GRAND BUT BLAND!! (BAAHUBALI 2: THE CONCLUSION – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: M.M. Kreem
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th April 2017

Baahubali 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Baahubali 2: The Conclusion is an upcoming Indian epic historical fiction film, starring Prabhas, Anushka Shetty, Rana Daggubati, Sathyaraj, and Tamannaah Bhatia. The film has been directed by S.S. Rajamouli, and produced by Shobu Yarlagadda and Prasad Devineni. The film is being distributed in Hindi by Karan Johar’s Dharma Productions. The film is a sequel to 2015’s super-duper hit ‘Baahubali: The Beginning’. Technically this one is a prequel and (SPOILER ALERT FOR ALL WHO HAVEN’T WATCHED THE FIRST FILM, IF ANY OF YOU EXIST) shows the story of Baahubali himself, as opposed to his son Shiva’s story in the first film. It also gives the answer that all India is awaiting — Why Katappa Killed Baahubali. The makers have even made it into a trend called #WKKB. 😂 Anyway, the music director of the film is the same man who did the first film (of course!), M.M. Kreem. The first album was very situational, but three songs nevertheless stood out, out of seven. This album is smaller in size, with five songs, and I also hope it is better in terms of quality too. What I’m expecting is grand, royal and majestic music. And I’m pretty sure I will get it too. Without further delay, let’s jump right into the album to this much-awaited film of 2017.


1. Jiyo Re Bahubali

Singers ~ Daler Mehndi, Sanjeev Chimmalgi & Ramya Behra

“Gali gali teri lau jali, jiyo re Baahubali,
Praanon se badhke humko hai, tu pyaara,
Sab gaayenge, dohraayenge, abb tera jayjaykara!”

The album starts off aptly with a grand, anthemic title song giving the titular character, Baahubali, a larger-than-life image, projecting him as a Superman. The composition by Kreem is quite similar to his other such songs that were included in the first movie. It flows freely, the only impediment it face being the anthemic “Aisa, woh aisa, jaise parvat avichal sa” chants, that kind of restrict the flow of the song. The female portion has been composed very beautifully, and also the mukhda by Daler Mehndi. The rest is very passable, and forgettable as soon as you finish listening to the song. Kreem uses the strings section from ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ from the first film, a very clever inclusion because that portion was like the definition of the song, and the theme song of the film. That brings us to Kreem’s arrangements, which are, very suitably, full of grand war-based sounds, like the booming percussions and impressive strings. The chorus portions are least effective however, and fail to raise the interest of the listener. Vocals are grand, and Daler Mehndi aces the mukhda and hookline. He has just as much scope in the song as Bombay Jayshri had in ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ and Kailash Kher in ‘Jal Rahi Hain’ (Both songs from the first film, in which these singers had negligible portions compared to the chorus, who took away the most part of the song). Similarly, here, Ramya Behra in her stunning antara, and Sanjeev Chimmalgi in his antara. Again, I reiterate that the chorus portions, though important in keeping with that whole war theme of the movie, sound very mediocre. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics take the grandeur to another level. Only partially impressive in every department except lyrics, in which it is completely impressive!

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Veeron Ke Veer Aa

Singers ~ Aditi Paul & Deepu

“Oh oh re raja, veeron ke veer aa,
Nainon se tu na door hona,
Main toh hoon teri, phir kaisi deri,
Le jaa jahaan tera thikaana,
Haath se ye haath jod lo na,
Hai saath dono ko behna,
Bas teri hai Devasena!”

As soon as the song starts, I got reminded of a construction site, metal clanging against metal, hammers and construction tools at the go. It reminded me a bit of ‘Manohari’ from the first movie. Turns out it isn’t a construction song though, as the lyrics clearly indicate. Anyway, first things first — the composition. M.M. Kreem provides this very weird-sounding composition, which sounds seductive at places (as it is supposed to be), but falls flat in others. The “na na, na na, na na” loop sounds amazing, and the mukhda hooks you, but, as happened in the first song, you will lose your interest in the antara. It just has such a haphazard composition which you can’t keep track of, so you just give up. The bridge line between the antara and hookline though, is cleverly done. The vocals are good, not great. Neeti Mohan would’ve been perfect for the song. I’m still waiting for Aditi Paul to come with another stellar song like ‘Ang Laga De’ (Ram-Leela). That being said, she manages to convey the romance nicely, and does the seductive-Devasena thing properly. Her companion, Deepu, also does well. Kreem’s arrangements barring the construction site sounds are fascinating; a very nice assortment of strings and brass instruments give the song a much-needed grandeur. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are functional for the situation. Good but not great.

Rating: 3/5

 

3. Soja Zara

 Singer ~ Madhushree

“Gopiyon ke peeche, phire tu nisdin, palchhin,
Thhak gaye paanv tere!
Saans zara le le, ruk jaa Kanha, thham ja,
Maan bhi jaa pagle!
Saanvare! Baawre!
Kal bhi hongi ye rang raliyaan,
Kal phir aana oh re chhaliya,
Dooba yeh din, chal so jaa!
Kanha soja zara, oh Kanha soja zara!”

Now this is what I was waiting for from this album. A song with a very charming old-world 90s charm to it, this one is a nice and sweet romantic song, using the example of Radha-Krishna, like so many romantic songs like to do in Indian songs. Kreem’s composition is majestic and magnificent, obviously based in a Carnatic Raaga, and the result is just enticing! The mukhda pulls in the listener right away, wih its lilting and upbeat tune, two qualities we don’t quite get in the same song nowadays! The mellifluous hookline is a respite from the jarring hooklines of many recent songs, and the antara is just fabulous with its sweetness double than that of the mukhda. The composer also decorates the composition with wonderful arrangements — on a catchy beat that almost sounds Caribbean if the Carnatic melody is removed from the song! The flute stands out, as it should if the song is based on Lord Krishna! Guitars too, have been played very enticingly, and you can’t not like them! The duff gives a nice old-fashioned-sounding beat to the song. The flute show in the second interlude is MIND-BLOWING!! Madhushree (after a long time!!) proves herself yet again, and though I was initially wishing Shreya Ghoshal had sung this one after hearing its Telugu version, I’m satisfied with Madhushree’s rendition as well. The backing chorus in this song surpasses any backing chorus I’ve heard this year! Their conclusion to the song from 4:00 onwards in the song, ends the song on a beautiful note. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here are as cute and sweet as those two words can get! MAGNIFICENT!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Jay-Jaykara

Singer ~ Kailash Kher

“Kya kabhi ambar se, surya bichhadta hai?
Kya kabhi bin baati, deepak jalta hai?
Kaisi hai yeh anhonee, har aankh hui nam,
Chhod gaya jo tu, kaise jiyenge hum?
Tu hi kinaara, tu hi sahara, tu jag saara,
Tu hi humaara suraj, tu hi taara,
Jay-Jaykara, Jay-Jaykara,
Swami dena saath humaara!”

Kailash Kher, who had sung two songs in the previous film’s album, out of which I loved none, rather got bored by both, returns in this album to sing yet another melancholic song, something I get really apprehensive of hearing. However, to my pleasant surprise, this song is actually better than all the other melancholic Kailash Kher songs out there. The tedium hits you initially but wears off with the advent of that war-chant-like chorus in the interlude after the mukhda. The composition is soulful, but I wouldn’t exactly call it heart-rending. Again, the humming from ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ is incorporated into this song. From the antara, the song sounds very lively, and not melancholic. Kreem’s arrangements help to make this easier, the booming percussion providing an awesome beat, and the strings infusing grandeur and a majestic quality to the song. Kailash Kher has sung well, in his trademark style, and he has been well supported by the chorus singers, who take it away in that interlude I wrote about above. The lyrics make out to us that it isn’t exactly a sad song, it is rather a plea from the subjects to their king Baahubali. And Manoj Muntashir has written them so well, they actually compel you to focus on them instead of the composition for most of the time! A song with great lyrics, a good composition and supported by amazing arrangements, but lacking in repeat value. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Shivam

“Kya mrityu uss maha samar ki janani hai,
Jiska, varnan, srushti karti,
Kya ambar ki nagari se woh rakhwala aaya,
Jiske paanv choome dharti?”

Another melancholic-sounding song starts, but yet again, the beginning deceives us as it changes course soon enough. This song is like a short background score, an anthem of sorts. There is very less by way of composition, and so, it doesn’t quite stay with you as a listener. The arrangements too, are minimal except for a nice background percussion that gives the song its anthemic quality. The santoor that starts the song is great. The chorus again takes centre stage for most of the song, but the lead vocals are by Kreem’s son, Kaala Bhairava. The lyrics have very little substance, but are very well written. A song made to be heard in the cinema hall.

Rating: 2/5


Baahubali 2 is an album that fits in with its predecessor. The songs do not make much sense or appeal to one without the visuals. The case was similar with the previous album. At least that one had two to three amazing songs to hear as audio songs. Here? Just one. I’m happy at least that one song is outstanding! A soundtrack that sounds grand, but deep down below, is bland!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 3 + 5 + 3.5 + 2 = 16.5

Album Percentage: 66%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Soja Zara > Jay-Jaykara > Veeron Ke Veer Aa = Jiyo Re Bahubali > Shivam

 

Which is your favourite song from Baahubali 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “GRAND BUT BLAND!! (BAAHUBALI 2: THE CONCLUSION – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

  1. Well written review of a good but nit great album. Actually i m disappointed with the album as the 1st part had more songs n better ones too. But not at all disappointed by ur review.
    Keep up the good work 🙂 👍

    Like

Leave A Comment...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s