MUSIC KA MAIDAAN FATEH NA HO PAAYA! (SANJU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman, Rohan-Rohan & Vikram Montrose
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Shekhar Astitwa, Puneet Sharma & Rohan Gokhale
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 29th June 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 29th June 2018

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Sanju Album Cover

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Sanju is a Bollywood biopic starring Ranbir Kapoor, Paresh Rawal, Manisha Koirala, Dia Mirza, Vicky Kaushal, Sonam Kapoor, Karishma Tanna, Jim Sarbh and Anushka Sharma among others. The film is directed by Rajkumar Hirani, and produced by him along with Vidhu Vinod Chopra. We all know how Sanjay Dutt features in almost all of Hirani’s films, save ‘3 Idiots’. However, Hirani says he never got to know him personally until one day he started talking about all his hardships during an emotional breakdown. That lit a lamp in Hirani’s mind, and he decided to make a biopic. Now, I can’t comment on the movie as I haven’t watched it yet, but I can sure do a music review, right? 🤣 The music of the film has been composed by three composer entities (one being a duo), Rohan-Rohan, Vikram Montrose and A.R. Rahman. It’s surprising to see Rahman first of all in a multicomposer album, because whenever he did those in the past, it was because he left midway due to other commitments. But here, he was the last addition reportedly! Rohan-Rohan have two songs, and it isn’t their Hindi debut; that happened four years ago with ‘Mumbai Delhi Mumbai’, but it is Vikram’s Hindi film debut — he has done some Hindi pop songs and a Marathi album called ‘Bhay’, which was mediocre. Also, I’ve noticed that Hirani uses music as a prop to take the story forward, but not even in the way other filmmakers do (they’ll have a song play in the background and all). No, Hirani will have a full-fledged four-minute song sequence, but it’ll make the moment fun and enjoyable. However, the music itself isn’t always up to the mark. His favourite film album of mine is ‘Pk’, because the music actually was good there. Let’s check out how the music is with ‘Sanju’, though you might already know by my review’s headline. Sorry. I’m dimwitted that way.


Rohan-Rohan are the ‘chosen ones’ who get to begin this album. And they do it in quite a quirky manner too! Main Badhiya Tu Bhi Badhiya is a song that is supposed to be an old song that the character are singing in the 80s, so the song is composed like a 50s nok-jhhok number. It starts with a wonderful opening prelude, which instantly sucks you into the 50s. Sunidhi’s voice modulation is fantastic, and is obviously one of the best vocal renditions of the year. Sonu Nigam, in comparison seems weak, but I wonder, since he can mimic so well, why didn’t he sing in a nasal tone, as well? He still has sung in one, but it could’ve been more pronounced I feel. Rohan-Rohan’s composition is fun, but takes some time getting used to. And Puneet Sharma’s lyrics are very quirky and funny, especially the part when they talk about ‘family planning’ or rather, the lack of it. The song somewhat addresses Sanjay Duty’s commitment issues, and it’s the typical Hirani way of presenting a serious topic in such a flippant and casual way.

Rohan-Rohan’s second song doesn’t fare too well. Bhopu Baj Raha Hain tries to start with a retro sound as well, trumpets blaring, bhopus belting out weird noises, but it soon transcends into a very weird zone. Nakash Aziz was the obvious choice for the song, and I must say Rohan-Rohan’s arrangements are enjoyable, but I’m sure nobody will listen to this song again. There’s not magnetism or attractiveness to it. The antaras are poorly structured, and I’d never expect this song to be in any big commercial film. The worst part is that this is a Hirani film. Though the duo has tried to create the Hirani zone in this song as well, I feel it could’ve been less effervescent. The lyrics by Rohan Gokhale and Shekhar Astitwa are just a bunch of words you never think much about.

Vikram Montrose, the debutant, also starts off his share of the album with a song that everyone would love because of the motivational touch, the powerful vocals and the inspirational lyrics. Kar Har Maidaan Fateh does carry thag irresistibly moving sound, I agree. The choice of Sukhwinder Singh wasn’t surprising, but the choice of Shreya Ghoshal was surprising, and the way she sings is even more surprising — she sings quite lower than she usually sings. She shines even then, though. Sukhwinder Singh’s parts sound almost heard-before and nothing new, but because of the freshness Shreya brings through her low pitch, the song reaches different levels of awesomeness. Vikram arranges is quite standardly, with rock guitars, percussions, and drums. However, the violin playing the hookline in the interludes, is amazing. Also, the composition took some time to grow on me, but when it did, I couldn’t get it out of my head. All in all, it was a good debut for Montrose.

His second song Baba Bolta Hain Bas Ho Gaya, is hinged on the quirky lyrics by Puneet Sharma and Rohan Gokhale. Papon brings a different, rough texture to his otherwise smooth voice, but I enjoyed Ranbir’s parts more. And Supriya Pathak (not the one you’re thinking of) sings her lines quite funnily. The groove and gun sounds throughout the song have been overused so many times in so many gangster movies in Bollywood, that it sounds boring here. The song is also unbearably long, at just under than 5 minutes. However, I’m sure this song is for the theatres.

And then enters A.R. Rahman, who gets two songs too. Ruby Ruby starts with that irresistible bass line, followed by the wonderful guitars (Keba Jeremiah) and a grungy voice keeps whispering “Rrrrrubyy”. When the actual melody starts, you are initially confused, and the song takes some listens to get used to, but since it depicts Dutt’s drug addiction phase, I think it’s deliberately composed like that — so many lines repeating so many times; there’s actually three discernible different parts in the song that keep repeating over and over. And it sends us into a trance. The percussions are amazing too, as are the strings! Shashwat Singh masters the grunge very well, and I especially loved the part when he does the descension from ‘Tu bhi, ruby, ruby…’. Poorvi Koutish is a capable backing vocalists, and her ‘la la la’ is so haunting, it sucks you in.

Speaking of haunting, Rahman’s next song Mujhe Chaand Pe Le Chalo is just that. A sensuous composition, rendered just perfectly by Nikhita Gandhi, the song immediately has you hooked. It has a number of lines ending with high notes, which Nikhita holds so wonderfully. The rhythm Rahman employs in the background is intriguing, and reminds you of ‘Muskaanein Jhoothi Hai’ from ‘Talaash’ with the shakers, the subtle percussion, and very muffled strings that give the song an even more sensuous atmosphere. Irshad Kamil writes lyrics that suit the ambience of the song, and I feel that the song itself can transport you to the moon. Also, Nikhita hums so brilliantly at the end of the song. 😍


Sanju turns out to be the weakest Hirani album for me, due to the meaningless quirks from the newer songs by the younger composers, that just brings the album down. The music field has sadly not been conquered by Hirani this time.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 5 + 8 + 6 + 8.5 + 9 = 44.5

Album Percentage: 74.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी< सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mujhe Chaand Pe Le Chalo > Ruby Ruby > Main Badhiya Tu Bhi Badhiya = Kar Har Maidaan Fateh > Baba Bolta Hain Bas Ho Gaya > Bhopu Baj Raha Hain

Which is your favourite song from Sanju? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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A MUFFLED SOUND EXPLOSION!! (PARMANU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar & Jeet Gannguli
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu Srivastava, Dr. Kumar Vishwas, Sachin Sanghvi & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 15th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 25th May 2018

Parmanu Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Parmanu is a Bollywood drama/thriller film starring John Abraham, Boman Irani and Diana Penty, directed by Abhishek Sharma and produced by Zee Studios, JA Entertainment and Kyta Productions. The film revolves around the 1998 bomb test explosions conducted by the Indian Army at Pokhran, Rajasthan under the leadership of Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam during PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s tenure. The film has opened to mixed reviews, but what had me most excited about the film (since the subject matter isn’t really the kind I like) was the music by Sachin-Jigar. Well, Sachin-Jigar and Jeet Gannguli, as I learned after the album released.


Sachin-Jigar April start the album off with a refreshing song Shubh Din, which follows the folksy Gujarati/Rajasthani template to the tee, but still manages to turn out as an entertaining number. They recreate their own ‘Aavi Re Hoon Aavi Re’ (from the Gujarati movie Carry On Kesar), and the song has a catchy instrumental loop after the hookline, which Sachin-Jigar have made sure, hooks the audience. The arrangements give the impression that the makers were going for something grander, but had to settle for less than what they intended. The folksiness doesn’t come out full-fledgedly as one would expect from Sachin-Jigar, but ends up sounding muffled. The vocals by Keerthi Sagathia and Jyotica Tangri are amazing though, as is Sachin-Jigar’s composition, so at least the song is entertaining for as long as it plays.
The next folksy number by Sachin-Jigar, Thare Vaaste, is like a patriotic recreation of their song ‘Chunar’ (ABCD 2), especially lyrically. Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics are aptly poignant and patriotic, but sadly, the composers’ tune doesn’t match up to that level; it fails to move the listener. The anthemic tune gets repetitive after some time, and though Divya Kumar does well in trying to make the song sound energetic, it is again the fault of the muffled-sounding arrangements, that the song doesn’t come to life as would be expected.
Kasumbi, the best song of the album, also sees the duo follow the folksy template, but this time Vayu’s lyrics are Punjabi, in a film set in Rajasthan. This one starts off like another ‘Chunar’ spawn, but soon sets in as a moving patriotic number — the shehnaai is the most remarkable instrument used here; it harks back to the old patriotic songs. Again, the arrangements sound muffled here too (what’s with the poor programming throughout the album?) but Sachin-Jigar’s tune is so strong, it can be overlooked. Also, Divya Kumar gives an amazing performance, especially in that gem of a hookline. Vayu’s lyrics are beautiful, incorporating the word ‘Kasumbi’, which is probably the name for the saffron colour associated with patriotism in Gujarat and Rajasthan.
The last two songs composed by Sachin-Jigar in this album, have soothing tunes and less of a folksy impact than the previous songs. Sapna is the trademark Sachin-Jigar romantic melody (a la ‘Meet’ from ‘Simran’) in its composition, but the lyrics by Sachin Sanghvi are not romantic at all. Overall it is a pleasant listen, which Sachin-Jigar doing their signature method of repeating an instrumental loop after the hookline. (The loop in this song sounds a lot like the one in ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ from “Meri Pyaari Bindu”). Arijit Singh is himself in the song, and carries it off like he carries off every song he’s ever carried off. The guitars are enjoyable and soothing, and the sarangi is beautiful, and the song itself is fortunately short — any longer and it would’ve been too long.
The last song by Sachin-Jigar, De De Jagah, is yet another in the same vein as ‘Sapna’, but this time, the lyricist (poet and politician Dr. Kumar Vishwas) complements it with romantic lyrics. What strikes me right away, yet again, is that something is wrong with the mixing, making Yasser Desai’s voice sound like it has been recorded on WhatsApp. Sachin-Jigar’s vibrant composition is one of the best of theirs over the period of 2016-2018, and Yasser Desai, barring the bad use of his vocals, tries to do his best, and succeeds fairly enough. The guitars and tablas complement each other surprisingly well, and the harmonium provides the soul in the song. The tune of the hookline is what will get you hooked to this song, just like songs traditionally are supposed to do.
Now, the reason I described that as Sachin-Jigar’s last song, is because there’s a kind of guest composer we have in the album; he has been waiting patiently for his turn, and I’m more than happy to talk about his song. The man in question in Jeet Gannguli, who has somehow bagged a romantic (read Mohit Suri-like sob-inducing) song in a movie like this. Jitni Dafa is one of those songs we have heard enough of in Bollywood, and I can’t believe the makers would proactively damage their own music album by including such a song in the album. It starts off painfully simple, and until those ‘Aashiqui 2’-ish beats start, it isn’t that painful, but when they do start, you keep waiting for the song to end. Rashmi-Virag write great lyrics, but hey, I’m quite sure John’s character in the film has time to weep like this at such a critical time and dire situation. And the singer is Yasser Desai, trying his best to be a mix of Mustafa Zahid, Arijit Singh, Saim Bhatt and Atif Aslam.


Parmanu has a soundtrack that mostly sticks to the point (barring that guest song) but something is definitely wrong with the arrangements; if they had been better mixed and mastered, the sound would’ve been grander and more enjoyable!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 39

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kasumbi > Shubh Din > De De Jagah > Thare Vaaste = Sapna > Jitni Dafa

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 19 (from previous albums) + 01 = 20

Which is your favourite song from Parmanu? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

ANGREZI MEIN KEHTE HAI MIXED BAG!! (ANGREZI MEIN KEHTE HAIN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pravin Kunwar, Oni-Adil & Ranjan Sharma
♪ Lyrics by: Yogesh, Amir Khusro, Pratibha Tiku Sharma & Pradip Sharma Khusro
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 9th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 18th May 2018

Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain is a Bollywood romantic drama starring Sanjay Mishra, Pankaj Tripathi, Anshuman Jha, Brijendra Kala, Ekavali Khanna & Shivani Raghuvanshi, directed by Harish Vyas and produced by Manav Malhotra. The film has music by three new composers – Pravin Kunwar, Oni-Adil and Ranjan Sharma. Let’s see how these three newcomers fare!


This album is the perfect example of equitable distribution of songs in a multicomposer album, each composing entity gets two songs each!
Praveen Kunwar starts the album with a pleasant romantic song Meri Aankhein, where we get to hear the composer singing a nice pahaadi type folksy portion before the real song starts. The melody is a typical Shaan melody — simple, heard-before, but pleasant. Shaan always gets such songs right, and he does so here too. Vaishali Made, who we hear in Bollywood only now, after her big break (which wasn’t her debut) in “Bajirao Mastani”, sounds great too, but not irreplaceable. The song has pleasant arrangements consisting of guitars and strings mostly, and all in all, is a fun listen.
Whatever composing talent Praveen seemed to have with his first song, seems to have evaporated with his second song Piya Mosey Rooth Gaye, a painfully slow and sombre 90s-ish sad song, in which singer Satyendra Tripathi tries (and succeeds about halfway) to sound as much as he can, like Udit Narayan. The composition bores you, but can’t even put you to sleep; it’s just boring. The flute in the arrangements too, can’t do anything to rouse the listener from the depression that the composition and the vocals forces him into. I doubt this would be well received even if it were released in the 90s.
The next composer, Ranjan Sharma, composes two songs on traditional lyrics, the first and the better one being Ab Maan Jao Saawariya, which is almost (almost) suitable for a period film, but not the Bhansali and Gowariker kind, more like the ones for which Ismail Darbar would compose (without Bhansali backing him, of course). That being said, though, the classical composition is soulful, and the tablas and sarangi do a wonderful job together, to make it sound better. Mahua Chakroborty’s vocals are pitch perfect, for such a song. The song will unfortunately bore those who haven’t warmed up to Hindustani classical music.
Ranjan’s second song More Banni Ki Mehendi, starts off as an entertaining wedding song, but in just one minute it turns into a painfully stretched and slow bidaai song with the usual Bollywood BIDAAI tropes — a slow duff rhythm, paayal sounds, and a composition that tries to tear your heart open. The singer Archana Thammala has a great voice though, I have to admit. Ranjan Sharma’s auto tuned voice could’ve been avoided!
The reason I write about composers Oni-Adil at the end, is because their songs are the only two songs that are both by the same composers and are both good.
Tera Hua Main Jab Se is a really pleasant romantic song, just like ‘Meri Aankhein’, but any day, Mohit Chauhan is a better pick than Shaan for such a song. This song is probably the freshest song of the album, because the arrangements just make you feel so good. The hookline too, is catchy, and it almost sounds like the kind of song Pritam would compose for a non-Bhatt film around 2008-2010. The guitars really sound amazing here.
The composer duo surprises me when they do a complete 180 degree turn, for their next song Aaj Rang Hai, a traditional number with lyrics by Amir Khusro. It is my favourite song from the album, because it is a really well done Qawwali, and the composers have splendidly done the arrangements — harmonium, tablas, chimtas, dholaks. The composition is spiritual and perfect for such a song! The vocals by Jatinder Pal Singh, and others, is amazing. If you don’t like Qawwalis, you should still hear this one; kmaybe you’d start appreciating the musical prowess it takes to create them!


This is one of those albums where certain songs are amazingly beautiful, while others are just bad and boring. Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain ‘mixed bag!’ 😂

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 5 + 6.5 + 4 + 8.5 + 8 = 39

Album Percentage: 65%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hua Main Jab Se > Aaj Rang Hai > Meri Aankhein > Ab Maan Jao Saawariya > Piya Mose Rooth Gaye > More Banne Ki Mehendi

Which is your favourite song from Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DEBUTANTS HIJACK THE ALBUM FROM NUCLEYA!! (HIGH JACK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Nucleya, Anurag Saikia, Rajat Tiwari, SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar
♪ Lyrics by: Akarsh Khurana, Vibha Saraf, SlowCheeta & Rajat Tiwari
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th April 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th May 2018

High Jack Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


High Jack is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film starring Sumeet Vyas, Sonalli Seygall, and Mantra Mugdh, directed by Akarsh Khurana and produced by Phantom Films and Viu. The trailer makes it seem like a movie that requires insanely quirky music, and the music is by multiple composers. Nucleya, Anurag Saikia, Rajat Tiwari, SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar are composing for this album, and barring Nucleya, all the other composers are debuting with this album. So, fasten your seatbelts as we take off on this flight that is the album of this film!


Nucleya starts off the album with probably the freshest song I’ve heard in a while, Behka. The song starts with a pleasant guitar strum accompanied by a fresh EDM sound, that runs all throughout the song, and Nucleya does a nice job not making it boring, even though the song runs for four minutes! Vibha Saraf sings one stanza at the beginning, and the same one towards the end; barring that, the song is completely EDM — and good EDM at that! Nucleya is great at this kind of stuff, and it’s nice to see a Bollywood producer actually letting him make it. Anurag Kashyap directed his energies into making a high octane rap song earlier this year in ‘Mukkabaaz’, and now he (because Phantom produced the film) lets him do his signature EDM, which turns out mind blowing.
Nucleya’s other song Aapaatkaleen, is a short theme song with dialogues by the cast members, and another catchy and groovy EDM rhythm, and fun sound effects. It’s nice to see Nucleya get experimental with sound in a Bollywood film.
Anurag Saikia’s Bollywood debut happens with another experimental track, the best of this album, Prabhu Ji. The song appears in two versions. Both versions have the same arrangements, but just sung by two different singers, Asees Kaur and debutant Suvarna Tiwari.
The Asees Kaur Version will definitely be the radio’s favourite, while music lovers would love the Suvarna Tiwari Version, because of the classical singing talent she possesses. At the end of the day, both versions are enjoyable. Anurag Saikia’s composition is a winner, because it is an efficient bhajan-like tune, and the amazing fusion with Electronic music is a wonderful touch, making the song sound extremely fresh. The lyrics by director Akarsh Khurana are great, and intentionally (or unintentionally?) funny, because in such a film you know this isn’t going to be a real bhajan situation, so the lyrics sound all the more quirky!
SlowCheeta and Shwetang Shankar step into Bollywood with Kripya Dhyaan De, another song with some sick electronic programming, especially with the bagpipes. There isn’t much by way of composition here, as it is primarily a rap song, but that too, has been done tastefully. However, it isn’t something that you’ll think of much after listening to it. It’ll play and get over, and you’ll forget about it soon. That’s not saying it isn’t catchy though, and the composers have given it a nice soundscape.
The last composer Rajat Tiwari, also debuting with this album, presents his song Happy Ending Song, also in two versions. Both the First Version and the Second Version go completely acoustic and say so too, in the lyrics by Akarsh Khurana. (“Electronic music kaafi sun liya, isiliye acoustic bajaana hai“). The composition itself is enjoyable, feel-good, much like the rest of the songs in the album, and again the arrangements and vocals are done well. Taaruk Raina is a great find, he sings the song in a charming way in both versions, and while Sumedha Karmahe accompanies him (sounding as usual like she could have sounded better) in the first version, Manasi Mulherkar (sounding like Shefali Alvares). The lyrics are enjoyable and suitable for the end credits scene.


Barring one song, the album is completely high on electronic music, but more than that, it is a launchpad for four talented composers, who kind of hijack the album from Nucleya!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 8.5 + 6 + 7 + 7 = 52

Album Percentage: 74. 3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Prabhu Ji (Both Versions) > Behka > Happy Ending Song (Both Versions) = Aapaatkaaleen > Kripya Dhyaan De

 

Which is your favourite song from High Jack? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

ADORABLE BUT FORGETTABLE! (MERI NIMMO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Krsna Solo & Mangesh Dhakde
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 25th April 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 27th April 2018

Meri Nimmo Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Meri Nimmo is a Bollywood film starring Anjali Patil and Karan Dave, directed by Rahul Shanklya and produced by Aanand L. Rai. The film was released directly on Eros’ streaming service Eros Now. The film’s music has been composed by two composers, one of which we get to hear once every year (at least), and one who we are only hearing for the second time since he debuted in bollywood! The former being Krsna Solo, and the latter being Mangesh Dhakde (who debuted with four amazing songs in ‘Hawaizaada’ in 2015). Expecting some good music, especially because it is an Anand Rai production!


Krsna’s part of the album opens with a sweet retro sounding song Bulbula, which resembles Vishal-Shekhar’s ‘Dil Kaagzi’ (Gippi) in every aspect. The arrangements are similar waltzy arrangements, with the mandolin and flutes. The composition is of the same lilting type, and Paroma Das Gupta even tries to sound like Neeti Mohan (and succeeds). The only place this song falls flat, is the composition. The mukhda is so painfully repetitive, the saccharine nature of the rest of the song too, can’t make up for it. It was nice to hear something from Krsna though, since he only appears once or twice a year!
His second song, Yeh Bhi Beet Jaayega, fares much better. A simple piano starts the song, and this song too is in the retro zone. This time though, the composition is more eventful, and Sukriti Kakar’s vocals are beautiful. Raj Shekhar’s lyrics are sweet, as was required for this movie. The strings interlude creates a grand feel, and the antara continues the sweetness of the song. The thing is, I don’t think I’ll be listening to these songs again in the future — they just aren’t that memorable.
Mangesh Dhakde, returning three and a half years after his debut in ‘Hawaizaada’, presents Tumse Hi by Javed Ali, a good composition, but just that. I loved the sarangi and mandolin; they create a soothing effect. It seems like Mangesh has stretched the composition at places instead of getting to the hookline early. The hookline itself has a nice old Bollywood touch, with that amazing nuance by Javed Ali. Javed Ali too, doesn’t sound at his best, with an awkward coarseness in his otherwise silky voice. Raj Shekhar’s lyrics though, are incredible.


Overall, a passable album. Expected much, much more from these two composers. Still, give this album a listen. Chances are, you will find one song that you’ll enjoy, but only for the duration it plays.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 7.5 + 7 = 21

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Yeh Bhi Beet Jaayega > Tumse Hi > Bulbula

Which is your favourite song from Meri Nimmo? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE MERCURY OF MITHOON’S VERSATILITY RISING!! (MERCURY – Music Review) : Dessert Review

Single Track Details
♪ Singers: Haricharan & Gajendra Verma
♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Song Released On: 
♪ Movie Released On: 13th April 2018

The Mercury Song

 

Listen to the song: Saavn

Buy the song: iTunes


Mercury is a silent thriller directed by Karthik Subbaraj, starring Prabhudeva. The film has one promotional track in Hindi composed by Mithoon, and it’s out of Mithoon’s usual composition style, so let’s get started with the review!


The last time I checked, The Mercury Song was over seven minutes long. Now, it seems they’ve cut it short and now it’s just four minutes long! Well, all the better for them because the song was quite tedious earlier. Now, I’ll review this short version. The song is really different from what we usually get to hear from Mithoon; I give credit for that to Subbaraj, the director. He is probably the one responsible for giving Mithoon the freedom he needed. Earlier this year, we’ve heard maudlin tracks like “Tum Mere Ho’ (Hate Story IV) and “Lo Safar” (Baaghi 2) from Mithoon. Here, he composes a catchy dance song that is perfect for Prabhudeva. Haricharan sings the song amazingly, almost in the vein of Benny Dayal’s style of singing. I’m guessing Gajendra Verma is responsible for the rap (which is boring). Mithoon’s programming is impressive, but also gets repetitive as the song progresses. I can’t believe Sayeed Quadri has written the song. I mean, what’s the point of roping in Quadri if you don’t want something poetic?


It was necessary to hear something like this from Mithoon, just to remind us that it isn’t his fault that he’s been composing boring songs lately!

Total Points Scored by this Track: 7

Percentage: 70%

Final Rating: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

BEYOND BOLLYWOOD!! (BEYOND THE CLOUDS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman
♪ Lyrics by: MC Heam
♪ Music Label: KM Musiq
♪ Music Released On: 2nd April 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 20th April 2018

Beyond The Clouds Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Beyond The Clouds is a Bollywood drama film starring Ishaan Khatter, Malavika Mohanan in lead roles, and directed by Majid Majidi. The film is produced by Zee Studios. Majidi is directing a Hindi film for the first time, and he ropes in for the music, the same music composer who scored for his last Persian film, A.R. Rahman. Let’s see how the Mozart of Madras performs under the vision of such a prestigious director!


Rahman starts the album off with the two only songs with lyrics, and both of them feature some kind of mawali rap, but very stylishly done. The craziness isn’t toned down at all in Ala Re Ala; Dilshad Shabbir Shaikh MC Heam and Nikhita Gandhi doing their best to make it worthwhile. Nikhita especially, entertains with those unabashed interjections that really transport you to the humble setting of the movie. Ey Chhote Motor Chala doesn’t fare so well, thanks to some disconnect in the programming. MC Heam and Dilshad Shabbir Shaikh again, do amazing with the rap, but Rahman gives it a weird hip hop sound that doesn’t quite connect as much as the booming percussions in the previous song did.
The tradition from the lyrical songs to the instrumentals is wonderfully bridged by a song that is basically instrumental, but features Nikhita Gandhi’s humming. Beyond The Clouds is probably the most memorable instrumental track that will release this year; and Nikhita Gandhi’s soulful humming makes it all the more enjoyable. Rahman’s instrumentation is so beautiful, with the piano, taking centre stage, and the strings joining in whenever necessary. It almost feels like a live orchestra performance with Rahman on the piano. 😍 The signature tune of the song is a recurring tune throughout the album; it appears in many of the instrumentals. The last one minute of this track, though, is heaven. The track really opens up and clarinets join the vivacious strings, making it unforgettable!
The next track Son Of Mumbai is hinged around the same composition, this time too, with amazing piano and strings. The only difference is that, while the previous track took three minutes to gain pace, this one jumps right in, and is all in all much more memorable just for that reason! (If you’re the kind of person who remembers instrumentals, like I do!) The tune is given a different metre here, and it sounds happier and livelier, as opposed to the soul of the previous one. Rahman even throws in some brass towards the middle. Again, the last one minute or so is of a very feel-good nature. Wind instruments own that segment of the song.
The Game Of Life is the quintessential classical track Rahman is made to put whenever a Western director needs him, but this time since the film is set in India too, it seems more fitting. The wonderful mélange of the tablas (done oh so brilliantly) and sitar (done just as beautifully) makes you feel amazing. The short track ends before you know it, though.
Twist Of Destiny is the first mellow track we get, and is led primarily by low-octave strings. This one isn’t just as memorable compared to the others because it will definitely have an impact somewhere in the movie. Loved the harmony with the strings though! Again, the ‘Beyond The Clouds’ theme features here, but this time it is in a sombre mode.
The Gift makes things happy-go-lucky again, with Rahman’s amazingly placed flute playing the ‘Beyond The Clouds’ theme in its n’th variant. The high pitched flute that pitches in towards the middle stole my heart. Again, like all great things, it ends too soon.
The Family Comes Home has a certain poise to it, something that only comes with very systematically placed numbers in films — so I’m guessing it will feature at a very critical point in the film. Again, flutes steal the show, but strings are prominent too. One wishes this one were shorter.
Here onwards the album goes into a very sombre space, where most of the tracks sound more or less the same. Second Thoughts starts the melancholia with a very slow paced piano-led, strings-backed track that actually does work to soothe you down. Again, the theme features here beautifully, with piano, strings and wind instruments all teaming up to create a soulful impact. The song is one of the more interesting ones out of this lot of tracks.
Akshi, Hospital, The Family Leaves and Full Moon are melancholic numbers with the same instruments; they all seem way too long, and at this point the album has started to get repetitive.
Reunited is a waft of fresh air, in that it isn’t that melancholic, and just right for the casual listener. The strings and piano work well together, to make this track instantly likeable, and of course, because I liked it, Rahman ended it soon. 😤 The xylophone sounds beautiful, and I guess this track features during the resolution of the movie (as is evident from its title).
Holi gets Rahman into his “composing for Prabhudeva” mode; the shehnaai is really entertaining, as are the percussions! It’s nice to see him come back to such Indian sounds after a primarily Western sounding soundtrack! That was a great finale to the album!


Barring the low patch in the middle of the album, this soundtrack is primarily one of the best of the year so far, only because of the fact that it actually is a “soundtrack” in true sense! This goes beyond the usual Bollywood scope of music composition and kudos to KM Musiq for bagging the rights to the album, because nobody else would’ve released it the same way.

P.S. I will be lumping together the points of all twelve instrumentals and scoring them out of 120, instead of writing individual points for twelve similar-sounding instrumentals!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 6.5 + 9 + 84.5 = 107

Album Percentage: 71.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Beyond The Clouds > The Game Of Life > The Gift > Reunited > Holi > The Rest

 

No poll this time. For obvious reasons. 😛