NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

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NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1 (ITTEFAQ, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR, RIBBON, RAM RATAN, SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA & JULIE 2 – Mini Music Reviews)

November 2017 Round-Up #1

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1

This round-up covers the following albums of November 2017 releases: ‘Ittefaq’ by Tanishk Bagchi, ‘The House Next Door’ by Girishh G, ‘Ribbon’ by Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai, ‘Ram Ratan’ by Bappi Lahiri, ‘Julie 2’ by Rooh Band, Viju Shah & Javed-Mohsin, and ‘Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Zain-Sam-Raees, Rashid Khan & Anand Raj Anand.

The ones that haven’t been covered in this post will be included in the next round-up for November, or will be written about in a separate post all for themselves.



♦ Intense & Intriguing, Ittefaq Se: ITTEFAQ Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Anjaan, Tanishk Bagchi & Groot
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 23rd October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the song: Saavn
Buy the song: iTunes


The only song from this film is a Atmos-Pop remake of “Raat Baaki” (Namak Halaal), named Ittefaq Se. Tanishk Bagchi is back to his remaking streak, after some nice original music in “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” with partner Vayu. He keeps the original song intact, and that’s good, and he mysterious vibe that accompanies the song goes well with the setting of the film. The beats are nice as well. The only place the song lacks is the vocals, where Jubin sounds like he always does, and is starting to sound monotonous now, and Nikhita eats up her words while producing an over-stylish voice. I would have preferred Neeti Mohan on this one. The change in lyrics from “Pyaar Se” to “Ittefaq Se” actually fits in really well!


A good remake, that called for better voices behind it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Song: 3.5 

Song Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 38 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Ittefaq) = 39


♦ As Always, Romance Predominates: THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR Music Review

♪ Music by: Girishh G
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Vayu Srivastava & Chen-Yu Maglin
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 16th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the album: Saavn
Buy the album: iTunes


Girishh G starts the album off with a dulcet Mithoon-with-Bhatts-like melody, O Mere Sanam, that impresses because of its complexity, like every other Mithoon melody. Benny Dayal sings in his trademark husky tone for romantic songs, and the hookline is something that gives you goosebumps. Girissh’s piano is the highlight of the arrangements, while Shakeel Azmi’s lyrics are beautiful with a delicious assemblage of Urdu words. Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai is aptly disturbing, demonic as it is, and the composition is frankly very bad. It is Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics that make the song disturbing, and not because it is scary! Because it is cringeworthy. Suraj Jagan spoils the vocals, his co-singer Shilpa Natarajan could’ve done just fine without him. Xiao Xiao Ma is a haunting Chinese lullaby-ish number, which is good as long as it lasts, volatilizing shortly afterwards. The last track, The House Next Door, is a short instrumental piece, which again has the problem of not being captivating, despite the wonderful use of strings.


Not the best album for Girishh to debut in Bollywood with!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 1.5 + 3 + 3 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध।< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Mere Sanam > The House Next Door = Xiao Xiao Ma > Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai

 



♦ Cute Little Ribbon: RIBBON Music Review

♪ Music by: Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Sagar & Puneet Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 31st October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Mikey McCleary presents a Sufi rock song, Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai, to start off the album, and also introduces a new singer Aniket Mangrulkar, a singer who is a much better tuned rock singer than the much-in-demand Amit Mishra. The composition by McCleary is irresistible, especially in the hook parts. The rhythms are spot on, and the lyrics too, are meaningful. Sagar Desai, the second composer, comes with a dulcet number, Har Mod Par Umeed Hai, which couldn’t have been better sung by anyone other than Jasleen Royal with her sweet voice. The composition is slow and jazzy, and so it takes some time to love, but it is at par with the first song on the lyrics front.


This seems to be the season for short and sweet (and most importantly, script-driven) soundtracks.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai > Har Mod Par Umeed Hai



♦ Bappi’s Music Ratan Has Lost Its Shine!: RAM RATAN Music Review

♪ Music by: Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Deepak Sneh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


So, I only heard this album because the music composer was Bappi Lahiri, and I should’ve realised he is so irrelevant these days as far as composing goes. Nevertheless, here’s the “review” — a highly uninterested one, at that. Nand Lala starts off thinking it is ‘Bairi Piya’ (Devdas), but then goes off into a ‘Maiyya Yashoda’ (Hum Saath Saath Hain), and then becomes cheesier than any Krishna song ever. Palak’s cheap vocals do not help. The composition is bad, as expected, and Bappi doesn’t give anything great in the arrangements either. Instead he adds a cringeworthy English “rap” in the interlude! 😣 Nagada Nagada is the most dated 2000s Gujarati dhol mix, and Raja Hasan and Bhoomi Trivedi are made to sing like pop artists making a Garba album to be sold outside temples. Yeh Hai Dance Bar is as cheesy as its name — and Bappi is singing it himself. He tries to make it full of techno sounds but it flops. Jal Jal Jal Rahi Hain Raatein, starts off as if it could be the best of the album, with the irresistible sensuous tabla beats that R.D. Burman used in ‘Jaane Do Na’ (Saagar), but as soon as Sadhana starts with her outdated voice, it goes downhill. Mohammed Irfan too, sings like Bappi Lahiri! It turns out to be the most cringeworthy song on the album.


Bappi Lahiri clearly has lost his Music Ratan!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 1.5 + 0.5 + 2 = 6.5

Album Percentage: 32.5% 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Why don’t you just skip it? I might be the only one in the world to have had the honour of listening to it!



♦ Reprise Versions Zaroor Sunna: SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA Music Review

♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Raees-Zain-Saim, Rashid Khan & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kunaal Vermaa, Shakeel Azmi, Kumaar & Gaurav Krishna Bansal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of the three versions that Jogi appears in, any layman would pick Shafqat’s version as the best – owing to his seasoned voice and classical prowess, and amazing nuances, not to mention Arko’s clever usage of wedding sounds at the beginning. The duet version is spoiled by Yasser trying to ape Shafqat’s singing style, and Arko’s typical duff rhythms with harmonica. The female version by Aakanksha Sharma is good too, where Aakanksha sounds like a better version of Palak Muchhal. The overall composition, though, is typical of Arko now, and he needs to move on from this. It is the sister of ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ and ‘Nazm Nazm’. Kaushik-Akash-Guddu compose Main Hoon Saath Tere for JAM8, another song that relies on the company’s previous success, ‘Zaalima’. The digital tune is tweaked, and Harshdeep gets kicked out, and some notes undergo permutations and combinations, and voila! We get this song. The hookline reminds me of some song, but I cannot remember at all which one! Arijit’s singing is very dull and he seems asleep, but Shivani Bhayana’s female version is pretty good, with different arrangements. The song falls flat in the antara though. It is Pallo Latke by newcomers Raees-Zain-Saim, which surprisingly becomes the song of the album, as an individual song (not including the various versions). As a remake of a Rajasthani folk song, it is surprisingly good, and will do until we get to hear some real Rajasthani folk music in “Padmavati”. Jyotica Tangri sounds amazing here, sweeter than she does in her Neha Kakkar avatar. Yasser spoils the song again, along with Fazilpuria’s annoyingly interrupting rap. The Dr. Zeus-esque tumbi seems out of place in a Rajasthani song though. Rashid Khan returns after a loooooooooong time, to give another typical romantic song Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki, again in three versions, out of which once again, Shafqat’s steals the thunder. The composition is nothing special, it is Rashid’s usual sweet as sugar tune which is oh-so-predictable. Asees sounds sweet in her version, while newcomer Asit Tripathy also does well. Asit’s version scores high because of the beautiful Rajasthani arrangements — the ravanhatta being most prominent. The lyrics resemble those of ‘Main Rang Sharbaton Ka’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and are good enough until they become very cringeworthy with the Hinglish portion. Last on the album is veteran Anand Raaj Anand’s angsty rock song (in two versions) Mera Intkaam Dekhegi about a boy warning his girlfriend (ex-girlfriend??) that if she rejects him, she will have to see his revenge. Oh, the melodrama. She should just say, “Oh alright, let me get my camera too so the world can see it too.” Krishna hurts the ears with his painful rendition, and Anand’s was skip-worthy right from the beginning.


An ensemble of composers bring five pleasant, but heard-before songs, and are forced to make innumerable versions of them, to make sure we never forget them. No wonder the newcomers steal the cake. 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 1 = 37

Album Percentage: 67.27%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jogi (Shafqat Version) > Pallo Latke = Jogi (Duet) = Jogi (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Asit) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Shafqat) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Female) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Male) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Krishna) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Anand)

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 39 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana) = 40

 



♦ Raunchy Diaries: JULIE 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Viju Shah, Rooh Band, Atif Ali & Javed-Mohsin
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan & Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 18th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Rooh Band & Atif Ali’s debut in Bollywood starts off with quite a corny title song Oh Julie, which is good enough as far as the arrangements and rhythm go, but the vocals and lyrics pull it down; stuff we have heard time and again. Their second song Koi Hausla Toh Hoh, also sung by their leading vocalist Anupam Nair, is the everyday Pakistani pop, something even the Bhatts would resist from including in their albums now, with staid lyrics like “Saanson Ka Chalte Rehna Hi Toh zindagi nahin”. Veteran composer Viju Shah’s stint of three songs for this album is devoid of much electronic disturbance. The romantic song Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai, is a typical 90s melody, in which the singer Mistu Bardhan sounds like Sadhana Sargam does in her live concerts. The voice is harsh to the ears. The reprise version Aise Kya Baat Hai, in Palak Muchhal’s voice, is better only because the voice is more ear-friendly. Otherwise, the song is just as flat and dated. His third song happens to be a raunchy item number, Kharama Kharama, sung by Pawni Pandey, and which surprisingly fares much better, thanks to the irresistible South Indian rhythm. Again, it is bogged down by a typically 90s composition, and the lyrics obviously. Javed-Mohsin, nephews of Sajid-Wajid, present the last song, Mala Seenha, sung by Mamta Sharma, a tedious rehash of their uncles’ item songs with the singer. Again, the rhythms are the only worthy parts of the song.


An album that you will automatically avoid.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 + 3 = 15

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kharama Kharama = Mala Seenha > Aise Kya Baat Hai = Oh Julie > Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai = Koi Hausla Toh Hoh



 

Hope you enjoyed this Round-up! Second one coming soon!!

OCTOBER 2017 ROUND-UP (CHEF, TU HAI MERA SUNDAY, RANCHI DIARIES, GOLMAAL AGAIN, JIA AUR JIA — Mini Music Reviews) + Important Announcement!!


The Important Announcement

Due to the scarcity of time, from now on, I will sum up the entire month’s reviews in a set of two articles each month, one usually around the 15th of the month and the other towards the end. Of course, certain albums that I feel need a separate post (either because they might have many songs, or be spectacular albums, or even if the movies are highly awaited ones) I will do so for those albums. I will reveal the chosen album for this month — it’ll be “Secret Superstar” — I don’t guarantee it’ll be rated very high, but because of the buzz surrounding it, it requires a separate post, I feel! Meanwhile, the usual monthly awards posts will sum everything up once again at the end of every month in the form of awards. I really hope this format helps me balance my schedule! And I can’t wait to return to my normal long posts — till then enjoy your luck of getting to read short reviews from my side!!


October 2017 Round-Up

So this post will cover the reviews for the all but two of October releases that have already released — ‘Chef’ by Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik, ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’ by Amartya Rahut (Bobo), ‘Ranchi Diaries’ by Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran, ‘Golmaal Again’ by Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George-DJ Chetas & Abhishek Arora, and ‘Jia Aur Jia’ by Sachin Gupta, Nisschal Zaveri & Sameer Nichani. There will be separate reviews for ‘Secret Superstar’ and ‘Rukh’, both by Amit Trivedi.



♦ A Delectable Treat For The Ears: CHEF Music Review

♪ Music by: Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik
♪ Lyrics by: Ankur Tewari & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to ‘Tere Mere’: Saavn
Buy ‘Tere Mere’: iTunes


Raghu Dixit starts off the album with Shugal Laga Le, a song having a heavy folk influence from Kerala. The backing vocalists provide that freshness associated with Kerala, and Raghu’s characteristic voice makes it all the more intriguing to listen to. In his arrangements too, he adds a dash of everything, and especially those percussions are mind blowing, along with the banjo. Ankur’s lyrics made me acquainted with a new phrase “Shugal Laga Le” meaning “find a hobby, or find something to do”. The next song by him is also reliant on folk music, this time Celtic/Irish. Banjaara is steeped heavily on the beautiful flutes that characterise Irish music, with amazing percussion and backing vocals yet again. Vishal Dadlani does great justice to the sing with those power-packed vocals. The song is one of those many motivational songs that Vishal gets to sing in Bollywood, except that this time, it has a whole new style to it. The mellow Darmiyaan, exudes a positivity in spite of the fact that it is a sad song — mostly because of Raghu’s ebullience. A splendid guitar backdrop makes it simple and sweet, and Raghu’s diction has to be lauded. Raghu takes forth the melancholia in a more Bollywood-ish way in Khoya Khoya, which I rank as the best of the album — underrated Shahid Mallya taking charge of the vocals in a very beautiful way, and Dixit’s composition has that old-world-charm to it. The sarangi is quite impressive here! The alternative rock set up will make this one loveable to many! Raghu’s last song on the album is the effervescent Tan Tan, rendered with spunk by Nikhita Gandhi, the only female vocalist on the album. In her texture, she gives off vibes of Shalmali and Shefali. Guest composer Amaal Mallik, whose song Tere Mere was also removed from the album later, produces a song you can immediately tell is by him. That doesn’t make its richness diluted, though — it’s still wonderful, with the nice dholak rhythm accompanying Armaan Malik’s beautiful voice. Also, Rashmi-Virag’s lyrics are amazing!
All in all, Chef is one of the best albums of the year in that it is a clever mix of melancholia, inspiration and romance. Raghu Dixit must sign more and more Bollywood films — I firmly believe that this is his best Bollywood album yet!

Total Points Scored by This Album (in the order mentioned in the review): 4 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 88.3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Banjaara = Khoya Khoya > Tan Tan > Tere Mere = Shugal Laga Le = Darmiyaan



♦ A Perfect Sunday Album: TU HAI MERA SUNDAY Music Review

♪ Music by: Amartya Rahut
♪ Lyrics by: Milind Dhaimade
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 29th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of Arijit’s two songs, the classically-steeped sad song Dhundlo Tum fares better, with an addictive strings orchestra accompanying it, and it quickly steers away from the Bhatt-ish genre that it starts off with. Had that continued, it wouldn’t have been half as good. The digital Sitar is beautiful. His other song, Thodi Si Jagah, is also classical-based for some initial parts, before it turns into an upbeat number that loses itself halfway through the song. The rock backdrop ofthe hook line couldn’t have been more clichéd. Arijit’s vocal prowess is clearly showcased in the song though. It is Amartya’s violin solo that impresses though, with its distinct classical tune. The title song, Tu Hai Mera Sunday, takes a pleasant Christmassy turn, with soft jazz making your ears happy. Shalmali renders it with a familiarity that makes you feel amazing. The brass portions have been done really well here, as are the drums. The clarinet and piano is wonderful too. It is nothing more than the lyrics that make it sound even more personal though. Ash King’s Yeh Mera Man is a pleasant departure from his previous song ‘Bandook Meri Laila’ (A Gentleman) and brings him back to his comfort zone. Again, a jazzy tune gives the song a kind of spring, and that whistle portion is so pleasantly surprising and charming, it is hard to dislike. The guitars are impressive here. Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai, a clubbish number sung by Nandini Srikar, is probably the weakest of the album, where the tune and the arrangement are just mismatched; the hookline sounds like this song was pitched for the situation of ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ (Don) before ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ was finalised.
Amartya’s best album to date provides us with a nice mix of classical music, jazz music and a banal club number! This album will go highly underrated and unnoticed though!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album (in order mentioned in the review): 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dhundhlo Tum > Thodi Si Jagah = Tu Hai Mera Sunday > Yeh Mera Man > Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai



♦ Uninteresting Diaries: RANCHI DIARIES Music Review

♪ Music by: Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran
♪ Lyrics by: Nickk, Manoj Muntashir, Tony Kakkar & Sattwik Mohanty
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 13th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Some newcomer Nickk is — he has just been made to make another ‘Baby Doll’, now that Meet Bros. just be refusing to do it. However, Fashion Queen has something in addition to the usual ‘Baby Doll’ sequels — an Arabic strings backdrop that just helps it as much as a car can help you fly. The new singer Raahi seems disillusioned with the ideals that it is okay to sing like Kanika Kapoor if you aren’t her. The composer’s rap is dumb. Helicopter‘s lyricist and composer Tony Kakkar uses the word ‘helicopter’ as a metaphor for ‘getting high’. 😶 Siblings Tony and Neha render it with as much mediocrity as they can muster. I can’t believe Tony is the same guy behind ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D) and ‘Khuda Bhi’ (Ek Paheli Leela), but then he has made ‘Ek Do Teen Chaar’ (Ek Paheli Leela) and ‘Do Peg Maar’ (One Night Stand). Jeet Gannguli’s Thoda Aur is the composer’s usual pathos-filled romantic number — you would think that after a year-long break, he would return with something pleasant. But it is the same old Arijit-Palak love story. And the irony is that this song sounds like ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D). So did Tony help him here instead of making his own song better? 😏 The last song is a banal Mika solo Godfather, composed by Pritam’s former assistants Bobby-Imran, which I couldn’t even finish once when I started to listen to it.
This is a Hodge-podge of the worst songs from the weirdest mix of composers ever.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2 + 1.5 + 3 + 0.5 = 7

Album Percentage: 35%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thoda Aur > Fashion Queen > Helicopter > Godfather



♦ Amaal Ka Kamaal (Again): GOLMAAL AGAIN Music Review

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George, DJ Chetas, Abhishek Arora, Anu Malik & Raamlaxman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar & Rahat Indori
♪ Music Label: T-Series [“Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 6th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 20th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate”: Saavn


The album to the much-awaited fourth instalment to the ‘Golmaal’ series starts with the Title Track, where South film composer Thaman S. is called in just to do that clichéd Kuthu rhythm we are all bored of. Brijesh Shandilya does well as the lead male singer, but Aditi Singh Sharma sounds utterly replaceable. She gets another song, Itna Sannata Kyun Hai, composed by Lijo George and DJ Chetas, where her part towers over her male co-singer Amit Mishra’s parts. The hookline is like a desperate scream in our ears, to make noise. The EDM after the hookline is so bad, I can’t describe it. Amaal Mallik, lead composer, gets two songs, where one is obviously a 90s remake. ‘Neend Churayi Meri’ (Ishq) is the privileged song, named by the company as Maine Tujhko Dekha. The song’s best part is that Neeraj Sridhar returns after a long time to sing a song that is tailor-made for his song. Sukriti Kakar complements him well, but the song is better as an individual song than it is as a remake. Had the hookline been original, it would have been amazing! Amaal’s second song happens to be the album’s best — Hum Nahi Sudhrenge gives those rays of positivity like ‘Apna Har Din’ did in ‘Golmaal 3’. Though the song is similar to Amaal’s other EDM numbers like “Sooraj Dooba Hai”, “Buddhu Sa Mann” and “Zindagi Aa Raha Hoon Main”, it works well because of its positivity and Armaan yet again sings charmingly! What Saregama holds of the album is an unplugged, slow-paced version of ‘Maine Pyaar Kiya’s Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate, sung very simply by Nikhil D’Souza and Anushka Manchanda, and arranged soothingly by Abhishek Arora (of Abhishek-Akshay) and Samyuktha Narendran. It doesn’t work too much though, in spite of not changing much from the old song.
The worst Golmaal album is held up solely by Amaal’s songs (or song).


Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 = 16

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hum Nahi Sudhrenge > Maine Tujhko Dekha = Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate > Itna Sannata Kyun Hai = Golmaal Again (Title Track)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 35 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Golmaal Again) = 37


♦ Nisschal O Nisschal, Aur Compose Karo! : JIA AUR JIA Music Review

♪ Music by: Nisschal Zaveri, Sachin Gupta, Sameer Nichani & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Mudassar Aziz, Raqueeb Alam, Vachaspati Mishra & Hasrat Jaipuri
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company [“Jia O Jia Reprise” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 17th October 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Jia O Jia Reprise”: Saavn


The songs by Sachin Gupta start off the album, and though they do not impress you immediately, you do get attuned to them on hearing them for a couple of times. Na Shukre is a wild rock song about carefree girls, and Smita Malhotra makes a rocking debut with her vocals in this, the rock guitars played wonderfully. Shivani Bhayana’s Naach Basanti, on the other hand, is a bit too rowdy to go with its amazing club arrangements, but apparently by the lyrics, it is supposed to be some sort of an ode to “Sholay”. Many of the small additions by Gupta in this song happen to catch your attention, like the techno sounds at the beginning, and the folksy portion at the end.
The newcomer composer, Nisschal Zaveri, steps in for the rest of the songs (with lyrics) and I must say, he does quite an amazing job in his first album itself. His lullaby-ish, classical-based Na Jaa appears in two versions, one in Asees Kaur’s voice, with a stark resemblance to her singing in ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Dobaara), while the other is in Nandini Srikar’s voice. Obviously, Nandini’s version wins my heart because of her seasoned voice and more classically inclined singing. The Tabla in this song has to be mentioned, as do the strings, guitars and mandolin. The arrangements overpower the voice of Asees in her version, another drawback of that version. Nandini’s version has everything that the music buff longs for in a good song.
Zaveri’s other song, released by Saregama, is a reprise of Shankar-Jaikishan-Mohd. Rafi classic Jia O Jia, and is an apt remake of the song, with an upbeat clubbish sound, one of the freshest remakes I’ve heard this year. The song feels like a splash of water on your face — despite being a remake, Zaveri uses his creativity to make it a bit unconventional, without being bogged down by the thought of what’s popular these days. The synth has been used amazingly, and the backing chorus singing “Jia O” after every hook is just sweet! Jyotica sounds amazing in this song, the least she has sounded like Neha Kakkar ever! But Rashid Ali, being heard after a long time, falls flat due to the excessive programming done to his voice. The Latino turn of sound midway into the song takes time to get used to, but is awesome!
The background score composer for the film, Sameer Nichani, gets one of his instrumental pieces added to the album, and it is called Jia Aur Jia Theme, and is heavy on Spanish guitars, played in a very sensuous way. It is extremely short at one and a half minute, but soothes your senses for all its worth.
A hidden gem of an album, wherein we find a new composer who must get many, many more songs in Bollywood!! Zaveri scores higher than Gupta here.


 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 23.5

Album Percentage: 78.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Na Jaa By Nandini > Jia O Jia Reprise = Na Jaa = Jia Aur Jia Theme > Na Shukre > Naach Basanti

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 37 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Jia Aur Jia) = 38


I hope that wasn’t too long (though I know it was) but this is what I’m going to have to do until I am a bit more free. I personally liked this method of reviewing and don’t mind continuing it forever too! So maybe, just maybe, you might get the “Secret Superstar” and “Rukh” reviews in this format too, but in separate posts and not clubbed together! Lets see! Till then, enjoy music! 😉

NEW Composer Rachita Impresses A TON!! (NEWTON – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rachita Arora
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 22nd September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 22nd September 2017

Newton Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Newton is a Bollywood black comedy film, starring Rajkummar Rao, Pankaj Tripathi, Raghubir Yadav and Anjali Patil, directed by Amit V. Masurkar, and produced by Manish Mundhra of Drishyam Films. The movie, as we all know, has garnered great response from cinema-lovers and *most* critics, and we also know it is India’s official entry for “Best Foreign Language Film” in the 90th Academy Awards. Best of luck to us for that! Anyway, back to the point. The film revolves around a government clerk, Newton (played by Rao) who is sent for election duty in a naxal-controlled town in the jungles of Chhattisgarh. His struggle to ensure a fair election and educating the locals about election is what constitutes the base of the film. Of course, the film, as many of these films are, doesn’t have music, save for a promotional song by Rachita Arora. It comes in two versions in the album, so let’s check it out! Hopefully, Rachita makes a smashing debut with this film!


1. Chal Tu Apna Kaam Kar

Singer ~ Amit Trivedi, Backing Vocals ~ Satish Badoliya

Rachita starts off the song with a promising whistle, intriguing listeners right away. As Amit Trivedi starts with the song’s first note, an immediate whiff of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s music hits your ears, and the song has you hooked from there onwards. The new composer has made sure her composition is intriguing, because usually, satirical songs fall flat due to their compositions not begin up to the mark. Thankfully, here, Rachita’s composition is really quirky and very catchy and fun to listen to — with the beautifully mellifluous hookline doing the trick for her nicely. It is her arrangements that outdo the composition though. A groovy beat supports the song throughout, only to be joined by catchy finger snaps, quirky technological sounds, nice bass, cool guitars (Meghdeep Bose), drums, beautiful strings, and even an unexpected flute (Tejas Vinchurkar)! The dumroo and the harmonium, coupled by a wacky folksy backing vocal (Satish Badoliya) in the second antara, help the song sound more massy. What really surprised me was the oud/rabaab in the first interlude, giving the song a nice and folksy touch! Rachita’s digital programming too, is amazing — she proves her mettle in programming with her first ever Bollywood song! Amit Trivedi was the perfect choice for the vocals, and he always carries such songs with a lot of confidence and spunk. His heavy voice really makes for an interesting listen. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics work on the protagonist’s catchphrase “Chal Tu Apna Kaam Kar”, and spin it into a nice satirical piece! Things look sunny for this talented new composer. Welcome to Bollywood, Rachita Arora!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Chal Tu Apna Kaam Kar (Raghubir Yadav Version)

Singer ~ Raghubir Yadav, Backing Vocals ~ Atam Prakash Mishra and Ashish Kumar Mishra

The second version of the song is nothing like the first version; it is a more folksy rendition invoking memories of the ‘Gangs Of Wasseypur’ songs that Sneha Khanwalkar had recorded from local artists. Here, Rachita does quite the same thing, but instead of looking for some new singers, she decides to let Raghubir Yadav, acting in the film, sing it. And he does immense justice to the folksy nature of this version. First of all, Rachita has changed the composition to make it more suited for a folk song, and though the composition this time isn’t extraordinary, it is good. It is also more soulful. Raghubir Yadav aces the vocals, while Rachita’s arrangements are cool — the harmonium and folksy percussion (Dipesh Verma), along with the folksy backing vocals, provides a nice ambience to the song. The plucked instruments (probably iktara) and chimtas too provide a nice folk touch. As mentioned before, the lyrics are awesome! A folksy reprise of the previous song, with slightly less repeat value, but who cares about repeat value?

Rating: 3.5/5


So, Newton is a short album, with two tracks, both the same song at least lyrically. Rachita makes a smashing debut and it seems she will soon establish her as a composer who does not really care about the mass appeal and popularity of her songs, since both her songs here are true to the film, and not made to attract people. (The same category as people like Mikey McCleary, Sneha Khanwalkar etc). Also, the fact that Eros Music released the music late here (which is fine, since this isn’t a film like “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” which relied heavily on music) shows that they didn’t really want to reveal the songs early. Newton gives us an amazing new composer!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Version 1 > Version 2

 

 

SACHIN-JIGAR’S GANGSTA BLUES!! (HASEENA PARKAR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Kirthi Shetty & Vayu Srivastava
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 8th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd September 2017

Haseena Parkar Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Haseena Parkar is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Shraddha Kapoor in the titular role, and with Siddhanth Kapoor and Ankur Bhatia playing key characters in the film. The film is directed by Apoorva Lakhia, produced by Nahid Khan. It revolves around the life of Haseena Parkar, Dawood Ibrahim’s sister. It witnesses Shraddha Kapoor trying out a role that might just transform her career to a new phase, different from all those annoying girl-next-door-who-is-also-a-singer roles. The music in Lakhia’s films is generally inconsequential, but here he ropes in Sachin-Jigar, a duo who I know, won’t compose for films where music is just an attraction. Anyway, this is their sixth and penultimate album of the year (we are left with ‘Parmanu’ which will release in December) so let’s see how they fare after the above average ‘Bhoomi’!


1. Tere Bina / Tere Bina (Reprise)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Priya Saraiya / Priya Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar’s shortest album of the year (not counting ‘Hindi Medium’ in which they did only two songs) starts with a romantic ballad that really gives a cordial invitation to those goosebumps, and the goosebumps on your skin in turn have a nice gala time for the entire duration of the song. Of course, the makers opt for Arijit, but I must say this is the best Sachin-Jigar have used Arijit this year. His voice is best suited for this, unlike in ‘Haareya’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) which was sung in Ayushmann style, and ‘Laagi Na Choote’ (A Gentleman) which was in everyday Arijit style. But this one has an entire different charisma and charm to it. Priya’s sugary voice returns after the duo autotuned it too much in ‘Baat Ban Jaaye’ (A Gentleman), and so, she sounds amazing as always. The Priya-Arijit duo really gives off big ‘Jaise Mera Tu’ (Happy Ending) vibes. The composition, however, is the least Sachin-Jigar-ish I would expect it to be. In fact, it has more shades of Rahman’s composing style, or some places even Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The hookline is so mellifluous, you just can’t get it out of your head if you listen to the song for just two times. The Antaras are amazing, and I especially appreciated Priya’s portions, because of her beautiful voice that melts in your ears! (Did that sound awkward? Well, it does!! Just like sugar melts in your mouth, her voice melted in my ears and it was bliss!) Sachin-Jigar excel with the strings this time and Tapas Roy’s creative plucked strings again feature as one of the best parts of the song. The song itself starts with Tapas Roy’s plucked instruments, like a beautiful folksy song, full of rawness and earthiness. The beats throughout the song are simple though, and resemble slightly Rahman’s beats in ‘Maahi Ve’ (Highway) and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s beats in ‘Tere Naina’ (Chandni Chowk To China). The flute interludes are scintillating. The Reprise Version of the song has the duo rearrange the song on a more haunting base, with wind blowing, and piano notes, and dramatic percussion. Priya handles it solo, and that helps people like me who love her voice get attracted to it. The lyrics of both versions are by her too, and she writes beautiful lines, comparing how the two lovers are incomplete without each other, to things like “What if the sky was colourless?” and it is just so fun to listen to these metaphors. 🙂 A beautiful romantic song, with an apt sad version too!

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original, 4/5 for the Reprise

 

2. Bantai

Singers ~ DIVINE & Kirthi Shetty, Lyrics by ~ Kirthi Shetty

Apoorva Lakhia’s ‘Shootout At Lokhandwala’ had an utterly ridiculous music album, but the song everyone still remembers is Mika’s gangster song, ‘Aye Ganpat’. Now, Lakhia tries to make Sachin-Jigar recreate that vibe in ‘Haseena Parkar’. The duo’s composition is obviously better than Mika’s composition for ‘Ganpat’. The hook is especially catchy. It is the antara where things start going helter-skelter, and the song starts to fall out. It has a horrible composition. (Maybe because right before that, we hear them pouring alcohol into glasses — clearly, it got to the character’s heads so Sachin-Jigar must have deliberately made it a weirdish composition. 😂). Mumbai rapper DIVINE comes on board, supported by Saavn’s movie reviewer, Kirthi Shetty of ‘Bhai ke Rapchik Reviews’. The vocals are suitable for such a song, and increase the repeat value, but just to an extent. The lyrics by Kirthi Shetty, too, are apt for the situation. The arrangements are quite underwhelming, but you can’t expect much more than this. Sachin-Jigar do not fare exceptionally at this, but manage to create a sketchy gangster song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

3. Piya Aa

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Srivastava

I guess, just as a gangster song is a regular in Apoorva Lakhia’s films, so is a Pancham-da flavoured item song. So now Sachin-Jigar make that for him. And though my choice of words makes me sound as if I’m irritated, I’m not. The song is good, with a punchy vibe to it. Sachin-Jigar very exceptionally channel their inner R.D. Burman, and churn out a melody to match the catchiness of ‘Parda’ (Once Upon A Time In Mumbaai), ‘Ice Cream’ (The Xposé) and ‘Balma’ (Khiladi 786), some Pancham-da flavoured songs which weren’t by him! 😃 The hookline is trademark Pancham, and you might suffer from a serious bout of nodding your head side to side in that signature dance step of such songs. 😂 The arrangements are the usual fare for such songs, with trumpets and the sax leading, and those bongo-congo percussions that make Pancham songs what they are. Sunidhi’s energetic vocals help make the song more lively, whilst Vayu writes suitable lyrics. The song is short, and so is my review for it. An almost perfect R.D. Burman styled song!

Rating: 3.5/5


Haseena Parkar is one of those albums, like ‘Bhoomi’ that Sachin-Jigar seem to have picked up for experience. They get a chance to compose stuff here, that they never get to compose in their usual rom-com fares, and they do quite a good job at it too. With only three songs, this one is quite a Lilliput of an album, but Sachin-Jigar prove that they have it in them!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 2.5 + 3.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 72.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Bina > Tere Bina (Reprise) > Piya Aa > Bantai

 

Which is your favourite song from Haseena Parkar? Please vote for it below! Thanks!! 🙂

SACHIN-JIGAR STAY GROUNDED!! (BHOOMI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Anvita Dutt, Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 28th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd September 2017

Bhoomi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bhoomi is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller starring Sanjay Dutt, Aditi Rao Hydari and Sidhant Gupta in lead roles. The film has been directed by ‘Mary Kom’ and ‘Sarbjit’ fame Omung Kumar, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Sandeep Singh. The film is a revenge saga revolving around a father trying to avenge his daughter, who is a rape victim. Now, this filmmaker Omung Kumar, has been known for making loud and sobby dramatic films, but also, both of his previous films have had amazing music albums as well, featuring in the Music Mastani’s Top 20 Albums of the respective years they released in. While ‘Mary Kom’ featured music by newcomers Shashi-Shivamm, and ‘Sarbjit’ featured a nice mix of T-Series-affiliated artists (Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Jeet Gannguli), and newcomers Shail-Pritesh, this time Omung raises the bar by roping in highly busy composers Sachin-Jigar. Now this is probably the first time I remember seeing the duo compose for a drama like this, so it’ll be something new for them and for us. But expectations are still sky high because of Omung! So let’s see how far above the bhoomi (ground) Sachin-Jigar’s music flies!


1. Trippy Trippy

Singers ~ Neha Kakkar, Benny Dayal, Brijesh Shandilya & Badshah, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar’s fifth album of the year starts off with a song I can’t believe they have made!! The song is a club song with a composition that I would expect from someone like Badshah or Yo Yo Honey Singh, and not Sachin-Jigar! The composition is very weird, and not in the good way. It is basically just a typical item song composition, and coming from Sachin-Jigar, that is quite shocking. The male portions especially, are very disappointing. Those are actually the parts that could’ve been the best. Also, the antara is quite similar to their own “Teri Mahima Aprampaar” (Entertainment). The hookline is just Badshah belching out the words in an expressionless tone. Here, it is evident the composers were trying to experiment, just to make the song sound a bit better, but sadly, they couldn’t make those experiments work. For example, the flute and dhols arrangement was clearly done to increase the quirkiness of the song, but it backfires, sadly. The beats too, aren’t addictive or anything — it is just a straightforward song to listen to and forget. The vocals by Neha Kakkar are very disappointing after that amazing rendition of hers in ‘Ghungta’ (Babumoshai Bandookbaaz)! Here she doesn’t even sound half as energetic as she did there! Benny Dayal and Brijesh Shandilya (and of course Badshah) are used very less, and their portions are just repeated over and over. Good, because those parts are very irritating. Also, the ‘Hicky hicky’ sung by Neha is kind of irritating too! The lyrics by Priya Saraiya are the usual fare we get to hear in such songs, and nothing really makes sense. A song that must be a mistake!!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Lag Ja Gale

Singer ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Next up, the composers present a romantic song, very saccharine-sweet, and following a Sufi template to the tee. Again, it is shocking that Sachin-Jigar’s music gets so predictable, but let’s not complain just yet. The composition here is very beautiful, and doesn’t take time to like. The mukhda and antara are especially very beautiful. It is the hook line “tere mere pyaar nu“, that is very predictable and sounds out of place, in an otherwise beautiful song. I can’t remember which, but it sounds an awful lot like a very famous 90s song too. The presence of Rahat almost impeded me from liking the song a lot. His voice has been making songs heavy and inaccessible these days (Like it did for ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ from ‘Baadshaho’), but thankfully, Sachin-Jigar have employed his voice prudently, and not overdone the high pitch or the aalaaps, and it comes out very beautiful. The “Rab Varga” loop gives the song a very unconventionally abrupt start, and it’s one of the best effects of the song. The arrangements by the duo are the trademark Sufi dholaks and tablas, but because of the composition, you bear with it. Also, a wonderful sarangi keeps you engaged throughout the song! The major part of the song also has acoustic guitars, making it a kind of fusion between Sufi and acoustic guitars. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are very cute, and very simple-sweet. A rare song by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan that will be known for simplicity! I wish there was some innovation though, as it has turned out very predictable!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Will You Marry Me

Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt

After two slightly disappointing songs, Sachin-Jigar get to make a wedding song for the film. Now, this song seems to be one of those disappointing songs which grow with time, because that’s what happened with me. I found it a bit weird at first, but in the successive listens, I started to like it bit by bit. Now this is purely subjective, but I still think Sachin-Jigar didn’t try to make this song (or any song from this film) complicated and layered, and that’s why this is happening. The songs are straightforward, something we hardly get from Sachin-Jigar, and that’s why we might be disappointed at first. Anyway, the composition is a peppy wedding number, complete with Punjabi phrases and effective Indian wedding arrangements. The hookline seems very cheesy at first, but becomes catchy later on. The beginning is quite entertaining, with those dialogues, and after that, Jonita’s weird programmed voice singing something gibberish, I believe. That is one of the best parts of the song. The female chorus too, is very entertaining, and the word “ponga pandit” specifically caught my interest. Lyricist Anvita Dutt has utilised it so nicely. As the hookline gets closer though, the song increases its heard-before-ness, and it becomes an ordinary wedding song by the time the hookline arrives, though it is catchy. The antara is no better. Vocals are entertaining, especially Jonita’s, and the female backing vocalists. Divya gets the same part to sing twice, and he sounds good too, but it is the composition of his parts that sounds too flat. Arrangements consist of digital beats accompanied by Indian wedding instruments like the shehnaai (wonderful interlude on that!), dhols etc. Anvita Dutt’s lyrics are very innovative at parts and very ordinary at parts. A confusing song! You don’t know whether you like it or not!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Kho Diya

Singer ~ Sachin Sanghvi, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Now comes what I’ve been expecting from Sachin-Jigar ever since ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ released and I loved all the songs. After that, frankly, I didn’t love any Sachin-Jigar song as much as I loved the song ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’, in any of their albums that released. But now, in ‘Bhoomi’, they come up with a deserving opponent for ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ with this song, another ghazal, and in my opinion, even better than ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ itself. I’ll explain why. The composition is genuinely ghazal-like, as in an actual, authentic ghazal! Though that song was also a ghazal, it did have minor Bollywood-ish touches. But in this song, Sachin-Jigar do not bow down to peer pressure in order to make a Bollywood-friendly song. The song still does carry many nuances of Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s style of composition though. I sincerely hope SLB catches this song and ropes Sachin-Jigar in for his next project! The antara is one of the most beautiful compositions I’ve heard in a while. The arrangements too, are amazing, with soothing tablas, divine manjeeras, beautiful Guitars, and scintillating strings that provide an atmosphere of love and divinity. The water drop sounds, so characteristic of SLB, sound beautiful. Sachin Sanghvi says this is his first solo song in Bollywood (He also sang a duet with Shreya Ghoshal in ‘Jayantabhai Ki Luv Story’ before this), and he does his solo debut in a smashing manner! His voice has that amazing metallic touch, which people might mistake for programming, but it is his raw voice! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are yet again, one of the most brilliant she’s written this year. A lovely number that is surely going to stay with me for a long time!!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Daag

Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

The pathos enters now, as it always does. Of course, because this is an Omung Kumar film after all. There has to be an overtly dramatic sad song. And that happens to be this song. Now, the composition is really good, if I have to judge as per it’s genre. But as an individual song, this doesn’t take me anywhere. After the magic that the former song had me possessed with, this song falls flat! The duo try to lift it up with an intriguing and mysterious arrangement (this guitar riffs do the trick), but how much can a song be able to be saved by good arrangements if the composition isn’t appealing? Sukhwinder adds to the tedium, with his heavy voice, and it sounds very uncomfortable. Even though the composition is so poignant, it all sounds fake due to the overcooked nature of the music and vocals. The hookline itself too, is very tedious. It sounds like something that should have released around 2008. Sadly, this one isn’t memorable at all!

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Jai Mata Di

Singers ~ Ajay Gogavale & Sanjay Dutt, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani

To wrap up the album, Sachin-Jigar present a devotional song. Now Ganeshotsav has ended, and Navratri is about to start, and with the film opening just one day after Navratri starts, it seems an apt decision to include a song entitled ‘Jai Mata Di’ in the album. Now, the song is primarily a very dramatic devotional song again, to make it fit with Omung Kumar standards of drama. However, it fares a bit better than that one, thanks to the divine touch. The composition is amazing, and Sachin-Jigar mould themselves into a very trademark Ajay-Atul mode to compose this one. Actually, if Ajay-Atul had composed for the ‘Sarkar’ series, and the chants would’ve been ‘Jai Mata Di’ instead of ‘Govinda’, then this would have been the perfect background score for the ‘Sarkar’ franchise. To add to the Ajay-Atul feel, Sachin-Jigar even rope in Ajay as the lead vocalist. As always, he aces the song. Sanjay Dutt starts the song with a mantra, bt his interventions throughout the actual song when he sings “Jai Maa Jai Maa’, sound better. The arrangements are good, and Especially the strings are amazing. Other sounds like the tabla, and the pathos-filled composition make it sound like yet another SLB song, a la ‘Gajanana’ (Bajirao Mastani), and ‘Dola Re Dola’ (Devdas). This song isn’t something to enjoy with your earphones, but something to experience in theatres!

Rating: 3.5/5


Bhoomi is a great example of an album composed by talented composers, but which suffers due to their inexperience in the genre of drama. Sachin-Jigar have composed for drama films very less; they usually go for rom-coms or musicals, but in this one, their discomfort is visible while composing for such a film. They still do try to add their own elements into the album, like the quirkiness of ‘Will You Marry Me’, which diffuses into thin air later on in the song. The best song in definitely ‘Kho Diya’, which I’m sure you will agree with, and so might they themselves. Anyway, it is one of those rare occasions where Sachin-Jigar disappoint, and it will surely pass!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 5 + 3 + 3.5 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kho Diya > Lag Ja Gale > Will You Marry Me = Jai Mata Di > Daag > Trippy Trippy

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhoomi? Please vote for it below! Thanks!! 🙂

APTLY SIMPLE AND MINIMALISTIC!! (PARTITION: 1947 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman
♪ Lyrics by: Navneet Virk
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th August 2017

Partition: 1947 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Partition: 1947 is an upcoming historical film, starring Hugh Bonneville, Gillian Anderson, Manish Dayal, Huma Qureshi and Late Om Puri in central roles. The film is directed by Gurinder Chadha, and produced by Paula Mayeda Berges, Gurinder Chadha and Deepak Nayar. The film has already released as ‘Viceroy’s House’ in the United Kingdom, and is ready for a Hindi release in India, in the Independence month, August. A.R. Rahman has scored the background music for the English version, but in the Hindi album, T-Series released only three songs, all the vocal songs (which are also not in the English soundtrack). So we get a short album. Let’s see whether it does justice to the movie’s theme.

P.S. I don’t know whether the Traditional songs are by Rahman, so I’ve not credited him for them. If you have any idea, do let me know.


1. Do Dilon Ke

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Hariharan, Music by ~ A.R. Rahman, Lyrics by ~ Navneet Virk

The only A.R. Rahman-composed song makes its place as he first song of the album, and ironically, it is going to be the end credits song for the movie. Just like any other A.R. Rahman song, this one takes time to grow, but eventually grips you. The composition is very similar to Rahman’s songs of the 90s, and particularly has a great hangover of ‘Tu Hi Re’ (Bombay). The antaras are beautiful, while the mukhda takes time to get accustomed to. What increases the déjà vu of the song, is Hariharan’s beautiful voice. It takes you back to the 90s Rahman vibe, and you just drown into his voice. Even better is Shreya, singing for him after quite some time. Her voice is the perfect mixture of sweet and silky and grave and solemn. The solemnity with which both of them render the song gives it an amazing aura. The arrangements are good, and very minimal. The piano stands out wonderfully, and strings towards the end make the song sound more rich. The richest part of the song, are the lyrics, by Navneet Virk, which are a beautiful metaphor seeing the 1947 Partition as a heartbreak. A good song, but lacks repeat value, as I believe it should!
Rating: 4/5

 

2. Duma Dum Mast Kalander

Singer ~ Hans Raj Hans, Music & Lyrics Traditional

The most famous folk song, probably, in India gets yet another recreation here. This is not much of a recreation though, as Hans Raj Hans is just singing the folk song in the least innovative manner possible. Of course, the experience of hearing the song yet again is wonderful, but I would’ve appreciated it had there been some variations, as Mikey McCleary had done in ‘David’. But since this is a historical film, I guess it is fitting they didn’t do that. The arrangements are jovial, with the amazing tablas and dholaks, accompanied by the harmonium, sounding rich and earthy. The tumbi and chimta, an essential part of Punjabi folk, make their way in here too. Hans Raj Hans’ vocals are amazing, as expected. Would this song have sounded any better if Rahman had been given the opportunity to recreate it? That is, assuming, he hasn’t!
Rating: 3/5

 

3. Jindwa

Singer ~ Hans Raj Hans, Music & Lyrics Traditional

Another folk song, one that I’ve never heard this time, makes its way into the album. This one sounds much better than ‘Duma Dum Mast Kalander’ because of the freshness and the fact that it is not something we have heard before. Of course, the composition overlaps many other songs we have heard that are based off of Punjabi folk songs, and now we know where those songs were inspired from. The arrangements here are so beautiful, with rich ethnic flutes and that tabla percussion going on throughout. Guitars also make it sound more fresh. The harmonium is an obvious part of it. There are sudden portions that escalate into high-octane dhols and bhangra. The flute actually sounds like the flute in ‘Chalo Chale Mitwa’ (Nayak), which was by Rahman, so I do suspect that Rahman was indeed, in charge of these two folk songs. Who knows!
Rating: 3.5/5


Partition 1947 is another one of those albums that sticks true to the film’s script. If all the songs are by Rahman, and there’s no way to know if they are or not, thanks to T-Series’ vague crediting style, the album is a letdown, particularly with the folk songs, because we know that Rahman can compose folk songs beautifully. Anyway, the album is aptly short, and situational!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 3.5 = 10.5

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  Do Dilon Ke > Jindwa > Duma Dum Mast Kalander

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 22 (from previous albums) + 02 = 24

 

Which is your favourite song from Partition 1947? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂