WELCOME TO 2012!! (WELCOME TO NEW YORK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Shamir Tandon & Meet Bros.
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Kausar Munir, Sajid Khan, Danish Sabri, Charanjeet Charan & Varun Likhate
♪ Music Label: Pooja Music / Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 16th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd February 2018

Welcome To New York Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Welcome to New York is a Bollywood comedy starring Sonakshi Sinha, Diljit Dosanjh, Karan Johar, Boman Irani, Lara Dutta, Riteish Deshmukh and a bunch of whoever turned up at the 2017 IIFA Awards held at New York City. The film is directed by Chakri Toleti and produced by Vashu Bhagnani and Jackky Bhagnani. Now, the film seems to be a huge two hour long advertisement for IIFA, and no wonder it flopped. On top of that, the music is by people who aren’t very famous for giving great music (at least not anymore) — Sajid-Wajid, Meet Bros & Shamir Tandon. So let’s see whether the music of this film is just as farcical as the film itself seems to be!

A film that seems to be made on a whim, just because people happened to be available to make a film with, has music too, that seems to be made on a whim. What else can justify the creation of a song called Pant Mein Gun? Maybe the fact that Sajid-Wajid have composed it makes it a bit less shocking. The only good that comes out of this one, is that we know that Sajid-Wajid know how to play with EDM now. But that’s not good, either, considering how great they are at doing the live instruments thing. Diljit Dosanjh and Sajid himself belt this one out as if they’re robots, repeating the same lines over and over again. This is definitely one of those songs that are so bad that they are good! Highly recommended.
The other one by Sajid-Wajid is Nain Phisal Gaye, a quite entertaining song about a tailor fantasizing that she is stitching clothes for Salman Khan. How interesting. 😐 Well, Sajid-Wajid’s composition is purely desi thankfully; they get the best out of themselves when they go the desi way, and has a kind of retro vibe to it. The lyrics by Kausar Munir are fun, though situational, with ample references to words that come across everyday in a tailor’s business. Payal Dev sings it effectively, and thankfully doesn’t repeat her horrific act from ‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’ (Kaabil) last year.
Shamir Tandon gets two songs as well, with Ishtehaar turning out to be the best of the album, but only because of it adhering to the conventional Bollywood sad song template, and roping in Rahat Fateh Ali Khan makes it all work. Dhvani Bhanushali, debuting in Bollywood with this song, makes it sure that she is here to stay for some time. Her voice is perfect for Bollywood! The flute has been played wonderfully in this song, and that’s pretty much all that is noteworthy!
Shamir’s other song, Smiley Song, is a song where the composer himself, along with Dhvani Bhanushali and Boman Irani take it in turns to try and imitate the laughter of a number of Bollywood celebrities — it gets highly irritating after a point.
The last song is by Meet Bros, a Punjabi number which sounds like we have all heard it many times before, bearing the name Meher Hai Rab Di. The song itself doesn’t have “rab di mehr” because of its laidback sound and typical lyrics and whatnot. Also, it is sung by Mika (don’t need to explain why that is an excuse for it’s being bad) and Khushboo Grewal, who hardly gets anything to sing.

As a means of timepass also, this album fails miserably! Welcome to 2012 I would say, when songs like these were oh-so-prevalent.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 6 = 29.5

Album Percentage: 59%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishtehaar > Nain Phisal Gaye > Meher Hai Rab Di > Smiley Song > Pant Mein Gun


Which is your favourite song from Welcome To New York? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂



Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Jeet Gannguli & Sandeep Shirodkar
♪ Lyrics by: Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 23rd January 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 15th January 2018

Phir Se… Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Phir Se… Is a Bollywood film starring Kunal Kohli and Jennifer Winget, directed by Kunal Kohli and Ajay Bhuyan, and produced by The Bombay Film Company. The film, originally slated for theatrical release in 2015, got postponed indefinitely due to legal issues, so the makes finally decided to release it this year directly in Netflix. The music is by Jeet Gannguli, who was quite active back in 2015, and so let’s see if the songs fall into his “superhit” category of songs or just sound dated!

The last time Jeet Gannguli composed in a Hindi film was so long ago, I can only guess and not tell with certainty (of course, without a quick search through my blog). So I guess it was ‘Raaz Reboot’ in September 2016. And I believe he composed only one song last year, in ‘Ranchi Diaries’. Now, this movie was slated to release in 2015, and ended up releasing on Netflix in 2018. So technically, he still hasn’t composed for a new film since ‘Raaz Reboot’, barring the single song he composed for ‘Ranchi Diaries’. It still makes me glad to hear his music again, for some reason, because it is always the same formula, but almost always works. So here goes!
The title track of Phir Se was released as a T-Series single sung by Amruta Fadnavis and Amitabh Bachchan. I immediately recognised the tune, But couldn’t place it and my friend (he knows who he is) immediately linked it to that song. Of course, this version is better, with Nikhil D’Souza and Shreya Ghoshal on vocals. The sultry tune, coupled with a saxophone arrangement makes it feel calming. A Remix by Sandeep Shirodkar, is passable, because I doubt it will be noticeable enough to be played in clubs and whatnot. The Sad Version too, wouldn’t have mattered even if it hadn’t been in the album.
The mukhda of the title track is used as the antara of Maine Socha Ke Chura Loon, a song whose delay probably led Jeet Gannguli to recycle it and use it as ‘Lo Maan Liya’ (Raaz Reboot). The composition is similar to that song at many places. Arijit does a great job, as he always does in a Gannguli composition, while Shreya barely gets time to make a difference. Arrangements are once again soothing.
The next half of the album consists of upbeat tracks, relatively. Mohit Chauhan leads both of them as the male vocalist, joined by Tulsi Kumar in one, and Monali Thakur and Shreya Ghoshal in the other. The Mohit-Tulsi combo works surprisingly well in Rozana, a song with a distinct early 2000s Kunal Kohli film sound. It would be be a surprise if Jatin-Lalit had composed this one. Jeet also uses the ‘Ladki Kyon’ guitar riff from ‘Hum Tum’ to hark back to the filmmaker’s film. The trio of Mohit, Monali and Shreya end up giving my favourite song of the soundtrack, Yeh Dil Jo Hai Badmaash Hai, an upbeat track with an amazingly catchy tune. Surprisingly enough, Monali is not overshadowed by Shreya as one would expect, but both get their part in the song. Mohit is wonderful as always in these types of songs.

Jeet’s three-year-old album still wouldn’t have changed if he would have tried to tweak it in 2017. I would expect the same thing from Jeet whether it is 2015 or 2020.


Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 5 + 6 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 8 = 41

Album Percentage: 68.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Yeh Dil Jo Hai Badmaash Hai > Maine Socha Ke Chura Loon = Rozana > Phir Se > Phir Se (Sad) > Phir Se (Remix)


Which is your favourite song from Phir SePlease vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Yo Yo Honey Singh, Rochak Kohli, Amaal Mallik, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Saurabh-Vaibhav & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Yo Yo Honey Singh, Singhsta, Oye Sheraa, Kumaar, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa, Swapnil Tiwari & Sham Balkar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd February 2018

Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety is a Bollywood comedy film starring Kartik Aaryan, Sunny Singh and Nushrat Bharucha in lead roles. The film is directed by Luv Ranjan, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Luv Ranjan and Ankur Garg. The film’s “success” (by which I only mean box office success) can be attributed to the hit music the album featured, by artists like Yo Yo Honey Singh (who is back after a long break), Rochak Kohli, Amaal Mallik, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa and debutants Saurabh-Vaibhav. Let’s jump right into my review because there’s not much to say, three weeks after the film released! 😂

Yo Yo Honey Singh, after an I-don’t-know-how-long hiatus returns to Bollywood, with this album. What a surprise T-Series gives him only remakes to handle. And surprisingly, he too, handles them with care! Dil Chori, remake of Anand Raaj Anand composed and Hans Raj Hans sung pop single ‘Dil Chori Sada Ho Gaya’, becomes a catchy party number, and since the original song itself featured the words nasha and talli, Honey Singh needs no extra efforts in structuring his rap all around daaru. But the digital dhol rhythm really makes it lively. The female vocalist Simar Kaur also does well in a Kaala Doreya-esque cameo. It took a long time to grow on me though. His other song Chhote Chhote Peg is a remake of Anand Raaj Anand composed, Hans Raj Hans sung Bollywood Song ‘Tote Tote’ (Bichchoo), and this song too, sounds better than the original, if not good. The song is an ugly mishmash of a weird Neha Kakkar line that doesn’t match at all with the hook of the old song, though Navraj Hans sings the new hook better than his father had in the old song. Also, these lyrics fit into the tune more than “Tote Tote Ho Gaya Dil Tote Tote Ho Gaya“. 😆 Bt that doesn’t mean the lyrics themselves are exceptional — they’re quite the opposite. And they’re by people who call themselves weird names like Oye Sheraa and Singhsta. Again, Honey Singh steals the show with arrangements only. The trap music is catchy, as are the other techno sounds used. I can’t really say either of his songs are bad as such, but they’re just not good either.
Amaal Mallik returns with another ‘Sooraj Dooba Hai’ but this time it has tropical house vibes. Also this time the “Sooraj Dooba Hai” actually happens Subah Subah. 😂 Arijit doesn’t sound as fresh as he sounded in ‘Sooraj Dooba Hai’, probably because he sang so many such songs after that. And Prakriti sounds functional, but then nobody else could’ve sung her parts better, either. Overall, a good song, but could have been better.
The next song is by a composer who is quite on the rise these days, Guru Randhawa, being helped by T-Series to get his songs into any movie where there’s the scope of a clubbish number with Punjabi lyrics. Of course, ‘Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety’ was the obvious film that his song Kaun Nachdi was made for. The Punjabi sound is merged well with the electronic sound, giving it a fresh and enjoyable groove. The surprise element here is Neeti Mohan, getting back to back songs, where she aces her portions with amazing vocals. Her high-pitched voice sounds so good! And Guru himself sings and writes the song entertainingly, befitting to the movie’s theme.
Rochak Kohli, another composer who seems to be getting a lot of movies one after the other, but still hasn’t done a complete album (at least as far as I can recall), enters the album next, with two songs that are quite templatised with respect to the sound they carry. Lakk Mera Hit is a typical Punjabi ladies’ sangeet number, with Sukriti Kakar not doing her best behind the mic, but Rochak’s arrangements are entertaining, even though they have nothing new in them. The composition is such a heard-before one, it is hard to like it, especially in 2018.
Tera Yaar Hoon Main fares better, the melancholia channeled this time not for a breakup between lovers, but for a rift between best friends. The lyrics here (Kumaar) are the best lyrics of any song on the album, obviously, and Arijit delivers yet another beautiful rendition. The composition, though again not very fresh, does create an impact with its stretched notes and abrupt hookline. The Punjabi intermission towards the end was unexpected, but amazing. The arrangements are soulful, with great use of guitar and piano.
The seemingly debutant duo Saurabh-Vaibhav come up with a song tailor-made for Mika, Sweety Slowly Slowly, but I must say, the song itself isn’t bad. Though Mika, as is his habit, eats up half of each word in the lyrics, the entertaining composition coupled with the nice groovy beats makes for an entertaining but situational listen! I don’t understand why Mika drops the “z” from “badtameez“, the “se” from “Please” and so on, in the antara, though!
Probably the grooviest of the groovy numbers is what I’ve saved for the end — Bom Diggy Diggy. Now, this isn’t the kind of song I usually like. But I’ve got to admit, Zack Knight has churned up something really catchy here! Sounding a lot like those English pop songs until the Punjabi/Rajasthani interruption in the middle, the song really holds your attention from the initial harmonium portion. Of course, T-Series must’ve had to buy rights to Zack Knight’s single from 2017 ‘Bom Diggy’, but it has turned out to be worth the deal. Jasmin Walia’s voice is cute, despite the numerous mispronunciations.

Overall, this is an album full of club numbers, each one different from the rest, but it is the soulful song that stands out of the bunch of club songs, and a well-made club song adapted from a pop song by an independent artist, steals the show.


Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 6 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 8.5 = 59.5

Album Percentage: 74.38%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Yaar Hoon Main = Bom Diggy Diggy > Subah Subah = Kaun Nachdi > Sweety Slowly Slowly = Dil Chori = Lakk Mera Hit > Chhote Chhote Peg


Which is your favourite song from Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂


Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 02 (from previous albums) + 03 (from Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety) = 05


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli & Ankit Tiwari
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 1st February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 16th February 2018

Aiyaary Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Aiyaary is a Bollywood thriller starring an ensemble cast comprising Sidharth Malhotra, Manoj Bajpayee, Rakul Preet Singh, Vikram Gokhale, Pooja Chopra, Naseeruddin Shah, Kumud Mishra, Adil Hussain and Anupam Kher. The film is directed by Neeraj Pandey and produced by Reliance Entertainment and Pen Studios. Well, the fate of the film and its music has akready been decided, but for the record, I’m completing the albums I missed on my break– this being one of the first ones. The music is by Rochak Kohli and Ankit Tiwari, the former getting a lot of work nowadays, but the latter getting almost no work at all. Anyway, I expect an album that has nothing to do with the film, because it’s a Neeraj Pandey film after all. Hopefully, the songs will be listenable out of the film, if they’re in the film in the first place, that is. Let’s dive right in.

Rochak Kohli’s start to 2018 comes with Lae Dooba, a rehash of his 2017 hit ‘Rozana’ (Naam Shabana), this time in Sunidhi Chauhan’s voice. The song is great even by itself though, with Sunidhi slaying it as always with the calm tune, and the soothing arrangements playing their magic on you. The antara’s composition treads dangerously close to that of ‘Rozana’s antara, and Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics also become ‘Jab Chhooke Tu Nikle’ here, just like it was ‘Mujhe Chhooke Tu Guzar‘ in ‘Rozana’. Rochak is getting typecast now, but still manages to give great music. The arrangements are soothing too, with nice percussion (Sanket Naik) and amazing guitars (Mohit Dogra, Ankur Mukherjee).
His other song Shuru Kar has a nice anthemic vibe to it, harking back to Neerja’s ‘Aankhein Milayenge Darr Se’. Amit Mishra is the perfect rockstar to sing this song, and Neha Bhasin in her short role does well. It works in its intentions to rouse a certain motivation in our heart. Muntashir’s lyrics here are good too, going well with the patriotic and motivational vibe of the song. What will put one off instantly though, are the three stanzas with the exact same tune, making the song sound too repetitive, to top its already repetitive hookline.
Added later to the album, giving me a chance to review it now, is Lae Dooba By Asees Kaur, which is a clubbish interpretation of that song, where Asees graduates from her position as the backing vocalist, to the lead vocalist. Rochak’s lively electronic arrangement here is fresh and entertaining, and what’s best is that it has a life out of the movie. (Actually all Neeraj Pandey movie songs have lives outside the movie because they rarely fit into the movie – “M.S. Dhoni” being the exception!)
Ankit’s Yaad Hai sounds a lot like a Himesh Reshammiya composition, especially the parts the composer himself sings. Palak Muchhal sounds great here, except for a few blunders in diction that should have been rectified. (The first few lines are barely intelligible.) Arrangements are beautiful — especially the piano (Zafar Iqubal Ansari) and violins. Reading DJ Phukan’s name (one of Pritam’s frequent collaborators) in the credits as the arranger and producer doesn’t surprise me, because such beautiful arrangements can only be done by him! The lyrics of this song happen to be the best of the album; not surprising, seeing the past record of songs that Tiwari and Muntashir have made together.

A typical Neeraj Pandey short, simple and straightforward soundtrack with no ‘Aiyaary’ (sorcery) whatsoever.


Total Points Scored by This Album:8.5 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 8 = 30.5

Album Percentage: 76.25%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Lae Dooba > Yaad Hai > Lae Dooba By Asees Kaur > Shuru Kar

Which is your favourite song from Aiyaary? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sanjay Leela Bhansali
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Siddharth-Garima & Swaroop Khan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st January 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th January 2018

Padmaavat Album Cover


Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes

Padmaavat is an upcoming Bollywood period film starring Deepika Padukone, Shahid Kapoor and Ranveer Singh in lead roles, and Aditi Rao Hydari, Jim Sarbh, Raza Murad and Anupriya Goenka in supporting roles. The film is directed by Sanjay Leela Bhansali and produced by himself along with Sudhanshu Vats and Ajit Andhare. So the film has been in the news for the past three months and so, and as happy as I am that it is finally releasing, I can’t stop wondering what Bhansali himself must have gone through during all this. Anyway, on to the music. Bhansali had started off in ‘Khamoshi’ with a composer duo that was quite famous back then — Jatin-Lalit. With his next film though, he started to push debutants, and we got Ismail Darbar and Monty Sharma. However, with “Guzaarish”, he started composing his films’ music himself, and that tradition has carried on to his fourth film after “Guzaarish”. The results were phenomenal everytime he composed for a film himself, and I’m expecting, of course, this one to be no less!!

Before going into the songs, two things I notice immediately are how late the music has released, since music plays such an integral part of Bhansali’s films, and the second thing I notice is corollary to that — it has only six songs, breaking the usual Bhansali tradition of ten songs — it seems this movie hinges more on its script than its music. That being said though, the album is a treat for lovers of music from different regions! Now, let’s see how the songs fared for me.
The minor blemishes in Ghoomar (will get to them) are wisely covered up by an enticing Rajasthani folk chorus and arrangement, which doesn’t make it necessary to delve deeper into the song for any criticism. The starting and end chorus portions let by Swaroop Khan, complemented by the wonderful female chorus — Aditi Paul, Tarannum Mallik, Pratibha Baghel & Kalpana Gandharv, are brilliant and rich in their sound, grand as an SLB song can only be. The blemishes referred to earlier are mainly whenever Shreya goes into ultra-high pitch, as in the antara. Percussions are delightful, with the dhols and khartals stealing the show, and the subtle sarangi and shehnaai too, make their presence felt. The only other song on the album that sounds Rajasthan-based is Holi, a folk song of the Manganiyar and Langa communities. Richa Sharma’s stupendous rendition figures well amidst the Mughal-e-Azam-esque music, with Shail Hada’s wonderful Aalaaps making the Mughal-e-Azam-esque feeling stronger! The tablas and all other percussions too, for that matter, are wonderful here, as is the sitar, and even the wonderful peacock sounds.
The next part of the album sounds wholly and solely Middle-Eastern, in keeping with the Khilji Dynasty sound. Khalibali seems to be a celebratory number in the villain’s lair, where the villain is lovestruck at first sight of you-know-who. And if the film had been produced by Disney, the song would not have been out of place. Not that it is out of place here too, but can’t imagine Khilji dancing to this just as I couldn’t imagine Bajirao dancing to ‘Malhari’ until I saw it. The song itself is quite enjoyable, with an overbearing Balkan touch, and nice Arabic warbling in the backing chorus. Shivam Pathak has a nice time crooning the song, and gets the evilness of Khilji quite perfect. Shail Hada complements him well. I just don’t know why it starts like a song from a movie like “Robot”. The arrangements are great — the Arabic violins, percussions give it an enjoyable touch.
More enjoyable as a Middle-Eastern themed song is Binte Dil by Arijit, breaking the usual Arijit-SLB song stereotype. The warbling by Arijit here is amazing, but gets awkward after a point. The oud and percussions are well done. The song starts promisingly but slows down in the middle portions, where Arijit sounds strained. The compositions of both these Khilji songs are quite ho-hum too, frankly.
The other two songs fit neither in the Rajasthan category nor the Middle-Eastern themed category. That being said, Ek Dil Ek Jaan is a wonderful Sufi romantic number, sung wonderfully by Shivam Pathak, the lucky man who gets to sing for both the male leads. The song is highly propped on his vocals, because otherwise it is a typical SLB Raag yaman number, almost a mix of ‘Laal Ishq’ (Ram-Leela) and ‘Aayat’ (Bajirao Mastani) in equal proportions. The best of the album also features here; Nainowale Ne by Neeti Mohan is a wonderful romantic number, which is heavily inspired by classical music. Neeti’s rendition is one of her most cute yet mature renditions yet. Bhansali increases the song’s richness by adding wonderful musical arrangements like the sitar, santoor, peacocks (again), matka, and the beautiful backing chorus towards the end and in the interlude. The song is way too short, and I wish it were much, much longer!! Siddharth-Garima’s lyrics are beautiful too, with a mix of innocence and sensuousness.

On a concluding note, you might have noticed I wrote almost nothing  about the lyrics in the album — thats because barring Siddharth-Garima’s ‘Nainowale Ne’, the lyrics are nothing but the usual, run-of-the-mill material.

Not as intriguing as Bhansali’s other albums, but definitely has a place of its own, with so much musical richness in the arrangements!


Total Points Scored by This Album:8.5 + 8.5 + 8 + 8 + 8 + 9.5 = 50.5

Album Percentage: 84.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  Nainowale Ne > Holi = Ghoomar > Khalibali = Ek Dil Ek Jaan = Binte Dil


Which is your favourite song from Padmaavat? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Nitin Krishna Menon, Ajay Govind, Raajeev V. Bhalla, Joi Barua & Pawan Rasaily
♪ Lyrics by: Ajay Govind, Akshay K. Saxena & Joi Barua
♪ Music Label: Kahwa Music
♪ Music Released On: 12th January 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th January 2018

My Birthday Song Album Cover


Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes

My Birthday Song is an upcoming Bollywood thriller starring Sanjay Suri and Nora Fatehi in lead roles. The film is directed by Samir Soni, and produced by Sanjay Suri and Samir Soni. The music for the film is composed by Nitin Krishna Menon, Ajay Govind, Rajeev Bhalla, Joi Barua & Pawan Rasaily. I know Rajeev had composed the title track for ‘O Teri’ back in 2014, and it was enjoyable, and Joi Barua’s last, ‘Dusokute’ from ‘Margarita With A Straw’ was an exceptional song, so expectations are there from these two. As for the lead composer duo, Nitin & Ajay, I’ve not heard anything about them! I am prepared to be surprised, though!!

The title song of My Birthday Song is perfect for a movie of this genre — and the melancholia is welcome because it is a fresh change from the Mithoon school of melancholia. The Western sound of it brings a new sound to the industry, a zone where not many composers like to tread these days. However, the pace of Raajeev Bhalla’s composition is so slow, that when I thought the song was over, only three of its four minutes had passed. Of the chunk of the album composed by Nitin Krishna Menon & Ajay Govind, the best are the two songs sung by Mohan Kanan. While Ajnabi has a beautiful retro vibe to it, with a smile-inducing composition and fresh lyrics by Ajay, Mohan renders it beautifully with his low-pitched voice. Ghayal is more on the melancholic side, but still manages to hook me till the end, despite its six minute duration. Again, thanks to Mohan’s vocals, and the duo’s wonderful programming and arrangements.
The Joi Barua chunk of the album has a song composed by the duo that composed the last two songs, Nitin-Ajay, and a song composed by the singer himself, along with guitarist Pawan Rasaily. The former is Bhaag, a rock song, which could’ve been better in terms of melody, but then, it is a rock number. The duo’s arrangements are good. The lyrics too, are good. The last song is Rain, composed by Joi himself, with amazing guitar work by Pawan Rasaily. It is an English song, with a sensuous vibe to it, and does what it is supposed to, in just over two minutes.

An album which I’m glad to have stumbled upon! 🙂

Total Points Scored by This Album:6 + 7.5 + 7 + 6 + 6.5 = 33

Album Percentage: 66%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ajnabi > Ghayal > Rain > My Birthday Song = Bhaag


Which is your favourite song from My Birthday Song? Please vote for it below! Thanks ! 🙂


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 26th December 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th January 2018

Padman Album Cover


Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes

Pad Man is an upcoming Bollywood social drama directed by R. Balki, starring Akshay Kumar, Radhika Apte and Sonam Kapoor. The film is produced by Twinkle Khanna, SPE Films India, Cape Of Good Films, KriArj Entertainment and Hope Productions. The film revolves around the story of Arunachalam Muruganantham, a social activist from Tamil Nadu. The film is set to release a day prior to Republic Day, a day that is by default reserved for Akshay Kumar films. This time, Balki does not rely on his frequent collaborator Ilaiyaraaja to score music, but instead borrows his wife, Gauri Shinde’s go-to composer Amit Trivedi, who had scored for both of her films, ‘English Vinglish’ and ‘Dear Zindagi’. This is the first time he will compose for Balki and I believe, for Akshay Kumar too. I expect a lot from him after his successful ‘Qaidi Band’, ‘Secret Superstar’ and ‘Rukh’ last year! Let’s see how the music album for this film turns out!

After completing three albums last year, and using Arijit’s voice in two of them, Amit returns in the new year with his first song being an Arijit song. Aaj Se Teri is a heavenly romantic post-marriage number, whose lyrics by Kausar Munir (2017 is over but she’s still impressing us with her lyrics!) make it even better; the composition is a sweet 90s-ish tune, and Arijit sounding like Kumar Sanu in some parts makes it even better. The amazing arrangements include wonderful shehnaai (Omkar Dhumal) and Ethnic strings by Tapas Roy. The Pad Man Song shows that Amit really enjoys working with Mika, after ‘Sexy Baliye’ in ‘Secret Superstar’, and the result shows itself in an upbeat desi number, with an amazing ladies’ chorus (Deepti Rege, Mayuri Kudalkar & Pragati Joshi). The ladies’ chorus is in Trivedi’s ‘Ghanchakkar Babu’ (Ghanchakkar) zone, especially with the weird Chinese-sounding interruptions. The interlude is owned by the chorus though. The percussions in the song are amazing, and the harmonium (Akhlak Hussain Varsi) gives it a delightful U.P.-Bihar vibe, though Trivedi’s composition itself falls flat in places. The lyrics though, are a great subversion of the conventional image if a ‘superhero’, and make me believe that a ‘real superhero’ is nothing like that. Hu Ba Hu is a clubbish number that makes you wonder where the makers intend to place it in the film, but the signature Amit tune, vocals and arrangements (especially the mandolin, rabaab et al by Tapas Roy) hark back to ‘Queen’s ‘Badra Bahaar’ and ‘O Gujariya’ at the same time, and make it a very enjoyable listen. The onomatopoeia at the beginning is really catchy too, and works properly to suck you into the song. Also amazing are Munir’s lyrics, about two individuals striving to accomplish a joint mission, probably referring to the characters essayed by Akshay and Sonam.
Sayaani is the ‘Pad Man’ equivalent to ‘Dangal’s ‘Idiot Banna’, this time with four leading singers, including Yashita Sharma, Jonita Gandhi, Yashika Sikka and Rani Kaur. The backing vocalists also include Meghna Mishra, the young lead singer of “Secret Superstar”! The song itself seems like a mishmash of many wedding songs of Bollywood, and at one point it sounds exactly like a certain song, which I cant remember now! The ladies do sing amazingly though, and Trivedi’s arrangements make it more enjoyable, with the percussions yet again taking centre stage. Also enjoyable are the strings by Tapas Roy. The last song Saale Sapne is another trademark Trivedi affair, has shades of songs from “Queen” and the drums from ‘Gudgudi’ from “Secret Superstar” appear here too. Mohit Chauhan sings well, but the song seems too long to enjoy completely, and too typical. When the second antara starts, it starts to get tedious! Kausar’s lyrics are the only highlight of the song.

Amit continues to play safe, and stays in his comfort zone.


Total Points Scored by This Album: 8.5 + 7.5 + 8 + 7 + 6.5 = 37.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Se Teri > Hu Ba Hu > The Pad Man Song > Sayaani > Saale Sapne


Which is your favourite song from Pad Man? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂