A BEHEN WHO CAN’T DANCE, BUT CAN ONLY ROMANCE! (BEHEN HOGI TERI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Rishi Rich, Jaidev Kumar, Amjad-Nadeem, Yash Narvekar & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Bipin Das, Yash Narvekar, Amit Dhanani, Late Anand Bakshi, Sonu Saggu, Rohit Sharma, Parry G & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 23rd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Behen Hogi Teri Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Behen Hogi Teri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy starring Shruti Hassan, Rajkummar Rao, Gautam Gulati and Gulshan Grover in lead roles. The film is directed by Ajay K. Pannalal and produced by Tony D’Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. The film’s slogan is “All Indians are NOT Brothers and Sisters!” Well, going by the trailer and this slogan thingy, it seems like a quirky and light hearted romantic comedy, but you know Bollywood, they can add drama into anything and everything. The music of the film, as expected is by multiple composers, including Pritam’s A&R venture JAM8 (Kaushik-Akash-Guddu this time), Rishi Rich, Amjad-Nadeem (after a long time, huh!), Jaidev Kumar and Yash Narvekar. Out of these composers, none, I repeat none, have given anything outstanding in the past, so one can just hope that some miracle occurs and they give us great music for this film. Expectations are moderate, but hoping for the best, let’s explore the music of ‘Behen Hogi Teri’.


1. Jai Maa

Singers ~ Sahil Solanki, Jyotica Tangri & Parry G, Original Composition by ~ Prem Hardeep & Badshah, Music Recreated by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap Lyrics by ~ Parry G

Wow. So now the music industry has started remaking remakes. ‘Kala Chashma’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which was a quite banal remake by Badshah, of the Punjabi pop number ‘Kala Chashma’ by Prem Hardeep, itself, now gets remade into a mata-ki-chowki song. Jaidev Kumar, who had earlier remade ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz) into a similar satirical devotional song, ‘O Meri Mata’ in ‘Bajatey Raho’, takes the same composition that Badshah had made. Nothing changed in the tune, and that’s why it would make the public even crazier. The arrangements seem more toned down and not as harsh and shrill as they were in the original (I mean the original remake). I guess they added the dhols here specially for the jagraata setting. And they’ve, quite to my immense pleasure, gotten rid of the EDM at the end, and the shouting ladies and breaking glasses from the ‘Baar Baar Dekho’ song. Vocals here sound good and aptly funny as per the Goddess prayer setting. Sahil Solanki sounds much better than Amar Arshi, the original singer of both the original and Badshah’s remake. A rapper called Parry G {I don’t know why these people like to write a single letter after a weird nickname; we are going to meet another one later in the album!} reprises Badshah’s “sadkon pe chale jab ladkon ke dilon mein tu aag laga de baby firrrreeeeee” with a rap that sounds much more pleasant. Jyotica Tangri is a nice replacement for Neha Kakkar, but with less of an edge in her voice. The replacement lyrics by Sonu Saggu are quite funny too, but not something that will make you “ROFL” or “LOL” either. Interesting how the remake of a remake turns out to be better than the original remake. Let’s start remaking remakes now. P.S. I hope a certain music company doesn’t read that or else we will be over-flooded with ‘Baby Doll’ remakes. (Then again, aren’t we already over flooded by them!)

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tera Hoke Rahoon

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash-Guddu (KAG for JAM8), Lyrics by ~ Bipin Das

Next up, we get a dulcet melody from Pritam’s A&R company, JAM8. This time, the composers of the two songs in ‘1920 London’, Kaushik-Akash, are joined by someone calling himself Guddu, thus making it a trio. And this way, they produce a song that I will remember as one of the best (and the best till now) from any composer for JAM8. The composition, for once, doesn’t sound like a Pritam composition; for once the composers working behind the JAM8 label do not try to emulate Pritam’s late 2000s style of composition. In fact, the composition kind of reminded me of Bobby-Imran’s songs in ‘Badmaashiyan’, or some of Jeet Gannguli’s works. The free flow of the hookline makes it instantly likeable, and the mukhda and antara has a calm, soothing but haunting touch to it, something I’m always ready for if it isn’t too maudlin. The arrangements are fabulous; they just add to the haunting characteristic of the song. The guitar has been played in such a subtle manner, in the beginning, that it is impossible to not be sucked in right away. And when the orchestra sets in, the song just gets many times better. The electronic tabla adds to the serenity, while that wonderful flute interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. In the antara guitars have been played in a wonderful play-stop-play-stop manner that is so comforting. And the tabla doesn’t stop either! Arijit, the first choice for any composer associated with Pritam, and Pritam himself, renders the mellow composition with such ease, in the voice of his that I love, as opposed to that droning voice he uses in sleepy songs. The way he sings the “uff tak na yaara karoon”, is so beautiful! Bipin Das (newcomer?) writes lyrics that are instantly lovable. The first time JAM8 do something that doesn’t resemble their mentor’s work heavily, and it turns out to be a success. 

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Jaanu

Singers ~ Juggy D, Shivi & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

So after the remake of a remake, we get a remake of another classic, in fact, one of my favourite songs by R.D. Burman. The likeable, sweet and fun-to-listen-to classic gets a makeover and now it looks horrendous. Rishi Rich seems to have struck a big deal in Bollywood after his long hiatus, because after he returned in ‘Half Girlfriend’, with a mediocre title song, he gets to do another (though horrible) song here. The man makes sure that somebody says “This is a Rishi Rich refix” before the song starts, and that is so annoying! We have the credits in front of us and we can read your name there. I know here are some music listeners out there who don’t care about who made a song, and they will continue not caring, so even if you say your name there, they wouldn’t care. And then comes the cliché of saying the names of the singer (Juggy D) and the rapper (Raftaar). And what I don’t understand is, why not say the name of the female artiste! Hasn’t she contributed anything to the song? They did the same thing in ‘High Heels’ from ‘Ki & Ka’ and they repeat it here. If anything, Shivi is shining in this song amongst the hackneyed renditions of the male artist and Raftaar. Oh by the way, Juggy D. 😄 Another artist naming himself like that. Rishi Rich has kept the composition intact, fortunately. But what he does instead, is even more unfortunate. He breaks up the hookline, making it sound like a cassette that is stuck at one point. And then it stops to make way for a weirdly-placed techno music piece. And then it proceeds and ends. How boring. There are so many raps in the song, it is hard to concentrate on the actual song. And Raftaar raps so oddly. Just to keep the “Behen” theme intact, he adds so many lines about sisters, that were so unnecessary. And now for thr vocals. Juggy D can’t sing at all. The proof? If someone isn’t able to sing the nuance in the word “Hindustan” in this song, he or she is definitely not a good singer. Shivi barely manages to sing that part, but does much better than her co-singers, making her stand out even with a mediocre performance. Of course, they don’t match the singing calibre of the legendary combination of Kishore Kumar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle & Usha Mangeshkar from the original song. The arrangements are irritating club sounds, EDM thrown here and there. But I enjoyed the parts with the Spanish guitars, and the strings incorporated from the old song. A horrible remake of a song that deserved a much better remake, or no remake!

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Teri Yaadon Mein / Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai, Pawni Pandey & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar & Sukriti Kakar, Music Composed by ~ Yash Narvekar, Music Produced by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Yash Narvekar & Amit Dhanani

Rishi Rich comes back for the next song too, but this time, things are different. This time, the song is a romantic song. And this time, Rishi Rich has only produced the song. Rishi Rich gives a composing break to someone I’ve seen many times in the singer category in various Amaal Mallik, Meet Bros. and even Rishi Rich songs, Yash Narvekar. He gets to compose the tune. And I must say, it is quite a commendable tune! Yes,  does follow the usual Bollywood romance template, with its tune, but it manages to engage the listeners. However, the listener does lose interest in some places. The hookline is very typical, but still, it managed to garner my interest. The antara too, follows the same pattern. What really engages the listeners, though, is Rishi Rich’s beats and arrangements. In the first version, Rishi employs a nice and groovy beat, a hip-hop beat in a romantic song, which at first elicits a weird reaction from the listener, but it sets in perfectly after a couple of listens. Especially the tablas which Rishi has added occasionally, are amazing. The second version, the Reprise, takes a more templated route, with guitars and piano taking the lead, making for a more calm listen. A harmonium too pops up later on, quite oddly. The piano interlude in that version is a must-hear. The vocals are good in both versions. While Yasser, sounding as similar to Arijit as ever, and Pawni Pandey stir up a nice chemistry in the first version, the essence of the song only reaches us in the Reprise because the voices of Yash & Sukriti haven’t been touched. Programming ruins the feel of the voices in the first version. However, I loved Yash’s backing vocals in the first song, that sound like tabla bols. Yash & Amit Dhanani together write a song that is full of typical lines and phrases, like the song title itself. Experimental, but works to some extent. The Reprise version fares better!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Original Version, 4/5 for Reprise Version

 

5. Tenu Na Bol Pawaan / Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Jyotica Tangri / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Amjad-Nadeem, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Sharma

Amjad-Nadeem, back in the composing scene after quite some time, have been roped in for the final song on the album. Amjad-Nadeem are usually known to meddle in typical romantic songs or horrendous massy item songs. This time around too, they have provided a typical romantic song, but that typicality is very enjoyable. The composition is sugary-sweet, something that is very rare from Amjad-Nadeem, who usually produce melodramatic sounding songs. The hookline is so heard-before, so clichéd, yet it manages to click with the listener. There is a high-pitched line that just makes you love the song even more. The antaraa are a bit less engaging, but still manage to keep the flow of the song intact. There are two versions to this song as well; one being a male version (with female humming in the background, hence the credit for Jyotica) and the other being a female version, which is kind of unplugged. The male version has heavenly instrumentation. It starts off with nice chimey sounds, followed by the sweetest flute portion I’ve heard in quite a while. The melody is structured on a simple guitar riff that, though it is very simple and typical, engages the listener. Strings join in later, bringing the third dimension to the song, and how! The second version is, as I said before, unplugged, and has a nice acoustic guitar riff playing in the background, and nothing else. The minimalistic feel of it, makes it even more appealing. Vocals are perfect in both versions. This is no doubt, Yasser’s best performance ever, and he sounds so different than usual here! Jyotica does the humming in Yasser’s version. Asees Kaur, on the other hand, renders her unplugged version with such a beautiful aura around her, that it is mesmerizing. Though her track is longer by one minute than Yasser’s, it makes for a good calm listen. The lyrics by Rohit Sharma (I don’t know whether he’s the Sharma who composed the songs of ‘Anaarkali of Aaraah’ or any other one. He’s definitely not the cricketer, right?) are sweet too. A song full of sweet things. Sweetness lies in simplicity after all.

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Reprise Version


Behen Hogi Teri is an unexpectedly cool multicomposer album! Going by the composers’ names, I was least expecting such a good album. However, it seems like all the composers have pitched in to provide their best. For a romantic comedy, a good album is a must, and fortunately, this album delivers as expected, if not less than expected. Yes, one song is very bad, but the others make up for it. And since the finance theme predominates the album, maybe that’s why they managed to wrench out such good songs from the music directors. An album predominantly made of romantic songs, but still works fine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 4.5 + 1 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hoke Rahoon = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein > Jai Maa > Jaanu

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 12 (from previous albums) + 02 = 14

 

Which is your favourite song from Behen Hogi Teri? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

SAAT SURON SE SAJA ALBUM!! (DEAR MAYA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Anupam Roy & Sandman (Sandeep Patil)
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Rashi Mal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 19th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Dear Maya Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dear Maya is an upcoming Bollywood drama film that marks the comeback of Manisha Koirala, and also stars Shreya Chaudhary and Madiha Imam, alongside her in the film. The film has been directed by debutante Sunaina Bhatnagar, who has been Imtiaz Ali’s Assistant Director in ‘Jab We Met’ and ‘Love Aaj Kal’, and is now foraying into direction herself. The film has been produced by Shobhna Yadav and Sandeep Leyzell. The film is about two 14-year old girls who live in Shimla, Anna and Ira, who find out about an old lady named Maya Devi (played by Koirala), who hasn’t come out of her house for 20 years. The reason she hasn’t stepped out of her bungalow for 20 years is because, when she was of a marriageable age, nobody agreed to marry her. The two teenagers, mischievous as they are, decide to prank her by writing fake love letters pretending they are one of her suitors from Delhi, saying he wants to marry her. Full of hope and excitement, Maya leaves for Delhi to meet the suitor. Six years later, the 21-year old Anna and Ira set off to Delhi to find Maya and apologize. So the plot seems very intriguing, and it will surely be very enjoyable to watch. One might expect the music of the film to be composed by A.R. Rahman or Pritam due to Imtiaz Ali’s constant collaborations with the two, but Sunaina chooses Anupam Roy for the music of this film. The Bengali film composer, who debuted in Bollywood almost exactly two years ago, has already gotten some great songs to his credit — the full album of ‘Piku’, two songs in ‘Pink’, and one song in ‘Running Shaadi’. But what makes this fourth album of his extra special, is that it is his first album for a non-Shoojit Sircar film. And that’s saying quite a lot. It means others have started recognizing his immense talent. And that also means we as listeners get to hear more of him! Yay! Joining him with a guest composition is Sandeep Patil, who goes by the name of “SandMan”. Expecting lots from this album, mainly due to the type of film it is, I am diving into it ready for some brilliance!


1. Saat Rangon Se / Saat Rangon Se (Acoustic Version)

Singers ~ Rekha Bhardwaj / Anupam Roy, Music by ~ Anupam Roy, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Dhoop ko churaaungi, chhupanugi wahaan, ho,
Ik naya savera hai, chhupa hua jahaan,
Dheere dheere savere ko jeeti jaaungi,
Bheege bheege ujaalon ko peeti jaaungi,
Maine khud ko aaj keh diya hai haan!”

A wonderful, pleasant piano portion kicks off the first song on the soundtrack — a lilting melody all about loving yourself and living life to the fullest. The composition by Anupam Roy is a very uplifting, soulful one, composed on the seven-count rhythm that I love oh-so-much! The mukhda is aptly gripping, and though the song starts quite slowly, it is that seven-count rhythm that pulls you in eventually, a rhythm which is always used when you want everyone to love your song! (Like ‘Abhi Mujh Mein Kahin’ from ‘Agneepath’ and ‘Bhagwaan Hai Kahan Re Tu’ from ‘PK’.) The antaras follow suit and are as soulful as they can get, and they just leave you feeling happier than ever. The “Hmm-hmm-hmm” by Rekha at the end of every stanza is just so charmingly delightful! The Acoustic Version has the same composition and lyrics, and differs only in terms of arrangements and vocals. The arrangements in the first version are just ethereal. The piano notes suck you into the song and you succumb very happily, but the tablas are as soulful as the word can get. The chimes that play occasionally in the song bring a very breezy touch to it. Whereas, in Acoustic version, aptly named, Anupam employs simple piano and guitars, and removes the tablas, too, making the song sound soulful in a very different manner. Definitely, the piano is the highlight of that version. Again, shakers provide a nice calmness to the song. A wonderful strings interlude sweeps you off your feet! The vocals in both versions are impeccable. Rekha, as always, carries the song to a new level altogether, and her high notes are spot-on. As always, her little nuances work only in favour of the song. Anupam too, manages to keep intact the tranquility of the song, and with his metallic voice, sucks you completely into the song. That high-pitched line in the antaras both singers sung in their individual styles, but both of them sang it so melodiously! Last but definitely, definitely, not the least, Irshad Kamil’s lyrics, which are very meaningful and loveable. They’re all about loving yourself, and accepting life the way it is. A perfect, semi-classical start to this album!

Rating: 5/5 for The Original, 5/5 for the Acoustic Version

 

2. Sune Saaye

Singer ~ Harshdeep Kaur, Music by ~ Anupam Roy, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Bas darwaaza khol ke rakhna, khol ke rakhna,
Khud ko itna mol ke rakhna, mol ke rakhna,
Aaye na mujhko, sab rishton ko, naap ke rakhna, tol ke rakhna,
Main hoon badi naadaan, poore hoke armaan,
Koi leke muskaan jaane, kahaan se kabhi bhi aa jaye,
Soone Saaye, tune paaye,
Soone Saaye, jo hai paaye!”

The next song sucks you into itself right from the first note, which happens to be an amazing sitar strum, followed by a just as amazing guitar riff. And just as these two come into play, you get a feeling that this song is going to make you really happy. And that’s exactly what it does. The song is essentially an inspirational, motivational one, about being positive. Once again, Anupam Roy gets into play an outstanding semiclassical composition that immediately works its magic on the listeners. The mukhda with its low notes definitely impressed me, but even more impressive is the antara, with an amazing tune that has the capability to make you feel nostalgic, just as it did to me. And the high notes in the antara are just WOW!! Both antaras make sure you don’t leave the song midway. The 5 minute long duration of the song has been utilised well, minute for minute by Anupam. That reflects in the arrangements as well. Anupam has very wonderfully employed a fusion arrangement that does nothing but remind the listeners of the ‘Piku’ album. A wonderful soft rock base of rock guitars and drums, played in a very tranquil manner, coupled with acoustic guitars, comprises the Western part of the arrangements. The Indian classical portions of the arrangements comprise nothing but a sitar. And that Sitar is hands-down, the star, the highlight of the song. Everytime it plays, it tugs at your heartstrings and makes you crave for more. And more. Until finally, your heart is satisfied when Anupam throws in an OUTSTANDING sitar interlude after the first antara. I don’t even know how much I should appreciate that part, but it will definitely be one of my favourite usages of sitar in Bollywood music forever! And what makes it sound even better, is that the rock background doesn’t stop even when the sitar is being played! Impressive stuff. The vocals are astounding, Harshdeep owning the song just like she always does! Her rendition here reminds one of ‘Heer’ (Jab Tak Hai Jaan) due to the charisma in her voice, the seamless undulations from low to high octaves. Towards the end too, the sitar plays a wonderful piece, coupled with Harshdeep’s beautiful aalaap Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are amazing here too! They are about waiting patiently for that life-changing moment that comes to everybody, in its own time. The “pyaara mehmaan” referred to in the first line, made me smile very openly, and when a song’s lyrics make you smile that way, you know they are effective!! A song that exudes charisma and nostalgia!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Kehne Ko

Singer ~ Jonita Gandhi, Music by ~ Anupam Roy, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Rakhna chhupake baat woh, ek din jo boli raat ko,
Aankhon mein aankhein daalke, haathon mein leke haath ko,
Tum bin aasaan nahin hai, lagta hai jaan nahin hai,
Dil Hai, Sama nahin hai,
Jhootha hai jo yahi, kehne ko dil nahin,
Dukhta hai dil kahin, kehne ko dil nahin,
How do I say goodbye?”

Melancholic piano chords welcome you into the next song, followed by an even more melancholic composition. Anupam Roy gives a sad song in the form of this song, and for the most part, it is quite maudlin, and not as engaging as the previous two songs. The Mukhda itself provides a faltery start to the song, and the line “How do I say goodbye?” sounds so very overtly sentimental. The first antara too, doesn’t strive to uplift the nature of the song, but things get interesting only in the second interlude, when Anupam introduces a wonderful soft rock instrumentation, and the composition of the second Antara too, is very engaging. One line in the antara, really touched my soul though, and that is the high-pitched one that ends the antara, “Dil hai, samaa nahin hai!” Jonita renders that line with such a wonderful, nuanced touch. That brings us to her vocals. She is definitely the star of the song, and brings some interest into the maudlin song. Arrangements are completely Western, with the pianos dominating for a major first part of the song, and then, as mentioned above, the soft rock template, complete with drums and guitars, kicks in. The strings in the first interlude, too, do not manage to garner the listeners’ interest. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are good enough, but again, quite melodramatic. A rare melodramatic song from Anupam, but I’m sure it is just his first, so no worries!! 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Buri Buri

Singer ~ Rashi Mal, Music by ~ Sandman (Sandeep Patil), Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil, English Rap Lyrics by ~ Rashi Mal

(What should I even quote here?)

Sandman enters the album for the final song of the album, an upbeat English pop styled song, sung by newcomer Rashi Mal. This song is probably the song revolving around the two 14-year old girls in the movie. The composition is quite good, but falls flat in places, especially the hook that goes “Karein Buri Buri Buri Buri Buri Buri Buri Buri Baatein“. And that “baatein” is whispered in such a way, that you can barely hear it unless you strain your ears. And also, after they say “buri buri buri…“, there’s a weird gasping noise, and you’re like “What the heck?”. The “I’m a sunshine girllllll” is something that would sound at home in a Barbie advertisement. The arrangements are cool, the beats are groovy, and various techno sounds have been put to good use. Rashi Mal’s vocals are mediocre, but anyday better than Anushka Shahaney who sang the English songs in ‘Half Girlfriend’. At least her accent is genuine. She pens down the English lyrics herself, and coupled with Kamil’s Hindi lyrics, they make a good situational song about the careless characters. Above average, but not something that would cater to Bollywood audiences.

Rating: 2.5/5


Dear Maya is an album that delivers as expected. Anupam Roy scores with three out of his four songs, the fourth one lagging a tad behind. His specialty is fusion, and here too, in the best song of the album, “Sune Saaye”, he showcases a brilliant fusion. The other songs follow templates, and out of that one works brilliantly (Saat Rangon Se). Sandman, on the other hand, provides a mediocre, situational song that won’t really go much ahead. Overall, this is an album that works partly, but whatever works, works big-time!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 5 + 5 + 3.5 + 2.5 = 21

Album Percentage: 84%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sune Saaye > Saat Rangon Se = Saat Rangon Se (Acoustic Version) > Kehne Ko > Buri Buri

{Note: Though ‘Sune Saaye’ and both versions of “Saat Rangon Se” scored the same, I loved ‘Sune Saaye’ much more!}

 

Which is your favourite song from Dear Maya? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

31st MUSIC MASTANI MONTHLY AWARDS (MAY 2017)

Important Statistics

♪ Number of Albums Reviewed: 5

♪ Albums Reviewed: Meri Pyaari Bindu, Sarkar 3, Hindi Medium, Half Girlfriend & Sachin: A Billion Dreams

♪ Music Composers: Sachin-Jigar, Ravi Shankar, Rohan-Vinayak, Niladri Kumar, Abhijit Vaghani, Sukhbir, Guru Randhawa, Intense, Rajat Nagpal, Tanishk Bagchi, Farhan Saeed, Mithoon, Rahul Mishra, Ami Mishra, Rishi Rich & A.R. Rahman

Now on with the awards:

31st Music Mastani Monthly Awards

♪ MAIN AWARDS

• Singer of the Month (Female) : Parineeti Chopra for Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Singer of the Month (Male) : Arijit Singh for Haareya (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Composer of the Month (Song) : Sachin-Jigar for Ek Jindari (Hindi Medium)

• Composer of the Month (Album) : Sachin-Jigar for Meri Pyaari Bindu

• Album of the Month: Meri Pyaari Bindu (Music by: Sachin-Jigar; Lyrics by: Kausar Munir, Priya Saraiya & Rana Mazumder; Singers: Parineeti Chopra, Arijit Singh, Nakash Aziz, Jonita Gandhi, Clinton Cerejo, Dominique Cerejo, Monali Thakur, Jigar Saraiya, Sanah Moidutty & Sonu Nigam; Music On: YRF Music)

• Musical Jodi of the Month (Best Duet) : Clinton Cerejo & Dominique Cerejo for Iss Tarah (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Lyricist of the Month: Kausar Munir for Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

 

♪ SONG AWARDS

• Best Romantic Song: Haareya (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Best Dance Song: Iss Tarah (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Best Sad Song: Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Best Club Song: Iss Tarah (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Best Classical-Based Song: N/A

• Best Song With A Western Influence: Khol De Baahein (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Best Song With A Folk Influence: Mard Maratha (Sachin: A Billion Dreams) AND Ganpati Aarti (Sarkar 3)

• Song With The Best Use Of Fusion: Thodi Der (Half Girlfriend)

• Best Backing Vocals: Dawn Cordo, Arun Kamath & Shambhavi Singh for Hoor (Hindi Medium)

• Best Sound Effects in A Song: Ek Jindari (Hindi Medium)

• Best Retro-Styled Song: Iss Tarah (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Best Humorous Song: Ye Jawaani Teri (Meri Pyaari Bindu)

• Best Rap in A Song: Arjun for Suit Suit (Hindi Medium)

• Best Remake: Thodi Der (Half Girlfriend)

♪ SPECIAL AWARDS

• Bandar Kya Jaane Adrak Ka Swaad (Best Album That Went Pretty Much Unnoticed) : Sachin: A Billion Dreams (Junglee Music / Times Music)

• Newcomer(s) of the Month:

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Female) : Parineeti Chopra for Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin (Meri Pyaari Bindu) AND Anjali Gaikwad for Mard Maratha (Sachin: A Billion Dreams)

– Newcomer of the Month (Singer – Male) : Rahul Mishra for Tu Hi Hai (Half Girlfriend)

– Newcomer of the Month (Composer) : Farhan Saeed for Thodi Der (Half Girlfriend)

• Music Label of the Month: Junglee Music / Times Music (Sachin: A Billion Dreams) {Because YRF released ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’s music in a very weird way, and all the other albums except ‘Sachin’ were bad!}

• Most Unusual, But Awesome Choice of Singer: Parineeti Chopra for Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin (Meri Pyaari Bindu)


Reviews Next Month: Dobaara, Dear Maya, Behen Hogi Teri, Sweetiee Weds NRI, Raabta, Bank Chor, Guest Iin London, Tubelight, Shab & Mom

FROM THE MOZART OF MADRAS TO THE MASTER BLASTER… (SACHIN: A BILLION DREAMS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Kaly
♪ Music Label: Junglee Music / Times Music
♪ Music Released On: 18th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 26th May 2017

Sachin: A Billion Dreams Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Sachin: A Billion Dreams is an upcoming docu-drama starring Sachin Tendulkar, directed by James Erskine and produced by Ravi Bhagchandka and Shrikant Bhasi. The film is a biopic that covers many aspects of Sachin’s professional and personal life, as narrated by the cricketer himself. Sachin is probably the most phenomenal star in the history of cricket, since he has so many fans and followers and well-wishers. For a biopic of such an important personality in sports, the makers make an apt decision for the music director of the film by finding his equivalent in the music industry — A.R. Rahman. Now, I know this won’t be a conventional Hindi film album with song-and-dance routines. What I’m expecting is a heart-moving and soulful score for this film. So let’s see whether Rahman, with his three songs in the film, can bring out the greatness of Tendulkar through his music!


1. Hind Mere Jind

Singer ~ A.R. Rahman

“Abb sabhi maan lo, baat yeh pyaar se,
Maante ho bhala, kyun sadaa haar se,
Jo shikhar ke liye hai bana Hind hai,
Woh meri jaan hai, with meri jind hai,
Aa rahi hai sadaa, dil ki har taar se,
Abb sabhi maan lo baat yeh pyaar se!”

A.R. Rahman kicks off the album with an aptly placed patriotic song. Sachin Tendulkar is probably one of the most well-known idols of the country and he is also very dedicated towards his country, and so it is no surprise that the first track in the album happens to be a patriotic number. What is a surprise, though, is the manner in which the Mozart of Madras composed this patriotic number. The song is composed in a very tranquilizing manner, something Rahman very often likes to work with. At first, the composition seems odd, but after a couple of listens you get used to it, and it grows on you. And after that it sounds magical!  The mukhda is a bit odd in the way it abruptly starts off with the “Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh, oh beliyaa” but it gradually gets better. The hookline is alsp quite commonplace. But the part that hooked me to the song, is the Antara which takes a delightfully tranquil Qawwali-ish mode, a la ‘Kun Faaya Kun’ (Rockstar), something that Rahman excels in. Also, who would’ve expected that kind of a treatment to be given to a patriotic song! But then, it was Rahman himself who did it years ago, in ‘Yeh Jo Des Hai Tera’ (Swades). The “Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh” loop is very catchy and it is probably the line that will hook most people to this song. Rahman’s arrangements are grand without being over-the-top. The song starts with a wonderful sound, like a flute. And after that, a synthetic shehnaai-like portion steals the breath away. When the melody of the song actually starts, there is predominantly piano arrangements, with a metronome ticking in the background. How simple, but the piano chords really make it sound grand. The sitar addition is just beautiful, while the claps during the “Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh” interlude are some booming arrangements. It is in the antara, again, when everything becomes more scintillating. A beautiful female chorus hums a trademark Rahman-ish melody, and then the Qawwali-ish portion starts, where Rahman, the mastermind that he is, adds the harmonium which increases the depth of the antara manifold. Rahman’s voice has a certain resonance, which no other singer in Bollywood at this point of time, can emulate. His voice gives the song another dimension altogether; it is so impactful. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are aptly patriotic, of course. A very soothing patriotic song, on the lines of ‘Yeh Jo Des Hai Tera’ (Swades).

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Sachin Sachin

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Kaly, Rap Lyrics by ~ Kaly

“Raste chaahe hon ghane hi,
Hai ujaala tere haathon mein,
Ho adhoora khwaab toh phir,
Neend kaise aaye raaton mein?
Abhi aadhi kheli toone baazi,
Abhi chotein dil ki taazi taazi,
Abhi dil ko hai karna raazi,
Teri hauslon ne paa leni hai manzilein!”

After that heart-moving patriotic song, Rahman comes up with a ‘Sachin’ anthem. And the song is quite cool. Yes, the composition is quite blander than I would’ve expected somebody like Rahman to compose, but what made the day for me, was the way he used the ‘Sachiiiin, Sachiiin’ chants that make the stadium vibrate, as the hookline of this song. The sheer innovativeness with which that portion is done, made me think about the song completely differently. The padding around the hookline, though, is a bit underwhelming, and it has a quite run-of-the-mill sports anthem-like sound to it. Sukhwinder Singh’s vocals are topnotch, and he creates the ambience that will remind us of all of Sachin Tendulkar’s amazing feats in the history of cricket. As always his energy level is unmatchable. Kaly, the rapper, too does a fine job. Rahman’s arrangements are mostly digital percussion again, but I must say, the beats are very groovy, though at the same time, very typical and clichéd. There’s another uncredited female portion in the interlude, which was the peak point of the song, next to the “Sachin” chants. Irshad Kamil very appropriately praises the God of Cricket in his writing. An anthem that works only partly with its composition, but has a top-class hookline, and amazing vocals!

Rating: 3/5

 

3. Mard Maratha

Singers ~ A.R. Ameen & Anjali Gaikwad

“Dam dam dam Tain Tain Tain Tain Mard Maratha Tain Tain re!”

A vocal loop that reminds me of so many of Rahman’s Tamil songs kicks off the last song on the album, a fun and enjoyable children’s song that will surely make you get up and dancing to its beats. Rahman composes it in a way that will instantly appeal to the listeners, and especially the younger children. That vocal rhythm keeps repeating throughout the song, and keeps the listeners glued to the song. The mukhda is quite catchy as well, and very effectively leads to the vocal rhythm again, which serves as the song’s hookline. Rahman keeps the catchiness constant throughout the song; the antara is also very impressive. Not just the composition, but even the arrangements and vocals stand out in the song. The composer employs a very typical Maharashtrian dholki beat, that works in favour of the song and sets up a nice Maharashtrian feel to the song, apt because Sachin is from Maharashtra. The beginning has a nice Irish flute, that helps in getting the listener hooked. The interlude has a nice dhol-taasha part, coupled with nice Indian banjo after that. And of course, the dholki remains constant. Rahman’s guitars help infuse amazing energy to the song wherever they play. The vocals are very impressive, with two children singing joyously, but perfectly. They hit the right notes everytime, and even showcase for us, some very impressive rapid aalaaps. Rahman’s son, Ameen, does a good job, but his female co-singer, Anjali Gaikwad steals the show when she sings mind blowing aalaaps. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are fun and enjoyable, just like the song. Sachin’s young fans will love this one!

Rating: 4/5


Sachin: A Billion Dreams is aptly short, sweet and simple. With a patriotic song, an ode to Sachin, and a children’s song, the album is quite a mixed bag.However, it doesn’t seem like one of those albums that I will listen to over and over again, and it is definitely not one of Rahman’s best. He showcases his experimentalist side in ‘Mard Maratha’, but the other two songs lack that.Nevertheless, they are good songs for a film in which I least expected songs. The Mozart of Madras puts aside his garish orchestration and complex compositions and delivers a sweet and simple album for the Master Blaster!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 4 = 11

Album Percentage: 73.34%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hind Mere Jind = Mard Maratha > Sachin Sachin

 

Please vote for your favourite song from Sachin: A Billion Dreams! Thanks! 🙂

THODI DER AUR THEHER JAAUN??? (HALF GIRLFRIEND – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Tanishk Bagchi, Rishi Rich, Farhan Saeed, Rahul Mishra & Ami Mishra
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Arafat Mehmood, Tanishk Bagchi, R. Rekhi, Veronica Mehta, Yash Anand, Yash Narvekar, Ishita Moitra Udhwani, Kumaar, Anushka Shahaney, Laado Suwalka & Kunaal Vermaa
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 27th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Half Girlfriend Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Half Girlfriend is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama film, starring Shraddha Kapoor and Arjun Kapoor. The film is directed by Mohit Suri, and produced by Shobha Kapoor, Ekta Kapoor, Mohit Suri and Chetan Bhagat. The film is an adaptation of Chetan Bhagat’s 2014 super-hit novel {In that everyone started hitting it after reading it, so it became super hit} of the same name. I have read that book and didn’t think much of it. And I’m not going to waste time on the plot. So let’s see who is behind the music this time. Now Mohit Suri is always up for new musical talent, and he brought Arijit Singh, Ankit Tiwari and Ami Mishra into the limelight with his previous film albums. I must say, ‘Ek Villain’ and ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ were better off than ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was full of clichés. And now this movie seems like it will be a complete detour from the usual type of music we hear in his other films. Maybe, just maybe, the songs with the lead characters staring at each other for infinite amounts of time, and shots of Shraddha Kapoor crying her eyes out, will not be removed and maybe we will be spared the melodrama that exists in all other Suri movies. But then again, maybe not. Maybe Mohit Suri will make Chetan’s rom-com into a romantic drama just like his other films. And of course, maybe the music will follow suit. That is confirmed as soon as I read the name of the first music director, Mithoon. He has collaborated with Mohit Suri in almost all of his movies, and the only collaboration I didn’t like of theirs, was ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (‘Aashiqui 2), after which I loved the sings from the next two movies. He gets three tracks here, but all are based on the same song. Tanishk Bagchi, the latest composer going tons of places this year, gets a single song here, and hopefully he opens his account with Mohit Suri fabulously so that we get to hear him in more Mohit Suri albums. Rishi Rich, after a long hiatus after the ‘Hum Tum’ song, returns {he has two more albums upcoming this year!} and he gets two tracks. Next up is Ami Mishra, who debuted with ‘Hasi’ from ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ in 2015, and vanished after that. He gets one song too. Then we have the debutants. Rahul Mishra with one song (I have never heard of him so can’t say what I’m expecting), and Farhan Saeed, who is debuting only as a composer; he has sung a couple of songs previously, and in this album, he gets to compose two tracks, out if which one is a version of the other. So with an astounding ten tracks to review, I must start right away.


1. Baarish

Singers ~ Ash King & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk Bagchi & Arafat Mehmood

Tanishk gets to open the album with his only song in the film. The song is a romantic song, with a tune that will have any Bollywood music lover hooked right away — because it adheres to all Bollywood sensibilities so obediently. The composition is like a trademark Bollywood romantic composition, and sweet too, at that. The mukhda makes the song start in a very sweet way, but that bridge from the mukhda to the hookline, which goes “Aankhon Ke Darmiyaan…” comes so abruptly, you are baffled for a moment. But afterwards, it is nothing but an uphill journey for the composition. The antara is how antaras in romantic songs traditionally are — calm and soothing. Again, an abrupt pause has been added at the end of the antara, which could’ve been avoided since the two lines fit together perfectly even without a pause! The tune for the mandolin loop that plays throughout the song is just so lovely! The hookline itself is yet again, something that will appease all Bollywood lovers, especially 90s music lovers. The arrangements which Tanishk has used in the song work in favour of the song, and as I said, that mandolin loop is sooooo catchy and hummable. The santoor starts off the song wonderfully, and it suits the ‘rainy’ theme of the song. The flute and strings too, add to the beauty of the song. As for the vocals, Ash King does well, but we have heard more outstanding renditions from him, in front of which this seems so ordinary. Shashaa just has to hum a line in an interlude. Tanishk & Arafat Mehmood wield the pen and produce utterly nonsensical words, defying all the laws of grammar. And however serious they might be trying to sound, it just sounds ridiculous. A song that sticks to those criteria that would make it a hit in Bollywood, but doesn’t dare to go experimental.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Thodi Der

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Farhan Saeed, Music by Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The next song in the album is another romantic song; the only difference is that this time, both of them love each other — in the first song it was like one-sided. Like tape. This song marks Farhan Saeed’s Bollywood debut as a composer, and it is actually a re-work of his own pop single of the same name. Thank goodness, he brings in a female singer to sing this one with him, and it is none other than Shreya Ghoshal. She handles the nuances very well, and her saccharine voice suits the composition very well. Farhan too, sings his parts well, but it doesn’t have the same impact. The composition itself, sounds very nice to the ears, but clearly has something missing and like the last song, only caters to people who like traditional, typical, same-old-kind of music. The hookline has a great tune though. The arrangements are better off here, with a wonderful sarangi taking care of the people who want variation in the song, and that sarangi solo in the interlude is not to be missed. The guitars are evidence of the fact that the song would’ve sounded so bland without the sarangi — they’ve been played that boringly. It would’ve been quite nice to hear a Sufi treatment given to the song, like tablas/dholaks and the like. A harmonium can be heard, but in very miserly quantities. Occasionally the sarangi reminds you of ‘Roke Na Ruke Naina’ (Badrinath Ki Dulhania), and I even started humming its antara, after the mukhda of this was over. Kumaar’s lyrics are not great, and there are places where they’re about the day not being able to live, and the night not breathing when the two characters aren’t together. Good for a couple of listens, but not something to repeat over and over again.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Tu Hi Hai

Singer ~ Rahul Mishra, Music by Rahul Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Laado Suwalka

The piano notes of the next song start and instantly you think ‘Bhatt’. Even though they aren’t in any way associated with this film, the piano notes just scream ‘Bhatt’ at you — “BHATT! BHATT! BHATT!” And when you continue listening to the song, you realize that the piano notes were right and you should have listened to their warning cries. Rahul Mishra, a debutant helms this track, and tries to make it as bland and dead as ever. The composition is a trademark Bhatt-ish one, and even though those songs sometimes do impress me, this one falls into category of them which I utterly despise right from the first time I hear them. The hookline is something decent, and that’s pretty much it, because it has been composed so drearily. Dreadfully slow, the song seems to get nowhere and leaves no impression on you after it ends. And the duration doesn’t help, because five and a half minutes is pretty long, for a staid composition. The only part of the song that seems impressive (only to an extent, because it is nothing new) is when the chorus singers try to make the song a Sufi song, and they succeed, but then Rahul starts with the Pakistani pop stuff again. Rahul Mishra’s vocals are quite good; he should carry forth his singing in the industry. The arrangements sound like a terribly-slowed-down version of the arrangements of the ‘Sanam Re’ title track. That tablas and electric guitars arrangement got old after just one song — ‘Sanam Re’. The lyrics by Laado Suwalka are even more typical than the composition. Not a very impressive debut, but hopefully somebody likes it and gives Rahul Mishra another chance.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

4. Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga / Pal Bhar (Chaahunga Reprise)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shashaa Tirupati / Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon steps in with the next track, and that’s something I was looking forward to, because he has been giving somewhat impressive songs in Mohit Suri’s film albums. However, when I played the song, the result was so anticlimactic I can’t express it in words. Mithoon’s composition sounds like a very desperate attempt to recreate the magic of ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (Aashiqui 2), a magic which I was immune to anyway, so this song too, didn’t affect me with its supposed magical composition. Of course, the song will become a rage nevertheless. Come on! It is Arijit and Mithoon after all! The song fares well for the mukhda, after which it seems to disassemble itself and both antaras sound like a different song altogether. Especially the female antara, seems like Mithoon strung together some completely unrelated notes to construct it. The first antara is slightly better, and it is a relief they’ve repeated it like thrice in the Reprise Version. But the drawback of the Reprise is that there’s no mukhda there. Also, the words and tune don’t match, creating that “Dubbed Music” effect, when you understand the song is dubbed because the words don’t fit well into the composition. Arijit gets into his dull mode here, and in some places you really feel that he drifted off to sleep. Shashaa in her antara does well, but not excellent. The arrangements are also boring. In the first version, they are fine, until those ‘Tum Hi Ho’ beats take over and you go like “Oh Goddddd! Not again!”. I loved the piano notes in the beginning though, and the santoor interlude. There’s a place before Shashaa’s antara where a wonderful flute mesmerizes you. But after that, there’s a staccato piano piece that sounds so random, haphazard and horrible. The Reprise gets the arrangements better. It starts with some weird harp-like sound, and a sound like water dripping from a leaking pipe, and Arijit’s voice is programmed such that you’ll actually believe he’s in some dingy underground basement where a pipe is leaking. But the better part of the arrangements is later, when strings are added in. Otherwise, everything is almost the same as the first version. So both versions have their own plus points. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are definitely the highlight of both the tracks. They surpass Mithoon’s arrangements, his dull composition and Arijit’s dreary rendition. One read through them and you’ll be stunned. Mithoon in his uncreative form.

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 2.5/5 for the Reprise

 

5. Lost Without You

Singers ~ Ami Mishra & Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Ami Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kunaal Vermaa & Anushka Shahaney

A bit of freshness seems to enter the album with the next song, Ami Mishra’s contribution to the album. It is a song with half-English, half-Hindi lyrics, and with a rock backdrop. The composition of the Hindi parts again, sticks to the normal Bhatt music criteria. The only way the song sounds fresher is due to the English parts, which are interspersed with the Hindi portions quite gratuitously. There’s a catch to that too, though. The “singer” behind those English parts, Anushka Shahaney, seems to be putting on a very artificial accent, something that will barely impress you once you hear it, and it sounds like nonsense because you can’t make out her English. Meanwhile, Ami continues droning on his Hindi portion, which isn’t quite different from his other song ‘Hasi’ (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Especially the “aaaaa aaaaa” sounds very similar to ‘Hasi’. The arrangements consist of very typical rock elements, the guitars and drums playing throughout the song. There is an interlude where Ami has added some oriental sounding guitar-like sound. The Hindi lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, are again, nothing innovative, and you barely pay attention to them as the song continues to play. Anushka Shahaney, who has written whatever she rambles herself, should’ve sung in such a way that we could’ve understood what she had written. Ami Mishra disappoints this time, but at least something is fresh here — the addition of English parts, even though they’re unintelligible. The album is just going more and more downhill.

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Stay A Little Longer

Singer ~ Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Anushka Shahaney, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Farhan Saeed returns, this time with Anushka Shahaney. And they spoil ‘Thodi Der’ for us. This song is basically an English version of that song, as is evident from its name.. a direct translation from Hindi to English. The composition, I already liked before, but here, even the little nuances that featured in the Hindi version have been gotten rid of, because it’s English right? And English songs can’t have nuances in them right? The song just sounds mediocre, even more so because of the way Anushka sings them in that accent. Her lyrics this time can at least be made out — but they sound very ridiculous. And of course, they don’t fit into the tune, so she has to sing “come” as “cu-uhm”, “love” and “lu-uhv”, “new” as “nyu-oo”, and she has to add “Oh”s and “Ah”s anywhere randomly. Ishita Moitra Udhwani helps her with “additional lyrics”, a term which I don’t understand because can’t two people write a song together? Or did she just replace one word by another so she deserves less credit? 😏 The only thing better here, is the arrangement, which has not only sarangi, but a very opulent symphonic orchestra towards the end, something that wouldn’t have suited in the Hindi song, but something which this English version didn’t deserve, frankly. Supposed to be soothing, but the singer makes sure it is anything but that. At least the arrangements respect us.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Mere Dil Mein / Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta / Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Yash Anand & Yash Narvekar, English Lyrics ~ R. Rekhi & Veronica Mehta, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Rishi Rich comes into the album very, very late, with a song you can call the title song of the film. And it is the only so-called upbeat number in the entire album. As such, we are bound to love it, especially people like me who were bored to death by the previous songs. The song is essentially a hip-hop number, with a groovy beat, and Rishi Rich informs us right at the beginning, “This is the Rishi Rich beat”. The song starts with some dialogue by someone sounding like Kangana Ranaut… Don’t miss it! The hookline is insanely catchy, and that “I gotta let you know…” line too, is very catchy. The composition is very repetitive though, and these two things are repeated over and over again so many times, you get annoyed after some time. There are not many more things constituting the arrangements, except that trippy beats and various weird sound effects. Veronica Mehta, who also featured in Rishi Rich’s “Hum Tum” song, at least sings in a more believable accent, but again, many of the words are not decipherable. Yash Narvekar, on the other hand, sings the male portions well, and I think Bollywood has a new Benny Dayal now. In charge of the lyrics are two people each for English and Hindi lyrics. 😂😂 And again, that additional lyricist, Ishita Udhwani, helps them, but they seem to not want to place her in the main lyricist’s list. Poor girl. There’s another version called the Dialogue Version, which has some of the most cringe-inducing dialogues from the film. That ‘Sentiyaa Gaye Hum Toh‘ dialogue is so cheesy! The dialogues come across as very annoying, and it is so evident that Arjun Kapoor wasn’t the right choice for playing this village boy. 😑 At least this song breaks the seemingly neverending spree of depressing songs!

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 1.5/5 for the Dialogue Version

 

8. Half Girlfriend (Love Theme)

(Instrumental, Music by Mithoon)

An instrumental track by Mithoon arrives to finish the album off. Mithoon provides us with a love theme, similar to the love theme he gave in ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was, I admit, a soul-stirring track. Here, he gives us an instrumental with selected lines from “Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga” played on the piano. Since I loved the piano notes in the song, I loved the first part of this track, where everything is just on plain piano. Later on, the orchestra pitches in, and brings a haunting and grand feel to the track. A choir can be heard as well, trying to make it sound even more haunting. After that comes a flute part which is beautiful. The orchestra returns to support the flute, and the song ends on a very grand note, like every instrumental should. Though I didn’t like the actual song which this track is based on, I thoroughly enjoyed the instrumental, and four and a half minutes just flew by.

Rating: 3.5/5


Half Girlfriend is a half-baked album. You know, when you fry something and it remains raw inside? That’s what this album is like. The makers have gone into such trouble making ten tracks for this movie, and sadly, not even one is memorable. All of them stick to typical clichéd song-making styles, and even a simple would be memorable, only if the composition were better. Tanishk and Farhan’s songs stand out by far, the rest seem to lag behind. I’ve heard a lot of good things going around about this album, and I waited. I heard it thrice like I do for any album before writing its review. And then I heard it while reviewing and that’s when I really understood how good (read bad) it is. Now I can’t wait any longer for my brain to like this album, can I? Thodi Der Aur Theher Jaaun? No way!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 1.5 + 3.5 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 53%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thodi Der > Baarish = Half Girlfriend (Love Theme) > Lost Without You > Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga = Pal Bhar = Mere Dil Mein > Stay A Little Longer > Tu Hi Hai = Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

 

Which is your favourite song from Half Girlfriend? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

PUNJABI MEDIUM!! (HINDI MEDIUM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Intense, Sukhbir & Abhijit Vaghani
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Kumaar, Guru Randhawa, Arjun & Ikka
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Hindi Medium Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Hindi Medium is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film, starring Irrfan Khan, Saba Qamar and Deepak Dobriyal in lead roles. The film is directed by Saket Chaudhary and produced by Dinesh Vijan, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film follows a young couple who wish to enter the English-speaking society for the sake of their daughter. After watching the trailer, this one looks like it will be a laugh riot, and I’m eagerly waiting for it. The music for this one is given by Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal and Abhijit Vaghani. While Sachin-Jigar have worked hard and given two new and original songs, the rest have “remade” hit pop songs, and you’ll get to know soon why “remade” is in inverted commas.


1. Suit Suit

Singers ~ Guru Randhawa & Arjun, Original Composition by ~ Intense, Music Recreated by ~ Guru Randhawa & Rajat Nagpal, Lyrics by ~ Guru Randhawa & Arjun

“Oh tenu suit suit karda!” 

– Guru Randhawa

The album starts with something that T-Series are experts at. Recreating old songs. After butchering many songs from Bollywood, T-Series now expands its reach to the Punjabi pop singles they have released earlier. And thus, we get “Suit Suit”, by Guru Randhawa and Arjun (the guy who shot to fame by reprising Bollywood songs into English in a quite ludicrous manner). The song is as typical as a Punjabi pop song can get and after getting to know the soul of Punjab in ‘Phillauri’, thanks to Shashwat Sachdev and Jasleen Royal, we are just taken back to the fake Punjabi feels. Nobody’s going to get tricked into thinking this is what Punjabis listen to all day. Well, maybe at weddings. Anyhow, the song is not even eligible of being called a remake, because it is the exact same thing copied and pasted here, with faster beats. I heard the original, and it has such slow beats, it sounded odd. Thankfully, the new song has faster beats to go with the song. I must admit that the song itself is catchy and my hatred towards the act of remaking songs cannot make me deny that. The beats are something on the lines of the EDM beats that many American artists just add into their songs by default, even before constructing the tune and all. The clichéd tune, originally composed by someone going by the name of Intense, is far from intense, but it is interspersed with Arjun’s English rap, which seems to sound the same in all his songs. In fact, he starts the song off, and that’s how all his female fans will instantly be drawn into the song. The interludes comprise of a weird sound that sounds something like a pig squealing. The hookline is one of the most commonplace tunes, but it still manages to be catchy. Sadly, the rest of the song just sounds repetitive. There’s an impressively rapid rap by Arjun in the second interlude though. I don’t really know what Guru Randhawa and Rajat Nagpal have done by way of recreation here, because everything just sounds the same, but then, they have done the monumental task of making the beats faster. And then again, I am not so well-versed with the original song. Guru Randhawa’s voice is so rustic and earthy, it would “SUIT” a rustic folk song, and I would love to see him do that! As for the lyrics, the hookline is the only reason I can see, for the song to be added in this film — Saba Qamar’s character in the movie must’ve worn a suit to try to fit in with the elite society. But then, couldn’t Sachin-Jigar have made an original, even comedic and better, song for that situation!?

Rating: 2.5/5 {Only for the beats and the hookline!}

 

2. Hoor

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Backing Vocals by ~ Dawn Cordo, Arun Kamath & Shambhavi Singh, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Lafzon ke haseen, dhaagon mein kahin,
Piro rahaa hoon kabse main huzoor,
Koshishein zara, hain nigaahon ki,
Tujhe dekhne ki ho khataa zaroor,
Deewangi kahoon isey, ya hai mera fitoor?
Koi hoor, jaise tu!”

– Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar step into the album with the second song, a romantic song with a heavenly Qawwali-ish treatment. The song also brings together Atif Aslam and Sachin-Jigar yet again, after so many beautiful songs that trio has given us over the years. I can’t really say the same about this song though, unfortunately. The song starts with wonderful humming by an awesome backing chorus (Dawn Cordo, Arun Kamath & Shambhavi Singh) but when the actual melody sung by Atif begins, it loses you somewhere. Sachin-Jigar have constructed a very iffy composition there, something that leaves you confused as to whether you like it or not. No, I don’t mean it is bad at all! It is a lilting composition, with the words flowing into one another very freely, but the composition just didn’t connect with me, something I felt very guilty of, and odd about, because I loved that spectacular album of theirs, ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’. The antara was something I could hardly pay attention to as it was not gripping. I kept waiting for that one part in the song that would have me hooked, but it never came. 😦 The few great things I can rave about in the song, though, were the arrangements. A wonderful harmonium-led (Rinku Rajput) portion starts off the song, with occasional tabla beats (Rupak Dhamankar), that sound marvellous. And then the piano (Rinku Rajput) and Drums (Lindsay D’mello) too, are wonderful. The guitars (Kalyan Baruah) that conclude the song sound amazing! It provides a nice lounge-ish feel, with the fusion of Classical and Western Contemporary. Atif’s vocals are great, and his trademark faltering voice infuses beauty into the vocals. He sings the high-pitched line in the hookline beautifully! I’ve already written about the beauty with which the backing vocalists support him. That leaves the lyrics by Priya Saraiya. These are amazing as well, aptly romantic. The hookline has been written very well! A song that excels in everything except the composition, which could’ve been much better compared to Sachin-Jigar’s previous compositions.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Oh Ho Ho Ho (Remix)

Singer ~ Sukhbir, Original Composition by ~ Sukhbir, Music Recreated by ~ Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written and Performed by ~ Ikka

“Oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ishq tera tadpaave!” 

– Kumaar

This song is like a bonus addition. Yeah, because it is just a remix (and a futile one too, at that) of a very famous Bhangra song, “Ishq Tera Tadpaave” by Sukhbir. And guess who’s the chosen one to remix it? Abhijit Vaghani. And guess what he does? Just adds a rap by Ikka somewhere in the middle, which makes the song sound vulgar, and he obviously adds a line about drinking. Who is going to listen to this song, when the original is still fresh in the people’s minds? If they wanted to make the characters dance to it in the film, they could’ve done so without adding a song in the album. I guess Abhijit has added extra beats, but it doesn’t really make a difference. And by the way, kudos to the way T-Series has named the song. “Oh Ho Ho Ho” is like the way I used to search on Google when I heard this song playing in weddings and didn’t know what it is! 😏 A song banking on the popularity of the original. 

Rating: 1/5 {including 0.5 as a bonus for at least choosing this song.}

 

 

4. Ek Jindari

Singer ~ Tanishka Sanghvi, Backing Vocals ~ Sugandha Date, Karishma Butia, Stiphen Ghorpade, Prateek Mane, Arya Mahale, Anica Chabra, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Suraj jaise chamkenge, dekhe hain saddi ankhiyaan ne hai sapney ambraan de, eh sapney ambraan de,
Boond boond jodenge pal pal, door door beh jaayenge, eh naal samandaraan de, eh naal samandaraan de!
Assi, aithe khade, hai jaana pare,
Na kum humko tol!
Assi, zidd pe adde, junooni bade,
Eh dil ke ne bol!
Haan ek jindari meri, sau khwahishaan,
Ek ek main poori karaan,
Haan ek jindari meri, sau khwahishaan,
Mushkil humein rokna!”

– Kumaar

Sachin-Jigar get to wrap up this album, thankfully. And the song really does make for a grand finale! It starts with a vocal rhythm sung by the cute Tanishkaa Sanghvi, Sachin’s daughter, coupled with wonderful rhythms by Taufiq Qureshi, someone who always makes the song sound great when he works with Sachin-Jigar. The song is a motivational one, and stands true to its theme, with a hard-hitting rhythm and a composition that does succeed indeed to move you. The mukhda starts the song off on such a high level, that it must’ve been difficult to compose the rest of the song without letting that level drop. And I must say, Sachin-Jigar succeed in that mission exceptionally well. That neverending, breathless styled line in the mukhda is astounding! The two antaras that follow are amazing, the first being another “strong will and motivation” type stanza emulating the tune of the mukhda, while the second is a toned-down and calm one, a nice respite in an amazingly hard-hitting song. The “assi…” effect in the lines before the hookline is really intriguing, and Tanishka renders it with spunk. The hookline itself is so well-placed, and the chorus (Sugandha Date, Karishma Butia, Stiphen Ghorpade, Prateek Mane, Arya Mahale, Anica Chabra) joins Tanishka to make it sound more effective. The arrangements are electrifying, with the rock guitars, drums, and Taufiq Qureshi’s amazing percussion lifting up the already amazing composition manifold. Tanishkaa handles the composition with maturity and cuteness, a deadly combination. How cool is it that motivational songs sung by kids are the most motivational! 😄 Kumaar’s lyrics are some of the best lyrics by him this year, and maybe in his career. The song I was waiting for arrives at the end!

Rating: 5/5


Hindi Medium is quite a decent album, overall. It is a Sachin-Jigar show all the way, and I wouldn’t have minded if the other two songs hadn’t been there. Anyway, those two are the reason this album will score very low. Though Sachin-Jigar leave me confused with one song, the other ones makes up for that completely. Abhijit Vaghani can keep on “remaking” songs, while Guru Randhawa will hardly be seen again in Bollywood, I guess, especially not as a music composer. They just added this song because they needed it. Anyway, since all the songs but one are Punjabi, why don’t we call the album Punjabi Medium? 😄

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 1 + 5 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ek Jindari > Hoor > Suit Suit > Oh Ho Ho Ho (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes in 2017: 10 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Hindi Medium) = 12

Which is your favourite song from Hindi Medium? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

LOOK, THEY RELEASED THE BGM!! (SARKAR 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ravi Shankar, Niladri Kumar & Rohan-Vinayak
♪ Lyrics by: Rohit Teotia, Sirasri & Mandar Cholkar
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 2nd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th May 2017

Sarkar 3

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Sarkar 3 is an upcoming Bollywood political crime thriller, starring Amitabh Bachchan, Jackie Shroff, Manoj Bajpayee, Amit Sadh, Rohini Hattangadi and Yami Gautam in crucial roles. The film is directed by Ram Gopal Varma, and produced by Rahul Mittra, Anand Pandit, Gopal Shivram Dalvi, Krishna Choudhary and WeOne. It is the third instalment in the “Sarkar” franchise, and it is the story of a girl who has set out to avenge her father’s death, which she blames “Sarkar” (Bachchan) for. The franchise is not really known for its music; music is like a side business for the franchise (Except the “Govinda” theme), and practically every Ram Gopal Varma film after his collaborations with A.R. Rahman and Sandeep Chowta. If at all any money arises from the sale of the music album, it is well and good for the film. 😂 After having Bapi-Tutul (last heard in ‘Saat Uchakkey’ last year) compose for the first two films, RGV ropes in a Ravi Shankar for this instalment, someone I’ve never heard of, and the only Ravi Shankar I could find in Google is the Indian Classical composer who died in 2012. So I don’t know who exactly this Ravi Shankar is. Along with him are 2016’s amazing finds, found by Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari in “Nil Battey Sannata”, Rohan-Vinayak, and another musician who debuted in 2016 with “Shorgul”, Niladri Kumar. I have substantial expectations from these two, and whatever Ravi Shankar gives will be an added bonus. So here’s the review for “Sarkar 3”!


1. Angry Mix

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mika Singh, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

The album starts with a song that starts with Sukhwinder singing “Sarkaaaaaaarrrrr….”, followed by club beats that were the thing in around 2002-2003. The beginning of the song itself fails to raise eyebrows, and I assure you, none of the rest will surprise you either. The composition is so dated and haphazard, you don’t even know what you’re listening to. Ravi Shankar has tried to co pose it in a chantlike manner, but fails due to the datedness and blandness of the composition. The arrangements are nothing but an overdose of techno music that doesn’t fit in today’s era of techno music. But it suits the crime theme of the film, and that’s pretty much all that it gets right. The vocals are by Sukhwinder Singh and Mika Singh, who are two people that can make boring songs sound slightly better, but here, even they can’t succeed in saving the dead composition. The “Govinda Govinda” chants by Sukhwinder sound blatantly dull. The lyrics are the normal, run-of-the-mill lyrics that usually feature in such tracks. What a bore.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

2. Ganpati Aarti

Singer ~ Amitabh Bachchan, Music by ~ Rohan-Vinayak

Okay, so it’s weird to be reviewing an Aarti, but I will have to judge it only on the basis of vocals and arrangements. This song is basically the Ganpati Aarti, as the name suggests. Rohan-Vinayak, who made a smashing debut last year with “Nil Battey Sannata”, get to helm this one. And I must say, they do it with utmost integrity and respect. The dignity of the Aarti is retained, and nothing is changed except the arrangements, and those too, are very simple and traditional. Claps, bells, Mridangam, manjeeras, strings and other traditional instruments are used to enhance the Maharashtrian feel of the song, and much like any well-arranged devotional song, it gives you goosebumps. Amitabh Bachchan’s deep and resonant voice just complements the wonderful arrangements and gives the Aarti a very respectable touch, which might not have been there, if someone else had sung it. The chorus singers are wonderful, and play an important role in making the song what it is! Your everyday Aarti, treated with utmost care and presented to you with the Maharashtrian flavour intact.

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Gussa

Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

This is the original version of the track that arrived previously as Angry Mix. The track is the same as far as the composition goes. If it isn’t, I was too lazy to make out the difference. To hear that boring and banal composition yet again is a punishment to the ears. What makes this one slightly better than the “Mix”, is the arrangements. Very aptly, they provide a BGM-like quality to the song, the kind of music that would play when you’re watching a thriller and a crucial moment arrives. The brass instruments provide a regal quality to the song, but they get monotonous after a while. Later, a very clichéd sound sets in, with the dholaks and manjeeras, as if a politician’s procession is going through town. Who would want to hear that in a song? Sukhwinder reprises the vocals, and the song actually sounds better without Mika, as Sukhwinder’s voices oozes of command and power. The “govinda govinda” chants are even more pronounced here, and because of the dholak-manjeeras rhythm, it sounds all the more commonplace. A song only apt for being a background piece. 

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Sam Dham

Singers ~ Kailash Kher & Saket Bairoliya, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

The “Sam Dham Dand Bhed” chants from “Sarkar” return here, coupled with the “Govinda Govinda” chants. And then Kailash Kher comes and sings a strictly lifeless composition that will bore you to infinity. Ravi Shankar’s composition doesn’t deserve to be heard; at the same time, the arrangements are the usual dholak rhythm, with those bells that are supposedly trying to intimidate us with their sound. The brass and strings get sidelined due to the overbearing sound of the dholaks. (They only manage to make you go to sleep, though) Kailash sounds least interested in singing this one. And I am least interested in listening it to it over and over, so I am stopping the review here.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

5. Thamba

Singer ~ Navraj Hans, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Sirasri

This one starts with the famous “Mujhe jo sahi lagta hai…” dialogue in Big B’s voice, and what follows is a formulaic crime song that sounds like so many of those gangster-themed songs of Bollywood that try to showcase gangsters as superheroes, except here, it is a politician and not a gangster. The composition seems to be trying hard to be cool, but succeeds not even one bit. Things are a bit better in the arrangements department, but that’s because Ravi Shankar takes the help of techno sounds, and regal brass tunes to uplift the song. The beats are good but very laidback, and get very monotonous after a point. The electric guitar parts are impressive to an extent, until it gets all weird. The “govinda govinda” chants haven’t been kept out of this song either. And then those random outbursts of “thamba” (Which means “Stop” in Marathi) are so miserable. How boring. Navraj Hans brings in an avatar of his that I have never heard, and after hearing it, I wish I never had! There is a rap somewhere in the middle by someone who is unfortunately uncredited. The lyrics by Sirasri (??) are something that we have heard so many times already. Another epic fail, and it isn’t even funny.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

6. Shakti

Singers ~ Mika Singh, Adarsh Shinde & Saket Bairoliya, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Mandar Cholkar

The “Govinda Govinda” chants start off the next song, and then a random shout of “Go! Win! Da!” (Which is “Govinda” horribly pronounced). As soon as Mika starts rambling out the words of this sing, and as soon as the dhols and bells start playing, you roll your eyes and press the “Next” button. At least you can press that. I can’t. I have to review it. The composition is yet another clichéd composition that suits only in a Ram Gopal Varma film. And it is tailor made for Mika Singh. Adarsh Shinde, a singer we hear mostly in the Marathi industry singing folksy numbers, supports him ably, and the best parts in the song are by him, like the aalaaps. The arrangements are the typical fare of dholaks and bells, but I loved the stop-and-play manner in which the dholak is played in the antaras. A song that seems extra long just because all the songs before it sounded just like it. 

Rating: 1/5

 

7. Sarkar Trance

(Instrumental), Music by ~ Niladri Kumar

Niladri Kumar’s instrumental arrives at the very end of the album, as instrumentals usually do. The Zitarist produces a very hodgepodge mix of Sarkar dialogues and techno sounds with this track. And no, the “Govinda govinda” isn’t absent. A minute into the track, it changes from a dull dialogue delivery of Bachchan’s, to a cool, sinister-sounding track, where the synthesiser tune actually does sound deserving of some attention. And then some uncredited lady very sinisterly sings something that sounds like a mantra. The racy nature of the song makes it feel more like a track from an Anurag Kashyap film, than a RGV film. Impressive, but far from excellent.

Rating: 2/5


Sarkar 3 is an album you’d best not listen to. Unless you want to be bombarded by “Govinda govinda” chants. Unless you want to hear all the dialogues and chants that were already heard in ‘Sarkar’ and ‘Sarkar Raj’, again, like revision, to prepare you for the third film. Unless you want to hear songs that sound the exact same and you can’t differentiate one from another. Unless you want to hear a unidimensional soundtrack. Unless you want to just hear dholaks and bells. And finally, unless you want to miss a wonderful Ganpati Aarti sung by the effervescent Bachchan and arranged by the wonderful Rohan-Vinayak. {Hint: Just hear that song, and that’s it}. A movie that could’ve gone without a seven-track music album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 0.5 + 5 + 1 + 0.5 + 0.5 + 1 + 2 = 10.5

Album Percentage: 30% {In case you want to know, Without the Aarti, it  18.33% 😂}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ganpati Aarti > Sarkar Trance > SKIP THE REST!

 

I’m not bothering to make a “What’s Your Favourite Song?” poll.