NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

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KAUSAR MUNIR – THE SECRET SUPERSTAR! (SECRET SUPERSTAR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 18th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 19th October 2017

Secret Superstar Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Secret Superstar is a Bollywood drama starring Zaira Wasim, Meher Vij, Tirth Sharma, Raj Arjun and Aamir Khan. The film is directed and written by debutant Advait Chandan, and produced by Aamir Khan, Zee Studios and Akash ChawlaAfter the success of ‘Dangal’, Aamir Khan once again casts Zaira Wasim in the lead role here, in a story which is basically a young girl, Insia’s, journey to fulfilling her dream of becoming a famous singer. Great reviews have already started pouring in for the film, and I’m not going to rant about how Zee Music should’ve released the album for a musical movie much earlier than one day before the movie. Anyway, the music this time has been scored by a composer who has never composed for Aamir Khan. Amit Trivedi is choosing much more music-oriented scripts nowadays, as is evident from his choices of ‘Qaidi Band’ and now this. In ‘Qaidi Band’ he impressed a lot, managing to give the whole album a distinct rock touch, without making it sound monotonous. But this time, he needs to keep in mind the point of view of a 14-year old school going girl, and compose from her point of view. That might be tough, it might be easy, but we know it would not be something unconventional, like Trivedi is known to do. His quirkiness is expected to stay out of the album, but the soulful side of his is definitely expected to show itself in this particular album. So without further ado, because most of you are already in theatres watching the movie, or have already watched it, or are going this weekend, let’s jump into the music of ‘Secret Superstar’!


Main Kaun Hoon is the perfect self-discovery song to suit the film’s story and though the composition turns out to be quite underwhelming, barring the uplifting portion towards the end, it is debutante (15-years old only, at the time of recording the song) Meghna Mishra’s amazing vocals that redeem the song. The hookline is good, but very conventional at the same time. Given that the song has been written and composed by a young teenager though, it is perfect. The strings and drums and guitars by Trivedi make the song worthwhile. Kausar Munir’s lyrics here are just a snippet of the beautiful words that are to come in the rest of the album. Meri Pyaari Ammi follows with another staid composition, with unnecessary pauses that break the continuity of the song, and a hookline that is high-spirited but manages to get tiresome towards the end. Again, Meghna’s vocals are beautiful, but here it is lyricist Kausar Munir who makes the song cherishable due to her wonderful lyrics!
It is only in the beautiful folk-based Sapne Re that we remember that the album’s music is by Trivedi, because he bases it on a wonderful North-Eastern rhythm, one that we loved in his ‘Sawaar Loon’ (Lootera; 2013). Wonderful guitars and strings accompany the innocent composition; something that we would never have heard from Trivedi had it not been for this film which gave him the chance to compose from the point of view of a teenage girl. The folksy music gels well with Meghna’s sugary sweet vocals, and Kausar’s lyrics also keep the innocence of childhood intact. While in this song, the protagonist encourages her dreams to come true, she wills them to get locked up inside her heart in the polar opposite O Re Manwa. It is a beauty how two opposite situations arise in the same album, and through Kausar’s lyrics it is almost like a story unfolding in front of us. The composition itself is another one that doesn’t scream ‘Trivedi’, but can still be deciphered as a Trivedi song by the wonderful rock base, especially the way the guitars have been played. And as I juxtapose ‘Sapne Re’ with ‘O Re Manwa’, Amit also introduces a musical segment from ‘Sapne Re’ into ‘O Re Manwa’, as if trying to consolidate my assumption that these two songs are linked somehow! Meghna’s singing is toned down in a very subtle manner here, and she sounds so much different from her other songs here, mostly due to the lack of high octave notes.
The best song of the album though, is the dreamy Nachdi Phira, a song that stands out due to its motivational and inspirational sound. The composition starts off beautifully, with serene piano and strings working together to soothe your senses, until it breaks out into a high-spirited rock ballad, centred around Kausar Munir’s lyrics that create a nomadic touch. The antara of this song in particular, is beautifully composed, amazingly traversing the high octaves and hitting the heart at the right places. The lyrics of the mukhda of this song are used again in the cheesy Sexy Baliye, a song used to bring out the corniness of Aamir Khan’s character Shakti Kumaarr, a veteran music composer who isn’t in form anymore, as is evident from Trivedi’s spoofy composition. The arrangements are a mishmash of all kinds of sounds from all sorts of Bollywood songs — Punjabi pop, Bhangra and whatnot. It reminds me of ‘Switty’ (Delhi Belly). Mika sings aptly, and even if this weren’t a spoof song, he would’ve sounded the same. 😆
The only other male song on the album, I’ll Miss You is by another debutant, Kushal Chokshi. He gets to sing the romantic song which brings out the romance between Insia and Chintan. The song is refreshing, and has a trademark Trivedi touch, especially in the guitars in the hookline. Kausar’s lyrics will be especially loved by those who miss their school days. The school romance she cooks up in the lyrics is just so sweet, you will be reminded of your school days. Sunidhi Chauhan, who, coincidentally, I was thinking of when I thought who could have sung Meghna Mishra’s songs if this wasn’t a film with a teenage protagonist, gets the most lively song on the album, Gudgudi — a feel-good number that once again stands out because of its quirky lyrics. Amit’s composition is a wonderfully sprightly one, in trademark Amit Trivedi style, especially in the line before the hook. Mandolins and banjoes and harmonicas and brass instruments stand out among others, and give it a wonderful country sound. Sunidhi, ever-energetic, was the best choice for the song. Kausar pens amazing lyrics with so many everyday references, it is so fun to listen to.


Keeping in mind the setting of Secret Superstar, and the fact that the protagonist stirring up all this music is a young girl of fourteen of fifteen, the music is aptly conventional. Though I was a bit disappointed after Trivedi made that awesome rock album ‘Qaidi Band’, I soon came to terms with the fact that not always can he try something new like that. Here though, what actually shines is the amazing singing by debutante Meghna Mishra (I must say, great find, and also Kushal Chokshi!) and the splendid lyrics by Kausar Munir! The secret superstar here is the lyricist!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album (in the order they appear in the review): 4 + 3.5 + 5 + 4.5 + 5 + 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 = 34

Album Percentage: 85%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sapne Re = Nachdi Phira > O Re Manwa = I’ll Miss You > Main Kaun Hoon = Gudgudi > Sexy Baliye = Meri Pyaari Ammi

 

Which is your favourite song from Secret Superstar? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

OCTOBER 2017 ROUND-UP (CHEF, TU HAI MERA SUNDAY, RANCHI DIARIES, GOLMAAL AGAIN, JIA AUR JIA — Mini Music Reviews) + Important Announcement!!


The Important Announcement

Due to the scarcity of time, from now on, I will sum up the entire month’s reviews in a set of two articles each month, one usually around the 15th of the month and the other towards the end. Of course, certain albums that I feel need a separate post (either because they might have many songs, or be spectacular albums, or even if the movies are highly awaited ones) I will do so for those albums. I will reveal the chosen album for this month — it’ll be “Secret Superstar” — I don’t guarantee it’ll be rated very high, but because of the buzz surrounding it, it requires a separate post, I feel! Meanwhile, the usual monthly awards posts will sum everything up once again at the end of every month in the form of awards. I really hope this format helps me balance my schedule! And I can’t wait to return to my normal long posts — till then enjoy your luck of getting to read short reviews from my side!!


October 2017 Round-Up

So this post will cover the reviews for the all but two of October releases that have already released — ‘Chef’ by Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik, ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’ by Amartya Rahut (Bobo), ‘Ranchi Diaries’ by Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran, ‘Golmaal Again’ by Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George-DJ Chetas & Abhishek Arora, and ‘Jia Aur Jia’ by Sachin Gupta, Nisschal Zaveri & Sameer Nichani. There will be separate reviews for ‘Secret Superstar’ and ‘Rukh’, both by Amit Trivedi.



♦ A Delectable Treat For The Ears: CHEF Music Review

♪ Music by: Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik
♪ Lyrics by: Ankur Tewari & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to ‘Tere Mere’: Saavn
Buy ‘Tere Mere’: iTunes


Raghu Dixit starts off the album with Shugal Laga Le, a song having a heavy folk influence from Kerala. The backing vocalists provide that freshness associated with Kerala, and Raghu’s characteristic voice makes it all the more intriguing to listen to. In his arrangements too, he adds a dash of everything, and especially those percussions are mind blowing, along with the banjo. Ankur’s lyrics made me acquainted with a new phrase “Shugal Laga Le” meaning “find a hobby, or find something to do”. The next song by him is also reliant on folk music, this time Celtic/Irish. Banjaara is steeped heavily on the beautiful flutes that characterise Irish music, with amazing percussion and backing vocals yet again. Vishal Dadlani does great justice to the sing with those power-packed vocals. The song is one of those many motivational songs that Vishal gets to sing in Bollywood, except that this time, it has a whole new style to it. The mellow Darmiyaan, exudes a positivity in spite of the fact that it is a sad song — mostly because of Raghu’s ebullience. A splendid guitar backdrop makes it simple and sweet, and Raghu’s diction has to be lauded. Raghu takes forth the melancholia in a more Bollywood-ish way in Khoya Khoya, which I rank as the best of the album — underrated Shahid Mallya taking charge of the vocals in a very beautiful way, and Dixit’s composition has that old-world-charm to it. The sarangi is quite impressive here! The alternative rock set up will make this one loveable to many! Raghu’s last song on the album is the effervescent Tan Tan, rendered with spunk by Nikhita Gandhi, the only female vocalist on the album. In her texture, she gives off vibes of Shalmali and Shefali. Guest composer Amaal Mallik, whose song Tere Mere was also removed from the album later, produces a song you can immediately tell is by him. That doesn’t make its richness diluted, though — it’s still wonderful, with the nice dholak rhythm accompanying Armaan Malik’s beautiful voice. Also, Rashmi-Virag’s lyrics are amazing!
All in all, Chef is one of the best albums of the year in that it is a clever mix of melancholia, inspiration and romance. Raghu Dixit must sign more and more Bollywood films — I firmly believe that this is his best Bollywood album yet!

Total Points Scored by This Album (in the order mentioned in the review): 4 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 88.3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Banjaara = Khoya Khoya > Tan Tan > Tere Mere = Shugal Laga Le = Darmiyaan



♦ A Perfect Sunday Album: TU HAI MERA SUNDAY Music Review

♪ Music by: Amartya Rahut
♪ Lyrics by: Milind Dhaimade
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 29th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of Arijit’s two songs, the classically-steeped sad song Dhundlo Tum fares better, with an addictive strings orchestra accompanying it, and it quickly steers away from the Bhatt-ish genre that it starts off with. Had that continued, it wouldn’t have been half as good. The digital Sitar is beautiful. His other song, Thodi Si Jagah, is also classical-based for some initial parts, before it turns into an upbeat number that loses itself halfway through the song. The rock backdrop ofthe hook line couldn’t have been more clichéd. Arijit’s vocal prowess is clearly showcased in the song though. It is Amartya’s violin solo that impresses though, with its distinct classical tune. The title song, Tu Hai Mera Sunday, takes a pleasant Christmassy turn, with soft jazz making your ears happy. Shalmali renders it with a familiarity that makes you feel amazing. The brass portions have been done really well here, as are the drums. The clarinet and piano is wonderful too. It is nothing more than the lyrics that make it sound even more personal though. Ash King’s Yeh Mera Man is a pleasant departure from his previous song ‘Bandook Meri Laila’ (A Gentleman) and brings him back to his comfort zone. Again, a jazzy tune gives the song a kind of spring, and that whistle portion is so pleasantly surprising and charming, it is hard to dislike. The guitars are impressive here. Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai, a clubbish number sung by Nandini Srikar, is probably the weakest of the album, where the tune and the arrangement are just mismatched; the hookline sounds like this song was pitched for the situation of ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ (Don) before ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ was finalised.
Amartya’s best album to date provides us with a nice mix of classical music, jazz music and a banal club number! This album will go highly underrated and unnoticed though!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album (in order mentioned in the review): 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dhundhlo Tum > Thodi Si Jagah = Tu Hai Mera Sunday > Yeh Mera Man > Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai



♦ Uninteresting Diaries: RANCHI DIARIES Music Review

♪ Music by: Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran
♪ Lyrics by: Nickk, Manoj Muntashir, Tony Kakkar & Sattwik Mohanty
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 13th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Some newcomer Nickk is — he has just been made to make another ‘Baby Doll’, now that Meet Bros. just be refusing to do it. However, Fashion Queen has something in addition to the usual ‘Baby Doll’ sequels — an Arabic strings backdrop that just helps it as much as a car can help you fly. The new singer Raahi seems disillusioned with the ideals that it is okay to sing like Kanika Kapoor if you aren’t her. The composer’s rap is dumb. Helicopter‘s lyricist and composer Tony Kakkar uses the word ‘helicopter’ as a metaphor for ‘getting high’. 😶 Siblings Tony and Neha render it with as much mediocrity as they can muster. I can’t believe Tony is the same guy behind ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D) and ‘Khuda Bhi’ (Ek Paheli Leela), but then he has made ‘Ek Do Teen Chaar’ (Ek Paheli Leela) and ‘Do Peg Maar’ (One Night Stand). Jeet Gannguli’s Thoda Aur is the composer’s usual pathos-filled romantic number — you would think that after a year-long break, he would return with something pleasant. But it is the same old Arijit-Palak love story. And the irony is that this song sounds like ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D). So did Tony help him here instead of making his own song better? 😏 The last song is a banal Mika solo Godfather, composed by Pritam’s former assistants Bobby-Imran, which I couldn’t even finish once when I started to listen to it.
This is a Hodge-podge of the worst songs from the weirdest mix of composers ever.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2 + 1.5 + 3 + 0.5 = 7

Album Percentage: 35%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thoda Aur > Fashion Queen > Helicopter > Godfather



♦ Amaal Ka Kamaal (Again): GOLMAAL AGAIN Music Review

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George, DJ Chetas, Abhishek Arora, Anu Malik & Raamlaxman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar & Rahat Indori
♪ Music Label: T-Series [“Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 6th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 20th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate”: Saavn


The album to the much-awaited fourth instalment to the ‘Golmaal’ series starts with the Title Track, where South film composer Thaman S. is called in just to do that clichéd Kuthu rhythm we are all bored of. Brijesh Shandilya does well as the lead male singer, but Aditi Singh Sharma sounds utterly replaceable. She gets another song, Itna Sannata Kyun Hai, composed by Lijo George and DJ Chetas, where her part towers over her male co-singer Amit Mishra’s parts. The hookline is like a desperate scream in our ears, to make noise. The EDM after the hookline is so bad, I can’t describe it. Amaal Mallik, lead composer, gets two songs, where one is obviously a 90s remake. ‘Neend Churayi Meri’ (Ishq) is the privileged song, named by the company as Maine Tujhko Dekha. The song’s best part is that Neeraj Sridhar returns after a long time to sing a song that is tailor-made for his song. Sukriti Kakar complements him well, but the song is better as an individual song than it is as a remake. Had the hookline been original, it would have been amazing! Amaal’s second song happens to be the album’s best — Hum Nahi Sudhrenge gives those rays of positivity like ‘Apna Har Din’ did in ‘Golmaal 3’. Though the song is similar to Amaal’s other EDM numbers like “Sooraj Dooba Hai”, “Buddhu Sa Mann” and “Zindagi Aa Raha Hoon Main”, it works well because of its positivity and Armaan yet again sings charmingly! What Saregama holds of the album is an unplugged, slow-paced version of ‘Maine Pyaar Kiya’s Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate, sung very simply by Nikhil D’Souza and Anushka Manchanda, and arranged soothingly by Abhishek Arora (of Abhishek-Akshay) and Samyuktha Narendran. It doesn’t work too much though, in spite of not changing much from the old song.
The worst Golmaal album is held up solely by Amaal’s songs (or song).


Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 = 16

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hum Nahi Sudhrenge > Maine Tujhko Dekha = Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate > Itna Sannata Kyun Hai = Golmaal Again (Title Track)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 35 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Golmaal Again) = 37


♦ Nisschal O Nisschal, Aur Compose Karo! : JIA AUR JIA Music Review

♪ Music by: Nisschal Zaveri, Sachin Gupta, Sameer Nichani & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Mudassar Aziz, Raqueeb Alam, Vachaspati Mishra & Hasrat Jaipuri
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company [“Jia O Jia Reprise” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 17th October 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Jia O Jia Reprise”: Saavn


The songs by Sachin Gupta start off the album, and though they do not impress you immediately, you do get attuned to them on hearing them for a couple of times. Na Shukre is a wild rock song about carefree girls, and Smita Malhotra makes a rocking debut with her vocals in this, the rock guitars played wonderfully. Shivani Bhayana’s Naach Basanti, on the other hand, is a bit too rowdy to go with its amazing club arrangements, but apparently by the lyrics, it is supposed to be some sort of an ode to “Sholay”. Many of the small additions by Gupta in this song happen to catch your attention, like the techno sounds at the beginning, and the folksy portion at the end.
The newcomer composer, Nisschal Zaveri, steps in for the rest of the songs (with lyrics) and I must say, he does quite an amazing job in his first album itself. His lullaby-ish, classical-based Na Jaa appears in two versions, one in Asees Kaur’s voice, with a stark resemblance to her singing in ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Dobaara), while the other is in Nandini Srikar’s voice. Obviously, Nandini’s version wins my heart because of her seasoned voice and more classically inclined singing. The Tabla in this song has to be mentioned, as do the strings, guitars and mandolin. The arrangements overpower the voice of Asees in her version, another drawback of that version. Nandini’s version has everything that the music buff longs for in a good song.
Zaveri’s other song, released by Saregama, is a reprise of Shankar-Jaikishan-Mohd. Rafi classic Jia O Jia, and is an apt remake of the song, with an upbeat clubbish sound, one of the freshest remakes I’ve heard this year. The song feels like a splash of water on your face — despite being a remake, Zaveri uses his creativity to make it a bit unconventional, without being bogged down by the thought of what’s popular these days. The synth has been used amazingly, and the backing chorus singing “Jia O” after every hook is just sweet! Jyotica sounds amazing in this song, the least she has sounded like Neha Kakkar ever! But Rashid Ali, being heard after a long time, falls flat due to the excessive programming done to his voice. The Latino turn of sound midway into the song takes time to get used to, but is awesome!
The background score composer for the film, Sameer Nichani, gets one of his instrumental pieces added to the album, and it is called Jia Aur Jia Theme, and is heavy on Spanish guitars, played in a very sensuous way. It is extremely short at one and a half minute, but soothes your senses for all its worth.
A hidden gem of an album, wherein we find a new composer who must get many, many more songs in Bollywood!! Zaveri scores higher than Gupta here.


 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 23.5

Album Percentage: 78.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Na Jaa By Nandini > Jia O Jia Reprise = Na Jaa = Jia Aur Jia Theme > Na Shukre > Naach Basanti

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 37 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Jia Aur Jia) = 38


I hope that wasn’t too long (though I know it was) but this is what I’m going to have to do until I am a bit more free. I personally liked this method of reviewing and don’t mind continuing it forever too! So maybe, just maybe, you might get the “Secret Superstar” and “Rukh” reviews in this format too, but in separate posts and not clubbed together! Lets see! Till then, enjoy music! 😉

EK COMPOSER, DO COMPOSER, TEEN COMPOSER!! (LUCKNOW CENTRAL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arjunna Harjaie, Rochak Kohli, Tanishk Bagchi, Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Adheesh Verma & Sukhwinder Singh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 18th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th September 2017

Lucknow Central Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Lucknow Central is a Bollywood drama film, starring Farhan Akhtar, Gippy Grewal, Inaamulhaq, Deepak Dobriyal , Diana Penty, Rajesh Sharma and Ronit Roy. The film has been directed by Ranjit Tiwari, and produced by Viacom18 Motion Pictures, Monisha Advani, Madhu C. Bhojwani and Nikkhil Advani. The plotline of this film closely resembles that of recently released ‘Qaidi Band’, and it is obviously a coincidence of the worst case. There is a difference though. The music here, is done by multiple composers. Leading the way is youngster Arjunna Harjaie, with three songs, and after he impressed so much in ‘Titoo MBA’, I cant wait to hear what he did here. Tanishk Bagchi has two songs too, and one is a remake, because he is the remake specialist according to T-Series. Guest composer Rochak Kohli presents one song in the album. All three of these composers have proved their mettle in the past, and it goes without saying that when it is an Advani production, the film is bound to have good if not great music. Also, I think Farhan Akhtar himself looks into the music of his films, and so it is bound to be great. Comparisons between this film and ‘Qaidi Band’ are sure to happen, but I noticed ‘Qaidi Band’ relied much more on the music, and this will rely much more on plot points. It reflects even in the number of songs — that film had nine, while this one has five and one version. So let’s see if this album supports the film!


1. Kaavaan Kaavaan

Singer ~ Divya Kumar, Chorus ~ Shivek, Anubhav, Aditya, Shubham, Umesh, Veljon, Vishal and Sarthak From Asm Academy, Original Composition by ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna, Music Recreated by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Original Lyrics by ~ Sukhwinder Singh, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

When Bollywood starts remaking songs from Hollywood movies (doesn’t matter that the song is Hindi, though) you would think things are finally messed up for real. However, it is a pleasant surprise when the remake actually turns out to be good, and quite innovative. Arjuna Harjai (now spelling his name as Arjunna Harjaie) returns after a year and a half, after the song from ‘Do Lafzon Ki Kahani’ last year, and gets the opportunity to recreate this quite popular Punjabi number ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’ (Monsoon Wedding). The original had been composed jointly by Sukhwinder Singh and the film’s composer Mychael Danna. Now this remake is quite a good one. The composition has been kept intact for most of the song, with Arjunna having composed a new prelude to the song, with a haunting tune that immediately gets you interested. The original composition is good, and the “Kaavaan Kaavaan” portions, which I found irritating in the original, actually sound good here. The thing that makes this remake worthwhile though, is the amazing music. Arjunna equips a booming dhol rhythm (Vishal Dande), that has the required effect on the listener, making him or her groove to it happily. The shehnaai gives a wonderful traditional feel to the song. Strings and dafli have been used occasionally to infuse a strain of pathos through the song, and especially the antara (incorporated from the original itself) is beautiful, both in tune and its arrangements. The numerous tempo changes would normally be very confusing to a listener, but here, Arjunna manages them so seamlessly, it is unbelievable. As for the vocals, Divya Kumar steps into Sukhwinder Singh’s shoes without a problem, but because he does so, it evokes memories of Divya’s own ‘Jee Karda’ (Badlapur) in the first line of the song. 😄 And then a layman can easily say, “Hey! It’s a copy!” Because he wouldn’t know that ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’ came before ‘Jee Karda’. But I commend the makers for firmly sticking with Divya’s voice anyway, since he has sung amazingly — the Punjabi-ness comes across beautifully through his voice, and he especially does the emotional portions very nicely. Kumaar’s additional lyrics are good too, adding on Sukhwinder’s original. An apt remake, with an amazing rhythm, and changes that do not disrupt the original song’s integrity.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Meer-E-Kaarwaan

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Neeti Mohan, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Adheesh Verma

Rochak Kohli enters the soundtrack next, with his sole song, which happens to be a wonderful Sufi duet, with, again, a strain of pathos running through it. The composer doesn’t usually get to do such songs, but he did impress us with the amazingly soothing ‘Rozana’ (Naam Shabana) earlier this year, so it is no surprise that he ended up composing this one so well. The composition is so fresh, and quite like the Pritam school of alternative rock, it mixes Sufi sounds with a templated rock rhythm. Without the Sufi, the rock would’ve sounded incomplete, and vice versa. So it is like a beautiful combination that couldn’t be avoided. The antara is beautiful, and I must mention Neeti here, because she has sung her antara splendidly, and it is a delight to hear her in that whispery voice of hers. Her co-singer, Amit Mishra, builds on where Pritam left him off in ‘Bulleya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), and here, he makes an effort to remain soft and not as energetic as he was there, and the result is excellent. The arrangements are rich as well, the dholaks providing the authentic Sufi touch, while the amazing guitar work (Keba Jeremiah) and strokes (Tapas Roy) are one of the highlights of the song. The choruses at the end and in the second interlude, have been composed beautifully. Also, there’s a pause after the second interlude, where one thinks the song ends, but it seems Rochak has more to give us! The lyrics by Adheesh Verma are great too! A song that wonderfully mixes elements of Pritam and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy styles of composition, and a beautiful Sufi-Rock arrangement!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Teen Kabootar

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan & Divya Kumar, Additional Vocals ~ Aflatunes, Music by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written & Performed by ~ Raftaar

Arjunna returns to the album with his second song, this time, a fun a cappella number full of onomatopoeia. The beginning itself gets your interest peaked and you listen closely right from the beginning, where the singers do an innovative sargam, that sounds excellent. The composition by Arjunna, yet again, resembles the style of a cappella that Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy are well-known for, and they have succeeded with it in songs like ‘Maston Ka Jhund’ (Bhaag Milkha Bhaag). The composition doesn’t appeal to you at once though. It is the various vocal rhythms and sound effects that help you to find it appealing. The vocalists do an amazing job. Mohit’s metallic voice is the perfect choice for the song, and when he goes seamlessly from low to high notes, it sounds wonderful! Divya usually takes the high octaves and does so here as well. These lead singers definitely do well, but the backing vocalists also provide a very fun element to the song! The interlude where they sing “Chaaku Chaaku Leke Jaa..” is so fun to listen to! Even Raftaar’s rap adds an element of fun to the song. About the arrangements, whatever I say will be less. Amazing percussions (Taufiq Qureshi’s Mumbai Stamp) and guitar work makes the song appealing to listen to, and as mentioned before, Arjunna’s amazing use of the a cappella style in a desi way makes this song sound very unconventional. Kumaar’s situational lyrics too are clever and serve the purpose well. This song might be Arjunna’s ticket to many more Bollywood films which need quirky music!!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Rangdaari

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Music by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Arijit Singh has started to get songs in every film yet again; there was a kind of low phase intermittently. The only difference is that before, it used to appear right at the beginning of soundtracks. Now it has changed. And in this album too, we see an Arijit Singh song popping up as the fourth song on the soundtrack. The composition is amazingly beautiful. Arjunna Harjaie composes a wonderful Sufi tune, which is familiar to the ears, but soothing nonetheless. The hookline is something you’ve heard time and again, but still works its magic to soothe you down. Especially that line “tu laagey mujhe dushman si..” has been composed very beautifully. The antaras are beautiful, and the whole structure of the song reminds me of the recently released ‘Bairaagi’ (Bareilly Ki Barfi) which sadly, didn’t work for me as well as this. Arjunna decorates his magical composition with stellar musical instruments. First of all, he gives the genuine Sufi touch with the dholaks (Aanchal Goud), which sound wonderful and very earthy. But it is the interlude, in which he introduces a wonderful flute piece (Shubham Shirule), accompanied by a MIND-BLOWING sargam by Arijit (or is it Arjunna?). And it is then that the song gives off beautiful Rahmanish vibes, but also gets its own place in your heart. The Duff rhythms do sound too heard-before, but they’re ignorable due to the wonderful things Arjunna has added besides that. The ethnic strings sound amazing here, and as always, Tapas Roy has done magic with them. The vocals by Arijit are top-notch, but it is his everyday composition and he aces it as was expected. The lyrics are very impressive here as well. A beautiful Sufi song, with a familiar sound, but still impressed me because of its innocence!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Kaavaan Kaavaan (Remix)

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Renesa, Original Music by ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Sukhwinder Singh, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

So ‘Kaavaan Kaavaan’, the opening track of the album, gets a ‘Remix’, or so T-Series calls it. But this isn’t the remix of Arjunna Harjaie’s song. It is the remix of the original song from ‘Monsoon Wedding’, done by Tanishk Bagchi, the third composer of the album. Also, I wouldn’t call it a remix at all, since it might just be another remake of the song by Tanishk, but Arjunna’s must have gotten chosen as the main version. This one is merely Tanishk’s original take on this song. That having been said, I can say Tanishk has worked very hard on this one. He tries to add digital beats wherever possible to make the song sound fresh, but some places it just doesn’t work, especially after the Indian arrangements that led the Arjunna version. Not that Tanishk hasn’t added dhols and all, but the emotion of the song doesn’t come across as well in this one. For a dance track though, this is better. Tanishk also ropes in Sukhwinder himself to re-dub the song, and that’s definitely a plus point. Renesa does the female portions of the song, and she sounds awesome. What bugged me was the hookline, where I found the backing vocalists too loud. A more zesty remake, but not more effective.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Baaki Rab Pe Chhod De

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya, Vayu, Tanishk Bagchi & Arman Hasan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Tanishk’s second song serves as the caboose for this album, closing the album on a very lively and bright note. I say this because right from the beginning of the song, you know it is going to lift your spirits. It starts quite similarly to ‘Raula’ (Jab Harry Met Sejal), with lively plucked strings. The composition is fun to listen to, too, but gets slightly disjointed in the latter parts. It starts off brilliantly though, and the hookline is delightful. The arrangements here too, are mainly digital beats, but this time they succeed in remaking the song livelier. Tanishk’s trademark liveliness comes across well through this song, and it is a thing to wonder, why he spends time in doing some remakes. The singers do justice to the song, the lead singer, Brijesh doing an exceptionally good job. Little Arman Hasan, who we heard in ‘Kankad’ (Shubh Mangal Saavdhan), singing alongside his father Raja Hasan, does well too. Vayu has probably done some backing vocals, so I couldn’t really place him in the song! Kumaar’s lyrics, are amazing. He writes some amazingly positive lines in this one too, taking the support of various scientific inventors like Thomas Edison and Graham Bell. Lively song, but could’ve been slightly better!

Rating: 4/5


Lucknow Central is one of those rare multicomposer albums that is a delight to listen to. Well, I guess when each composer knows what he is best at, and delivers the best of whatever he is best at, with the proper supervision by the director and producer, the multicomposer album can also turn out well. Ek Composer, Do Composer, Teen Composer, But No Sign That This Album is Multicomposer!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 4 = 24.5

Album Percentage: 81.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rangdaari = Meer-E-Kaarwaan > Kaavaan Kaavaan = Baaki Rab Pe Chhod De = Teen Kabootar > Kaavaan Kaavaan (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 31 (from previous albums) + 02 {counting both different takes on ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’} = 33

 

Which is your favourite song from Lucknow Central? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DAGAONKAR BABU SANGEETBAAZ!! (BABUMOSHAI BANDOOKBAAZ – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gaurav Dagaonkar, Abhilash-Joel, Debojyoti Mishra & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Ghalib Asad Bhopali & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 17th August 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 25th August 2017

Babumoshai Bandookbaaz Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a Bollywood crime comedy film, starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui and Bidita Bag and directed by Kushan Nandy. The film has been produced by Kiran Shyam Shroff and Ashmith Kunder. The music for this film has been given (five out of six songs) by Gaurav Dagaonkar, a composer we hear in Bollywood quite infrequently. The last time we heard him was in ‘Wah Taj’ when he made a song that nobody heard again. Before that though, he had given some good music for ‘Heartless’ (2014), and ‘Kaafirana’ (Joker; 2012). Hopefully since he’s in charge of the major chunk of the album here, he will do his best. The guest composers are a debutant duo named Abhilash-Joel, who have worked on a scratch composition by Debojyoti Mishra, and built their song around it. Hopefully, they make a great debut! So let’s jump into this bandookbaaz album and hope it is sangeetbaaz!!


1. Barfani (Male) / Barfani (Female)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Orunima Bhattacharya, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

Gaurav Dagaonkar starts off this album with a delightfully haunting (What an oxymoron) classical number, based on raag jog. The composer really pleasantly surprised me with his amazing command over classical notes. The way his notes have come out in such a mellifluous manner, is commendable. The mukhda is an instantly gripping portion, and the hook, ‘jal jaane do‘, is what gives you the goosebumps. The antara, in the ideal way that classical songs usually go, follows a more happy-sounding route, and it contrasts very well with that haunting mukhda. The composition reminds you of many 90s songs, when Bollywood music was so heavily inspired by traditional classical music. The lyrics by Ghalib Asad Bhopali are quite intense, and do justice to the song’s theme quite perfectly. The word ‘barfani‘, is a word I’m hearing for the first time in a Bollywood song in recent years! The song is presented in two versions, male and female — both with the same haunting arrangements, thanks to a wonderful beat given by the jingle bells (ghungroo), and a very beautiful play of the guitars and the Dobro (Shomu Seal) which give a very sitar-ish sound. The male version is sung with impeccable finesse, by Armaan Malik, and I believe this is his first such song, which is so heavily based on classical music. He handles the song beautifully, in the lower octaves, and I believe it is his career’s best performance, solely because he tries something new! Orunima Bhattacharya is in charge of the other version, and she takes up a higher pitch, and aces it, and you can tell she has been classically trained. A beautiful and haunting romantic song to start off the album!

Rating: 4.5/5 for Male Version, 4.5/5 for Female Version

 

2. Aye Saiyan

Singers ~ Orunima Bhattacharya & Vivek Naik, Original Composition & Lyrics Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The second song seems like a song that was a residue from the ‘Anaarkali Of Aarah’ album that released earlier this year. It follows the same folksy vibe, as if there’s a dance going on in the village. Gaurav aces the composition, which is essentially a Bhojpuri folk song, but his music makes it more lively and likeable. The same tune is repeated throughout the song, so it does get a bit tedious towards the end, but I guess that’s how the folk song is. The lyrics are funny, if you understand Bhojpuri. The harmonium (Satyajeet Prabhu) leads the way right from the beginning, giving a very fresh vibe to the song, and the sprightly rhythm and percussions (Satyajeet Jamsandekar) is enjoyable as well! There are amazing dholaks that give the song a rhythm to which you can nod your head! The vocals by Orunima are great here as well, and she showcases her versatility in this song, which is so different from the first one! Vivek Naik has a short interruption, which disturbs more than sounds good. A fun and cute folksy number!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Ghungta

Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Chorus ~ Vivek Naik, Santosh Bote & Rahul Chitnis, Original (Hook) Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, New Composition by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi

Here comes another remake, and this time, it’s incorporated into an item song. But before we apply our judgements to that sentence, let’s listen to the song with an open mind. Because when I did that, I really enjoyed the song, thanks to Gaurav Dagaonkar’s enjoyable music, and Neha Kakkar’s very energetic vocals! The song is the remake of R.D. Burman’s ‘Haye Re Haye Tera Ghungta’ (Dhongi), and what I liked is that the only part taken from the old song is the hook. The only difference is that the girl is singing ‘mera ghungta‘ instead of the boys singing ‘tera ghungta‘. The rest of the composition goes well with that hook, and especially the antara is very catchy, and has a trademark Panchamda touch to it. The arrangements are just as lively, with the signature Maharashtrian dhol-taasha rhythm backing it. But amazing guitars (Arvind Haldipur) welcome the listeners into the antara, and that makes the antara sound even more enticing. The vocals are something that propel the song to heights that might not have been touched, had the singer been different, or if Neha Kakkar had sung even a little bit lifelessly. However, her rendition is lively, and she proves again how much energy her voice has. Ghalib Asad Bhopali’s lyrics are very typical to this genre. One of the better of such songs to release this year.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Chulbuli

Singer ~ Papon, Additional Vocals ~ Vivek Hariharan, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The retro vibe kicks in with the next song, a naughty, mischievous number with a very retro tune. Gaurav Dagaonkar has composed it very well, and right from the opening harmonium bar, you know you are in for a treat. The composer has created a nice vaudevillian-esque tune, resembling the musical style that was prominent in the 50s. The tune of the Mukhda is amazing, and gets you gripped there itself. The lilt of the song is increased by the tempo and the beats. The Antara is irresistible, again having a very retro tune. The arrangements are beautiful; surprisingly, they’re a little less retro-esque. The European touch is high in them, with the accordions, mandolins and chimes being most prominent. However, to balance this old-school vibe, Gaurav throws in a number of wonderful things like electric guitars, drums and brass instruments. The vocals are mellifluous, and what can you expect other than mellifluous when it is the genius Papon behind the mic? His voice is so magnetic, you just can’t pay attention to anything else. Vivek Hariharan joins him in backing vocals. His rendition reminds me of ‘Labon Ka Karobaar’ (Befikre), and so do the arrangements, now that I think of it. Ghalib’s lyrics are great and fun! The best song of the album yet!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Khali Khali

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan, Music by ~ Debojyoti Mishra & Abhilash-Joel

The debutants Abhilash Lakra and Joel Dubba step in for this song, and they are in charge of a melancholic number, that haunts your soul. The composition is very haunting, and has been composed with such notes, that are sure to make you emotional, and frightened at the same time. The pace is very slow, aptly so. The problem arises in the Antara, where the song gets into the Bhatt mode, and as the listener, I started to zone out. And the way it runs after that is very tedious. The duo tries to make up for that with mysterious arrangements, but that too, sounds maudlin. There are amazing strings though, all throughout the song, and even the percussions are great. Mohit Chauhan sounds good, but doesn’t manage to keep our interest in the song. The lyrics are good, again. Not very impressive of a debut.

Rating: 2.5/5


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a pretty surprisingly good album! I was expecting very little from it before the first song came out. After that came out I started hoping for a little more, and the makers just gave more and more after that! Gaurav Dagaonkar finally gives an album that he can be proud of for ages — with Indian classical, folk, European music that proves his versatility. The debutant duo Abhilash-Joel do disappoint relatively, but show promise in their great sense of composition and arrangements. That makes this a quite sangeetbaaz album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4.5 + 2.5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Barfani (Male) = Barfani (Female) = Chulbuli > Aye Saiyan = Ghungta > Khali Khali

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 24 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz) = 26

Which is your favourite song from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

TWO GENTLEMEN WHO HARDLY EVER DISAPPOINT!! (A GENTLEMAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu, Priya Saraiya & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th August 2017

A Gentleman Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


A Gentleman is an upcoming Bollywood action comedy, starring Sidharth Malhotra, Jacqueline Fernandez, Suniel Shetty and Darshan Kumar in lead roles. The film is directed by Raj Nidimoru & Krishna DK and produced by Fox Star Studios. The film features Sidharth Malhotra in a double role, one being Sundar Susheel, and the other ‘Risky’. Hence the tagline of the film, ‘Sundar Susheel Risky’. The music of the film is given by the go-to music composers for Raj & DK, Sachin-Jigar. Going by the music of ‘Shor In The City’, ‘Go Goa Gone’, and ‘Happy Ending’, I’m sure this one’s also going to be a treat for people who love quirky music, and the genre of action comedy would give amazing song situations as well! Sachin-Jigar’s discography this year boasts of as many as seven film albums (with ‘Hindi Medium’ being a multicomposer one), and this one is the third to release. ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ remained my favourite album of the year until Pritam’s gigantic ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’ released. I can just hope that this one follows suit and becomes another favourite of mine this year!


1. Disco Disco

Singers ~ Benny Dayal & Shirley Setia, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Aaja ve hila denge hum aaj angana,
tere naal karke beat drop nachna,
Dil disco disco bole saari raat SAJNA!!” 

– Vayu

Sachin-Jigar’s third album of the year starts off with a very filmy disco song. Is filmy bad or good? Let’s find out. The composition is very catchy, especially the cross line that goes “Aaja Ve Hila Denge Hum Aaj Anganaa“. That part sounds so much like a retro number. The hookline is a typical Bollywood fare, but still manages to hook the listeners. I, for one, found this song more instantly appealing than any of the others on the album (because they took time to grow). The mukhda and antara follow suit, and don’t let the interest of the listener waiver. The major reason you are hooked to the song till the end, must be the short duration. Sachin-Jigar keep the song at a crisp 2:47, neither too long nor too short. The arrangements are great: the disco-esque feel comes out through the nice bass,drums and guitars, and a totally unexpected tumbi (Tapas Roy). The tumbi is what actually makes the song sound very experimental. It gets a nice solo portion in the interlude and towards the end. The vocals are entertaining; Can Benny Dayal ever disappoint in a club number? I love how he pronounces “sajna” as “sajjena“! Sachin-Jigar help Shirley Setia get her first Bollywood song, and despite everything against her on social media, she really handles the song well, and Sachin-Jigar with their genius thoughts, know how to use her voice to the best effect — in a club song! However, she does mumble a bit in the antara, but I guess the song called for that. Vayu’s lyrics are the usual Hinglish lyrics of Bollywood, but work quite well in the filmy song. A totally filmy disco song!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Baat Ban Jaaye

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Priya Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Hum dono aur yeh saari raat, sharaabi ho jaaye toh,
Band ho kamre mein hum do, aur chaabi kahin kho jaaye toh!
Toh baat ban jaaye!!” 

– Priya Saraiya

Here onwards in the album, things get a bit more Sachin-Jigar-ish, in that you take more time to get accustomed to the song and like it. The time may be two listens, three listens or even more, but the song is actually are wonderful once you listen to them, with close attention to the music. This one here, is a beach party number, and again, it has a bit of a retro touch. It starts off with a very contemporary vibe, the composition flowing like a romantic song. However, it takes an unexpected turn in the cross line (“hum dono aur yeh saari raat“) where, if you pay close attention to the music, a retro vibe kicks in. The composition for the hookline is a trademark Sachin-Jigar one, and makes you groove instantly, especially the hoots after the words “baat ban jaaye” have been sung. The antara is where the song loses pace and we lose interest; that composition is quite heard-before. Luckily enough, this song is short too, which makes the cross line come back soon enough. The arrangements are fantastic here, and suit as a beach party number. Acoustic guitars start the song off, giving the freshness to the song, as a beach number should be. The retro vibe I talked about consists of amazing guitars played in a retro manner. The digital beats are more heavy in this song, and quirky sounds decorate the song. The vocals are good, Siddharth Basrur leading the way in getting the listeners hooked. However, Priya Saraiya seems a bit too much autotuned here, and it loses the charm of her actual voice. Her lyrics too, are an ordinary fare, but suit the situation well, especially the hookline. A party song that seems ordinary, but will grow!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Chandralekha

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani & Jonita Gandhi, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Maari tuney aisi entry, hil gayi poori country,
Mere dil pe dent permanent pad gayi, nazrein jo mili,
Hadd se bhi zyaada cute tu, mere karmon ka fruit tu,
Koi hai gagan mein toh heaven jahaan se aakar tu giri!”

– Vayu

The next song throws us back into the years, with a characteristic rock and roll/hard rock vibe to it. It slightly resembles what Sachin-Jigar had done in ‘Yeh Jawaani Teri’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), but in a more Westernized manner. The composition again, takes time to grow, and till then all you can really focus on is the music. The guitars and drums are groovy as expected in a rock and roll song, but of course, Sachin-Jigar add a surprise element every time, and here, it is that sensuous saxophone, which sounds amazing every time it plays. The composition is good too, and like I said, it just takes time for you to catch on. The hookline is the mukhda, making it very short yet again. Two antaras follow, and also an interlude by Jonita. I loved the effect Sachin-Jigar have given to the last line of each antara — “Mud Mud Ke Na Dekha“, and “mujhe ek bhi paise ka”. There’s another amazing saxophone solo in the interlude before Jonita’s portions, and that’s even more impressive. The characteristic piano played in that retro manner, is mind blowing too. The vocals are amazing. I mean, how can Vishal Dadlani fail to crank up the energy? His husky voice is all you need to make this song entertaining. Jonita gets a very small part to sing, which is more like an interlude, but she nails it, in the traditional ‘Bollywood girl’ ‘I’m-Not-Interested’ manner. Vayu’s lyrics are fun as well, and kudos to him for using a name like Chandralekha for the girl, and also to Sachin-Jigar for fitting it into the tune so perfectly! A retro rock song that is really stress-busting!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Laagi Na Choote

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shreya Ghoshal, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Iss tarah chaahun tujhe,
Chaahun bhi toh tujhse main,
Ik pal ko bhi door na reh sakun..
Chaahe judaa,tere mere, raaste hain magar,
Aa main manzilein jod doon!
Rishta sa hai yeh, judne lagaa jo,
Chahoon kabhi na yeh toote!
Laagi na choote… Laagi na choote!”

– Priya Saraiya

After three upbeat numbers, and after much thought about whether the album does indeed have a soft and mellow number or not, here pops up a romantic song. Actually, this song was the last to release, so the makers successfully kept the romantic song a secret till the very end. The song falls into the category of ‘Slow Poison’ romantic songs — as you can tell, the song does take time to grow again! However, this time, the amount of time it takes is relatively less, thanks to the amazing composition! It has shades of Sachin-Jigar’s own ‘Thoda Thoda’ (Jayantabhai Ki Luv Story), but is way more intense. The mukhda is very trademark Sachin-Jigar, and the way the female portions are composed in the lower octave, is also, very characteristic of Sachin-Jigar’s previous works. It increases the magic manifold. The hook is something you just can’t forget soon! It has been made to stun us, and stun it does! The flow of the song is just so powerful, you are attentive till the end. Again, a short duration helps that to happen; your attention doesn’t wander somewhere in the middle. The arrangements are minimal and digital beats make up most of the background of the song. But the piano at the beginning and throughout is just so captivating, that you can’t dislike it. The guitar in the interlude also sounds unconventional. As for the vocals, Arijit and Shreya always make a good pair, and this time, Arijit takes the high portions while Shreya quite expertly handles the low portions, a role we see her taking up quite rarely. Well, Sachin-Jigar even made Rekha Bhardwaj (who is know for her beautifully high-pitched voice) to take up an amazing low-pitched voice in ‘Mileya Mileya’ (Happy Ending) and ‘Judaai’ (Badlapur), so I guess it’s just an innate trick that they use! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are good too, and she keeps them simple and sweet, avoiding heavy philosophical ideas. A beautiful romantic song, with nothing new, but really has you hooked!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Bandook Meri Laila

Singers ~ Ash King & Jigar Saraiya, Rap Performed by ~ Sidharth Malhotra & Raftaar, Lyrics by ~ Vayu, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

“Aaye haaye haaye, yeh goli daayein baayein jaaye,
Har disha mein yeh visphot kardi ae,
Jaaye jaaye jaaye, jiya na jaaye jaaye jaaye,
Meri jaan pe yun chot kardi ae,
Seene mein tuney, bullet utaari toh,
Udey jugnu haan, udey jugnu,
Le gayi dil ko, kudi tu shikari,
Bana Majnu main, bana Majnu!
Bandook meri Laila!”

– Vayu

Now this was the song everybody was waiting for ever since the motion poster of the film had released. It is described by the makers as an action song, and an action song it is! The song is probably some of the most addictive stuff to have released in the recent years. The hook has had everyone grooving to it for a long time. I don’t know why, maybe because of high expectations, the song seemed very flat the first time I heard it. However, with every subsequent listen, it grew more and more. The composition is addictive; the mukhda is awesome, and the hookline is world-famous now. The rest of the song is mostly rap. Now, about the rap. The rap by Sidharth Malhotra seems very odd, and it seems like a publicity stunt. Earlier this year, Sachin-Jigar made Parineeti sing a ghazal ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), and she aced it. However, here Sidharth seems a bit dull, and when Raftaar performs his rap, you can tell the huge difference between both of them. Of course, Raftaar is a professional rapper and that’s the reason, and I feel he should’ve gotten to sing the entire rap. The ‘Ban meri Laila‘ hooks are very addictive, and the way they sing ‘Laila!!‘ after that line is amazing! The arrangements are international sounding, and very impressive. It falls into the Tropical house genre which Pritam introduced earlier this year with the ‘Raabta’ title track. The EDM is highly impressive. It starts like a Chainsmokers track, and gets better than any Chainsmokers track as it progresses! The action theme is brought out amazingly through the arrangements. Ash King as the leading vocalist, does a fabulous job; it’s been a long time since we’ve heard him in such a groovy song! And Jigar Saraiya sounds great on the hookline. Vayu’s lyrics are fun and interesting as well. The song has a proper international touch to it, but it could’ve been better without Sidharth’s rap! 

Rating: 4/5


A Gentleman is yet another Sachin-Jigar album that doesn’t disappoint. It’s so tough to have an album in which all the songs have repeat value, and especially for an action film. Thankfully enough, Sachin-Jigar and Raj & DK always make a good team, and all of their albums together have been quirky and cool, not to mention catchy. And such albums are the ones that become chartbusters right away. After ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’, Sachin-Jigar provide another wholesome album with ‘A Gentleman’! Sachin-Jigar are two gentlemen who hardly ever disappoint!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 4 + 5 + 4 = 21

Album Percentage: 84%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Just listen to the album! 🙂

 

 

Which is your favourite song from A Gentleman? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MULTICOMPOSERS KI KHATTI-MEETHI BARFI!! (BAREILLY KI BARFI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Tanishk-Vayu, Samira Koppikar & Sameer Uddin
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Pravesh Mallick, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Tanishk-Vayu, Puneet Sharma & Akshay Verma
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 11th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th August 2017

Bareilly Ki Barfi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bareilly Ki Barfi is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, starring Kriti Sanon, Ayushmann Khurrana, and Rajkummar Rao in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Nil Battey Sannata’ fame Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari, and produced by Nitesh Tiwari and Shreyas Jain. The movie revolves around the Mishra family, who are in search for a suitable groom for their daughter, played by Sanon. The complexities and pressure of getting married is too much for Bitti, Sanon’s character, and she decides to run away. On the run, she finds a book, ‘Bareilly Ki Barfi’ at the train station, and picks it up, only to realise that the female protagonist thinks a lot like her! Thus she embarks on a quest to look for this someone who thinks so much like her. The story seems very content-driven, but that’s not to stop it from having some good music; in fact, most content-driven films have better music than others! Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari’s first film, ‘Nil Battey Sannata’, had an awesome album completely composed by a newcomer duo, Rohan-Vinayak. This time, the makers go for the multicomposer route. Tanishk Bagchi, Tanishk-Vayu, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar and Sameer Uddin are composing the music for this film. As I am expecting an overall good album, and since every name is a known name (even Sameer Uddin, who is the one who had done those remixes in ‘Bluffmaster’ long ago) I don’t think I need to say what I expect from each of them individually! So let’s help ourselves to this ‘Barfi’!


1. Sweety Tera Drama

Singers ~ Dev Negi, Pawni Pandey & Shraddha Pandit, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, Rap Written and Performed by ~ Pravesh Mallick

An aptly U.P. flavoured start to the album, the first song is a fun and upbeat dance number, along the lines of ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’s title song. Coincidentally, the man behind it is Tanishk, the composer of that song. The composition is very fun and enjoyable, and the composer has kept it relevantly short; such songs are least enjoyable if they ramble on for four minutes and longer. The shortness gives it a crisp feel, and leaves you wanting more. There is one mukhda and one antara, both composed entertainingly. The arrangements too resemble those of ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ title song, with the dholaks (Naveen Sharma), harmoniums and bulbultarang (Pradip Pandit) and quirky digital beats. The star music is amazing, especially that sarangi bit by Sangeet, that is so easy to miss! Tanishk adds very fun sound effects like that rap by Pravesh Mallick, then a random but funny “Myujik” that just plays anytime. His digital instrumentation is fun as well. The song has been sung by three singers and the rapper. The rapper, as stated before, brings out the U.P. flavour very well, and begins on a promising note. Dev Negi is his usual fun self, while Pawni and Shraddha, the two female vocalists, with two lines each, make a difference even with the little scope! Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics are fun too! A fun dance number that strives to be simple but sweet!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Nazm Nazm / Nazm Nazm (feat. Ayushmann Khurrana) / Nazm Nazm (feat. Sumedha Karmahe)

Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee / Ayushmann Khurrana / Sumedha Karmahe, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Arko steps forth to present his song, and as is the requisite whenever Arko composes for a multicomposer album nowadays, he gets to do the romantic song of the album. Well, since he is so good at making these, it seems logical. This song here, is yet another example of his romantic song composing skills. The composition is charming, but there is one small drawback, and that is that it takes a long time to grow. It consists of many twists and turns, and isn’t instantly hooking like most of his other songs. The second antara is particularly beautiful. The hookline manages to get the audience charmed. The lyrics though, are beautiful, and are another instance of how beautiful Arko himself writes!! The song appears in three versions, though, and one does feel that it is one too many. Arko doesn’t sing this song as well as he sang ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Dobaara), ‘Dariya’ (Baar Baar Dekho) or ‘Saathi Rey’ (Kapoor & Sons), and thus, his version comes across as slightly boring. The arrangements in this version also resemble ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ (Rustom) with those extra sugary Duff rhythms and synthesizer tune (Keys by Aditya Dev). It reduces the likability a bit. Ayushmann increases the ear-friendliness of the song with his trademark charming voice, and renders it with ease. His style of rounding the vowels makes the song sound so much like he has composed it himself. The variations he takes on many notes, which Arko had not, makes the song sound more layered. The arrangements too, get more Ayushmann-ish, with acoustic guitars (Krishna Pradhan), but the Arko-ness is retained with the amazing piano notes. Thankfully, the Duff rhythms are done away with. The last version happens to be a female version; a version I personally feel was least required. So Zee Music releases videos of singers singing covers of hit songs, and I almost know that this version will be used as that. Not to take it away from Sumedha though; she sings beautifully! Arko arranges this one with a soothing flute, but nothing else really stands out! A romantic song that features so many times, we have no choice but to love it!

Rating: 4/5 for Arko’s Version, 4.5/5 for Ayushmann’s Version, 3.5/5 for Sumedha’s Version

 

3. Twist Kamariya

Singers ~ Harshdeep Kaur, Yasser Desai, Tanishk Bagchi & Altamash, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

The next song has Tanishk coming back together with his partner with which he debuted, Vayu. They keep coming back together occasionally, and it is quite fun. Though their last song ‘Beat It Bijuriya’ could’ve been better, this one is a real treat. The composition is very simple, and if it were not for the amazingly quirky beats and arrangements, the song would not have sounded half as good. Of course, a very templated dhol rhythm accompanies the song, but a very quirky digital sound also comes along with that and everything sounds so innovative. The interlude is amazing, with the dhols and shehnaai. Rock guitars are really electrifying in the antara. The hookline, the way it is sung, is so cool. The pause between ‘Twist’ and ‘Kamariya’ really makes the difference. Im probably hearing Harshdeep Kaur in this zany avatar for the first time. I mean, she has sung upbeat numbers, but not so crazily funny! Tanishk-Vayu’s lyrics are a clever mix of Bhojpuri and Hindi and English. A song that calls for loud whistles and cheers in the theatre! U.P. folk meets techno music!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Bairaagi / Bairaagi (Samira Koppikar Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Samira Koppikar, Music by ~ Samira Koppikar,  Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

Samira Koppikar, who really pleasantly surprised me with her song in ‘Dobaara’ earlier this year, jumps onto the album next, with a melancholic song that is sung by –obviously — Arijit! The song is good, I can’t take that away from it. But somewhere the composition evokes so many memories of previous Arijit songs that were composed on the same rock lounge-ish template. It actually sounds like a Pritam song when that beautiful backing chorus comes in, and that’s probably the best effect of the song. The composition too, is beautiful, and hits the heart straight. I just don’t think I would listen to it a lot. The vocals are, obviously spot-on. What can be expected when it is Arijit? Fortunately, there’s another version, possibly for the music lovers. Samira sings this one, and it starts with a heavenly chorus by her. She sings in beautifully, and is first of all supported by a wonderfully soothing folksy string instrument, evoking memories of ‘Sahiba’ (Phillauri). Later that Punjabi feel is increased, when a nice dholak-led rhythm sets in. This version is definitely better than Arijit’s. The lyrics by Puneet Sharma are aptly romantic and melancholic at the same time. The word ‘bairaag‘ is a word I don’t think I’ve heard in a Bollywood song after ‘Laal Ishq’ (Ram-Leela)! Beautiful song, but might not stay with me for long.

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4/5 for Samira’s Version

 

5. Badass Babua

Singers ~ Abhishek Nailwal, Neha Bhasin & Sameer Uddin, Music by ~ Sameer Uddin, Lyrics by ~ Akshay Verma

A relatively newer addition to the album (as the composer Sameer Uddin wasn’t credited in the trailer or first poster of the film), this one is a funky “gangsta” song, probably made for Rajkummar’s character in the movie. The U.P. vagabond and rowdy feel is brought out with entertaining lyrics rendered with spunk by Abhishek Nailwal and the composer himself. The gangster feels are brought out by the rap, the techno beats and the overbearing sinister tone. The composition is catchy, but again, not a very lasting tune. The arrangements are more of what the song might be remembered for, if at all. The vocals are fine, and obviously the male singers have done an amazing job, or else, it wouldn’t have sounded so much like a gangster song full of attitude. Neha Bhasin is sidelined unfortunately, and reminds me of Ambili’s portions in ‘Hum Hain Bank Chor’ (Bank Chor). Entertaining, but not everlasting.

Rating: 3/5


Bareilly Ki Barfi is a relatively good multicomposer album. I think these days, the quality of multicomposer albums is definitely increasing, because makers now know the formula for it. You obviously need two upbeat numbers to increase the album’s hit status, and of course, a romantic song, a sad song (preferably by Arijit) and then a couple of versions. Zee seems to have mastered the formula, and they produce another album like ‘Behen Hogi Teri’, which is a mix of styles from different composers, yet comes together as a united album. With a mixed variety of songs, these multiple composers have come up with a nice, khatti-meethi Barfi!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 3 = 31

Album Percentage: 76.25%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Nazm Nazm (Ayushmann Khurrana) > Twist Kamariya = Sweety Tera Drama = Nazm Nazm = Bairaagi (Samira Koppikar) > Bairaagi = Nazm Nazm (Sumedha Karmahe) > Badass Babua

 

Which is your favourite song from Bareilly Ki Barfi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂