjh

 

2. What’s Up

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Jasleen Royal, Music by ~ Jasleen Royal, Lyrics by ~ Aditya Sharma 

“Ajj haathan di takiyan te khil aayi kaliyaan,
Surma laan akhiyan ch vekhe teri galiyaan,
Hansdi ae jachdi ae sohneya ve sachhiya
Nazraan na laggan ke khairan ne mangeya!”

– Aditya Sharma

The second song of the album is Jasleen Royal’s first out of the two she has composed in the album. This one is an upbeat Punjabi wedding song, and going by Jasleen’s list of songs, she has only one such song to her credit, which is ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which is one of my favourite Punjabi wedding songs of all time now. Now this song is also just as catchy and infectious. The energy just gets to you in no time. At first, the composition might seem very ordinary for a Punjabi wedding song, following the same template to the tee. But, as usually happens, later on I started loving the song just because of its immense simplicity. Jasleen’s composition is a sprightly one with nothing coming in the way of the listeners’ happiness. Especially the interludes she sings herself, are very cute and mood-uplifting. The other stanzas have been composed well too, and rendered boisterously by Mika, the go-to for such songs. Finally, he gets a song where he actually was required to sing it! The arrangements are as upbeat as can be, and Jasleen doesn’t necessarily recycle her ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ arrangements, but tries to make this sound different with more dhols. And the brass band makes an unignorable appearance in the song. It makes the song very breezy and happy-go-lucky. Of course, Jasleen also follows the traditional ‘play-the-hookline-on-brass-instruments’ method that Amaal Mallik recently followed in ‘Aashiq Surrender Hua’ (Badrinath Ki Dulhania). The vocals are amazing. As I mentioned, nobody but Mika could’ve sung this wih the same energy, and he sings like the old Mika, the Mika everybody enjoyed! So it is very enjoyable. Jasleen, in her fairy-like voice, sings her two stanzas very well, and though they are mere interludes, they get etched into your memory. They are very cute and sprightly. Aditya Sharma’s lyrics are fun and enjoyable, describing a Punjabi wedding beautifully! One of the more catchy Punjabi wedding songs of recent times!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Naughty Billo

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh, Nakash Aziz, Shilpi Paul & Anushka Sharma, Backng vocals ~ Vivek Hariharan, Romy, Shilpi Paul & Surya Raghunathan, Music by ~ Shashwat Sachdev, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt

“Malmal wala kurta rang firozi tha,
Uss par kaatil ik button tha Chaandi da,
Do nainon ka woh hamla, phass gaya bhola jatt yamla,
Marta kya na Karta!”

– Anvita Dutt

This song is Shashwat’s ticket to getting more and more offers from more and more producers and directors later on. Why? Because of the sheer innovativeness with which he has handled this song. Okay, so let me start from the beginning. The song is an experimental Punjabi dance song, quite similar to so many of the Punjabi pop numbers of today. However, there’s a nice catch in here. And that is the fact that Shashwat has so cleverly infused funky groove into the Punjabi song. The composition could’ve been better, but everything else covers that up, because the song excels in all other departments. I’ve not heard such a perfect Punjabi pop -ish number in quite a while. The song starts with a traditional old-fashioned Punjabi portion and we as listeners think the entire will follow suit. However, just as we are sure that will happen, Shashwat takes us by surprise and introduces a catchy (and purely modern, mind you) hookline that just makes you listen on! It is kind of a reprise to the old ‘Jhooth Boliya’ song. The arrangements are so experimental, and offbeat, that you just end up loving them. The funky beats are enough to make you dance without any inhibitions. Shashwat adds nice dhol percussion, and awesome brass instruments add the necessary funky element, not to mention the quintessential tumbi. So many backing vocalists randomly add their portions into the song as the song progresses, and it sounds like a free-for-all jam. Whatever the result is though, it is really innovative. The vocals are great too, with Diljit handling the Punjabi parts well, and Nakash the hookline. Shilpi Paul does well in her short parts, but Anushka steals the thunder with her full-of-attitude rap towards the end of the song. And it’s not even the “I-will-do-anything-just-to-make-my-movie-work” kind of stint! She actually sounds awesome in this new rapper form of hers! Anvita Dutt’s lyrics are fun and enjoyable. A fun funky song!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Sahiba

Singers ~ Romy & Pawni Pandey, Backing Vocals ~ Vivek Hariharan, Anurag Singh, Vibha Saraf, Abhiruchi Singh, Pawni Pandey, Varsha Tripathi & Gaia, Music by ~ Shashwat Sachdev, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt

“Tujhse aisa uljha, dil dhaaga dhaaga khincha,
Dargah pe jaise ho chadaron sa bichha,
Yun hi roz yeh udhadha buna,
Kissa ishq ka kai baar, humne phir se likha!
Sahebaan, sahebaan, chal wahaan jahaan Mirza!”

– Anvita Dutt

The way this song starts, reminds me of the starting of ‘Deewani Mastani’ (Bajirao Mastani). Anyway, the song is no doubt the best song of the album. Shashwat comes with yet another earthy folksy melody with this song. The mukhda starts quite slowly, but you will definitely start loving the song after you hear the hookline, which has a catchy and attractive old-world charm to it. Pawni Pandey’s antara has been composed very soulfully, in heart-rending low notes. Later the male part once again takes the song on a wonderful folksy route. However, it is the ‘conclusion’ of the song, that steals the spotlight. The song breaks into a Qawwali-esque mode there. Right from the “ohh sahibaaaaa…” till the end of the song, the song goes on a never-ending high, until the song itself ends. The “tere bina” verse is marvellous! Arrangements in this track are fabulous. The plucked strings (David Sinchury, Sanjoy Das, Youngmin Kim, Shashwat Sachdev) at the beginning, that oh-so-majestically reminded me of ‘Deewani Mastani’, are so gripping; they just pull you into the song. Also, Shashwat introduces a jingling sound in the beat after that, and it sounds so rustic and folksy! Lovely like never before. The percussions that break out in the hookline are wondrous as well. dholaks (Manoj Kumar) very well put the Punjabi theme of the song into action. The orchestra (Czech National Symphony Orchestra) works wonderfully throughout the song to give it a regal tinge, and they’ve accomplished it, I’m glad to say! The vocals by Romy are ravishing. The part he sings after Pawni’s, he has sung that so beautifully! And the Qawwali part too! It just gave me goosebumps! Pawni comes across as decent; she doesn’t seem to be managing the low notes too well. However Romy covers it with his magnificence in handling both high and low notes. The lyrics by Anvita Dutt are amazing here as well. Soul-stirring!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Bajaake Tumba

Singers ~ Romy & Shehnaz Akhtar, Backing Vocals ~ Vivek Hariharan, Music by ~ Shashwat Sachdev, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt

“Bajaake tumba, saare pind ki kudiyon ka, phillauri nachda!”

– Anvita Dutt

The folk doesn’t seem to get over just yet. Shashwat has yet another song left, and he makes sure the Punjabi folk influence doesn’t leave his songs until the last one. This one is a fun and enjoyable, but clearly situational song, which we listeners won’t be able to make heads or tails of as of yet, but it is fun to hear at least! It is an upbeat traditional bhangra number with an amazingly catchy tune considering its situational nature. It starts off quite odd, but gets better and better as it goes on. The hookline comes as an unexpected one with odd notes, that don’t match the fun nature of the other notes. That’s where the song gets interesting and experimental. The best part I loved in the song was the “oh yaara mere phirrrr na pooochooo aage kya hogaa…” part which was so smoothly sung by the singer!! The ‘timb lakk lakk timb’ loop is fun as well. The arrangements are just as fun as the composition. Of course dhols, dhadd, nagadas and the tumba make an integral part of the arrangements. A wonderful flutes assortment plays through the interlude. And the harmonium is splendid, too! The tempo increase towards the end is amusing as well! The two singers, Romy and Shehnaz Akhtar, do an amazing job in bringing forth the celebratory nature of the song through their singing. Though I’m not so qualified as to know who sang what, what I heard sounds good, and so I’m assuming both sang well. :p The backing vocalists play an important part in this song too, and their inputs make the song fun to listen to. About the lyrics, it seems that it is a kind of a story-telling session like we commonly see in films, where the man tells his friends about his experiences in winning the girl’s heart… Maybe? I don’t know. Enjoyable, but to an extent that can be crossed only after watching the film.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Din Shagna Da

Singer ~ Jasleen Royal, Music by ~ Jasleen Royal, Lyrics by ~ Neeraj Rajawat

“Jaavan na main bin shehnaiyan
Satrangi rubaiyaan,
Sunaa ja tu harjaiyaa..
Shamiyaana sajavan
Doli leke main aavan
Aatishbazi karaake
Tenu leke main jaavan”

– Neeraj Rajawat

Jasleen re-enters the soundtrack with her second track, which is actually her pop single which she has released in 2013. The song has been incorporated as it was into the soundtrack. It is a bidaai song with its own merits. The composition lies quite close to most of her previous songs, but is also instantly likeable; you don’t get time to compare it with the others because it is so emotional and heart-moving. Also, she takes the help of wonderful instrumentation to uplift the sound of this song. Instead of her usual acoustic guitar arrangements, she also adds apt dholaks, a sarangi, and I was surprised to hear a nice piano introduction to the song, and that plucked string instrument in the interlude is amazing! The magic lies in the second stanza, where she has programmed everything with a nice sound effect to it (can’t describe, but hear from 2:30 to the end) The composition is so heart-rending, (and I’ll say that it is already a common song that plays at weddings!) that it is perfectly apt for the situation. The vocals are beautiful. Jasleen sounds sweet and nothing less. Neeraj Rajawat’s lyrics, or whatever I could make out of them, are beautiful. A great depiction of the “sad” side of a wedding!

Rating: 4/5


Phillauri is an album full of the heart and soul of Punjab. No rapper comes to degrade Punjab’s honour, and create a dismal image of Punjab in our heads. On the other hand, two talented youngsters don the captain’s hat and compose some wonderful songs with the essence of the real Punjab. It is so true to the folk music of Punjab that it gets haunting at some point! Shashwat and Jasleen present, the heart haunt and soul of Punjab! 🙂

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 5 + 3.5 + 4 = 32

Album Percentage: 80%

Final Rating of This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sahiba > Naughty Billo > What’s Up = Din Shagna Da = Dum Dum > Dum Dum (Reprise) = Bajaake Tumba > Dum Dum (Punjabi Version)

 

Remake Counter:
No. of Remakes: 08 (From previous albums) + 00 (from Phillauri) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Phillauri? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

PREPARE TO GET TRAPPED IN THE BGM!! (TRAPPED – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Alokananda Dasgupta
♪ Lyrics by: Rajeshwari Dasgupta
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 11th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 17th March 2017

Trapped Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Trapped is an upcoming Bollywood psychological thriller starring Rajkummar Rao, Geetanjali Thapa and Khushboo Upadhyaya. The film has been directed by ‘Udaan’ and ‘Lootera’ fame Vikramaditya Motwane, and produced by Madhu Mantena, Vikas Bahl and Anurag Kashyap. The film is about a man who gets locked (or ‘Trapped’ as the makers call it) inside his own apartment home. I better not speculate about the flaws in the story, because many idiotic Facebook memes have already done it, without watching the movie; so be it. I’m sure there is more than meets the eye to this movie’s storyline. Anyway, the music. Vikramaditya Motwane, after doing two films, both of whose albums were composed by Amit Trivedi, now goes with a debutante, Alokananda Dasgupta. I’m guessing this new composer is more adept at composing background scores, because two of the four songs are instrumentals, and since the movie didn’t need song-and-dance sequences as such, Vikramaditya roped her in for this one. I suppose. Anyway, I’m expecting it to be a nice, niche-audience soundtrack, and I hope I fall into the niche category that this album has been made for!


1.Dheemi

Singer ~ Tejas Menon

“Dheemi, Dheemi, jaise yeh ehsaas,
Raatein, saugaatein, lagey, hai khaas..”

Alokananda starts her stint as a music director in Bollywood with an unconventional and offbeat romantic track that soothes despite all the oddities and dissimilarities it holds with the mainstream romantic tracks of today. The wonderful soothing guitar riff starts the song off on a lilting note, and when the melody starts, you are startled for a while since it is very offbeat. The tune is essentially not something that would appeal to everyone of us, but as you might know, I have a tendency of loving these unconventional songs. The composition is beautiful wih the right amount of soothing qualities in it. It doesn’t have much by way of stanzas; there’s just a single stanza at the beginning which dissipates into a wonderful harmonious choir humming towards the end of the two-and-a-half-minute long (or short) song! Newcomer Tejas Menon is impressive behind the mic, and he gets that feathery quality wonderfully in his voice. The song almost sounds like something straight out of an Indie music platform. 😅 You decide which platform exactly. Akokananda’s awesome variations in the humming portion really bring the best out of the singers. Arrangements are quite minimal, with only the aforementioned guitars. And they are fabulous. Strings too, have been played nicely. Rajeshwari Dasgupta does a decent job at the lyrics; nothing much to lap up by poetry freaks though. A feel-good romantic song to start the album off.

Rating: 4/5

 

2.Hai Tu

Singer ~ Gowri Jayakumar

“Raina beetey na yeh toh, dhoondhe tere naina,
Tu hai toh hai sakoon, hai tu, hai tu…”

The next song is primarily a version of ‘Dheemi’ with different lyrics and a female voice singing it, bt you won’t realise that it is a Reprise unless you really pay close attention to the composition and the tune of the background instruments. This song falls into the jazz genre, and the composition is quite weak in front of the previous song. The random pauses in the middle aren’t quite agreeable with me. The hookline is like a very uncontrolled lash-out by the singer. If it would have been given a slightly more shaped-out composition without such a freestyle nature, it would’ve been lots better. The singer Gowri Jayakumar, who I believe we last heard in the ‘Detective Byomkesh Bakshy’ soundtrack, goes all out trying to make it sound unconventional, but it just doesn’t click. The humming portion at the end of the hookline is what resembles ‘Dheemi’s humming bits. The instrumentation in this one though, is beautiful. The piano makes everything sound so cool and calm, and it gives a very soothing feeling to the ears, quite like certain Western songs do. The clarinet towards the end coupled with the strings, is awesome, as is the mouth organ throughout the song in the interludes. The lyrics here too, are nothing great. A slightly awkward song, which would suit better in the BGM while watching the film.

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Trapped (Theme)

(Instrumental)

The first out of the two instrumentals on the soundtrack arrives. This one starts off very promisingly. With dreamy sounds of wind instruments and then tinny sounds of the piano’s high notes, this one then breaks out into a lilting lullaby-ish number, very simple and sweet to the core. The basic melody played out on the piano is so heart-moving, it is definite that it will infuse magic into whatever scene it is picturised on in the movie. And then the violins come in, and also the mandolin. All these instruments work together in harmony to lift up the mood of the listener, who is in for the time of his life. (Or maybe day). Later, a clarinet joins and the song just becomes so pleasing to the senses. It is hard to fathom that though the background music is so important in bringing out the true emotions of the scene, most filmmakers don’t even bother to release it. The track ends soothingly, just as soothingly as it had started. A track which will definitely lull you in the theatres, but also lulls you at home too, something that I rarely find in instrumentals!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. I Am Trapped (Theme)

(Instrumental)

A short background piece follows, and this one is extremely creative and innovative. The silence in the beginning prepares you for something eerie, and eerie is what you get, when random construction-worker noises, water drops, and intense strings follow. It seems that this one is going to accompany the viewers while they get psychologically tricked during the film. The bass has been used wonderfully as a scary sound. A great background piece!

Rating: 4.5/5


Trapped is a nice little album. While the vocal tracks don’t provide much by way of entertainment, it is commendable of the makers to stick to the content of the film and not diverge from it just to get an audience to the theatres. The background pieces included in the album are splendid and it just throws light on the unfortunate fact that background music is so underrated in Bollywood. Disney’s ‘Beauty and The Beast’ soundtrack which released recently lists as many as 52 tracks, despite how short they are or how noticeable they are in the film. Each and every instrument in the movie is noticed and released in the soundtrack. So why not Bollywood…? Chew on it! As for ‘Trapped’ I must say that you should get prepared to be ‘Trapped’ in the BGM!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 2 + 5 + 4.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 77.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Trapped (Theme) > I Am Trapped (Theme) > Dheemi > Hai Tu

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 08 (previous albums) + 00 (from Trapped) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Trapped? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A TRIED-AND-TESTED MACHINE! (MACHINE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Dr. Zeus & Viju Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Arafat Mehmood, Niket Pandey, Ikka, Mohammed Irfan, Jasmine Sandlas, Shabbir Ahmed & Late Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 17th March 2017

Machine Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Machine is an upcoming Bollywood romantic thriller starring Kiara Advani and Mustafa Burmawalla, who is the son of Abbas Burmawalla. The directors of the film are Abbas-Mustan themselves, and the movie has been produced by Jayantilal Gada, Haresh Patel, Pranay Chokshi, Abbas-Mustan Films productions, and Dhaval Jayantilal Gada. The film revolves around two racing enthusiasts who fall in love. Abbas-Mustan’a films are known as very massy thrillers, and this seems to be no exception. Music seems to play a very important part in their films, and they make it a point to promote their films’ albums heavily before the movie’s release. And they’ve worked quite well with whatever compoosed they’ve worked with in the past. With the exception of their latest movie before this, ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ which had quite a dull album (and it wasn’t a thriller), many of their albums have been hits. They’ve collaborated with Jatin-Lalit (‘Khiladi’), Anu Malik (‘Baazigar’, ‘Baadshaah’, ‘Soldier’, ‘Ajnabee’), Himesh Reshammiya (‘Humraaz’, ‘Taarzan: The Wonder Car’, ‘Aitraaz’, ’36 China Town’) and Pritam (‘Naqaab’, ‘Race’, ‘Players’, ‘Race 2’). All of these albums were quite popular. However, the album to ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ was below even that. And it was a multicomposer album! This time around, the duo try to change that by roping in a single composer for five songs of the album, and a guest composer for one song. The man behind most of the album here is Tanishk Bagchi, who is currently riding on the success of his two enjoyable songs from ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. He has worked with the duo in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’, for one song (the best song of that album). The guest composer is Dr. Zeus, who also had a song in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’. I’m expecting quite a lot from Tanishk though, so let’s jump right in!


1.Itna Tumhe

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Can’t find any lyrics worth this space)

The soundtrack opens wih a romantic song filled with the Bhatts’ templated sound, but also paying “homage” to another old song, which, since it hasn’t been credited, has to be a “coincidence”. The song’s first line itself makes you instantly think of “Aakhir Tumhe Aana Hai” (Yalgaar), but all the coincidences flee at the end of that line, as composer Tanishk Bagchi sets the song to its very own composition that is quite catchy in itself. Now, Tanishk has never really given such a templated song before, at least not in the romance genre of songs, so it takes a little time to get accustomed to the fact that Tanishk has composed it. Till then, though, the song grows on you. The similarities in the first line of the mukhda notwithstanding, the rest of the song fares quite well as a romantic Bollywood song. Some places sound very heavily heard-before, but that doesn’t lessen the likeability in any way. The antara with its high notes sounds a bit uncomfortable to the ears at first, but sets in after a couple of listens. As a whole, it sounds like a song that the Bhatts had reserved but then never got a film to add it into. The English interlude by Shashaa Tirupati sounds very generic, but again, good enough. The arrangements are what makes the song even more likeable — the strings at the beginning are nice, and the digital beats are charming. Not to mention the cool twinkling sounds that Tanishk had added, which adds considerably to the ‘mechanical’ sound of the song, given that the name of the movie is “Machine”. Yasser Desai (who had dented last year with a couple of songs in ‘Beiimaan Love’ which I had no time to review) doesn’t quite fit in with the song, and his voice is kind of hard to digest; it sounds too robotic. Autotuned heavily, it is quite weird to listen to at first, but as everything else does, his voice also sets in later. Shashaa does her English interlude beautifully, but other than that, doesn’t have any other lines. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics are quite laidback, not to mention that the conscious effort to add the “..aana hai” and other rhyming stuff at the end of every hookline sounds a bit too forced! An above average start to the soundtrack, but gets the “Machine” theme right, because of the great arrangements and accidentally mechanical vocals.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Chatur Naar

Singers ~ Nakash Aziz & Shashaa Tirupati & Ikka, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Niket Pandey, Rap by ~ Ikka

(Utterly banal lyrics!)

Next up we get a party song, which is mandatory in every Abbas-Mustan film, so that they can show the actor driving up in a cool Lamborghini, and then the branded sunglasses of the actress. This time, without Pritam, they have to resort themselves to a quite low-standard party song (I believe that Pritam has given them the best party songs in the past) which tries to be a remake of the classic ‘Ek Chatur Naar’ (Padosan) but fails, because it sounds nothing like it except in bits and parts. And since they haven’t credited the old song’s musicians, I’m taking it to be a ‘spin-off’ like I did for ‘Mere Miyan Gaye England’ (Rangoon). The composition is upbeat and might (notice that I say MIGHT) get Gen Y dancing to its beats, which I still think are too loud for today’s music sensibilities. Though the composition is something I wouldn’t care to listen to again, the arrangements are quite youthful and lively. The beats really do make the song enjoyable, and Tanishk’s offbeat additions make the arrangements all the more weirdly likeable. Weird vocal tweaks added in the weirdest places are quite funny to hear. Otherwise, the composition is quite generic. The vocals are enjoyable as well. Nakash Aziz is enjoying himself in this party track, and his variations make the song worth listening. Shashaa Tirupati sings her lines like a typical club song singer, and she gets her voice programmed heavily as is the tradition in such songs. Ikka’s rap is very short thankfully, and it is not that great either. The other lyrics by Niket Pandey are another set of words more bent towards rhyming instead of making sense. Heard as a club song, it might work. But if you hear it thinking it is a remake, it will spoil the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Brake’An Fail

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rajveer Singh & Ikka, Music by ~ Dr. Zeus, Lyrics by ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rap by ~ Ikka

“Teri Meri Kahaani, duniya yaad karegi soch le,
Brake’An ne mereya fail te sajjna, rok saki te rok le!”

– Jasmine Sandlas

Dr. Zeus enters the soundtrack with his guest composition, another club/party song. Abbas-Mustan seriously can’t go without adding at least two of these in their albums! The song surprisingly, shows no resemblance to previous Dr. Zeus songs, and I was really surprised when I couldn’t find any of those screeching ladies and that trademark Dr. Zeus shattering glass in the song! The composition is quite a melancholic one, considering that it is for a club song. I mean, if he removed the club beats, it could just as well go as an undercover agent and place itself in a Sanjay Leela Bhansali soundtrack as the melancholic track. (Okay, just kidding!) The hookline “teri meri kahaani…” is quite catchy, and the rest of the song too, isn’t bad at all. The composition is actually catchy for once. It is one of those Dr. Zeus songs (probably the only one?) that doesn’t irritate. The arrangements are suitable for the song, and this time, Dr. Zeus aptly replaces those screaming ladies (from ‘Happy New Year’s ‘Lovely’ and ‘Ek Paheli Leela’s ‘Desi Look’) with car brake sounds, according to the theme of the movie, car racing. Jasmine’s vocals suit the song well, and the song wouldn’t have had the same impact with somebody else singing it. Rajveer Singh has quite little to contribute but Ikka has an extra long rap in the middle somewhere, which we just have to wait for it to end. Jasmine herself writes the lyrics for this one, and they are completely in Punjabi, and they seem quite meaningless, considering that it is a Club song. A good song from Dr. Zeus after all those screaming ladies and all that shattering glass.

Rating: 3/5

 

4.Tu Hi Toh Mera

Singer ~ Yasser Desai, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Very staid lyrics!)

Tanishk re-enters wih the fourth track of the album and one can’t help but think of Disney Princesses when this track starts. The arrangements really increase the Disney feel of the song. The composition is quite likeable until that jarring Pakistani pop styled line comes up and the hookline that follows too, follows the same template. The parts where the tempo is slow and everything actually sounds like a ballroom dance, are the best parts of the song, while everything else sounds below average, straight out of a Bhatt movie. The arrangements too, excel in the ballroom portions of the song. The sparkling sounds, coupled with the extravagant strings, set very fantastic arrangements to the song, and especially the beginning of the song, which is very waltzy, sounds amazing. But again, the parts before and during the hookline, sound very laidback and clichéd. There is a nice Spanish interlude which is enjoyable as well. Again, Yasser tries to be Arijit desperately, and one can’t help but sit and point out parts where he sounds a LOT like Arijit, which is almost the entire song. It would’ve been better for the makers to have just called in Arijit. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics here too, are very very heard-before and offer nothing new. A Bhatt-Disney fusion doesn’t work so well.

Rating: 2/5

 

5.Tera Junoon

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

“Jeena muhaal hai abb, tera sawaal hai abb,
De bataa, tu zara, kya naam loon main tere pyaar ka!”

– Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

Finally, here comes what I was expecting from Tanishk after he showed us his versatility in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. The composer takes his much-used desert-nomadic styled arrangements (he used it before in ‘Rabba’ from ‘Sarbjit’) and weaves a wonderful melody through it. The composition is just so melodious, it hooks you right away. It is one of those songs that you end up loving even though they are so ordinary, simple and heard-before. However, what made me love this one in spite of all these factors, was the simplicity of the composition, the fact that the déjà vu in the composition didn’t matter to the makers, and they just presented this song with a very simple coating. The arrangements are fascinating, with the mandolin rising high above everything else, even the strings. The claps give wonderful beats that are the highlight of the song. The overlying Arabic flavour works wonderfully in favour of the song. And the vocals are beautiful! Jubin sings in a way I’ve never heard him sing before, so much so that I hardly recognized him the first time I heard the song, until I read the credits! Well, it just goes to show his versatility. Arafat Mehmood is joined by Mohammed Irfan the singer to write this one, and I must say, the composition saved the lyrics, which resort to weird-sounding words to make it work. A great song hidden in an album of songs that are concentrated more in the “average” zone!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Cheez Badi

Singers ~ Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Viju Shah, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Tu Cheez Badi hai mast mast, tu cheez badi hai mast!”

– Late Anand Bakshi

The last song of the album was a later addition in that it released much later than the other five tracks did. And since I’m always so late in writing reviews, I get the advantage of adding such latecomer songs in my reviews. 😉 Anyway, about the song. As you might already have gauged by reading the name, the song is a remake (this time an official one) of the 1994 super-duper hit track by Viju Shah (who was one of the most innovative young composers of the time) ‘Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast Mast’ (Mohra). And the man who has been churning out one remake after another, Tanishk Bagchi, is in charge of this one. It was a relief to see him remaking it, instead of T-Series’ other go-to’s for remakes these days, Gourov-Roshin. So after two great 90s songs remade, Tanishk remakes this one with the club theme in mind. It starts off like an ordinary club song, but then that trademark “Pa ni saaaa…” from the old song comes in to indicate that it is a remake of that song. The composition contains almost nothing new except for a short line that Udit Narayan sings (he has redubbed everything for this song; his voice clipping hasn’t been retained from the old song). And yes, that line sounds quite odd in the song. It doesn’t gel in well with the rest of the song. The previous two remakes by Tanishk of course, had the old song’s tune retained, so this one is an odd one out that way. I liked the way he brought the old song’s antara’s tune to become the mukhda and then the antara too, of this version. The arrangements disappoint, with very everyday club beats. The mandolin playing the hookline’s tune provides respite, and so do the electronic tabla beats, but otherwise, the EDM is quite heavy, and too loud as well. The interludes both consist of very heavy EDM that is tough to digest with one of your favourite old songs. I enjoyed the small portion where Tanishk incorporated the old song though, in the second interlude. Vocals by Udit Narayan are awesome; he always manages to sound young! Neha Kakkar too, sings her parts well, without adding unnecessary nuances anywhere. Shabbir Ahmed’s additions to Anand Bakshi’s original lyrics are not any more crazy than the original, and the part which goes “zabardast dast” really calls for a cringe. Not one of Tanishk’s best remakes, but I would say it isn’t his “dosh dosh” as new lyrics have been added, unlike his other remakes (with the exception of the “Badrinath” title song).

Rating: 3/5


Machine seems to be an album miserably bowing down to supposed public demands. There’s a remake, three club songs, three Bhatt-ish romantic songs (of which one excels). Tanishk’s songs range from one sode of the spectrum to the other. If some are utterly boring, some are just as beautiful. Dr. Zeus gets it right with his sole song, but it won’t be something on my playlist for long. A tried-and-tested machine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 3.5 + 2 + 4.5 + 3 = 18

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Junoon > Brake’An Fail > Itna Tumhe = Cheez Badi > Tu Hi Toh Mera = Chatur Naar

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 07 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Machine) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Machine? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂