A BREACH IN THE RAABTA!! (RAABTA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: JAM8, Meet Bros., Sohrabuddin & J-Star
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Kumaar, Jitendra Raghuvanshi, J-Star & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 3rd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Raabta Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raabta is an upcoming Bollywood romantic reincarnation drama, starring Kriti Sanon, Sushant Singh Rajput, Jim Sarbh, Varun Sharma and Rajkummar Rao. The film is the directorial debut of already many times successful producer, Dinesh Vijan. The film is produced by him along with Homi Adajania, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s official gist is this: “When a human being dies, they lose 21 grams from the body. This, they say, is the weight of the soul. The journey of a soul transcends over space and time… beyond the realms of this earth. This film tells the story of two seemingly ordinary individuals, going about their lives until their paths cross and they realize that they belong with one another. Unaware of a connection that was forged several hundred years ago, Shiv and Saira are inexplicably drawn to each other, and it takes them on a hysterical rollercoaster of love, intrigue, entertainment and life (twice over!). When two souls unite, they become one.” 😴 Hopefully, it is executed well. The music of the film is by JAM8, and a guest composition by Meet Bros. also features on the album. I guess we all know the controver(sies) surrounding the music of the film, due to that one guest song, so there is no point reiterating them. We all know who the actual composer of the songs credited to JAM8 is, but he wishes that his name shouldn’t be associated with ‘Raabta’ because of his policy to only compose for solo-composer albums, so there’s no point in naming him. I just hope the music company learns its lessons and reconsiders it’s actions!! On this grave (😄) note, let’s start with the music review of ‘Raabta’. 


1. Ik Vaari Aa / Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hai pyaar toh kayi dafaa kiya,
Tujhse nahi kiya toh kya kiya,
Tera mera yeh vaasta,
Hai iss zindagi ki daastaan,
Ya phir koi hamaara pehle se raabta?
Toh ikk Vaari aa, aa bhi jaa!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The album starts off with a very happy-go-lucky, romantic club number, with a lilting yet groovy sound. The composition has the stamp of Pritam all over it, and the way it flows is in the trademark way that almost all Pritam songs flow. The song’s melody starts off right with the hook, which is a wonderfully composed piece, that efficiently works in pulling you into the song. The antara following it, too, is very happy-sounding and charming, but it is the last stanza, which I call the ‘conclusion’ because it just doesn’t seem like an antara, is what steals the thunder. That part has been composed in a very entrancing manner, and is a major throwback to the corresponding ‘conclusion’ part in Pritam’s ‘Tu Chahiye’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The high-pitched bridge line that leads to the hookline, is just amazing. The arrangements are quite similar to Pritam’s previous club song arrangements, with the upbeat EDM portions, and that wonderful “chipmunk” that we heard in ‘The Breakup Song’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) last year. There is a Sajid-Wajid touch in the arrangements somewhere (‘Mukhtasar’ from ‘Teri Meri Kahaani’ and ‘Raat Bhar’ from ‘Heropanti’). But on a whole, the EDM has a very international touch to it, and it sounds like JAM8 is trying to recreate Pritam’s club arrangements in an international style. But because I always something out-of-this-world in a Pritam club song, and since this song is by his company, this song was quite underwhelming in that department. The pumped-up portions of the arrangements sometimes clash with Arijit’s super-high-pitch, and that sounds quite odd at times. That brings us to Arijit’s vocals. Definitely not the best he’s performed, but he still manages to carry the song in a quite charismatic way, and doesn’t drive you to sleep like he did in ‘Half Girlfriend’. But of course, the parts where he goes super-high-pitch, made me uncomfortable, and that doesn’t happen with every other singer. In the second version of the song which takes a sans EDM route, and is more reliant on guitars to propel it, everything that sounded wrong in the arrangements is set right. A slight rock guitar backdrop makes the song lighter than it was in the original version, and definitely more enjoyable. The company also replaces the fun chipmunk-like EDM with a nice vocal chorus, which gives off ‘Tum Mile’ vibes somehow,and immediatel removes all Sajid-Wajid vibes. As for the vocals, they have improved due to Jubin’s smooth treatment of the composition, taking care not to sound like he is straining his voice too much, and handling the high notes much better than Arijit did. And the small nuance he takes while singing “yaara” and all of its rhyming words, is just magnificent! In the conclusion stanza, Jubin gets to sing an entirely differently-tuned line that fits in perfectly and sounds as good as its counterpart in the original version. Oh, and it is a welcome change, considering that we have been hearing the original for over a month now. So this reprise is really one of the best reprises to have come out, ever! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are great, and suitable for a fun romantic number. I don’t know what I missed in the first version, but something is surely missing. To cover it up though, the Reprise takes a nice romantic twist!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4.5/5 for Jubin’s Version

 

2. Raabta (Title Track)

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Arijit Singh, Original Composition by ~ Pritam, Music Recreated by ~ JAM8, Original Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya, New Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Hadd se zyaada mohabbat hoti hai jo,
Kehte hain ke ibaadat hoti hai woh,
Kusoor hai, ya koi yeh fitoor hai,
Kyun lage sab kuch andhera hai,
Bas yehi noor hai,
Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”

– Irshad Kamil

The recreation craze continues as ‘Raabta’ (Agent Vinod) is recreated in this movie, which takes its name from that song. But how fortunate are we, that the man who made the original song, is the one who is remaking it (through his company, that is). The track, originally a romantic number, and probably the first time Arijit Singh actually came into large notice, though he had sung other songs before that, has now been remade into a dance track for the film. But this dance track is as far from a regular Bollywoodish dance track as you can imagine. It has a very quite and soothing vibe to it, and a very unexpected twist in the form of a nice interruption wherein JAM8 introduces to Bollywood, a new genre of music called ‘Tropical House’, which sounds like some techno Caribbean music. Anyway, the new composition that the group has made for the remake, is great. The mukhda, sung by newbie (in Bollywood) Nikhita Gandhi, is charming and scintillating, with its romantic vibes really reaching you. The way they have joined it to the hookline of the original song too, is quite cool. The time the song goes downhill is when, after the nice and refreshing Tropical interlude, Arijit comes back to reprise his portion, the antara from the original song, a part I felt didn’t quite merge with this song. Yes, I know that if the hookline adapted well into this song, every other part should too, but I just didn’t feel the antara this time. When it went back to the new composition, I started grooving to the beats again. So it was like a sudden disconnection from the song. But then, JAM8 makes up for it in the fantabulous (which is a very small word to describe it!) ‘conclusion’ part of the song, which has a lilting and entrancing tune. Especially the oddly-but-fantastically placed line, “Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”, is a wonderful bridge from the ‘Conclusion’ to the hookline. And the continuous EDM beats, really infuse life into the song. The composers also add wonderful piano notes occasionally, and the guitars that start off the song are so vibrant! So I guess I have already spoken about the arrangements as much as I could. Moving on to the vocals, Nikhita Gandhi, another singer from the Rahman camp of singers, joins Pritam’s camp for this one (quite similar a story to that of the other well known ‘Gandhi’ singer, Jonita — not sisters!) And she totally owns her debut. Yes, Arijit gets the major part in the song, but because she opens it so smashingly, the listeners get hooked and keep waiting for her voice to return. Sadly, it comes back only for the hooklines. Arijit is his usual self, trying to be charming , succeeding and also acing that aforementioned ‘conclusion’ portion. Irshad Kamil writes the new lyrics for this song, wrapping Amitabh Bhattacharya’s already awesome lyrics with an awesomeness of his own. A song that takes itself miles away from its original, neither better nor worse, but just at par, in a different genre. Barring the copy-paste antara, the song is quite good.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Sadda Move

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh, Pardeep Singh Sran & Raftaar, Additional Vocals ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Bhangra ke rhythm mein, tuney Bharatnatyam kyun milaaya?
Mere mehboob, dekho sadda move!”

– Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya

In the next song, JAM8 cuts out the whole international feel that was looming over the album all this time, to replace it with a street hip-hop number in Punjabi style. And I must say, how disappointed I was, hearing this song. The composer takes a very weird route with this song. There isn’t much by way of composition, but whatever is, sounds like very often recycled Punjabi lines used innumerable times. Like the antaras. And the mukhda just starts off so abruptly, it takes time to adjust to it. Actually, a rap starts the song, and it is quite obnoxious. Raftaar. That “Sadda Move Move” line by Raftaar is so irritating. The hookline of the song, too, isn’t too impressive. Arrangements are what lift the song up for me. That flute loop that plays every now and then is just insane — a glimpse of the trademark Pritam-ish insanity that JAM8 has so far, cruelly kept out of this album. The digital beats are quite groovy, but they don’t really provide anything new and innovative, which is what I would like to hear when I listen to a Punjabi street hip-hop number. The tumbi and “burrrhhhaaaa“s are the typical Punjabi people clichés, thrust into the song just to stereotype Punjabi music. But I must say, the dhols are quite engaging. The vocals are above average — Diljit sounds good but not excellent; probably the composition is barring me from liking his rendition too. On the other hand, his co-singer, Pradeep Singh Sran, who made it big in Bollywood with his song ‘Cutiepie’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), brings back his Labh Janjua-ish voice and steals the listeners’ hearts. Raftaar is strictly annoying, and his rap is least enjoyable. Overall the song has a strong Meet Bros-ish vibe. Legends Amitabh Bhattacharya & Irshad Kamil come together to write something that Kumaar or Shabbir Ahmed would’ve written by themselves, if they had been approached. Quite stereotypical, and ‘enjoyable’ would be an exaggeration. A clear dip in the level of the album. 

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Altamash Faridi & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Tere nishaan, yaadon mein hai,
Tu kyun nahin, taqdeer mein?
Naadaan dil, hai dhoondhta,
Qurbat teri tasveer mein.
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Dekhe khudaya, do aashiqaan diyaan tabaahiyaan
Ve badi lambiyaan si judaiyaan!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After three relatively happy-sounding songs, it was necessary, I guess, for the composers to bring in a touch of pathos in the album. So they bring a sad song sung by Arijit, which I feel is loosely modelled on Pritam’s ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), because of the slight Sufi touch to it. The composition, I have to say, is something that disappointed me highly. I just couldn’t find anything great in it. The song is trying so hard to be emotional, but manages to ve not even one bit emotional! And that almost never happens with Pritam songs. The first two stanzas are composed on the same tune, and that is a major drawback, because it is what makes the song sound very, very monotonous. The very first line of the song made me think, “What?” because the music that starts off the song is very promising! After that it becomes a crying fest, something so overdramatic I wouldn’t have expected it to be a song from a big banner films as ‘Raabta’. The hookline is so unidimensional, it hardly managed to touch my heart as an emotional song should. The composition ends with another “conclusion” stanza, and this time, that stanza is clearly trying to emulate the “conclusion” of ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) with its composition, arrangements and Arijit’s singing style. The arrangements of the song are also very heard-before, and stale arrangements. The Dholak rhythm has gotten so old and typical, I wish no composer uses it in sad songs anymore! The music that starts the song though, the violin one, is very good! And that is what made me believe the rest of the song too, would follow suit. Arijit sings this one with utmost lack of expression, almost like a robot. It seems he spent all his energy in ‘Ik Vaari Aa’. The Faridi brothers pitch in for a good but again, clichéd, Sufi interlude, that only makes the song sound more artificial. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are good, but not amazing. A sad song that makes me sad that it had to be in this film.

Rating: 2/5

 

5. Main Tera Boyfriend

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Neha Kakkar & Meet Bros., Original Composition by ~ J-Star & Sohrabuddin, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Na Na Na Na!

– J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi

Guest composers, Meet Bros, step into the album now, for their remake of the popular track of J-Star’s, ‘Na Na Na Na’. Now there’s a huge controversy regarding who stole the song from whom and blah blah blah. But besides all that, I think the whole nation is raving about the song and how catchy it is. The original was definitely one of the catchiest pop songs of that year and even now, and Meet Bros try to keep its catchiness intact. They have built a typical Bollywoodish composition around it, which sounds least like a Meet Bros. composition, and more like a Pritam one. How coincidental because JAM8’s ‘Sadda Movie’s sounded like a Meet Bros song. The Mukhda starts the song off on a very nice tune, and expectations rise right away. It is the antara that could’ve been better, and repeating each Antara twice was not needed; it just made the song that much longer. The hook… Do I need to speak about it! 😀 The arrangements too, are very similar to Pritam’s, complete with the chipmunk noises here too. The club sounds are great as well, and make the song enjoyable at all points. The vocals are energetic, with Arijit replenishing all his drained energy, and giving a very spunky rendition of the song. Is it just me, or does anyone else also think he sounds amazing in upbeat numbers as well!? Neha cannot match up to her co-singer’s level and performs a bit disappointingly this time. Meet Bros. also come and sing an interlude that would have sounded better had it stayed out of the album. 😥 And after that, there’s a lady’s voice that says “I Wanna be your boyfriend.” 😮 Kumaar’s lyrics are the usual type of lyrics that go into such songs. A song that I didn’t expect much from, since it was a remake, turns out to be quite foot-tapping!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Darasal

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Inkaar mein jo chhupa hai woh ikraar ho!”

– Irshad Kamil

Finally, to finish off the album, JAM8 bring an Atif Aslam romantic melody, something that is quite quintessential in recent T-Series albums. As soon as the song started, it reminded me of ‘Jeena Jeena’ (Badlapur) because of the similar pattern of the guitar piece. The composition is actually very sweet, and it is also slow-paced like ‘Jeena Jeena’, and would suit well for a waltzy arrangement too. But JAM8 choose to keep things minimal and grace the song with nothing more than a nice and sweet guitar riff, and occasional amazing strings. The tune, though slow-paced, grows on you instantly. It is instantly likeable, unlike all the other JAM8 songs in the album, which I took some time to get accustomed to (Except the Jubin ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). I loved the way how they repeated the last line of every antara twice, and the last line of the song thrice. The antara itself is very calm and soothing, and gives a very breezy feel to the song. In the Mukhda, the line where he repeats the words twice, is just outstanding! (“Teri Ada, Ada Pe Marta…” etc.) This is actually what is expected from an ideal romantic comedy. Sadly, it comes in at the end of this album! 😪 Atif’s vocals are some of the best I’ve heard from him in quite a while; he sings the song with a totally different charm than he sung his other songs of late. It draws the picture of the typical boy-next-door image in Bollywood rom-coms. Kamil’s lyrics are just beautiful! Some of them are just salute-worthy, like the one I’ve featured up there at the beginning of this song’s review. Finally, a cute romantic song that befits the film’s romantic aspects. 

Rating: 4.5/5


Raabta is an album I wouldn’t have expected (read, I would have expected much more) from a romantic film like this. Most of the songs are prohibited to be the usual fun-and-frolic that we associate with Pritam, for no specific reason. In fact, the dance song from guests Meet Bros is better than the dance song from JAM8 itself. JAM8 sticks to a very conventional route, save the title track, and only manages to deliver well in two songs in that conventional barrier (‘Darasal’ and ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). But I can’t take away from the album that, as an entire album, it is full of variety and sounds good. It is just lacking on the innovative quotient, and likeability quotient, and hence, the repeat value. ‘Raabta’ means ‘connection’, but there is a slight breach in this Raabta!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 + 3 + 2+ 3.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darasal = Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version) > Raabta (Title Track) > Ik Vaari Aa = Main Tera Boyfriend > Sadda Move > Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 = 17

 

Which is your favourite song from Raabta? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

EACH SONG, DOBAARA! (DOBAARA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar, D. Wunder & Macks Wolf
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Puneet Sharma, D. Wunder & Tasha Tah
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Dobaara Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dobaara is an upcoming Bollywood horror film, starring Huma Qureshi, Saqib Saleem, Adil Hussain, Lisa Ray and Rhea Chakraborty in crucial roles. The film has been directed by Prawaal Raman and produced by the director along with Ishaan Saksena, Vikram Khakhar and Sunil Shah. It is an official remake of the 2013 Hollywood horror film ‘Oculus’, which is considered to be one of the scariest movies of all time. So horror films in Bollywood have been very miserably made, with people flying around so pathetically that it looks hilarious. For once, I feel that this is going to be a well-made horror film in Bollywood. Of course, another thing typical of Bollywood horror films is that they have romantic songs. For ‘Dobaara’, the music has been composed by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar, D. Wunder and Macks Wolf. Well, I know nothing about the latter two names, so I can’t speak about them, but I am expecting a lot from the first two names — Arko and Samira. Arko has been giving great songs for the whole of the last year and I don’t think he wants to stop now, so expecting good, creative songs from him. Meanwhile, Samira has vanished from composing after her amazing debut more than two years ago, with ‘Maati ka Palang’ (NH10). And she’s back now. Again, expecting a good song from her. So let’s see exactly how haunting the music of ‘Dobaara’ is!


1. Kaari Kaari / Kaari Kaari (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Asees Kaur / Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Payal Dev, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

“Maazi ko maazi rehne de, ankhiyon se nadiyaan behne de,
Toote inn waqt ke tukdon ko, rab ki farmaaish sehne de,
Shaakhon se kaliyaan tooti hai, jab se tu khud se yun roothi hai,
Zara dekh gaur se, oh saaiyaan, aks yeh tera, tu hi hai!”

– Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The song with which Arko starts off the album, reassures me yet again, that he is going to give amazing songs for this album. A beautiful, and by beautiful I mean extremely beautiful and more than that too, semiclassical melody is what the album starts with, and Arko can bask in the success of the song as it will reach many a listener’s hearts. The composition is a semiclassical melody that instantly hooks you, and Arko has structured it in a way that Bollywood songs usually aren’t. For example, after the mukhda, there’s a short stanza that doesn’t fall into any category and it goes “Tere jaisa hi dikhta hai, aks tera..” That stanza is bliss! The antara is just as soothing as the mukhda, while the hookline (which is subtly hidden within the Mukhda/antara) is just outstanding. As in all classical tunes, this one has intricate nuances, and the vocalists carry them out well. The song, featuring in two version, gets everything right in both versions. The arrangements are slightly different in each version. The first version has a beautiful, acoustic setting, with the guitar riff sounding mind blowing. Piano starts it off with a wonderful female voice programmed so as to enchant you right at the beginning! But the guitar riff that sets in once the melody starts, is just so simple and down-to-earth, that it is tough to dislike! The slide guitars + snaps combo in the interlude is wonderful as well. The Reprise takes the more classical route, and it starts off in a different way altogether. The guitar riff has been scrapped from this, and replaced by digital beats, along with something sounding like a Chinese xylophone. The arrangements of this one were a major throwback to ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani), and how coincident that Payal Dev has sung that one too. This one has an amazing aalaap in the interlude, and it is entrancing. Of course, no Arko song is completed without at least one guitar strum or riff, and he brings the guitar into play in the antara. The vocals are flawless in both versions. Asees in her version, gives her career best performance, and it sends chills down the spine listening to her perfecting each and every note, especially the nuances in the hookline. Payal, on the other hand, gives a more classically-toned rendition, which is probably why I remember the ‘Bajirao Mastani’ song. The thing to note is when she suddenly goes high in one of the hooklines towards the end. That was splendid! Arko, with his deep voice, enters in the antara, but complements the two ladies well in their respective songs. He writes the lyrics as well, and gives an aptly romantic, and soulful piece. A mind-blowing classical-based song, but kept extremely simple, all the better to win hearts with! 💜

Rating: 5/5 for Original, 5/5 for Reprise

 

2. Humdard / Humdard (Alt. Version)

Singers ~ Jyotica Tangri / Neha Pandey & Parry G, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Rap in Alt. Version Written by ~ Parry G

 “Takleef hogi, bechain honge, yeh raaste hain pathreeley,
Woh Zindagi ki, kahaani kaisi, ke bin lade hi jo jee le!”

– Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The next song by Arko, is highly disappointing. It is supposed to be some kind of sad song, but it barely manages to get the emotion right. The composition is more like a club song where a lady is sitting and singing a song while the main characters are sitting in the bar trying to forget their breakup. The beginning itself is so abrupt and odd, that it is tough to go on trying to like the song. The antara is good compared to the rest of the song, though. The arrangements are mostly digital beats that irritate mostly, and remind one of the songs from the ‘Saansein’ (2016) album. However, there’s a nice portion on strings that is mildly entertaining. Both versions have basically the same arrangements, but they differ in the vocal department. And both singers, I must say, fail to fit the bill here, and both of their renditions turn out to be least satisfying. The first version has Jyotica Tangri trying to be Neha Kakkar again, but even Neha Kakkar wouldn’t have sounded great in this song. Maybe Sonu Kakkar. And in the Alternate Version, newcomer Neha Pandey doesn’t impress at all, unfortunately; she suddenly changes vocal tones and that sounds very weird. And a quite impressive rapid rap by Parry G, who impressed even in ‘Jai Maa’ (Behen Hogi Teri), also features in the second version. I must say he sounds a lot like Yo Yo Honey Singh. The lyrics by Arko, are the saving grace of the song. They are actually good, and deserved a better composition to accompany them! A disaapointment from Arko after that brilliant song.

Rating: 1/5 for the Original, 1.5/5 for the Alternate Version

 

3. Ab Raat (Version 1) / Ab Raat (Version 2)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Samira Koppikar & Jonathan Rebeiro, Music by ~ Samira Koppikar, Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

“Dard dard andhera, zakhm si chaandni, Dhul jaayegi dhoop mein,
Sard haathon ka ghera, shehar ki berukhi, kho jaayegi goonj mein,
Parindon ki azaanein, gungunaati raah bhi, kehti hain aankhein choomke,
Bas, Abb raat guzarne waali hai, abb raat guzarne waali hai,
Abb raat guzarne waali hai, bas raat guzarne waali hai!”

– Puneet Sharma

At first, I thought this song is a remake of the old song ‘Ab Raat Guzarne Waali Hai’ (Awara), because the lyrics of the hook are the same, but it apparently isn’t, because this song has been released by Zee and not Saregama. 😂 Anyway, Samira steps in with her song, and even this song features twice. (The makers are really taking the title ‘Dobaara’ very seriously, huh?) However, I have no complaints with this song featuring twice. The song is a very, very soulful composition that gives you goosebumps. It is songs like this that must be added into horror films and not useless romantic songs. Samira’s composition is haunting to the core, very apt for the situation. The mukhda starts a bit slowly, but as soon as the hookline plays for the first time, you start getting intrigued and immerse yourself into the song. The first antara has an amazing tune, as does the second one, which is more like a Pritam-ish conclusion, rather than an antara. The arrangements by Samira, are yet another example of how to impress with the most used and most clichéd template ever. She employs a very effective soft rock arrangement to the first version, and it provides the required strength to the composition, which would sound sleepy without it. The drums, acoustic guitars and rock guitars complement each other very well, and it provides such a BEAUTIFUL ambience, spellbinding indeed. A Version 2 has been given a more acoustic treatment till the hookline starts, with the Acoustic guitar prominent. However, instead of making it plain and boring with only the guitar, Samira adds in a bit of this and a bit of that to make it sound better. A heart-rending flute has been employed in various places, and especially the interlude’s flute portion is something not to miss. Samira still doesn’t resist to add the drums here either, though. So this version sounds more like a Lounge Version, due to the combination of the flute, acoustic guitars and drums. Vocals are again flawless in both versions, Arijit at his soulful best, and Samira singing in a very different voice than she has in her other songs. She keeps it high-pitched, unlike the low pitch she uses in many of her songs. She has a co-singer named Jonathan Rebeiro, who has given a couple of words here and there as backing vocals. Last but definitely not the least, can we admire the lyrics here? The song is such a soulful song, but behind that tune are the genius words of Puneet Sharma, who writes less frequently, but has written some amazing songs for ‘Revolver Rani’ (2014; also the first album I ever reviewed!!) and songs for albums like ‘Cute Kameena’ (2016), ‘Mr. Joe B. Carvalho’ (2014) and ‘Aurangzeb’ (2013). But here, he gives another amazing piece of writing, which I just instantly fell for. The song is about waiting for the dark times to pass, and as they say, “This too shall pass”. A ravishing song!

Rating: 4.5/5 for Version 1, 5/5 for Version 2

 

4. Malang

Singers ~ Tasha Tah & D. Wunder, Music by ~ D. Wunder & Macks Wolf, Lyrics by ~ D. Wunder & Tasha Tah

“Malang Malang Maiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnn” 🐏

– D Wunder

This next song makes me recheck whether I’m actually listening to the ‘Dobaara’ album anymore or not. A generic Punjabi club number on the lines of Dr. Zeus’ songs is what makes up the “grand” finale to this album. The composition is so irritating at places, but catchy in some places. The hookline has the lead female singer bleating like a sheep, “Maiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnn”. That part is so irritating. The arrangements are typical club beats, but they aren’t so engaging. The vocals are execrable, and I’ve given an example up above. The English parts of the song are enjoyable though. But that’s like a “One in a million” good part, to quote the song. The Punjabi parts are so irritating, you forget to like anything else. Lyrics? What lyrics? Appalling.

Rating: 0.5/5


Dobaara is an album that depends on the Reprise versions to propel it. Three out of the four songs have another reprise, so that we hear it again. Thankfully, all these reprises are either better than or equal in comparison with the original songs, so I’m not complaining. Arko strikes gold, and what shiny gold, in the first song of his, but disappoints with the next one. Meanwhile, Samira Koppikar gets her guest composition extremely well, in both versions. Whoever D Wunder & Macks Wolf are, I hope they aren’t looking at Bollywood for a career. An album that gets a much higher rating than it would have, thanks to reprises, which made us hear the songs “dobaara”!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 5 + 1 + 1.5 + 4.5 + 5 + 0.5 = 22.5

Album Percentage: 64.29%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kaari Kaari = Kaari Kaari (Reprise) = Ab Raat (Version 2) > Ab Raat (Version 1) > Humdard (Alt. Version) > Humdard > Malang

 

Which is your favourite song from Dobaara? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A BEHEN WHO CAN’T DANCE, BUT CAN ONLY ROMANCE! (BEHEN HOGI TERI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Rishi Rich, Jaidev Kumar, Amjad-Nadeem, Yash Narvekar & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Bipin Das, Yash Narvekar, Amit Dhanani, Late Anand Bakshi, Sonu Saggu, Rohit Sharma, Parry G & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 23rd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Behen Hogi Teri Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Behen Hogi Teri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy starring Shruti Hassan, Rajkummar Rao, Gautam Gulati and Gulshan Grover in lead roles. The film is directed by Ajay K. Pannalal and produced by Tony D’Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. The film’s slogan is “All Indians are NOT Brothers and Sisters!” Well, going by the trailer and this slogan thingy, it seems like a quirky and light hearted romantic comedy, but you know Bollywood, they can add drama into anything and everything. The music of the film, as expected is by multiple composers, including Pritam’s A&R venture JAM8 (Kaushik-Akash-Guddu this time), Rishi Rich, Amjad-Nadeem (after a long time, huh!), Jaidev Kumar and Yash Narvekar. Out of these composers, none, I repeat none, have given anything outstanding in the past, so one can just hope that some miracle occurs and they give us great music for this film. Expectations are moderate, but hoping for the best, let’s explore the music of ‘Behen Hogi Teri’.


1. Jai Maa

Singers ~ Sahil Solanki, Jyotica Tangri & Parry G, Original Composition by ~ Prem Hardeep & Badshah, Music Recreated by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap Lyrics by ~ Parry G

Wow. So now the music industry has started remaking remakes. ‘Kala Chashma’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which was a quite banal remake by Badshah, of the Punjabi pop number ‘Kala Chashma’ by Prem Hardeep, itself, now gets remade into a mata-ki-chowki song. Jaidev Kumar, who had earlier remade ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz) into a similar satirical devotional song, ‘O Meri Mata’ in ‘Bajatey Raho’, takes the same composition that Badshah had made. Nothing changed in the tune, and that’s why it would make the public even crazier. The arrangements seem more toned down and not as harsh and shrill as they were in the original (I mean the original remake). I guess they added the dhols here specially for the jagraata setting. And they’ve, quite to my immense pleasure, gotten rid of the EDM at the end, and the shouting ladies and breaking glasses from the ‘Baar Baar Dekho’ song. Vocals here sound good and aptly funny as per the Goddess prayer setting. Sahil Solanki sounds much better than Amar Arshi, the original singer of both the original and Badshah’s remake. A rapper called Parry G {I don’t know why these people like to write a single letter after a weird nickname; we are going to meet another one later in the album!} reprises Badshah’s “sadkon pe chale jab ladkon ke dilon mein tu aag laga de baby firrrreeeeee” with a rap that sounds much more pleasant. Jyotica Tangri is a nice replacement for Neha Kakkar, but with less of an edge in her voice. The replacement lyrics by Sonu Saggu are quite funny too, but not something that will make you “ROFL” or “LOL” either. Interesting how the remake of a remake turns out to be better than the original remake. Let’s start remaking remakes now. P.S. I hope a certain music company doesn’t read that or else we will be over-flooded with ‘Baby Doll’ remakes. (Then again, aren’t we already over flooded by them!)

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tera Hoke Rahoon

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash-Guddu (KAG for JAM8), Lyrics by ~ Bipin Das

Next up, we get a dulcet melody from Pritam’s A&R company, JAM8. This time, the composers of the two songs in ‘1920 London’, Kaushik-Akash, are joined by someone calling himself Guddu, thus making it a trio. And this way, they produce a song that I will remember as one of the best (and the best till now) from any composer for JAM8. The composition, for once, doesn’t sound like a Pritam composition; for once the composers working behind the JAM8 label do not try to emulate Pritam’s late 2000s style of composition. In fact, the composition kind of reminded me of Bobby-Imran’s songs in ‘Badmaashiyan’, or some of Jeet Gannguli’s works. The free flow of the hookline makes it instantly likeable, and the mukhda and antara has a calm, soothing but haunting touch to it, something I’m always ready for if it isn’t too maudlin. The arrangements are fabulous; they just add to the haunting characteristic of the song. The guitar has been played in such a subtle manner, in the beginning, that it is impossible to not be sucked in right away. And when the orchestra sets in, the song just gets many times better. The electronic tabla adds to the serenity, while that wonderful flute interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. In the antara guitars have been played in a wonderful play-stop-play-stop manner that is so comforting. And the tabla doesn’t stop either! Arijit, the first choice for any composer associated with Pritam, and Pritam himself, renders the mellow composition with such ease, in the voice of his that I love, as opposed to that droning voice he uses in sleepy songs. The way he sings the “uff tak na yaara karoon”, is so beautiful! Bipin Das (newcomer?) writes lyrics that are instantly lovable. The first time JAM8 do something that doesn’t resemble their mentor’s work heavily, and it turns out to be a success. 

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Jaanu

Singers ~ Juggy D, Shivi & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

So after the remake of a remake, we get a remake of another classic, in fact, one of my favourite songs by R.D. Burman. The likeable, sweet and fun-to-listen-to classic gets a makeover and now it looks horrendous. Rishi Rich seems to have struck a big deal in Bollywood after his long hiatus, because after he returned in ‘Half Girlfriend’, with a mediocre title song, he gets to do another (though horrible) song here. The man makes sure that somebody says “This is a Rishi Rich refix” before the song starts, and that is so annoying! We have the credits in front of us and we can read your name there. I know here are some music listeners out there who don’t care about who made a song, and they will continue not caring, so even if you say your name there, they wouldn’t care. And then comes the cliché of saying the names of the singer (Juggy D) and the rapper (Raftaar). And what I don’t understand is, why not say the name of the female artiste! Hasn’t she contributed anything to the song? They did the same thing in ‘High Heels’ from ‘Ki & Ka’ and they repeat it here. If anything, Shivi is shining in this song amongst the hackneyed renditions of the male artist and Raftaar. Oh by the way, Juggy D. 😄 Another artist naming himself like that. Rishi Rich has kept the composition intact, fortunately. But what he does instead, is even more unfortunate. He breaks up the hookline, making it sound like a cassette that is stuck at one point. And then it stops to make way for a weirdly-placed techno music piece. And then it proceeds and ends. How boring. There are so many raps in the song, it is hard to concentrate on the actual song. And Raftaar raps so oddly. Just to keep the “Behen” theme intact, he adds so many lines about sisters, that were so unnecessary. And now for thr vocals. Juggy D can’t sing at all. The proof? If someone isn’t able to sing the nuance in the word “Hindustan” in this song, he or she is definitely not a good singer. Shivi barely manages to sing that part, but does much better than her co-singers, making her stand out even with a mediocre performance. Of course, they don’t match the singing calibre of the legendary combination of Kishore Kumar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle & Usha Mangeshkar from the original song. The arrangements are irritating club sounds, EDM thrown here and there. But I enjoyed the parts with the Spanish guitars, and the strings incorporated from the old song. A horrible remake of a song that deserved a much better remake, or no remake!

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Teri Yaadon Mein / Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai, Pawni Pandey & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar & Sukriti Kakar, Music Composed by ~ Yash Narvekar, Music Produced by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Yash Narvekar & Amit Dhanani

Rishi Rich comes back for the next song too, but this time, things are different. This time, the song is a romantic song. And this time, Rishi Rich has only produced the song. Rishi Rich gives a composing break to someone I’ve seen many times in the singer category in various Amaal Mallik, Meet Bros. and even Rishi Rich songs, Yash Narvekar. He gets to compose the tune. And I must say, it is quite a commendable tune! Yes,  does follow the usual Bollywood romance template, with its tune, but it manages to engage the listeners. However, the listener does lose interest in some places. The hookline is very typical, but still, it managed to garner my interest. The antara too, follows the same pattern. What really engages the listeners, though, is Rishi Rich’s beats and arrangements. In the first version, Rishi employs a nice and groovy beat, a hip-hop beat in a romantic song, which at first elicits a weird reaction from the listener, but it sets in perfectly after a couple of listens. Especially the tablas which Rishi has added occasionally, are amazing. The second version, the Reprise, takes a more templated route, with guitars and piano taking the lead, making for a more calm listen. A harmonium too pops up later on, quite oddly. The piano interlude in that version is a must-hear. The vocals are good in both versions. While Yasser, sounding as similar to Arijit as ever, and Pawni Pandey stir up a nice chemistry in the first version, the essence of the song only reaches us in the Reprise because the voices of Yash & Sukriti haven’t been touched. Programming ruins the feel of the voices in the first version. However, I loved Yash’s backing vocals in the first song, that sound like tabla bols. Yash & Amit Dhanani together write a song that is full of typical lines and phrases, like the song title itself. Experimental, but works to some extent. The Reprise version fares better!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Original Version, 4/5 for Reprise Version

 

5. Tenu Na Bol Pawaan / Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Jyotica Tangri / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Amjad-Nadeem, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Sharma

Amjad-Nadeem, back in the composing scene after quite some time, have been roped in for the final song on the album. Amjad-Nadeem are usually known to meddle in typical romantic songs or horrendous massy item songs. This time around too, they have provided a typical romantic song, but that typicality is very enjoyable. The composition is sugary-sweet, something that is very rare from Amjad-Nadeem, who usually produce melodramatic sounding songs. The hookline is so heard-before, so clichéd, yet it manages to click with the listener. There is a high-pitched line that just makes you love the song even more. The antaraa are a bit less engaging, but still manage to keep the flow of the song intact. There are two versions to this song as well; one being a male version (with female humming in the background, hence the credit for Jyotica) and the other being a female version, which is kind of unplugged. The male version has heavenly instrumentation. It starts off with nice chimey sounds, followed by the sweetest flute portion I’ve heard in quite a while. The melody is structured on a simple guitar riff that, though it is very simple and typical, engages the listener. Strings join in later, bringing the third dimension to the song, and how! The second version is, as I said before, unplugged, and has a nice acoustic guitar riff playing in the background, and nothing else. The minimalistic feel of it, makes it even more appealing. Vocals are perfect in both versions. This is no doubt, Yasser’s best performance ever, and he sounds so different than usual here! Jyotica does the humming in Yasser’s version. Asees Kaur, on the other hand, renders her unplugged version with such a beautiful aura around her, that it is mesmerizing. Though her track is longer by one minute than Yasser’s, it makes for a good calm listen. The lyrics by Rohit Sharma (I don’t know whether he’s the Sharma who composed the songs of ‘Anaarkali of Aaraah’ or any other one. He’s definitely not the cricketer, right?) are sweet too. A song full of sweet things. Sweetness lies in simplicity after all.

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Reprise Version


Behen Hogi Teri is an unexpectedly cool multicomposer album! Going by the composers’ names, I was least expecting such a good album. However, it seems like all the composers have pitched in to provide their best. For a romantic comedy, a good album is a must, and fortunately, this album delivers as expected, if not less than expected. Yes, one song is very bad, but the others make up for it. And since the finance theme predominates the album, maybe that’s why they managed to wrench out such good songs from the music directors. An album predominantly made of romantic songs, but still works fine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 4.5 + 1 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hoke Rahoon = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein > Jai Maa > Jaanu

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 12 (from previous albums) + 02 = 14

 

Which is your favourite song from Behen Hogi Teri? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

FROM THE MOZART OF MADRAS TO THE MASTER BLASTER… (SACHIN: A BILLION DREAMS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Kaly
♪ Music Label: Junglee Music / Times Music
♪ Music Released On: 18th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 26th May 2017

Sachin: A Billion Dreams Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Sachin: A Billion Dreams is an upcoming docu-drama starring Sachin Tendulkar, directed by James Erskine and produced by Ravi Bhagchandka and Shrikant Bhasi. The film is a biopic that covers many aspects of Sachin’s professional and personal life, as narrated by the cricketer himself. Sachin is probably the most phenomenal star in the history of cricket, since he has so many fans and followers and well-wishers. For a biopic of such an important personality in sports, the makers make an apt decision for the music director of the film by finding his equivalent in the music industry — A.R. Rahman. Now, I know this won’t be a conventional Hindi film album with song-and-dance routines. What I’m expecting is a heart-moving and soulful score for this film. So let’s see whether Rahman, with his three songs in the film, can bring out the greatness of Tendulkar through his music!


1. Hind Mere Jind

Singer ~ A.R. Rahman

“Abb sabhi maan lo, baat yeh pyaar se,
Maante ho bhala, kyun sadaa haar se,
Jo shikhar ke liye hai bana Hind hai,
Woh meri jaan hai, with meri jind hai,
Aa rahi hai sadaa, dil ki har taar se,
Abb sabhi maan lo baat yeh pyaar se!”

A.R. Rahman kicks off the album with an aptly placed patriotic song. Sachin Tendulkar is probably one of the most well-known idols of the country and he is also very dedicated towards his country, and so it is no surprise that the first track in the album happens to be a patriotic number. What is a surprise, though, is the manner in which the Mozart of Madras composed this patriotic number. The song is composed in a very tranquilizing manner, something Rahman very often likes to work with. At first, the composition seems odd, but after a couple of listens you get used to it, and it grows on you. And after that it sounds magical!  The mukhda is a bit odd in the way it abruptly starts off with the “Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh, oh beliyaa” but it gradually gets better. The hookline is alsp quite commonplace. But the part that hooked me to the song, is the Antara which takes a delightfully tranquil Qawwali-ish mode, a la ‘Kun Faaya Kun’ (Rockstar), something that Rahman excels in. Also, who would’ve expected that kind of a treatment to be given to a patriotic song! But then, it was Rahman himself who did it years ago, in ‘Yeh Jo Des Hai Tera’ (Swades). The “Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh” loop is very catchy and it is probably the line that will hook most people to this song. Rahman’s arrangements are grand without being over-the-top. The song starts with a wonderful sound, like a flute. And after that, a synthetic shehnaai-like portion steals the breath away. When the melody of the song actually starts, there is predominantly piano arrangements, with a metronome ticking in the background. How simple, but the piano chords really make it sound grand. The sitar addition is just beautiful, while the claps during the “Oh-oh-oh-oh-oh” interlude are some booming arrangements. It is in the antara, again, when everything becomes more scintillating. A beautiful female chorus hums a trademark Rahman-ish melody, and then the Qawwali-ish portion starts, where Rahman, the mastermind that he is, adds the harmonium which increases the depth of the antara manifold. Rahman’s voice has a certain resonance, which no other singer in Bollywood at this point of time, can emulate. His voice gives the song another dimension altogether; it is so impactful. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are aptly patriotic, of course. A very soothing patriotic song, on the lines of ‘Yeh Jo Des Hai Tera’ (Swades).

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Sachin Sachin

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Kaly, Rap Lyrics by ~ Kaly

“Raste chaahe hon ghane hi,
Hai ujaala tere haathon mein,
Ho adhoora khwaab toh phir,
Neend kaise aaye raaton mein?
Abhi aadhi kheli toone baazi,
Abhi chotein dil ki taazi taazi,
Abhi dil ko hai karna raazi,
Teri hauslon ne paa leni hai manzilein!”

After that heart-moving patriotic song, Rahman comes up with a ‘Sachin’ anthem. And the song is quite cool. Yes, the composition is quite blander than I would’ve expected somebody like Rahman to compose, but what made the day for me, was the way he used the ‘Sachiiiin, Sachiiin’ chants that make the stadium vibrate, as the hookline of this song. The sheer innovativeness with which that portion is done, made me think about the song completely differently. The padding around the hookline, though, is a bit underwhelming, and it has a quite run-of-the-mill sports anthem-like sound to it. Sukhwinder Singh’s vocals are topnotch, and he creates the ambience that will remind us of all of Sachin Tendulkar’s amazing feats in the history of cricket. As always his energy level is unmatchable. Kaly, the rapper, too does a fine job. Rahman’s arrangements are mostly digital percussion again, but I must say, the beats are very groovy, though at the same time, very typical and clichéd. There’s another uncredited female portion in the interlude, which was the peak point of the song, next to the “Sachin” chants. Irshad Kamil very appropriately praises the God of Cricket in his writing. An anthem that works only partly with its composition, but has a top-class hookline, and amazing vocals!

Rating: 3/5

 

3. Mard Maratha

Singers ~ A.R. Ameen & Anjali Gaikwad

“Dam dam dam Tain Tain Tain Tain Mard Maratha Tain Tain re!”

A vocal loop that reminds me of so many of Rahman’s Tamil songs kicks off the last song on the album, a fun and enjoyable children’s song that will surely make you get up and dancing to its beats. Rahman composes it in a way that will instantly appeal to the listeners, and especially the younger children. That vocal rhythm keeps repeating throughout the song, and keeps the listeners glued to the song. The mukhda is quite catchy as well, and very effectively leads to the vocal rhythm again, which serves as the song’s hookline. Rahman keeps the catchiness constant throughout the song; the antara is also very impressive. Not just the composition, but even the arrangements and vocals stand out in the song. The composer employs a very typical Maharashtrian dholki beat, that works in favour of the song and sets up a nice Maharashtrian feel to the song, apt because Sachin is from Maharashtra. The beginning has a nice Irish flute, that helps in getting the listener hooked. The interlude has a nice dhol-taasha part, coupled with nice Indian banjo after that. And of course, the dholki remains constant. Rahman’s guitars help infuse amazing energy to the song wherever they play. The vocals are very impressive, with two children singing joyously, but perfectly. They hit the right notes everytime, and even showcase for us, some very impressive rapid aalaaps. Rahman’s son, Ameen, does a good job, but his female co-singer, Anjali Gaikwad steals the show when she sings mind blowing aalaaps. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are fun and enjoyable, just like the song. Sachin’s young fans will love this one!

Rating: 4/5


Sachin: A Billion Dreams is aptly short, sweet and simple. With a patriotic song, an ode to Sachin, and a children’s song, the album is quite a mixed bag.However, it doesn’t seem like one of those albums that I will listen to over and over again, and it is definitely not one of Rahman’s best. He showcases his experimentalist side in ‘Mard Maratha’, but the other two songs lack that.Nevertheless, they are good songs for a film in which I least expected songs. The Mozart of Madras puts aside his garish orchestration and complex compositions and delivers a sweet and simple album for the Master Blaster!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 4 = 11

Album Percentage: 73.34%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hind Mere Jind = Mard Maratha > Sachin Sachin

 

Please vote for your favourite song from Sachin: A Billion Dreams! Thanks! 🙂

GRAND BUT BLAND!! (BAAHUBALI 2: THE CONCLUSION – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: M.M. Kreem
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th April 2017

Baahubali 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Baahubali 2: The Conclusion is an upcoming Indian epic historical fiction film, starring Prabhas, Anushka Shetty, Rana Daggubati, Sathyaraj, and Tamannaah Bhatia. The film has been directed by S.S. Rajamouli, and produced by Shobu Yarlagadda and Prasad Devineni. The film is being distributed in Hindi by Karan Johar’s Dharma Productions. The film is a sequel to 2015’s super-duper hit ‘Baahubali: The Beginning’. Technically this one is a prequel and (SPOILER ALERT FOR ALL WHO HAVEN’T WATCHED THE FIRST FILM, IF ANY OF YOU EXIST) shows the story of Baahubali himself, as opposed to his son Shiva’s story in the first film. It also gives the answer that all India is awaiting — Why Katappa Killed Baahubali. The makers have even made it into a trend called #WKKB. 😂 Anyway, the music director of the film is the same man who did the first film (of course!), M.M. Kreem. The first album was very situational, but three songs nevertheless stood out, out of seven. This album is smaller in size, with five songs, and I also hope it is better in terms of quality too. What I’m expecting is grand, royal and majestic music. And I’m pretty sure I will get it too. Without further delay, let’s jump right into the album to this much-awaited film of 2017.


1. Jiyo Re Bahubali

Singers ~ Daler Mehndi, Sanjeev Chimmalgi & Ramya Behra

“Gali gali teri lau jali, jiyo re Baahubali,
Praanon se badhke humko hai, tu pyaara,
Sab gaayenge, dohraayenge, abb tera jayjaykara!”

The album starts off aptly with a grand, anthemic title song giving the titular character, Baahubali, a larger-than-life image, projecting him as a Superman. The composition by Kreem is quite similar to his other such songs that were included in the first movie. It flows freely, the only impediment it face being the anthemic “Aisa, woh aisa, jaise parvat avichal sa” chants, that kind of restrict the flow of the song. The female portion has been composed very beautifully, and also the mukhda by Daler Mehndi. The rest is very passable, and forgettable as soon as you finish listening to the song. Kreem uses the strings section from ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ from the first film, a very clever inclusion because that portion was like the definition of the song, and the theme song of the film. That brings us to Kreem’s arrangements, which are, very suitably, full of grand war-based sounds, like the booming percussions and impressive strings. The chorus portions are least effective however, and fail to raise the interest of the listener. Vocals are grand, and Daler Mehndi aces the mukhda and hookline. He has just as much scope in the song as Bombay Jayshri had in ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ and Kailash Kher in ‘Jal Rahi Hain’ (Both songs from the first film, in which these singers had negligible portions compared to the chorus, who took away the most part of the song). Similarly, here, Ramya Behra in her stunning antara, and Sanjeev Chimmalgi in his antara. Again, I reiterate that the chorus portions, though important in keeping with that whole war theme of the movie, sound very mediocre. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics take the grandeur to another level. Only partially impressive in every department except lyrics, in which it is completely impressive!

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Veeron Ke Veer Aa

Singers ~ Aditi Paul & Deepu

“Oh oh re raja, veeron ke veer aa,
Nainon se tu na door hona,
Main toh hoon teri, phir kaisi deri,
Le jaa jahaan tera thikaana,
Haath se ye haath jod lo na,
Hai saath dono ko behna,
Bas teri hai Devasena!”

As soon as the song starts, I got reminded of a construction site, metal clanging against metal, hammers and construction tools at the go. It reminded me a bit of ‘Manohari’ from the first movie. Turns out it isn’t a construction song though, as the lyrics clearly indicate. Anyway, first things first — the composition. M.M. Kreem provides this very weird-sounding composition, which sounds seductive at places (as it is supposed to be), but falls flat in others. The “na na, na na, na na” loop sounds amazing, and the mukhda hooks you, but, as happened in the first song, you will lose your interest in the antara. It just has such a haphazard composition which you can’t keep track of, so you just give up. The bridge line between the antara and hookline though, is cleverly done. The vocals are good, not great. Neeti Mohan would’ve been perfect for the song. I’m still waiting for Aditi Paul to come with another stellar song like ‘Ang Laga De’ (Ram-Leela). That being said, she manages to convey the romance nicely, and does the seductive-Devasena thing properly. Her companion, Deepu, also does well. Kreem’s arrangements barring the construction site sounds are fascinating; a very nice assortment of strings and brass instruments give the song a much-needed grandeur. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are functional for the situation. Good but not great.

Rating: 3/5

 

3. Soja Zara

 Singer ~ Madhushree

“Gopiyon ke peeche, phire tu nisdin, palchhin,
Thhak gaye paanv tere!
Saans zara le le, ruk jaa Kanha, thham ja,
Maan bhi jaa pagle!
Saanvare! Baawre!
Kal bhi hongi ye rang raliyaan,
Kal phir aana oh re chhaliya,
Dooba yeh din, chal so jaa!
Kanha soja zara, oh Kanha soja zara!”

Now this is what I was waiting for from this album. A song with a very charming old-world 90s charm to it, this one is a nice and sweet romantic song, using the example of Radha-Krishna, like so many romantic songs like to do in Indian songs. Kreem’s composition is majestic and magnificent, obviously based in a Carnatic Raaga, and the result is just enticing! The mukhda pulls in the listener right away, wih its lilting and upbeat tune, two qualities we don’t quite get in the same song nowadays! The mellifluous hookline is a respite from the jarring hooklines of many recent songs, and the antara is just fabulous with its sweetness double than that of the mukhda. The composer also decorates the composition with wonderful arrangements — on a catchy beat that almost sounds Caribbean if the Carnatic melody is removed from the song! The flute stands out, as it should if the song is based on Lord Krishna! Guitars too, have been played very enticingly, and you can’t not like them! The duff gives a nice old-fashioned-sounding beat to the song. The flute show in the second interlude is MIND-BLOWING!! Madhushree (after a long time!!) proves herself yet again, and though I was initially wishing Shreya Ghoshal had sung this one after hearing its Telugu version, I’m satisfied with Madhushree’s rendition as well. The backing chorus in this song surpasses any backing chorus I’ve heard this year! Their conclusion to the song from 4:00 onwards in the song, ends the song on a beautiful note. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here are as cute and sweet as those two words can get! MAGNIFICENT!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Jay-Jaykara

Singer ~ Kailash Kher

“Kya kabhi ambar se, surya bichhadta hai?
Kya kabhi bin baati, deepak jalta hai?
Kaisi hai yeh anhonee, har aankh hui nam,
Chhod gaya jo tu, kaise jiyenge hum?
Tu hi kinaara, tu hi sahara, tu jag saara,
Tu hi humaara suraj, tu hi taara,
Jay-Jaykara, Jay-Jaykara,
Swami dena saath humaara!”

Kailash Kher, who had sung two songs in the previous film’s album, out of which I loved none, rather got bored by both, returns in this album to sing yet another melancholic song, something I get really apprehensive of hearing. However, to my pleasant surprise, this song is actually better than all the other melancholic Kailash Kher songs out there. The tedium hits you initially but wears off with the advent of that war-chant-like chorus in the interlude after the mukhda. The composition is soulful, but I wouldn’t exactly call it heart-rending. Again, the humming from ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ is incorporated into this song. From the antara, the song sounds very lively, and not melancholic. Kreem’s arrangements help to make this easier, the booming percussion providing an awesome beat, and the strings infusing grandeur and a majestic quality to the song. Kailash Kher has sung well, in his trademark style, and he has been well supported by the chorus singers, who take it away in that interlude I wrote about above. The lyrics make out to us that it isn’t exactly a sad song, it is rather a plea from the subjects to their king Baahubali. And Manoj Muntashir has written them so well, they actually compel you to focus on them instead of the composition for most of the time! A song with great lyrics, a good composition and supported by amazing arrangements, but lacking in repeat value. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Shivam

“Kya mrityu uss maha samar ki janani hai,
Jiska, varnan, srushti karti,
Kya ambar ki nagari se woh rakhwala aaya,
Jiske paanv choome dharti?”

Another melancholic-sounding song starts, but yet again, the beginning deceives us as it changes course soon enough. This song is like a short background score, an anthem of sorts. There is very less by way of composition, and so, it doesn’t quite stay with you as a listener. The arrangements too, are minimal except for a nice background percussion that gives the song its anthemic quality. The santoor that starts the song is great. The chorus again takes centre stage for most of the song, but the lead vocals are by Kreem’s son, Kaala Bhairava. The lyrics have very little substance, but are very well written. A song made to be heard in the cinema hall.

Rating: 2/5


Baahubali 2 is an album that fits in with its predecessor. The songs do not make much sense or appeal to one without the visuals. The case was similar with the previous album. At least that one had two to three amazing songs to hear as audio songs. Here? Just one. I’m happy at least that one song is outstanding! A soundtrack that sounds grand, but deep down below, is bland!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 3 + 5 + 3.5 + 2 = 16.5

Album Percentage: 66%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Soja Zara > Jay-Jaykara > Veeron Ke Veer Aa = Jiyo Re Bahubali > Shivam

 

Which is your favourite song from Baahubali 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

CATCHY TUNES IN A COVER OF EARTH!! (ANAARKALI OF AARAH – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rohit Sharma
♪ Lyrics by: Ramkumar Singh, Ravinder Randhawa, Prashant Ingole, Dr. Sagar & Avinash Das
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 6th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th March 2017

Anaarkali of Aarah Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Anaarkali Of Aarah is a Bollywood film starring Swara Bhaskar, Pankaj Tripathi and Sanjay Mishra in lead roles. The film has been directed by Avinash Das, and produced by Sandiip Kapur. The film is about a singer in Bihar who earns a living by singing songs at village functions. As she gets entangled into a spat with the Vice Chancellor of a prestigious university, she seeks justice, and the movie is about her struggle for justice. The movie has opened to great reviews, but as usual, my writing speed has fallen behind, and so here I am. The music for the movie has been composed by Rohit Sharma, who is NOT a cricketer; you can find him over at @rohitdecomposer on Twitter. He has composed for a music album for a movie I was aware of, but didnt pay much attention to, Jimmy Sheirgill’s ‘Shortcut Safaari’, but now he comes with a definitely bigger album, and with ten tracks it is definite that the music will be completely situational and plot-oriented, which is to say, it will be quite rustic and earthy. Is it a problem for me? No! As long it is catchy, I will like anything! 😀 So let’s dive into this ten-track album!


1. Dunaliya Mein Jung (Anaarkali’s Umph)

Singer ~ Swati Sharrma, Lyrics by ~ Ramkumar Singh

The album starts with a song alternatively called “Anaarkali’s Umph”, which is probably a misspelled version of ‘oomph’, but I get the point. Anyway, the song is clearly for one of Anaarkali’s performances, and as soon as it starts, you get the situational feel of it radiating out of it. The composition is quite toned-down, with not much by way of catchiness, but goes on quite a clichéd route. I’m sure if you go to Aarah itself, this is the kind of folk songs you will hear. So it was a smart move to keep it simple. The tune does make you dance like crazy later on, but one problem is its duration. Over five minutes, the song is quite daunting to sit through because of its monotony. The arrangements are aptly folksy. The bulbultarang (let’s call it the ‘Indian banjo’ henceforth in the review because it is a common instrument in the songs and I’m too lazy to add the italics effect.) has been used gratuitously, as is the harmonium, and very aptly too, because it replicates the folk performances of the region. Swati Sharrma sounds very different from what she usually sounds like in songs, and it is nice to hear her powerful vocals yet again after ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), after which she hardly got any substantial songs. Again, she seems mellowed down in some places, and you wonder how the song is supposed to be so ‘oomphy’ because Bollywood has seen much more oomph that this. Maybe it is because of Ramkumar’s lyrics, which aren’t really creative. A decent start to the album; not-so-oomphy, but catchy to an extent.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Lahanga Jhaanke (Accidental Firing)

Singer ~ Indu Sonali, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

Now this song is alternatively titled ‘Accidental Firing’ and I wonder what that means, unless there’s some situation in the movie. The song starts abruptly with the nice pungi/shehnai sound followed by the Indian banjo played in a very catchy tune. The composition for this one is quite more ‘oomphy’ than the last song, and you instantly get caught on to the rhythm, especially the percussion which has been done wonderfully! The composition is quite sultry and catchy, and the various twists in it really help propel it forward. The “sarak sarak sarakaile” hook is catchy. The antara takes a different route than the rest of the song, and the percussion changes very nicely; the seamless transition from one rhythm to another is a marvel to behold in this song. From rapid, it goes to slow and sultry, just to go back to rapid in a while. I think I’ve given enough away about the arrangements, so now about the vocals. Indu Sonali, a Bhojpuri singer, is an apt singer for the song and her nuances give the song an interesting touch, fun to listen. The lyrics here too are quite the same as the previous track, and I think it’s going to go on like this till the end of the album. A catchier song, that excels especially in arrangements.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Aye Sakhi Ooh (Keh Mukri)

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Ramkumar Singh

Next up comes the ‘keh mukri‘, which is basically a song where a lady describes qualities that sound like she’s praising her lover, and then denies it and says that she is talking about something else. We heard it in ‘Raanjhanaa’ too, if you remember! 🙂 This one is more sensual however, than that one, which seemed as sanctimonious as sanctimonious can get. The composition is, relevantly to the theme of the movie, quite sultry and sensual. The mukhda gives a perfect start to the song, while the antaras just continue it, and the hookline does its job. The arrangements are similar to the previous song, with a lot of amazing percussion consisting of dholaks and tablas. The Indian Banjo works its way amazingly throughout the upbeat song. Pawni Pandey’s vocals here sound very impressive, and not fake like they did in ‘Laila Main Laila’ (Raees). Rohit Sharma has also very interestingly tweaked her voice pitch in some places, providing a comic touch in those places. The backing vocalists efficiently do their job as men who are smitten by Anaarkali. Lyrics are the same. 😀 I should tell you though, that it isn’t like I was expecting better lyrics; it is perfectly fine here given the movie’s theme! Another catchy one!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Badnaam Jiya De Gaari (Thumri)

Singer ~ Rekha Bhardwaj, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

Next up we have a thumri, and who better than Rekha Bhardwaj to pull it off!? So Rohit treats us with an aptly folksy, earthy and rustic Thumri, that, at the same time, pulls at our heartstrings. The composition is so beautiful, and has a very heavy old-world-charm to it. The melancholic notes hit the right part of your heart, and instantly. The mukhda has been composed on the common kaherwa taal, while, quite interestingly, the antara has been composed on the three-beat dadra. And the transition between the two different taals, which are individually so commonly (or were so commonly) used in Bollywood songs, is so seamless! It brings you shivering with goosebumps everytime that transition occurs. That brings us to arrangements. Of course, these taals have been played marvellously on the tablas. However, he interludes are something to watch out for, where the sitar will transport you back to Naushad’s music in ‘Mughal-e-Azam’. A wonderful sarangi interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. The harmonium gives a very light background music, and if you are listening carefully, you might catch it. Rekha Bhardwaj pulls off the thumri, with as much finesse as she always does. Nobody on today’s list of singers (and active singers) could’ve replicated what she did in this song. Her nuances are to die for, while the rest of the song, she carries with an aura of power and yet, sounds very simple. Here, the lyrics by Ravinder Randhawa are wonderful. A strong and powerful thumri that needs to be promoted!!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Mann Beqaid Huva (Anaarkali’s Adieu)

Singer ~ Sonu Nigam, Lyrics by ~ Prashant Ingole

A guitar strum which starts off the next song, immediately tells you that it is quite different from he other songs of the album! And sure enough, this one is quite different in theme and therefore stands out. It has very little by way of earthiness, but there definitely is a gentle caressing breeze in the song. The breeziness can be credited to Sharma’s sweet composition. I was reminded of Anu Malik’s and Sonu Nigam’s collaborations in the 90s and early 2000s by this song. The line before the hookline, and the hookline itself, are so calming, and accentuated by the ravishing instrumentation. Usually such songs have very little in terms of orchestration, but this one is backed by a heavy strings orchestra, wonderful sarangi and if course, the acoustic guitar. Still, wonderful percussion of tablas can be heard in a line hat goes marvellously high-pitched in the antaras. Shakers too, are scintillating additions to the arrangements. Sonu Nigam carries the song with a charming aura, and his old songs are brought to mind instantly; not the middling compositions he had started singing in the middle. This song could have easily fit into a rom-com set in a rural region, and had it had some more urban arrangements, it could have also passed in an urban love story, and that’s why it becomes the odd one out in the album! Prashant Ingole (after a long time) writes marvellous, poetic lyrics, and it is a pleasure to hear him after a long time! Charming!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar (Anaarkali in Studio)

Singer ~ Swati Sharrma, Lyrics by ~ Dr. Sagar

This song starts with a kind of sher, in Bhojpuri, and proceeds to form a rather staid melody, which only sounds impressive occasionally. The composition is not so innovative, and could’ve been better, if not excellent. The whole thing sounds very heard-before and hence, fails to raise eyebrows. The antara doesn’t make things quite better, and is quite dull. The only thing that can pass as catchy, might be the hookline. The arrangements take the form of heard-before Qawwali arrangements, the harmonium leading the way with dholaks following. The Indian banjo too, has been utilised in a very clichéd way. Swati Sharrma doesn’t sound as good as she sounded in her previous song, but still sounds better than all her other songs in other albums. The lyrics are cute, but you hardly have the scope to notice them, as the song won’t compel you to hear it again! A staid melody ruins everything.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Sa Ra Ra Ra (Anaarkali’s Revenge)

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

This track seems to be a crucial scene from the film, included in the music album. And it is a Reprise of “Lahanga Jhaanke”. The differences between the two songs are plenty though. This one aptly starts with dialogues, probably as they are from the movie. And it gives a better setting to the song, than the abruptly starting ‘Lahanga Jhaanke’. The premise of the song, we can easily gauge, thanks to the dialogue parts by the emcee of the event and Swara Bhaskar as Anaarkali. The composition, atleast for the first half of the seven-and-a-half minute long song, is the same as ‘Lahanga Jhaanke’ song, but the actual ‘Sa Ra Ra Ra’ part starts four minutes into the song, after a cutting outburst by Anaarkali at a particular man in the audience. And that part is savage! The tune is apt as ut sticks to the whole ‘revenge’ theme, and has a quite sinister feel. Rohit Sharma has added better arrangements in this version, than he did in the original. It is basically the same, but a wonderful backing chorus makes up for whatever void was left unfilled in the first version. In the new portion, booming percussion helps the Anaarkali’s anger come out even better, with the chorus supporting her very well. Strings work well to intensify that portion of the song, while Swara’s dialogues really work in favour of the revenge theme; of course, the great actress that she is, she has rendered the dialogues veryyyyy convincingly! The vocals by Pawni Pandey are very impressive! This is one of Pawni’s best performances, and she just infuses a lot of power into the rendition. The lyrics are well-written, and so are the dialogues. A nice song to go with the revenge situation!

Rating: 4/5

 

8. Mera Balam Bambaiya (Rehearsal Song) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Pawni Pandey, Lyrics by ~ Avinash Das

The next three songs have been titled as “Bonus Songs”, probably because they aren’t in the film, and if you notice, they haven’t been mixed, mastered and developed further than a mere scratch version. The songs do sound like scratch versions, and the makers seemed to have included them in the album just for the music lovers. Anyway, this particular song has a nice and catchy tune, another folksy tune that grips you instantly. It is a short song, and again, sounds like a scratch version, as is evident from the minimal arrangements, which makes the song sound raw. However, it doesn’t take anything from the song. Rohit’s composition nevertheless, is very catchy. The hookline is something everybody would enjoy at first listen itself. The arrangements, though minimal, with mainly a harmonium and tablas/dholaks, are enjoyable, giving a feeling as if you are actually at an event in a village, and the song is being sung there by the villagers. Pawni yet again, aces the vocals, sounding as fun as ever. She seems to be enjoying herself, and Rohit Sharma himself (I believe) accompanies her in some parts. The lyrics are functional, situational again. A catchy one, which is not hampered by the raw sound — I wonder why they didn’t develop it further!

Rating: 4/5

 

9. Hamre Jobna Pe (Anaarkali’s Swag) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Indu Sonali, Lyrics by ~ Avinash Das

The second “Bonus Song” has more of a generic tune, heard-before, and not-too-catchy either. The composition sounds quite like “Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar” in many parts; maybe this was its precursor, and not finalised. Again, it is very short, and hasn’t been developed further than a stanza. There’s not much to say about the composition, so talking about the arrangements, I must say that the synthetic sounds added to it actually make it sound like a Bhojpuri film song. And the dholaks and harmonium lead the arrangements here too. Indu Sonali sings the song aptly, in her husky voice. The lyrics are something I didnt quite understand for the most. Middling.

Rating: 2/5

 

10. Laal Laal Cheekwa (Anwar’s Intro) [Bonus Track]

Singer ~ Rohit Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Ravinder Randhawa

The last song of this long album starts off quite simply with a simple dholak rhythm, which I’m sure you’ve heard somewhere before. The composition again, is not up to the mark, and the song lasts for a short one minute. The dholak arrangements break into a digital beat halfway through the track, and I wonder why the song hasn’t been polished before that; it sounds odd to hear a song that has been only half polished. Rohit Sharma’s vocals sound like Udit Narayan in places. The lyrics are situational yet again, and nothing to rave about. Dissatisfying.

Rating: 2/5


Anaarkali of Aarah was an album that bravely stuck to it’s script’s demands. It didn’t feel the requirement to rope in a famous pop singer to make it commercially viable. And as it is, it impressed me because of it’s honesty. The tunes are catchy, and aptly rustic, and clearly stick to the script. Rohit Sharma must have done lots of hard work researching about this style of music from Bihar and U.P. Kudos to that. Last but not the least, kudos to the makers for keeping the tunes as they were needed. Of course, the rating might go down due to the three bonus tracks, but this album was one with catchy tunes, covered with a coat of earth! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 2 + 4 + 4 + 2 + 2 = 34

Album Percentage: 68%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Badnaam Jiya De Gaari > Mann Beqaid Huva > Sa Ra Ra Ra = Aye Sakhi Ooh = Mera Balam Bambaiya > Lahanga Jhaanke > Dunaliya Mein Jung > Mora Piya Matlab Ka Yaar = Laal Laal Cheekwa = Hamre Jobna Pe

 

Remake Counter
No. of remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 00 (from Anarkali of Aarah) = 08

Which is your favourite song from Anaarkali of Aarah? Please vote for it below! 🙂 Thanks!

JOLLY GOOD ALBUM!! (JOLLY LL.B 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Manj Musik, Nilesh Patel, Chirantan Bhatt, Meet Bros. & Vishal Khurana
♪ Lyrics by: Manj Musik, Raftaar, Junaid Wasi, Shabbir Ahmed & Earl Edgar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 10th February 2017

Jolly LL.B 2 Album Cover

Jolly LL.B 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Jolly LL.B 2 is an upcoming comedy courtroom drama starring Akshay Kumar, Annu Kapoor, Saurabh Shukla and Huma Qureshi in prominent roles. The film has been directed by Subhash Kapoor, who earlier directed ‘Phas Gaye Re Obama’, ‘Jolly LLB’ and ‘Guddu Rangeela’, and produced by Fox Star Studios. The film revolves around the story of a small-time lawyer Jagdishwar Mishra a.k.a. Jolly, who earns a living by fighting small cases. In his desires to become a full-fledged lawyer though, Jolly ends up committing a mistake that could just as well destroy his career as a lawyer. The film deals with how Jolly gets himself out of this predicament. The film is the sequel to 2013 sleeper hit ‘Jolly LLB’. While the earlier film had a music album which can hardly be counted as one of Krsna’s best works, or even good works, as it was as middling a fare as your everyday T-Series multicomposer album, the sequel has an album which is just that — your everyday T-Series multicomposer album. And as it almost always is, there is one song composed by one team of composers. Manj Musik, who has the full support of Akshay Kumar now, what with him composing for Akshay in ‘Gabbar is Back’ and ‘Singh is Bliing’ in 2015, gets the first song. Helping him is Nilesh Patel, who has been credited as “Co-Composer”! Expectations are not too high but not zero either, as he has given good songs in the past, but just messed up a couple of times, thus earning my anger. Next up is Chirrantan Bhatt, another composer whose Bollywood career is strongly backed by Akshay. He gave hits for Akshay in both ‘Boss’ (2013) and in ‘Gabbar is Back’ (2015). This time too, he is back to perhaps give yet another path breaking romantic song. Meet Bros. feature as the third composers on board, and their association with Akshay has started long ago in 2012 when they scored the beautiful ‘Mere Nishaan’ in ‘OMG – Oh My God!’ After that, they went on to score for Akshay in so many films like ‘Boss’ (2013), ‘Baby’ (2015) and ‘Singh is Bliing’ (2015). But that was when Anjjan too was a part of the team. After the split with Anjjan, this is Meet Bros’ first song for Akshay; hopefully, it is just as good. And lastly is one-album old, Vishal Khurana who debuted last February with the stellar album to ‘Neerja’. Thankful that he has got another project finally, (after like ages!) I hope he takes good advantage of it and gives a great song. So let’s see what this multicomposer assortment has in store for us! Because Akshay Kumar and multicomposer have this very nice relationship which more often than always, impresses me! (Take any of the albums mentioned above for example!)


1. Go Pagal

Singers ~ Raftaar & Nindy Kaur, Additional Vocals ~ Girish Nakod & Manj Musik, Music by ~ Manj Musik, Co-composed by ~ Nilesh Patel, Lyrics by ~ Raftaar & Manj Musik

(I didn’t find any lyrics worth mentioning here!)

The album starts with the song I was least excited to hear — a Holi song titled ‘Go Pagal’. Okay, so Manj Musik has given some pretty good songs in the past, but only sticking to one kind of songs — fast, update rap songs (with the exception of the awesome ‘Aaja Mahi’ from ‘Singh Is Bliing’) As such, all his songs sound almost the same and you can really predict what’s going to come next in each song. This song too falls into the same category, but it goes a bit too overboard with the craziness. The composition is a typical Manj composition, though there are some nice folksy lines in the middle, (‘Bheegi bheegi lage lovely lovely…‘) which I suspect are composed by the co-composer Nilesh Patel. Anyway, the composition is quite all round the place and it is kind of hard to grasp on to. And that hookline is just yuck! I was fine till it played. It was such an abrupt end to the flow of the song, that it spoiled all the fun, or whatever fun was there. Also, it is quite similar in sructure to ‘Let’s Nacho’ (Kapoor & Sons) where they ‘say’ the hookline, not sing it, and then some weird tune plays in some very annoyingly high digitized pitch. And what’s worse, the person who says ‘Go Pagal’ here (That’d be Raftaar, I guess) sounds like he’s burping it. It sounds eww. In some places, the composition resembles ‘Tamanche Pe Disco’ (Bullett Raja). The arrangements are very mediocre, though that nice rapid dholak beat is something for which I would listen to the song over and over again, despite everything. And that chipmunk voice that says ‘Goli Re’ in the mukhda is just so cute! Every other thing regarding arrangements is strictly banal. It sounds like it has been thrown out of 2013 and should’ve been in ‘Jolly LLB’, but it forecasted that Akshay Kumar would star in the sequel, which is why it is here for us to get troubled by it. The vocals sound like robots have done it. Raftaar tries to sing charmingly, but how can he? He has to carry the entire song on his shoulders, and though he does quite well, it just sounds very monotonous. And Nindy Kaur in her part initially sounds as if she’s so shy, she can’t sing at all. (She’s trying to sound naughty, but it sounds shy…) Her voice sounds as robotic as ever. The lyrics (Raftaar and Manj) are as banal as possible. A Holi song has never been so trashily written in the history of Bollywood, I guess. Okay, maybe ‘Ang Se Ang Lagana’ from ‘Darr’ is an exception, but in recent times they’ve all been very well-written and fun. Though the makers might think this is fun too, it isn’t. A mediocre start to the album, and a disappointment from Manj and his team.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Bawara Mann

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan, Aalap by ~ Rheek Chakraborty, Music by ~ Chirrantan Bhatt, Lyrics by ~ Junaid Wasi

“Bawra Mann raah taake tarse re, Naina bhi malhar banke barse re!
Aadhe se, adhoore se, bin tere hum huye, feeka lagey, mujhko saara jahaan!”

– Junaid Wasi

Chirrantan Bhatt, another composer that Akshay Kumar seems to be backing these days, enters the soundtrack, with his song. Usually, the composer impresses us with nice Bhatt-ish melodies. This time though, he follows the path of one of his earlier songs, ‘Coffee Peetey Peetey’ from ‘Gabbar Is Back’, and presents a breezy, feel-good melody that could not have sounded better. Previously, ‘Coffee Peetey Peetey’ was my favourite song by him, but now I have to say, that it is this one. The composition is, as I said before, very breezy and happy-go-lucky. And I just love it when such songs come out. The mukhda starts off right away with the hookline, a wonderful tune with a light touch to it. It’s as if Chirrantan is saying, “Want to cut down on fat in your musical diet? Well then, listen to this song, with 80% less musical fat than other songs out there!” The antara goes into a nice and soothing low scale, as opposed to the cute high pitch of the mukhda. The composition kind of reminded me of Pritam’s ‘I’m Sorry Par Tumse Pyaar Ho Gaya’ (Shaadi Ke Side/Effects), in that it is a toned down version of the peppy and breezy composition of that song. Arrangements are fantastic, with the ukulele (Shomu Seal) and guitars (Shomu Seal & Sanjoy Das) really winning your heart by the end of the song, and giving the song its quirkiness. Piano notes occasionally bring the sobriety to the song, while wonderrrrrrful harmonicas throughout the song provide that heavenly touch, accompanied by a wonderful vocal choir. The vocals by both singers are fabulous as well. Jubin, who has already sung so many songs this year, ranging from mediocre to beautiful, has emerged as the superstar of the beginning of the year with another fantabulous rendition from his side. Neeti, on the other hand, only strengthens her charming image by singing the second antara, with as much expertise as possible. Her characteristic feathery voice elevates her portions to other levels. Junaid Wasi, who returns to writing lyrics after like four-and-a-half years (His last was in Chirrantan Bhatt’s album ‘1920: Evil Returns’) writes a splendid poetry-like piece. Hindustani classical terminology meets modern romance in his writing, and it actually proves to be a nice and pleasant fusion. This is where the album starts, in my opinion!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Jolly Good Fellow

Singers ~ Meet Brothers, Additional Vocals by ~ Purnima Solanki, Sanchita Sakat, Rap by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, English Rap by ~ Earl Edgar, Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, English Rap Written by ~ Earl Edgar

“Hello, how are you, mera Naam hai Jolly,
Manaane jashn nikli yaaron ki toli..
Bada colourful sa swag hai mera…
Karun jab use apni meethi si boli..
Nature mera hai cool, baaton mein banadoon fool,
Gopiyan bhi line mein hai karte Hi hello!
He’s a Jolly Good Fellow, He’s a Jolly Good Fellow,
Jai kanhaiyalaal ki, bolte chalo!”

– Shabbir Ahmed

What made me freak out even before starting the song was that the folk song ‘He’s A Jolly Good Fellow’ had been recreated! I mean if Bollywood can’t handle its own classics’ recreations, how will a British song be recreated well enough!! But then, the first note of the song played and all my worst doubts disappeared into thin air. The song starts with this uber-cool, smooth flute portion, played to the tune of the nursery rhyme! And from that moment on, you are hooked completely! The Meet Bros. have done an appreciable job in successfully recreating a Western song to suit the Indian music standards. A suitable “Chinta Ta Chita Chita” (Rowdy Rathore) based rhythm makes its way into the song and surprisingly provides an apt background beat for the English folk song. Of course, the duo has added their own composition for the mukhda and antara, and I can’t really say it is bad! The mukhda starts off the song well, showcasing the main character of the movie as a very sacrosanct person, and I must say, the tune is quite sanctimonious-sounding too. I mean, in Janmashtami, you will hear such tunes everywhere in India. The sound effects included by the duo are probably the most enjoyable I’ve heard in recent times. Yes, the sound of the song is very generic and heard-before. But I don’t really have any qualms in liking something that is likeable even though it has been heard before. The arrangements are booming and fun, with the aforementioned beats really infusing a lot of fun into the song. Different instruments, and especially the flute that plays occasionally, sound awesome. Whistles and the like make for nice “roadside attractions”. The vocals are good too,and the Meet Brothers sound at ease rendering the spunky song. The female backing vocalists provide nice entertainment with their cute inputs. Meanwhile the two rappers, (Shabbir Ahmed in Hindi and Earl Edgar in English) do not fare as well, with their commonplace rap. Shabbir, rapping to his own words, sounds confused. You can barely hear what he is saying. That being said, his lyrics are quite decent! It is a perfect character introduction song, and the incorporation of the “Jolly Good Fellow” phrase followed by “jai Kanhaiya laal ki, bolte chalo” is so interesting! It is a theme song that is quite entertaining. Might be irritating for some, but interesting for most!

Rating: 3/5

 

4. O Re Rangreza (Qawaali)

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Murtuza Mustafa & Qadir Mustafa, Music by ~ Vishal Khurana, Lyrics by ~ Junaid Wasi

{I do not know why T-Series is always so adamant on writing “Qawaali” in the title of their songs! I think this is like the third time they’ve done this, and once, the song wasn’t even a Qawwali! I think we are quite competent to make out whether a song is a Qawwali or not, and if they want to continue this, I advise them to write in brackets stuff like “Romantic Song” or “Dumb Party Song” too, why only Qawwali?}

“Rooh ne arzi lagaayi hai, Sahi kadam chala maula,
Mann ko ainth ke baati kar, tera charaag jala maula!”

– Junaid Wasi

Bollywood hasn’t churned out a single satisfying Qawwali as far as I can remember, after Tanishk Bagchi’s splendid rock-qawwali ‘Allah Hu Allah’s (Sarbjit). Now here comes another proper Qawwali, by which I mean a Qawwali without any unnecessary Bollywood elements. The young and talented composer Vishal Khurana (‘Neerja’ fame) has been roped in to compose this Qawwali, and going by the innovative work he did in ‘Neerja’, I was expecting a very, very impressive Qawwali. Unfortunately, I got quite a regular and ordinary one. The composition is good, and suits the situation (one of those situations that often arrive in Bollywood films where the protagonist has lost all hopes and has to leave it all up to God, and then a Qawwali or Bhajan plays) but goes awfully slow. It is not something that one would find themselves listening to too much. Because of these drawbacks, I expect the song to gain momentum only after the movie released, but the prospects of that are less too, because Qawwali isn’t a genre that finds many takers in today’s world. (Though I get fascinated and mesmerized by a good one, when it comes!) Anyway, that’s that in the composition. The “Mushkil kusha o re noor-e-khuda…” hook, though, is very beautifully composed, as are the antaras, slow speed notwithstanding. The arrangements follow a mesmerizing Roopak taal, with the tablas sounding spectacular, as does the Bulbultarang or Indian banjo. Vocals, thankfully, help the listener ignore the slow pace of the song, as Sukhwinder pours  his entire soul into the rendition, sounding very soulful in the process. Supported ably by the Mustafa brothers, he provides a nice, relaxing ambience with his voice. However, the main reason I would listen to this song again, even before the movie releases, is the spectacular writing by Junaid Wasi. He impressed in the romantic song and now impresses in a spiritual one as well. The line I’ve “showcased” is just one of the portions out of the many splendid lines in the song. A déjà-vu inducing Qawwali as far as the composition and arrangements go, but vocals and lyrics make this one an exemplary piece of art.

Rating: 4/5


Jolly LL.B 2 turns out to be quite a good album, if you judge it as a multicomposer album, which it is. Akshay Kumar almost always impresses whenever his music albums are scored by multiple composers. (Glaring exception being ‘Housefull 3′) The six individuals (counting Nilesh Patel and two Meet Brothers) come together to make an album that is definitely not perfect, but functional as a feel-good (or shall I say feel-jolly?) album, that will propagate the buzz of the movie before release. Yes, Manj and Meet Brothers’ songs could’ve been better, but they are still partially enjoyable. And I must say, this album is better than the album by Krsna to the first instalment of the franchise! A jolly jolly album! 😛

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 5 + 3 + 4 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 72.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bawara Mann > O Re Rangreza (Qawaali) > Jolly Good Fellow > Go Pagal

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 04 (from previous albums) + 00 = 04

 

Which is your favourite song from Jolly LL.B 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks!