THE MUSICAL SUPERHERO RESURFACES!! (BHAVESH JOSHI SUPERHERO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya, Anurag Kashyap, Babu Haabi & Naezy
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 1st June 2018

Bhavesh Joshi Superhero Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Bhavesh Joshi Superhero is a Bollywood action film starring Harshvardhan Kapoor, Priyanshu Painyuli and Nishikant Kamat, directed by Vikramaditya Motwane and produced by Reliance Entertainment, Eros International, Anurag Kashyap, Madhu Mantena and Vikas Bahl. The film is about a group of friends who set out to expose the water scams and other wrong activities in the city. When one of the friends dies, Sikandar (played by Harshvardhan Kapoor) sets out to become a vigilante and avenge his friend’s death and stop the corruption in the city. The film is quite different from what Motwane has made in the past, and it shows he is a versatile filmmaker, never repeating his formula. Of course, for music, he ropes in Amit Trivedi, after that one movie, ‘Trapped’, where he didn’t compose the music. Let’s see, what with all the soundtracks of his releasing this year, can Trivedi do a great job for a director whose films he is known to have done great music for?


The soundtrack starts off with a song called Hum Hain Insaaf that actually summarises the entire theme of the movie in three minutes — in a groovy rap track set to catchy beats and music by Trivedi, and rendered just as addictively by Babu Haabi and Naezy. Babu Haabi sounds much more amazing than he did two years ago in the songs of ‘Udta Punjab’, while Naezy sounds great as usual. Trivedi’s digital beats are catchy, especially the opening bars, which immediately attract your attention. The rap in this song actually doesn’t get boring at any point; it is fun also to listen to the lyrics, which are meaningful (written by Anurag Kashyap, Babu Haabi and Naezy together). The hookline has an anthemic ring to it, perfect for such a movie.

The other song that carries the change-the-world theme in its lyrics is Qasam Kha Li, because Bollywood superheroes can’t go without a dramatic oath ceremony. Just kidding, Phantom ‘Ph’ans. 🙂 Anyway, the song seems to have been quite easy for Trivedi, having composed ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’ (Raid) just recently. Maybe he called Papon over and said, “Let’s record two songs, both having the same blood running through them, and let’s see which one ends up in which movie.” That being said, this song is just as soulful and beautiful as the other, and clearly this fits into the ‘Bhavesh Joshi Superhero’ soundtrack more than the other song, and again, I was just joking about the “Let’s see which movie blah blah.” The strings and drums used by Trivedi are captivating throughout the song, and Papon’s sombre rendition is perfect for this retrospective number. Towards the end, Trivedi sets right what went wrong in Blackmail’s ‘Nindaraan Diyaan’ — he uses the rock template in a much better way than he did there (where he spoiled the entire climax of the song by overdoing the rock)! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are beautiful, and just perfect for what I’d imagine an Indian common man superhero to sing. 🙂

It is Chavanprash which has probably polarised audiences about this soundtrack; it is a super-cheesy and typical Trivedi qawwali-ish number with just as cheesy lyrics by Bhattacharya, but hey, I did enjoy it! Trivedi, first of all, is an expert at making such songs catchy, and he brings back his ‘Ghanchakkar’ self to make a kind of amalgamation of three songs from that soundtrack — ‘Ghanchakkar Babu’, ‘Allah Meherbaan’ and ‘Jholu Ram’. Divya Kumar’s effusive vocals make it known that you’re supposed to have fun listening to and crooning this song. And Amitabh’s lyrics, even the cringeworthy hookline, are fun! Trivedi adda those qawwali elements like the bulbultarang, and rock elements, and his signature quirky female chorus (Arohi Mhatre and Pragati Joshi) are ever loyal and give yet another enjoyable performance. The ‘satak’, ‘jhatak‘ effect in the antaras are so fun. Anyway, I love this song and you can judge me for it.

The best of the soundtrack comes with Tafreeh, where Trivedi starts the proceedings with a heady digital rhythm coupled with a nice guitar loop, and the Vikramaditya Motwane side of Amit Trivedi surfaces for the first time in this Vikramaditya Motwane soundtrack; the song instantly sends you back to the ‘Udaan’ soundtrack, more so because of Trivedi’s dreamy melody, than the arrangements. Also, he sings the ‘Chal Zaraa…” portion so amazingly, it’s hard not to get addicted! That beat he keeps up for the entire song in the background never gets repetitive. He even uses marching rhythms later on! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics have a certain message we all need to understand; the ‘carpe diem‘ philosophy resounding very vehemently throughout the song. Again, Trivedi does the rock parts well, and ends the song on a very entrancing high.


I won’t have many supporters for this statement, but I’m going to go ahead and call this Trivedi’s best soundtrack after a long time! Motwane really brings out the musical superhero that Trivedi really is! 😊

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 = 33

Album Percentage: 82.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tafreeh > Chavanprash > Qasam Kha Li > Hum Hain Insaaf

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhavesh Joshi Superhero? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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A HAPPY WEDDING OF PUNJABI AND ELECTRONIC MUSIC!! (VEERE DI WEDDING – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Shashwat Sachdev, Vishal Mishra, Qaran Mehta & White Noise
♪ Lyrics by: Anvita Dutt, Raj Shekhar, Shellee, Shashwat Sachdev, Gaurav Solanki, Qaran Mehta, Rupin Pahwa, Badshah & White Noise
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 8th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 1st June 2018

Veere Di Wedding Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Veere Di Wedding is a Bollywood coming-of-age film revolving around four friends played by Kareena Kapoor Khan, Sonam K. Ahuja, Swara Bhasker and Shikha Talsania. The film is directed by Shashanka Ghosh and produced by Ekta Kapoor, Shobha Kapoor, Anil Kapoor and Rhea Kapoor. Now, the film has been creating buzz right from its trailer release, and the music which has become a rage across the nation already (not all songs but a select few) has been composed by composers including Shashwat Sachdev, Vishal Mishra, Qaran Mehta and White Noise. Shashwat and Vishal are two young talents that haven’t yet disappointed with whatever they’ve composed. On the other hand, Qaran, who has been assisting music directors like Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Pritam for quite some time now, gets to make his composing debut with this film, and White Noise is actually Sachin-Jigar’s Artists & Repertoire venture like Pritam’s JAM8. So there is reason enough to believe this will be an enjoyable multicomposer album.


The lead composer, Shashwat Sachdev, actually has four songs in the album, which is half the number of original songs there are in the album, so let’s start with his songs. 😁
Pappi Le Loon, the album opener on all the streaming websites as well, is a fun-filled, catchy number, where, surprisingly, the vocals arrangements outdo the composition! You can even say there is almost nothing by way of composition; the entire stress is laid on the way the sound interacts with the booming vocals by Sunidhi Chauhan. Shashwat’s electronic music is impressive too, and as such, he didn’t need a strong tune, to make this song any better! Everything has been done by the entertaining vocals and arrangements. The Punjabi-flavoured portions nicely marry the electronic sound and make this song one to look forward to in the album — one of the main attractions in the album, I would say. And when has Sunidhi Chauhan ever underperformed? And Shellee’s lyrics are suitably quirky and fun.
In another Punjab-meets-electronic music fusion, Sachdev serves a folk song in modern packaging, quite the same way he did ‘Naughty Billo’ back in ‘Phillauri’, where he turned the folk song ‘Jhooth Boliya’ into a trippy hip-hop number. Here he gets to remake ‘Bhangra Ta Sajda’ into an EDM-Punjabi music fusion track named Bhangra Ta Sajda (No One Gives A Damn!). The song itself is really entertaining; it has everything you’d require to groove at a wedding, and out of one too — trippy EDM, entertaining dhols, and a nice touch of sarangi, something Shashwat seems to love hiding in each of his upbeat songs. Romy delivers an amazing performance, and Neha Kakkar delivers one which made me like her voice in a song after a long, long time. The initial retro-ish portion of the song has been done well, and Gaurav Solanki’s lyrics are just quirky fun. (I have a feeling I’ll be saying this about every song in the album)
Shashwat’s best comes with Bass Gira De Raja, where he composes, writes and sings the song! The song is standard Shashwat quirky fusion; the composition instantly has you hooked,and the lyrics actually had me smiling at certain points. The man sings amazingly too, and once the bass drops, the song becomes much more interesting than it was when it started. The way Sachdev plays and experiments with different sounds is what makes me look forward to his composing for many more films in the future. In ‘Phillauri’ he got to do a completely traditional Punjabi sound, and the fact that he is doing such experimental stuff here, showcases his versatility and talent!
His weakest song, and probably the weakest song of the album, Aa Jao Na, comes next, with its repetitive tune that is actually the typical Arijit melody. Even though it reaches a peak at one point, it just goes back to same droning nature over and over again — which gets really boring after a point. What’s more, composer Shashwat Sachdev doesn’t even give us much to chew on as Arijit belts out the repetitive tune — just digital beats and very few piano notes, which don’t really fill in the gaps well. Anyway, I know this song is going to be the biggest and most popular, so whatever I just wrote might just not matter.
The composer with the next largest number of songs is yet another upcoming talent Vishal Mishra, who still has me stunned by his amazing two songs in ‘Qarib Qarib Singlle’ last year. His part of the album starts with the song that everyone loved right from the trailer, Veere, which can best be described as the movie’s theme song. He takes the friendship theme of the film, and constructs such a positive composition using that idea, it’s quite surprising this song didn’t come from a Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy or a Pritam! It totally belongs to the rom-com age of Bollywood when they made happy songs like this for movies like ‘Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu’, ‘Anjaana Anjaani’, etc. The hookline has the listener in a trance the first time it plays, and keeps entrancing the listeners everytime it plays! To break the trance though, unfortunately, there are some elements that the song could’ve done without. First of all, the too-many-to-keep-track-of female singers! If you ask me, Aditi Singh Sharma was the only one who should have sung the female part, because I can unfortunately make out Iulia Vantur over there, and unfortunately, she starts the unfortunate female portion. How unfortunate. But happily, things are better in the second antara, where Vishal Mishra comes back to take things under control, and the female chorus here sounds amazing. He’s the second composer on the album now, who sings just as well as he composes! Wow! We have a cool future for Bollywood music! 🙂 Also, Anvita Dutt’s lyrics make for a really enjoyable friendship anthem, so that middle portion can easily be ignored!
Vishal Mishra sings his next song Dagmag Dagmag along with Payal Dev, who sounds like a less hyperactive version of Neha Kakkar. Anyway, the song could be easily mistaken for an Amit Trivedi song, with that amazingly catchy digital beat, and quirky tune. The hookline, which sounds the cheesiest the first time, really sets in with the passage of time (the number of times you listen to the song) and doesn’t sound as cheesy later on. The arrangements are mostly digital, as mentioned above, and that’s mainly where it resembles the Trivedi sound. Both the singers do an amazing job and seem to have had a fun time singing this track.
Qaran Mehta’s Tareefan, is an insanely catchy and addictive club track, Badshah sounding like he has never sounded before! Qaran’s programming is the main reason the song sounds so fresh, and that addictive hookline, and the loop that goes on behind it in the song, I can’t stop praising the song; it’s like a guilty pleasure listen of mine. 😂 The flak the song has been receiving is just so unjustified — how can you hate a song if you hate its music video? This song will probably remain the catchiest club song of 2018 for me, and even that cringeworthy rap of Badshah’s takes getting used to, but you end up ignoring that by the time you’re addicted to the song. Qaran, hor das kinni tareefan chaidi ae tenu?
The song appears in two more versions, one being a Remix By Dj Notorious, which is also quite addictive (as if the original song wasn’t sounding like a remix itself) and so it sounds like another version of the song, had DJ Notorious programmed it instead of Qaran himself. The Reprise Version acquaints us with a promising new singer, Lisa Mishra, whose voice seems weird on the song at first, but then it starts sounding better and better than that. The unplugged version required such a calm and soothing rendition, because the composition, which is quite strong, makes sure that it can stay fresh in any form, be it a club song, or a soothing number like this reprise.
As for the last song of the album, Laaj Sharam by Sachin-Jigar’s A&R venture White Noise, the song is also quite weak as compared to the rest of the album. Something seems off in White Noise’s fusion of Punjabi and electronic music, but the vocalists Divya Kumar and Jasleen Royal save the song with their entertaining rendition. Jasleen’s voice gets a makeover; she puts on a husky voice here, and I wish she uses this voice in more of her own compositions from now on; of course, when and if the need arises. The hookline for this song sounds unnecessarily repetitive, but the dhols do the job in pulling you through that. Enbee’s rap is passable, and it’s not like it ends soon, and the composers don’t add any entertaining music in the background during that either! Overall, this ends up as the second weakest song on the album for me.


A ten song album, this really delivers what was promised in such a huge scale wedding flick about friendship. The soundtrack has variety, and after listening to it so many times, I can say it has the potential to live even after the movie is watched and forgotten by everyone.The biggest achievement this soundtrack has made, is that, though it has multiple composers, they all have one set aim which they all succeed in — to make Punjabi music marry electronic music!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7.5 + 6.5 + 9 + 8.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 7 = 77

Album Percentage: 77%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Just Listen to them all in the order given on Saavn. 😂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 20 (from previous albums) + 01 = 21

Which is your favourite song from Veere Di Wedding? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

43rd MUSIC MASTANI MONTHLY AWARDS (MAY 2018)

Important Statistics

♪ Number of Albums Reviewed: 8

♪ Albums Reviewed: 102 Not Out, Raazi, Hope Aur Hum, High Jack, Khajoor Pe Atke, Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain, Parmanu & Bioscopewala

♪ Music Composers: Salim-Sulaiman, Amitabh Bachchan, Rohan-Vinayak, Hiral Brahmbhatt, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Rupert Fernandes, Anurag Saikia, SlowCheeta, Shwetang Shankar, Rajat Tiwari, Nucleya, Bickram Ghosh, Oni-Adil, Ranjan Sharma, Pravin Kunwar, Sachin-Jigar, Jeet Gannguli & Sandesh Shandilya

Now on with the awards:

43rd Music Mastani Monthly Awards

♪ MAIN AWARDS

Singer of the Month (Female) : Sunidhi Chauhan for Ae Watan – Female (Raazi)

• Singer of the Month (Male) : Arijit Singh for Raazi (Raazi)

• Composer of the Month (Song) : Salim-Sulaiman for Kuch Anokhe Rules (102 Not Out) AND Anurag Saikia for Prabhu Ji (High Jack)

• Composer of the Month (Album) : Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy for Raazi

• Album of the Month: Raazi (Music by: Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy; Lyrics by: Gulzar; Singers: Arijit Singh, Sunidhi Chauhan, Harshdeep Kaur, Vibha Saraf, Shankar Mahadevan; Music On: Zee Music)

• Musical Jodi of the Month (Best Duet) : Keerthi Sagathia & Jyotica Tangri for Shubh Din (Parmanu)

• Lyricist of the Month: Gulzar for Ae Watan (Raazi)

♪ SONG AWARDS

• Best Romantic Song: De De Jagah (Parmanu)

• Best Dance Song: Behka (High Jack)

• Best Sad Song: Dilbaro (Raazi)

• Best Club Song: Behka (High Jack)

• Best Classical-Based Song: Aaj Rang Hai (Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain)

• Best Song With A Western Influence: Behka (High Jack)

• Best Song With A Folk Influence: Dilbaro (Raazi) AND Bioscopewala (Bioscopewala)

• Song With The Best Use Of Fusion: Prabhu Ji (High Jack)

• Best Backing Vocals: Shankar Mahadevan Academy Children’s Chorus for Ae Watan Female (Raazi)

• Best Sound Effects in A Song: Behka (High Jack)

• Best Retro-Styled Song: Kuch Anokhe Rules (102 Not Out)

• Best Humorous Song: Prabhu Ji (High Jack)

• Best Rap in A Song: SlowCheeta for Kripaya Dhyaan De (High Jack)

• Best Remake: N/A

♪ SPECIAL AWARDS

• Bandar Kya Jaane Adrak Ka Swaad (Best Album That Went Pretty Much Unnoticed) : Hope Aur Hum (T-Series)

• Newcomer(s) of the Month:

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Female) : Suvarna Tiwari for Prabhu Ji (High Jack)

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Male) : Taaruk Raina for Happy Ending (High Jack)

– Newcomer of the Month (Composer) : Anurag Saikia for Prabhu Ji (High Jack) AND Rupert Fernandes for Hope Aur Hum

• Music Label of the Month: Zee Music Company (Raazi, High Jack, Bioscopewala, Parmanu, Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain & Khajoor Pe Atke)

• Most Unusual, But Awesome Choice of Singer: K. Mohan for Bioscopewala(Bioscopewala)

Hope you all agree!

Thanks for reading!!

A SONG FOR BOLLYWOOD BUFFS!! (BIOSCOPEWALA – Music Review) : Dessert Review

Single Track Details
♪ Singer: K. Mohan
♪ Music by: Sandesh Shandilya
♪ Lyrics by: Gulzar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 17th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 25th May 2018

Bioscopewala

Listen to the song: Saavn

Buy the song: iTunes


Bioscopewala is a Bollywood drama film starring Danny Denzongpa, Geetanjali Thapa and Adil Hussain, directed by Deb Medhekar and produced by Sunil Doshi. The film is based on Rabindranath Tagore’s short story ‘Kabuliwala’. The movie has only one song, composed by Sandesh Shandilya, with lyrics by Gulzar. I’m guessing the reason for roping in Gulzar was that he wrote the lyrics for the 1961 ‘Kabuliwala’ film starring Balraj Sahni. (Except the song ‘Aye Mere Pyaare Watan’). So I expect this song to be amazing and connected to the theme of cinema, because the ‘Bioscopewala’ in this film shows movies to children as opposed to the ‘Kabuliwala’ who sold dry fruits to them. 😂


Bioscopewala starts off with an amazing adlib, and the oud in the background actually transports you to the hills of the Northwest region. Throughout the song, composer Sandesh Shandilya mesmerizes you with layered string instruments, coupled with a nice Caribbean percussion, and that’s where the song’s strength lies. Singer Mohan Kannan too, helps a lot with his great voice, and moulds his voice into the perfect voice hat would suit a man who goes around showcasing movies to young children. The story of the ‘Kabuliwala’ would come alive in your mind just by listening to the song — the wonderful children’s chorus, the amazing lyrics by Gulzar saab, using phrases from various iconic songs and movies that Bollywood has produced — the small touches like this, make this song very deep and heart-warming. It reminded me of the Swanand Kirkire-sung version of “Ala Barfi” (Barfi), because of the similar vocal techniques used by the lead singers in the respective songs, to make it sound more earthy and raw.


This song really showcases Shandilya’s talent in music composition, and it raises the question why we don’t hear him more often!

 

Total Points Scored by this Track: 8.5

Percentage: 85%

Final Rating: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

5 SONGS THAT SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN REMADE!! (MUSICAL LIST #1)

So today marks the start of a new section in the blog — The “LISTS” Section, where I’ll be listing songs based on one particular theme, depending on what theme I’m feeling like listing songs about. :p

What better way to start this section off, than doing it in collaboration with one of my close blogger friends, Jemma Rajyaguru from the Girl At The Piano blog! Her blog is full of random musical thoughts, lists of songs, throwbacks to the Golden Era of Bollywood music, and new releases by new and upcoming artists!

Today, we will both be listing five songs each, which we wish would never have been remade! And yes, after reading my list, be sure to read Jemma’s, as her song choices are just as exciting, if not more exciting, than mine!! Correction: they definitely are more exciting!😁 So let’s get started with my five songs so you can check her list out! 🙂 If you want to check it out now though, here it is!

P.S.: I believe no song should be remade, but these are the ones where I just don’t agree with the remake!

P.P.S: These are in no particular order; it isn’t a Top5 list 🙂


1. Mere Rashke Qamar (Pop Song by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan)

• Original Song Details:

Music by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by Ustad Qamar Jalalvi, Sung by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, First Performed in 1988, Music Label: Hi-Tech Music

• Remake Details:

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by Fana Buland Shehri & Manoj Muntashir, Sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Tulsi Kumar, Used in 2017 Bollywood film ‘Baadshaho’, Music Label: T-Series

One would think that nephew Rahat Fateh Ali Khan would object to mauling his uncle’s gem of a qawwali, but instead, he helps maul it even more, with loud and screechy vocals that would even make the laziest person cringe. Tanishk Bagchi’s constant mandolin hook doesn’t help when it keeps repeating itself all the time amidst the din of Rahat and the backing vocalists shouting.


2. Dum Maaro Dum (Hare Rama Hare Krishna; 1971)

• Original Song Details

Music by R.D. Burman, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Asha Bhosle, for the 1971 Bollywood film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’, Music Label: Saregama

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Pritam Chakraborty, New Lyrics by Jaideep Sahni, Sung by Anushka Manchanda, for the 2011 Bollywood film ‘Dum Maaro Dum’, Music Label: T-Series

One of the party songs I doubt Pritam is proud of making, ‘Dum Maaro Dum’ stands high as a song that ruined the original for me big time. Yes, a lot of cool stuff is going on in the music, but the major letdown is Anushka Manchanda’s vocals, where they create a mess of what Asha Bhosle ji and R.D. Burman actually created in the 70s. And don’t even ask me about the rap.


3. Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast (Mohra; 1994)

• Original Song Details

Music by Viju Shah, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Udit Narayan & Kavita Krishnamurthy, for the 1994 Bollywood film ‘Mohra’, Music Label: Venus Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, New Lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed, Sung by Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, for the 2017 Bollywood film ‘Machine’, Music Label: T-Series

Probably the best remake on the list, but again, Tanishk stuck to his mandolin template here, where he kept repeating the hook of the song on mandolin, and though Neha Kakkar sounds passable, Udit Narayan seems to be the saving grace of the song, sounding younger than ever. The awkward dubstep mid way through the song is just *awkward*!


4. Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas (Blackmail; 1973)

• Original Song Details

Music by Kalyanji-Anandji, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan, Sung by Kishore Kumar, for the 1973 Bollywood film ‘Blackmail’, Music Label: Universal Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan retained, Sung by Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neumann Pinto, for the 2016 Bollywood film ‘Wajah Tum Ho’, Music Label: T-Series

Arijit himself wasn’t happy with the way Abhijit Vaghani programmed his voice in this one; and I can’t help but agree! How would you like it if you got to remake a song by the legendary Kishore Kumar, and get your voice all destroyed by electronic touches? To complement Arijit’s bad voice, we had Tulsi Kumar, who surprisingly sounded better!


5. Waqt Ne Kiya Kya Haseen Sitam (Kaagaz Ke Phool; 1959)

• Original Song Details

Music by S.D. Burman, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi, Sung by Geeta Dutt, for the 1959 Bollywood film ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’, Music Label: Saregama-HMV

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Rohan-Vinayak, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi retained, Sung by Amitabh Bachchan, for the 2018 Bollywood film ‘102 Not Out’, Music Label: Saregama

The most recent remake on the list. One would think Amitabh Bachchan ji would be a bit more sensitive when singing old classics as these, but sadly, he drones the song out in such a way, that you wonder “Waqt ne Kiya, kya Haseen sitam”. Rohan-Vinayak literally do nothing but stand and watch as they treat the listeners to almost six minutes of that torture without any enjoyable music in the background either!!


Well, all in all, I feel recreations were fine until they started to be blown out of proportion and being forced into every single album that Bollywood produced. Thanks to Jemma for giving me the mauka and dastoor to vent out my feelings about remakes; I hope you guys enjoyed our collaboration, and please make sure to check out Jemma’s list (it’s amazing)!

Thanks for reading, and stay tuned for more such lists about varied topics! 😁

A MUFFLED SOUND EXPLOSION!! (PARMANU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar & Jeet Gannguli
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu Srivastava, Dr. Kumar Vishwas, Sachin Sanghvi & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 15th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 25th May 2018

Parmanu Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Parmanu is a Bollywood drama/thriller film starring John Abraham, Boman Irani and Diana Penty, directed by Abhishek Sharma and produced by Zee Studios, JA Entertainment and Kyta Productions. The film revolves around the 1998 bomb test explosions conducted by the Indian Army at Pokhran, Rajasthan under the leadership of Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam during PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s tenure. The film has opened to mixed reviews, but what had me most excited about the film (since the subject matter isn’t really the kind I like) was the music by Sachin-Jigar. Well, Sachin-Jigar and Jeet Gannguli, as I learned after the album released.


Sachin-Jigar April start the album off with a refreshing song Shubh Din, which follows the folksy Gujarati/Rajasthani template to the tee, but still manages to turn out as an entertaining number. They recreate their own ‘Aavi Re Hoon Aavi Re’ (from the Gujarati movie Carry On Kesar), and the song has a catchy instrumental loop after the hookline, which Sachin-Jigar have made sure, hooks the audience. The arrangements give the impression that the makers were going for something grander, but had to settle for less than what they intended. The folksiness doesn’t come out full-fledgedly as one would expect from Sachin-Jigar, but ends up sounding muffled. The vocals by Keerthi Sagathia and Jyotica Tangri are amazing though, as is Sachin-Jigar’s composition, so at least the song is entertaining for as long as it plays.
The next folksy number by Sachin-Jigar, Thare Vaaste, is like a patriotic recreation of their song ‘Chunar’ (ABCD 2), especially lyrically. Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics are aptly poignant and patriotic, but sadly, the composers’ tune doesn’t match up to that level; it fails to move the listener. The anthemic tune gets repetitive after some time, and though Divya Kumar does well in trying to make the song sound energetic, it is again the fault of the muffled-sounding arrangements, that the song doesn’t come to life as would be expected.
Kasumbi, the best song of the album, also sees the duo follow the folksy template, but this time Vayu’s lyrics are Punjabi, in a film set in Rajasthan. This one starts off like another ‘Chunar’ spawn, but soon sets in as a moving patriotic number — the shehnaai is the most remarkable instrument used here; it harks back to the old patriotic songs. Again, the arrangements sound muffled here too (what’s with the poor programming throughout the album?) but Sachin-Jigar’s tune is so strong, it can be overlooked. Also, Divya Kumar gives an amazing performance, especially in that gem of a hookline. Vayu’s lyrics are beautiful, incorporating the word ‘Kasumbi’, which is probably the name for the saffron colour associated with patriotism in Gujarat and Rajasthan.
The last two songs composed by Sachin-Jigar in this album, have soothing tunes and less of a folksy impact than the previous songs. Sapna is the trademark Sachin-Jigar romantic melody (a la ‘Meet’ from ‘Simran’) in its composition, but the lyrics by Sachin Sanghvi are not romantic at all. Overall it is a pleasant listen, which Sachin-Jigar doing their signature method of repeating an instrumental loop after the hookline. (The loop in this song sounds a lot like the one in ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ from “Meri Pyaari Bindu”). Arijit Singh is himself in the song, and carries it off like he carries off every song he’s ever carried off. The guitars are enjoyable and soothing, and the sarangi is beautiful, and the song itself is fortunately short — any longer and it would’ve been too long.
The last song by Sachin-Jigar, De De Jagah, is yet another in the same vein as ‘Sapna’, but this time, the lyricist (poet and politician Dr. Kumar Vishwas) complements it with romantic lyrics. What strikes me right away, yet again, is that something is wrong with the mixing, making Yasser Desai’s voice sound like it has been recorded on WhatsApp. Sachin-Jigar’s vibrant composition is one of the best of theirs over the period of 2016-2018, and Yasser Desai, barring the bad use of his vocals, tries to do his best, and succeeds fairly enough. The guitars and tablas complement each other surprisingly well, and the harmonium provides the soul in the song. The tune of the hookline is what will get you hooked to this song, just like songs traditionally are supposed to do.
Now, the reason I described that as Sachin-Jigar’s last song, is because there’s a kind of guest composer we have in the album; he has been waiting patiently for his turn, and I’m more than happy to talk about his song. The man in question in Jeet Gannguli, who has somehow bagged a romantic (read Mohit Suri-like sob-inducing) song in a movie like this. Jitni Dafa is one of those songs we have heard enough of in Bollywood, and I can’t believe the makers would proactively damage their own music album by including such a song in the album. It starts off painfully simple, and until those ‘Aashiqui 2’-ish beats start, it isn’t that painful, but when they do start, you keep waiting for the song to end. Rashmi-Virag write great lyrics, but hey, I’m quite sure John’s character in the film has time to weep like this at such a critical time and dire situation. And the singer is Yasser Desai, trying his best to be a mix of Mustafa Zahid, Arijit Singh, Saim Bhatt and Atif Aslam.


Parmanu has a soundtrack that mostly sticks to the point (barring that guest song) but something is definitely wrong with the arrangements; if they had been better mixed and mastered, the sound would’ve been grander and more enjoyable!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 39

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kasumbi > Shubh Din > De De Jagah > Thare Vaaste = Sapna > Jitni Dafa

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 19 (from previous albums) + 01 = 20

Which is your favourite song from Parmanu? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

ANGREZI MEIN KEHTE HAI MIXED BAG!! (ANGREZI MEIN KEHTE HAIN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pravin Kunwar, Oni-Adil & Ranjan Sharma
♪ Lyrics by: Yogesh, Amir Khusro, Pratibha Tiku Sharma & Pradip Sharma Khusro
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 9th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 18th May 2018

Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain is a Bollywood romantic drama starring Sanjay Mishra, Pankaj Tripathi, Anshuman Jha, Brijendra Kala, Ekavali Khanna & Shivani Raghuvanshi, directed by Harish Vyas and produced by Manav Malhotra. The film has music by three new composers – Pravin Kunwar, Oni-Adil and Ranjan Sharma. Let’s see how these three newcomers fare!


This album is the perfect example of equitable distribution of songs in a multicomposer album, each composing entity gets two songs each!
Praveen Kunwar starts the album with a pleasant romantic song Meri Aankhein, where we get to hear the composer singing a nice pahaadi type folksy portion before the real song starts. The melody is a typical Shaan melody — simple, heard-before, but pleasant. Shaan always gets such songs right, and he does so here too. Vaishali Made, who we hear in Bollywood only now, after her big break (which wasn’t her debut) in “Bajirao Mastani”, sounds great too, but not irreplaceable. The song has pleasant arrangements consisting of guitars and strings mostly, and all in all, is a fun listen.
Whatever composing talent Praveen seemed to have with his first song, seems to have evaporated with his second song Piya Mosey Rooth Gaye, a painfully slow and sombre 90s-ish sad song, in which singer Satyendra Tripathi tries (and succeeds about halfway) to sound as much as he can, like Udit Narayan. The composition bores you, but can’t even put you to sleep; it’s just boring. The flute in the arrangements too, can’t do anything to rouse the listener from the depression that the composition and the vocals forces him into. I doubt this would be well received even if it were released in the 90s.
The next composer, Ranjan Sharma, composes two songs on traditional lyrics, the first and the better one being Ab Maan Jao Saawariya, which is almost (almost) suitable for a period film, but not the Bhansali and Gowariker kind, more like the ones for which Ismail Darbar would compose (without Bhansali backing him, of course). That being said, though, the classical composition is soulful, and the tablas and sarangi do a wonderful job together, to make it sound better. Mahua Chakroborty’s vocals are pitch perfect, for such a song. The song will unfortunately bore those who haven’t warmed up to Hindustani classical music.
Ranjan’s second song More Banni Ki Mehendi, starts off as an entertaining wedding song, but in just one minute it turns into a painfully stretched and slow bidaai song with the usual Bollywood BIDAAI tropes — a slow duff rhythm, paayal sounds, and a composition that tries to tear your heart open. The singer Archana Thammala has a great voice though, I have to admit. Ranjan Sharma’s auto tuned voice could’ve been avoided!
The reason I write about composers Oni-Adil at the end, is because their songs are the only two songs that are both by the same composers and are both good.
Tera Hua Main Jab Se is a really pleasant romantic song, just like ‘Meri Aankhein’, but any day, Mohit Chauhan is a better pick than Shaan for such a song. This song is probably the freshest song of the album, because the arrangements just make you feel so good. The hookline too, is catchy, and it almost sounds like the kind of song Pritam would compose for a non-Bhatt film around 2008-2010. The guitars really sound amazing here.
The composer duo surprises me when they do a complete 180 degree turn, for their next song Aaj Rang Hai, a traditional number with lyrics by Amir Khusro. It is my favourite song from the album, because it is a really well done Qawwali, and the composers have splendidly done the arrangements — harmonium, tablas, chimtas, dholaks. The composition is spiritual and perfect for such a song! The vocals by Jatinder Pal Singh, and others, is amazing. If you don’t like Qawwalis, you should still hear this one; kmaybe you’d start appreciating the musical prowess it takes to create them!


This is one of those albums where certain songs are amazingly beautiful, while others are just bad and boring. Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain ‘mixed bag!’ 😂

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 5 + 6.5 + 4 + 8.5 + 8 = 39

Album Percentage: 65%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hua Main Jab Se > Aaj Rang Hai > Meri Aankhein > Ab Maan Jao Saawariya > Piya Mose Rooth Gaye > More Banne Ki Mehendi

Which is your favourite song from Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂