NOT A VERY IMPORTANT ALBUM!! (VIP 2: LALKAR – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sean Roldan
♪ Lyrics by: Raqueeb Alam
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 26th June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th August 2017

VIP 2: Lalkar Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


VIP 2 (Lalkar) is an upcoming Tamil film that has been dubbed into Hindi, starring Dhanush and Kajol, directed by Soundarya Rajinikanth and produced by Dhanush and Kalaipuli S. Thanu. It is an action comedy, and a sequel to 2014’s ‘Vellailla Pattadhaari’. Knowing nothing about the first film or its music, except for the fact that it had been composed by talented young composer Anirudh, I’m diving into this album. It has been composed by Sean Roldan, another relatively new composer in the South, who I’ve heard has composed really good music for ‘Power Paandi’ earlier this year. Let’s hope he does the same for his first technically Hindi album!


1. Life Of Raghuvaran – Chal Re Raja

Singers ~ Rahul Nambiar & Yogi B, Backing Vocals ~ Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan

Sean Roldan starts the album with a rock song that doesn’t quite impress. The composition is all over the place, very hard to grasp, and understand. The hookline too, is literally very odd and weird. It reminds me of a same kind of song from ‘Kabali’, which was mediocre as well. The pulsating arrangements at least provide some entertainment in the song. Sean Roldan manages to create an enticing and hard-hitting rock rhythm, and the electric guitars (Josh Mark Raj) and drums (Ramkumar Kanakarajan) especially have been played amazingly to ensure that followers of heavy metal would love this song. Sean fuses this with folk instruments like the thavil (Hariprasad). The vocals are not quite welcoming in the song either; they are very crude, and supposed-to-be full of attitude, but it comes across as fake. The English rap sounds like an unwanted interruption in the proceedings of the song. The antara is better; its tune has a kind of Carnatic touch to it, or so I felt. (“Phir Se…”) The lyrics, or at least those that were intelligible, seem to be an inspirational and motivational song slash title song. Not a very enticing rock song, but the arrangements are splendid!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Angel Of Raghuvaran – Tu Mili Hai

Singers ~ Abhay Jodhpurkar & M.M. Manasi, Backing Vocals ~ Vasanth, Sean Roldan, Sudha & Ravi G. 

As soon as this song starts, it reminds me so heavily of ‘Jadoo Rawan Rawan’ from ‘Kabali’. The composition is based on the same raag, I guess. The composition itself is that kind, which haunts you too, but doesn’t leave a lasting impact on your ears. As long as it plays, it sucks you in and you find it impressive, only to forget it right away after it is over. It still is a very good composition; it’s just that it sounds so heard-before, and way too heavy to hear again. I see that Roldan has tried to infuse a kind of Tango-like rhythm, to fuse it with the Carnatic composition, but it fails. The arrangements are heavenly; the strings (Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra) are ravishing, while the twinkly sounds are just marvellous. The flute (Vishnu Vijay) and the strings are what upholds the arrangement though. Drums (Ramkumar Kanakarajan) and trumpets (Jaigopi & Ben) increase the multidimensionality of the arrangements. The vocals are functional; Abhay Jodhpurkar does well as the male singer, but M.M. Manasi sounds kind of out of place here, with her thick voice. The lyrics are the same old romantic lyrics that we find in these songs. A good composition, but too many times heard-before!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Torture of Raghuvaran – Main Ga Raha

Singer ~ K.G. Ranjith, Backing Vocals ~ Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan

This song sounds interesting right from the beginning, where it starts off in a kind of humorous way, and right enough, it opens up into a hilarious song about men singing about not wanting to get married! The Carnatic backdrop of the song makes it all the more funny to listen to, and the composition too, seems to be Carnatic-based. The hookline is instantly likeable, and cute. The backing vocalists (Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan) do well, and increase the comic value of the song. They complement the lead singer, K.G. Ranjith, who sounds a lot like Ayushmann Khurana, very well. The arrangements are fabulous. The traditional wedding brass band (Ben & Jaigopi) has been played against the backdrop of wonderfully rustic Carnatic folk music, complete with nadaswaram (D. Balasubramaniam), and the wonderful kuthu-style percussion (Two Man Army), which actually suits this song. I pity how Bollywood misuses and overuses that rhythm. The lyrics are extremely funny too. An enjoyable song!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Raghuvaran Vs. Vasundhara – Doori Zara Banake

Singers ~ Benny Dayal & Shaktishree Gopalan, Backing Vocals ~ Maria Roe Vincent & Sudha

This song sounds like a face-off between men and women kind of like ‘Thug Le’ (Ladies Vs. Ricky Bahl). The composition starts off quite abruptly, and doesn’t actually suck you in until Benny’s lines come in. The arrangements are beautiful! It starts off like a retro funk song with trumpets/brass instruments, and nice digital sounds. It later escalates to a nice and beautiful violin-oriented song in the interlude, where the Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra shows its wonderful skills yet again. The Guitars by Sean Roldan are very impressive too. The composition after the interlude is still below par, and doesn’t really hook you still. The two vocalists do well, especially Benny Dayal, who is incidentally the only Bollywood singer on this soundtrack. The lyrics make the song sound like it is a kind of face off between the two lead characters. Good with its arrangements, but falls flat with the tune!

Rating: 3/5

 

5. Vasundhara – The Empress Arrives

(Instrumental)

This instrumental is quite a grand one, for the entry of Kajol’s character. The feel that strikes you right when the song starts with those trumpets is that she’s a villain from a 1970s Bollywood film, whose music is composed by R.D. Burman. But then those EDM beats arrive and make the song even more interesting. A mysterious ‘Pink Panther’-esque portion follows, which is hinged on just the trumpets (Jaigopi). There is nothing much to hear here, except the mysterious yet whimsical sound of it all.

Rating: 2.5/5


VIP 2 (Lalkar) is yet another dubbed album that we will hear and forget. Forget the dubbed aspect of it; I’m sure it won’t be a memorable album even down south in its original language! Sean Roldan, I’ve heard great things about, but sadly, my first encounter with his music was not all that great! Not a very important album! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 2.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 62%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Torture of Raghuvaran (Main Ga Raha) > Angel of Raghuvaran (Tu Mili Hai) > Raghuvaran Vs Vasundhara (Doori Zara Banake) > Life of Raghuvaran (Chal Re Raja) = Vasundhara (The Empress Arrives)

 

What is your favourite song from VIP 2 (Lalkar)? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MUBARAKAN! A FLOP ALBUM HAS BEEN BORN! (MUBARAKAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Hassan Jahangir, Amaal Mallik, Rishi Rich, Yash Anand & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Badshah & Hassan Jahangir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th July 2017

Mubarakan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mubarakan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy of errors starring Arjun Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor, Anil Kapoor, Ileana D’Cruz, Athiya Shetty and Ratna Pathak Shah in the lead roles. The film is directed by the only director in Bollywood who still insists on doing comedies with a cast larger than a herd of cows, Anees Bazmee and produced by Ashwin Varde, Murad Khetani and Balwinder Singh Janjua. The film’s plot consists of such never-before-tried aspects like — double roles, a love quadrangle, a huge Punjabi family and Punjabi dance numbers. It is going to redefine Bollywood, I’m sure of it. 😏 If you didn’t get that sarcasm, moving on. The music is by T-Series, and that means multiple composers. Thankfully, one name out of the three composers, is a relief, it being the name of Amaal Mallik, the young composer proving his mettle out there. He gets two, upbeat dance tracks, so I hope those are catchy! The next two composers are Gourov-Roshin, returning after treating us to a small break from their remakes, and sadly they have three songs, and Rishi Rich with Yash Anand, who have composed the title song of the film. Let’s just get this over with, eh?


1. The Goggle Song

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam, Armaan Malik, Neeti Mohan, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A wedding song to start the album, this one is an enjoyable tune from Amaal. Not the best he can do for sure, but it still makes you groove to the beat. The beat itself is infectious, with the composer adding quirky sound effects making it sound better. The ensemble of singers does really well for a wedding song, and for once, Tulsi sounds better than Neeti. The lyrics are mediocre, but hilarious at times. A good wedding track, but not very innovative.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Mubarakan (Title Track)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Juggy D, Sukriti Kakar & Badshah, Music by ~ Rishi Rich & Yash Anand, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Badshah, Yamma Yamma Credits: Music by ~ R.D. Burman

“This is the Rishi Rich beat.” The song starts with this obvious statement, and an unexpected incorporation of some portions ‘Yamma Yamma’ (Shaan). The actual composition falls flat, but it is saved by R.D. Burman’s old song, which plays throughout, and its addition was quite creative. Vocals are horrible. Lyrics are horrible. Rap is horrible. Arrangements are not so horrible. (Mostly, it is the awesome oud from the old song). In short, a horrible song, but for the arrangements and the old song’s portions.
P.S. I wouldn’t call this a Remake as such.
Rating: 2.5/5 (0.5 bonus for using that old song wisely)

 

3. Jatt Jaguar

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Navraj Hans & Apeksha Dandekar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another typical Punjabi song, the Punjabi flavour accentuated even more by a mediocre composition that barely manages to grasp your attention, except at the hook. Even Vishal doesn’t sound as energetic as always, but Navraj does. Lyrics are typical. Arrangements are typical, but there are traces Amaal’s digital quirks. At many places the tune seems like some old song I can’t recall! 😥 Not the best Amaal can do.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Haathon Mein Thhe Haath

Singers ~ Papon, Altamash Faridi, Aditi Singh Sharma & Arpita Mukherjee, Backing Vocals by ~ Rinku Giri, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A typical Pakistani pop-esque song follows, and it immediately strikes me as Papon’s worst song after a long, long time. The composition is staid and clichéd, his vocals do not help at all. Aditi sounds over stylish as usual. Those typical digital beats add to the melancholia. Backing vocalists add to the staleness, especially the Sufi one. Lyrics are something you won’t even notice. A song that clearly doesn’t know where it belongs.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Hawa Hawa

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Prakriti Kakar, Original Composition by ~ Hassan Jahangir, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The hit Pakistani pop song remade, with a typppppical kuthu beat and rhythm! Mika singing increases the headache, and the new composition is just unbearable. The hookline is good, but the other parts fall flat. The female vocals by Prakriti sound good though. Lyrics belong to a Sajid-Wajid soundtrack. Why????
Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

Singers ~ Rinku Giri & Puja Basnet, Original Composition Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another Punjabi folksy song ends the album, this time a mélange of two Punjabi folk songs, ‘Kala Doriya’ and ‘Baari Barsi’. The composition doesn’t hook you at all; in fact it sounds like ‘Jatt Jaguar Part 2’. The new singer Rinku Giri is the typical Punjabi male singer affair, he sounds like Diljit Dosanjh. Arrangements are “louder louder”. Lyrics are typical. A song that relies on folk songs to propel it, but fails.
Rating: 2/5


Mubarakan is yet another feather in Bollywood’s cap of Punjabi albums. All of the songs are very staid, heard-before ones, that don’t really help generate any interest. Amaal does okayish in one song, but showcases his quirk in the other. The others perform subpar, with the exception of Rishi Rich, who has made quite a catchy song. But even with its catchiness I couldn’t rate it higher than 2.5. So, for anyone counting, Mubarakan! Another flop album has been born! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 51.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: The Goggle Song > Mubarakan = Jatt Jaguar = Haathon Mein Thhe Haath = Hawa Hawa > Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 20

 

Which is your favourite song from Mubarakan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

PARTIAL MUSICAL ROBBERY!! (BANK CHOR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Kailash Kher, Shamir Tandon, Baba Sehgal & Shrikanth Sriram
♪ Lyrics by: Adheesh Verma, Gautam Govind Sharma, Kailash Kher, Ambili Menon, Varun Likhate & Baba Sehgal
♪ Music Label: YRF Music
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 16th June 2017

Bank Chor Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bank Chor is an upcoming Bollywood crime comedy, starring Riteish Deshmukh, Vivek Oberoi, Bhuvan Arora, Sahil Vaid, Vikram Thapa and Rhea Chakraborty in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Luv Ka The End’ fame Bumpy, and produced by Ashish Patil. The film is apparently a comic caper about someone who chooses the wrongest day possible, to rob a bank. Along with two sidekicks who do not know how to even pick a lock. It looks like a spoof on YRF’s own ‘Dhoom’ franchise, and it would be hilarious, I’m sure. The music album is another multicomposer album, as is the norm nowadays. Kailash Kher, Rochak Kohli, Shamir Tandon, Baba Sehgal and Shrikanth Sriram are behind the music. Kailash Kher knows how to compose for comedies, as he proved to us in ‘Chandni Chowk To China’s, so expecting something just as cool as ‘Phatte Chak Lein De’ which was in that film. Rochak Kohli takes the lead, as he has three songs in the album, and after his cool music for ‘Naam Shabana’, a thriller, it will be interesting to see how he moulds himself for a comedy. It’s not that he hasn’t composed for a comedy before, though — remember ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’? Hopefully his songs here are better than those. Shamir Tandon, who has barely impressed me ever before, gets one song, while rapper Baba Sehgal is back with this album, with a single song. Shrikanth Sriram has an instrumental piece to his credit. Hopefully these five men have put together an album that is catchy as well as humorous and sticking to the theme of the movie. Let’s see!


1. Hum Hain Bank Chor

Singers ~ Kailash Kher & Ambili Menon, Music by ~ Kailash Kher, Lyrics by ~ Kailash Kher, Rap Written by ~ Ambili Menon

Kailash Kher, known for his legendary Sufi songs, kicks off the album with its title track, a song that banks on repetitive shouts of the movie’s “clever” title, to propel it forward. Sure enough, the continuous repetition of the title of the film in the way Kailash does it, manages to elicit a few guilty laughs from the audience. The tune as such is very, very artificial and generic, something that wouldn’t have got even one listener if it hadn’t been for the repetitive gag that is the repetition of the “hook”. And I must specify one thing: if you come across this song and you’re like “Oh, how nice, Kailash Kher is back at composing! Let’s give this a go, maybe it’s a Sufi fusion track!”, I’m sorry to tell you that you will be disappointed, so it’s better not to dive into this one with those outrageous expectations, because you know this is a comedy film. And anyway, he has done music for another comedy film in the past, “Chandni Chowk To China”, in which his songs were quite enjoyable too! Looking at it from that point of view, the song is quite enjoyable. The only fun part in the actual composition is the “Jab chori kar loon, chor ke ghar chori, chori karke khoob karoon munhjori!” That line in the antara is the only catchy part of the tune. The arrangements are quite cool, too, by the way. The saxophone is just amazing, and some comedic sound effects entertain the listeners throughout. Kailash’s husky, high-pitched voice is perfect for the song, and he manages to at least sing his faulty composition right. And yeah, since “Bank chor” doesn’t really sound like what he clearly intends it to sound like, he pronounces “Bank” as “Bhank” so that it does. His companion, Ambili, raps something somewhere in the middle that really doesn’t go well with the rest of the song. Kailash pens down the lyrics himself, and I must admit, some of the lyrics are just as hilarious as a song’s lyrics can be. {Which isn’t much; I mean, how loud can you laugh out because of a song!!} An apt song for the film, but not a repeat-listen song! 

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tashreef / Tashreef Unplugged (Cups Version)

Singer ~ Rochak Kohli / Rochak Kohli, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Adheesh Verma

Rochak Kohli steps in now, with his first song out of the two he has composed for the film. And this song, is one of the most innovative stuff we have got from a comedy film of late. If only the makers of ‘Housefull 3’ had roped in Rochak. Anyway, the song is a breezy, feel-good song, about the protagonist who is clearly not feeling very good. The composition is highly innovative and creative, with a country flavour that I’ve lately noticed Rochak uses a lot, like he did in most of his songs from “Hawaizaada”. The composition sounds odd at first, but later, it grows on you amazingly. The arrangements really stand out right away. The guitars are what bring in a nice Goan flavour, similar to that “Crazy Mode” of Pritam’s songs, like ‘Agal Bagal’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and ‘Chicken Kuk-Do-Koo’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The very weird additions of noises like “Toing toing toing” and other hen and pigeon sounds make the song sound lovely in a very different way. And also cute! The ukulele also sounds beautiful, and makes the arrangements sound very creative. Rochak sings in various different noises, as told earlier, but even when he’s singing in the normal way, it sounds very different from how he usually sings, and it is amazing! He keeps the pitch low, and it makes the song even more effective in bringing out the stress of the protagonist. An unplugged version is actually true to its name (sounds a lot like an unrefined cover version), and the cups that were used in the original too, are more prominent here, due to it being unplugged. It has less of a repeat value though. Adheesh Verma’s lyrics are very impressive, because they’re actually funny in an intellectual way. A highly creative song from a composer who has always meddled around with this kind of arrangement, but never gone up to this level. And now I doubt whether he can outdo himself after this!!

Rating: 4/5 for the Original, 3/5 for Unplugged Version

 

3. BC Rap Knockout: Mumbai Vs Delhi

Singers ~ Naezy & Pardhaan, Music by ~ Shamir Tandon, Lyrics by ~ Varun Likhate

Next up we get something, which at least I have only seen in YouTube videos till now. And it is a Rap Battle. Yes, it is perfectly alright to add the word ‘Epic’ in there, because the song is really an epic showdown between a resident of Mumbai and one of Delhi. There’s no composition as such, as the whole song is a Rap Battle. The arrangements by Shamir Tandon are cool as the backdrop of the battle, and they’re completely digital. What is actually worth hearing the song for, though, are the two amazing rappers behind it. Naezy stands for Mumbai, and Pardhaan for Delhi, and then we get to hear a hilarious competition about which city is the best. The whole attitude which the two rappers carry about themselves is what hooks the listeners to the song, even if it is merely on audio (as of now). Some of the lines they throw at each other are so outlandish, you end up laughing out loud, or at least smiling. And all the credit for that goes to the Lyricist, Varun Likhate. He has penned down an efficient rap battle, and it really sounds very genuine. A nice rap battle.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Jai Baba Bank Chor

Singer ~ Nakash Aziz, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Gautam Govind Sharma

This song is the second song by Rochak Kohli on the soundtrack, and after the very creative song, ‘Tashreef’, I bet nobody would have qualms in saying that this one disappoints big-time. The composition is very mediocre, and something we have heard many times. On top of that, Rochak equips a very stale Mumbaiya rhythm to act as the arrangements. Very loud arrangements, and not programmed well enough, makes it sound even more irritating. Nakash’s singing is as usual, energetic and full-hearted. Sadly, the composition doesn’t support him. Gautam Govind Sharma’s lyrics are sad to hear too. A disappointment from Rochak Kohli.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

5. Bae, Baba Aur Bank Chor

Singer ~ Baba Sehgal, Music by ~ Baba Sehgal, Lyrics by ~ Baba Sehgal

This song starts with beats making it sound as if it is a song from an English zombie film. Baba Sehgal is back in Bollywood after quite some time, and he has made this rap song. That makes it the second complete rap song in the soundtrack. This one grips you from the beginning just because of that Zombie-ish background. The rap isn’t too impressive, but you manage to keep listening just because of that background sounds. There is a nice rap in the interlude where Baba Sehgal sings random Spanish names. There isn’t much more by way of arrangements, either, other than that Zombie-ish background, and random sounds of people shouting, lions roaring and whatnot. This time, the shouts of ‘Bank chor!’ aren’t as effective as they were in Kailash Kher’s song. Baba Sehgal raps fine, but the lyrics are very boring. Another stale track, relying on a tune in the background and Baba Sehgal’s name to make it work.

Rating: 2/5

 

6. Mela – The Bank Chor Theme

(Instrumental), Music by ~ Shrikanth Sriram

Someone called Shrikanth Sriram produces this instrumental piece which is so boring, you will be surprised. It is basically the same sounds playing over and over again for five and a half minutes. There is a weird trumpet-like sound playing the main part, and cool percussion in the background, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, … You get the point.

Rating: 1/5


Bank Chor‘s music album starts off quite promisingly, but then just diffuses into a typical, monotonous and trying-to-be-funny kind of zone. I must salute Rochak Kohli though, for his creativity in ‘Tashreef’, and Kailash Kher for his versatility in the title song. The other songs, barring the rap battle by Shamir Tandon, are easily forgettable. An album that only partially manages to steal your heart

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 + 2 + 1

Album Percentage: 51.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tashreef > BC Rap Knockout: Mumbai Vs Delhi > Hum Hain Bank Chor = Tashreef Unplugged (Cups Version) > Bae, Baba Aur Bank Chor > Jai Baba Bank Chor > Mela – The Bank Chor Theme

 

Which is your favourite song from Bank Chor? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THODI DER AUR THEHER JAAUN??? (HALF GIRLFRIEND – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Tanishk Bagchi, Rishi Rich, Farhan Saeed, Rahul Mishra & Ami Mishra
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Arafat Mehmood, Tanishk Bagchi, R. Rekhi, Veronica Mehta, Yash Anand, Yash Narvekar, Ishita Moitra Udhwani, Kumaar, Anushka Shahaney, Laado Suwalka & Kunaal Vermaa
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 27th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Half Girlfriend Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Half Girlfriend is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama film, starring Shraddha Kapoor and Arjun Kapoor. The film is directed by Mohit Suri, and produced by Shobha Kapoor, Ekta Kapoor, Mohit Suri and Chetan Bhagat. The film is an adaptation of Chetan Bhagat’s 2014 super-hit novel {In that everyone started hitting it after reading it, so it became super hit} of the same name. I have read that book and didn’t think much of it. And I’m not going to waste time on the plot. So let’s see who is behind the music this time. Now Mohit Suri is always up for new musical talent, and he brought Arijit Singh, Ankit Tiwari and Ami Mishra into the limelight with his previous film albums. I must say, ‘Ek Villain’ and ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ were better off than ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was full of clichés. And now this movie seems like it will be a complete detour from the usual type of music we hear in his other films. Maybe, just maybe, the songs with the lead characters staring at each other for infinite amounts of time, and shots of Shraddha Kapoor crying her eyes out, will not be removed and maybe we will be spared the melodrama that exists in all other Suri movies. But then again, maybe not. Maybe Mohit Suri will make Chetan’s rom-com into a romantic drama just like his other films. And of course, maybe the music will follow suit. That is confirmed as soon as I read the name of the first music director, Mithoon. He has collaborated with Mohit Suri in almost all of his movies, and the only collaboration I didn’t like of theirs, was ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (‘Aashiqui 2), after which I loved the sings from the next two movies. He gets three tracks here, but all are based on the same song. Tanishk Bagchi, the latest composer going tons of places this year, gets a single song here, and hopefully he opens his account with Mohit Suri fabulously so that we get to hear him in more Mohit Suri albums. Rishi Rich, after a long hiatus after the ‘Hum Tum’ song, returns {he has two more albums upcoming this year!} and he gets two tracks. Next up is Ami Mishra, who debuted with ‘Hasi’ from ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ in 2015, and vanished after that. He gets one song too. Then we have the debutants. Rahul Mishra with one song (I have never heard of him so can’t say what I’m expecting), and Farhan Saeed, who is debuting only as a composer; he has sung a couple of songs previously, and in this album, he gets to compose two tracks, out if which one is a version of the other. So with an astounding ten tracks to review, I must start right away.


1. Baarish

Singers ~ Ash King & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk Bagchi & Arafat Mehmood

Tanishk gets to open the album with his only song in the film. The song is a romantic song, with a tune that will have any Bollywood music lover hooked right away — because it adheres to all Bollywood sensibilities so obediently. The composition is like a trademark Bollywood romantic composition, and sweet too, at that. The mukhda makes the song start in a very sweet way, but that bridge from the mukhda to the hookline, which goes “Aankhon Ke Darmiyaan…” comes so abruptly, you are baffled for a moment. But afterwards, it is nothing but an uphill journey for the composition. The antara is how antaras in romantic songs traditionally are — calm and soothing. Again, an abrupt pause has been added at the end of the antara, which could’ve been avoided since the two lines fit together perfectly even without a pause! The tune for the mandolin loop that plays throughout the song is just so lovely! The hookline itself is yet again, something that will appease all Bollywood lovers, especially 90s music lovers. The arrangements which Tanishk has used in the song work in favour of the song, and as I said, that mandolin loop is sooooo catchy and hummable. The santoor starts off the song wonderfully, and it suits the ‘rainy’ theme of the song. The flute and strings too, add to the beauty of the song. As for the vocals, Ash King does well, but we have heard more outstanding renditions from him, in front of which this seems so ordinary. Shashaa just has to hum a line in an interlude. Tanishk & Arafat Mehmood wield the pen and produce utterly nonsensical words, defying all the laws of grammar. And however serious they might be trying to sound, it just sounds ridiculous. A song that sticks to those criteria that would make it a hit in Bollywood, but doesn’t dare to go experimental.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Thodi Der

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Farhan Saeed, Music by Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The next song in the album is another romantic song; the only difference is that this time, both of them love each other — in the first song it was like one-sided. Like tape. This song marks Farhan Saeed’s Bollywood debut as a composer, and it is actually a re-work of his own pop single of the same name. Thank goodness, he brings in a female singer to sing this one with him, and it is none other than Shreya Ghoshal. She handles the nuances very well, and her saccharine voice suits the composition very well. Farhan too, sings his parts well, but it doesn’t have the same impact. The composition itself, sounds very nice to the ears, but clearly has something missing and like the last song, only caters to people who like traditional, typical, same-old-kind of music. The hookline has a great tune though. The arrangements are better off here, with a wonderful sarangi taking care of the people who want variation in the song, and that sarangi solo in the interlude is not to be missed. The guitars are evidence of the fact that the song would’ve sounded so bland without the sarangi — they’ve been played that boringly. It would’ve been quite nice to hear a Sufi treatment given to the song, like tablas/dholaks and the like. A harmonium can be heard, but in very miserly quantities. Occasionally the sarangi reminds you of ‘Roke Na Ruke Naina’ (Badrinath Ki Dulhania), and I even started humming its antara, after the mukhda of this was over. Kumaar’s lyrics are not great, and there are places where they’re about the day not being able to live, and the night not breathing when the two characters aren’t together. Good for a couple of listens, but not something to repeat over and over again.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Tu Hi Hai

Singer ~ Rahul Mishra, Music by Rahul Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Laado Suwalka

The piano notes of the next song start and instantly you think ‘Bhatt’. Even though they aren’t in any way associated with this film, the piano notes just scream ‘Bhatt’ at you — “BHATT! BHATT! BHATT!” And when you continue listening to the song, you realize that the piano notes were right and you should have listened to their warning cries. Rahul Mishra, a debutant helms this track, and tries to make it as bland and dead as ever. The composition is a trademark Bhatt-ish one, and even though those songs sometimes do impress me, this one falls into category of them which I utterly despise right from the first time I hear them. The hookline is something decent, and that’s pretty much it, because it has been composed so drearily. Dreadfully slow, the song seems to get nowhere and leaves no impression on you after it ends. And the duration doesn’t help, because five and a half minutes is pretty long, for a staid composition. The only part of the song that seems impressive (only to an extent, because it is nothing new) is when the chorus singers try to make the song a Sufi song, and they succeed, but then Rahul starts with the Pakistani pop stuff again. Rahul Mishra’s vocals are quite good; he should carry forth his singing in the industry. The arrangements sound like a terribly-slowed-down version of the arrangements of the ‘Sanam Re’ title track. That tablas and electric guitars arrangement got old after just one song — ‘Sanam Re’. The lyrics by Laado Suwalka are even more typical than the composition. Not a very impressive debut, but hopefully somebody likes it and gives Rahul Mishra another chance.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

4. Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga / Pal Bhar (Chaahunga Reprise)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shashaa Tirupati / Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon steps in with the next track, and that’s something I was looking forward to, because he has been giving somewhat impressive songs in Mohit Suri’s film albums. However, when I played the song, the result was so anticlimactic I can’t express it in words. Mithoon’s composition sounds like a very desperate attempt to recreate the magic of ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (Aashiqui 2), a magic which I was immune to anyway, so this song too, didn’t affect me with its supposed magical composition. Of course, the song will become a rage nevertheless. Come on! It is Arijit and Mithoon after all! The song fares well for the mukhda, after which it seems to disassemble itself and both antaras sound like a different song altogether. Especially the female antara, seems like Mithoon strung together some completely unrelated notes to construct it. The first antara is slightly better, and it is a relief they’ve repeated it like thrice in the Reprise Version. But the drawback of the Reprise is that there’s no mukhda there. Also, the words and tune don’t match, creating that “Dubbed Music” effect, when you understand the song is dubbed because the words don’t fit well into the composition. Arijit gets into his dull mode here, and in some places you really feel that he drifted off to sleep. Shashaa in her antara does well, but not excellent. The arrangements are also boring. In the first version, they are fine, until those ‘Tum Hi Ho’ beats take over and you go like “Oh Goddddd! Not again!”. I loved the piano notes in the beginning though, and the santoor interlude. There’s a place before Shashaa’s antara where a wonderful flute mesmerizes you. But after that, there’s a staccato piano piece that sounds so random, haphazard and horrible. The Reprise gets the arrangements better. It starts with some weird harp-like sound, and a sound like water dripping from a leaking pipe, and Arijit’s voice is programmed such that you’ll actually believe he’s in some dingy underground basement where a pipe is leaking. But the better part of the arrangements is later, when strings are added in. Otherwise, everything is almost the same as the first version. So both versions have their own plus points. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are definitely the highlight of both the tracks. They surpass Mithoon’s arrangements, his dull composition and Arijit’s dreary rendition. One read through them and you’ll be stunned. Mithoon in his uncreative form.

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 2.5/5 for the Reprise

 

5. Lost Without You

Singers ~ Ami Mishra & Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Ami Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kunaal Vermaa & Anushka Shahaney

A bit of freshness seems to enter the album with the next song, Ami Mishra’s contribution to the album. It is a song with half-English, half-Hindi lyrics, and with a rock backdrop. The composition of the Hindi parts again, sticks to the normal Bhatt music criteria. The only way the song sounds fresher is due to the English parts, which are interspersed with the Hindi portions quite gratuitously. There’s a catch to that too, though. The “singer” behind those English parts, Anushka Shahaney, seems to be putting on a very artificial accent, something that will barely impress you once you hear it, and it sounds like nonsense because you can’t make out her English. Meanwhile, Ami continues droning on his Hindi portion, which isn’t quite different from his other song ‘Hasi’ (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Especially the “aaaaa aaaaa” sounds very similar to ‘Hasi’. The arrangements consist of very typical rock elements, the guitars and drums playing throughout the song. There is an interlude where Ami has added some oriental sounding guitar-like sound. The Hindi lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, are again, nothing innovative, and you barely pay attention to them as the song continues to play. Anushka Shahaney, who has written whatever she rambles herself, should’ve sung in such a way that we could’ve understood what she had written. Ami Mishra disappoints this time, but at least something is fresh here — the addition of English parts, even though they’re unintelligible. The album is just going more and more downhill.

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Stay A Little Longer

Singer ~ Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Anushka Shahaney, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Farhan Saeed returns, this time with Anushka Shahaney. And they spoil ‘Thodi Der’ for us. This song is basically an English version of that song, as is evident from its name.. a direct translation from Hindi to English. The composition, I already liked before, but here, even the little nuances that featured in the Hindi version have been gotten rid of, because it’s English right? And English songs can’t have nuances in them right? The song just sounds mediocre, even more so because of the way Anushka sings them in that accent. Her lyrics this time can at least be made out — but they sound very ridiculous. And of course, they don’t fit into the tune, so she has to sing “come” as “cu-uhm”, “love” and “lu-uhv”, “new” as “nyu-oo”, and she has to add “Oh”s and “Ah”s anywhere randomly. Ishita Moitra Udhwani helps her with “additional lyrics”, a term which I don’t understand because can’t two people write a song together? Or did she just replace one word by another so she deserves less credit? 😏 The only thing better here, is the arrangement, which has not only sarangi, but a very opulent symphonic orchestra towards the end, something that wouldn’t have suited in the Hindi song, but something which this English version didn’t deserve, frankly. Supposed to be soothing, but the singer makes sure it is anything but that. At least the arrangements respect us.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Mere Dil Mein / Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta / Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Yash Anand & Yash Narvekar, English Lyrics ~ R. Rekhi & Veronica Mehta, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Rishi Rich comes into the album very, very late, with a song you can call the title song of the film. And it is the only so-called upbeat number in the entire album. As such, we are bound to love it, especially people like me who were bored to death by the previous songs. The song is essentially a hip-hop number, with a groovy beat, and Rishi Rich informs us right at the beginning, “This is the Rishi Rich beat”. The song starts with some dialogue by someone sounding like Kangana Ranaut… Don’t miss it! The hookline is insanely catchy, and that “I gotta let you know…” line too, is very catchy. The composition is very repetitive though, and these two things are repeated over and over again so many times, you get annoyed after some time. There are not many more things constituting the arrangements, except that trippy beats and various weird sound effects. Veronica Mehta, who also featured in Rishi Rich’s “Hum Tum” song, at least sings in a more believable accent, but again, many of the words are not decipherable. Yash Narvekar, on the other hand, sings the male portions well, and I think Bollywood has a new Benny Dayal now. In charge of the lyrics are two people each for English and Hindi lyrics. 😂😂 And again, that additional lyricist, Ishita Udhwani, helps them, but they seem to not want to place her in the main lyricist’s list. Poor girl. There’s another version called the Dialogue Version, which has some of the most cringe-inducing dialogues from the film. That ‘Sentiyaa Gaye Hum Toh‘ dialogue is so cheesy! The dialogues come across as very annoying, and it is so evident that Arjun Kapoor wasn’t the right choice for playing this village boy. 😑 At least this song breaks the seemingly neverending spree of depressing songs!

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 1.5/5 for the Dialogue Version

 

8. Half Girlfriend (Love Theme)

(Instrumental, Music by Mithoon)

An instrumental track by Mithoon arrives to finish the album off. Mithoon provides us with a love theme, similar to the love theme he gave in ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was, I admit, a soul-stirring track. Here, he gives us an instrumental with selected lines from “Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga” played on the piano. Since I loved the piano notes in the song, I loved the first part of this track, where everything is just on plain piano. Later on, the orchestra pitches in, and brings a haunting and grand feel to the track. A choir can be heard as well, trying to make it sound even more haunting. After that comes a flute part which is beautiful. The orchestra returns to support the flute, and the song ends on a very grand note, like every instrumental should. Though I didn’t like the actual song which this track is based on, I thoroughly enjoyed the instrumental, and four and a half minutes just flew by.

Rating: 3.5/5


Half Girlfriend is a half-baked album. You know, when you fry something and it remains raw inside? That’s what this album is like. The makers have gone into such trouble making ten tracks for this movie, and sadly, not even one is memorable. All of them stick to typical clichéd song-making styles, and even a simple would be memorable, only if the composition were better. Tanishk and Farhan’s songs stand out by far, the rest seem to lag behind. I’ve heard a lot of good things going around about this album, and I waited. I heard it thrice like I do for any album before writing its review. And then I heard it while reviewing and that’s when I really understood how good (read bad) it is. Now I can’t wait any longer for my brain to like this album, can I? Thodi Der Aur Theher Jaaun? No way!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 1.5 + 3.5 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 53%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thodi Der > Baarish = Half Girlfriend (Love Theme) > Lost Without You > Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga = Pal Bhar = Mere Dil Mein > Stay A Little Longer > Tu Hi Hai = Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

 

Which is your favourite song from Half Girlfriend? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

PUNJABI MEDIUM!! (HINDI MEDIUM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Intense, Sukhbir & Abhijit Vaghani
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Kumaar, Guru Randhawa, Arjun & Ikka
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Hindi Medium Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Hindi Medium is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film, starring Irrfan Khan, Saba Qamar and Deepak Dobriyal in lead roles. The film is directed by Saket Chaudhary and produced by Dinesh Vijan, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film follows a young couple who wish to enter the English-speaking society for the sake of their daughter. After watching the trailer, this one looks like it will be a laugh riot, and I’m eagerly waiting for it. The music for this one is given by Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal and Abhijit Vaghani. While Sachin-Jigar have worked hard and given two new and original songs, the rest have “remade” hit pop songs, and you’ll get to know soon why “remade” is in inverted commas.


1. Suit Suit

Singers ~ Guru Randhawa & Arjun, Original Composition by ~ Intense, Music Recreated by ~ Guru Randhawa & Rajat Nagpal, Lyrics by ~ Guru Randhawa & Arjun

“Oh tenu suit suit karda!” 

– Guru Randhawa

The album starts with something that T-Series are experts at. Recreating old songs. After butchering many songs from Bollywood, T-Series now expands its reach to the Punjabi pop singles they have released earlier. And thus, we get “Suit Suit”, by Guru Randhawa and Arjun (the guy who shot to fame by reprising Bollywood songs into English in a quite ludicrous manner). The song is as typical as a Punjabi pop song can get and after getting to know the soul of Punjab in ‘Phillauri’, thanks to Shashwat Sachdev and Jasleen Royal, we are just taken back to the fake Punjabi feels. Nobody’s going to get tricked into thinking this is what Punjabis listen to all day. Well, maybe at weddings. Anyhow, the song is not even eligible of being called a remake, because it is the exact same thing copied and pasted here, with faster beats. I heard the original, and it has such slow beats, it sounded odd. Thankfully, the new song has faster beats to go with the song. I must admit that the song itself is catchy and my hatred towards the act of remaking songs cannot make me deny that. The beats are something on the lines of the EDM beats that many American artists just add into their songs by default, even before constructing the tune and all. The clichéd tune, originally composed by someone going by the name of Intense, is far from intense, but it is interspersed with Arjun’s English rap, which seems to sound the same in all his songs. In fact, he starts the song off, and that’s how all his female fans will instantly be drawn into the song. The interludes comprise of a weird sound that sounds something like a pig squealing. The hookline is one of the most commonplace tunes, but it still manages to be catchy. Sadly, the rest of the song just sounds repetitive. There’s an impressively rapid rap by Arjun in the second interlude though. I don’t really know what Guru Randhawa and Rajat Nagpal have done by way of recreation here, because everything just sounds the same, but then, they have done the monumental task of making the beats faster. And then again, I am not so well-versed with the original song. Guru Randhawa’s voice is so rustic and earthy, it would “SUIT” a rustic folk song, and I would love to see him do that! As for the lyrics, the hookline is the only reason I can see, for the song to be added in this film — Saba Qamar’s character in the movie must’ve worn a suit to try to fit in with the elite society. But then, couldn’t Sachin-Jigar have made an original, even comedic and better, song for that situation!?

Rating: 2.5/5 {Only for the beats and the hookline!}

 

2. Hoor

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Backing Vocals by ~ Dawn Cordo, Arun Kamath & Shambhavi Singh, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Lafzon ke haseen, dhaagon mein kahin,
Piro rahaa hoon kabse main huzoor,
Koshishein zara, hain nigaahon ki,
Tujhe dekhne ki ho khataa zaroor,
Deewangi kahoon isey, ya hai mera fitoor?
Koi hoor, jaise tu!”

– Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar step into the album with the second song, a romantic song with a heavenly Qawwali-ish treatment. The song also brings together Atif Aslam and Sachin-Jigar yet again, after so many beautiful songs that trio has given us over the years. I can’t really say the same about this song though, unfortunately. The song starts with wonderful humming by an awesome backing chorus (Dawn Cordo, Arun Kamath & Shambhavi Singh) but when the actual melody sung by Atif begins, it loses you somewhere. Sachin-Jigar have constructed a very iffy composition there, something that leaves you confused as to whether you like it or not. No, I don’t mean it is bad at all! It is a lilting composition, with the words flowing into one another very freely, but the composition just didn’t connect with me, something I felt very guilty of, and odd about, because I loved that spectacular album of theirs, ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’. The antara was something I could hardly pay attention to as it was not gripping. I kept waiting for that one part in the song that would have me hooked, but it never came. 😦 The few great things I can rave about in the song, though, were the arrangements. A wonderful harmonium-led (Rinku Rajput) portion starts off the song, with occasional tabla beats (Rupak Dhamankar), that sound marvellous. And then the piano (Rinku Rajput) and Drums (Lindsay D’mello) too, are wonderful. The guitars (Kalyan Baruah) that conclude the song sound amazing! It provides a nice lounge-ish feel, with the fusion of Classical and Western Contemporary. Atif’s vocals are great, and his trademark faltering voice infuses beauty into the vocals. He sings the high-pitched line in the hookline beautifully! I’ve already written about the beauty with which the backing vocalists support him. That leaves the lyrics by Priya Saraiya. These are amazing as well, aptly romantic. The hookline has been written very well! A song that excels in everything except the composition, which could’ve been much better compared to Sachin-Jigar’s previous compositions.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Oh Ho Ho Ho (Remix)

Singer ~ Sukhbir, Original Composition by ~ Sukhbir, Music Recreated by ~ Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written and Performed by ~ Ikka

“Oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ishq tera tadpaave!” 

– Kumaar

This song is like a bonus addition. Yeah, because it is just a remix (and a futile one too, at that) of a very famous Bhangra song, “Ishq Tera Tadpaave” by Sukhbir. And guess who’s the chosen one to remix it? Abhijit Vaghani. And guess what he does? Just adds a rap by Ikka somewhere in the middle, which makes the song sound vulgar, and he obviously adds a line about drinking. Who is going to listen to this song, when the original is still fresh in the people’s minds? If they wanted to make the characters dance to it in the film, they could’ve done so without adding a song in the album. I guess Abhijit has added extra beats, but it doesn’t really make a difference. And by the way, kudos to the way T-Series has named the song. “Oh Ho Ho Ho” is like the way I used to search on Google when I heard this song playing in weddings and didn’t know what it is! 😏 A song banking on the popularity of the original. 

Rating: 1/5 {including 0.5 as a bonus for at least choosing this song.}

 

 

4. Ek Jindari

Singer ~ Tanishka Sanghvi, Backing Vocals ~ Sugandha Date, Karishma Butia, Stiphen Ghorpade, Prateek Mane, Arya Mahale, Anica Chabra, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Suraj jaise chamkenge, dekhe hain saddi ankhiyaan ne hai sapney ambraan de, eh sapney ambraan de,
Boond boond jodenge pal pal, door door beh jaayenge, eh naal samandaraan de, eh naal samandaraan de!
Assi, aithe khade, hai jaana pare,
Na kum humko tol!
Assi, zidd pe adde, junooni bade,
Eh dil ke ne bol!
Haan ek jindari meri, sau khwahishaan,
Ek ek main poori karaan,
Haan ek jindari meri, sau khwahishaan,
Mushkil humein rokna!”

– Kumaar

Sachin-Jigar get to wrap up this album, thankfully. And the song really does make for a grand finale! It starts with a vocal rhythm sung by the cute Tanishkaa Sanghvi, Sachin’s daughter, coupled with wonderful rhythms by Taufiq Qureshi, someone who always makes the song sound great when he works with Sachin-Jigar. The song is a motivational one, and stands true to its theme, with a hard-hitting rhythm and a composition that does succeed indeed to move you. The mukhda starts the song off on such a high level, that it must’ve been difficult to compose the rest of the song without letting that level drop. And I must say, Sachin-Jigar succeed in that mission exceptionally well. That neverending, breathless styled line in the mukhda is astounding! The two antaras that follow are amazing, the first being another “strong will and motivation” type stanza emulating the tune of the mukhda, while the second is a toned-down and calm one, a nice respite in an amazingly hard-hitting song. The “assi…” effect in the lines before the hookline is really intriguing, and Tanishka renders it with spunk. The hookline itself is so well-placed, and the chorus (Sugandha Date, Karishma Butia, Stiphen Ghorpade, Prateek Mane, Arya Mahale, Anica Chabra) joins Tanishka to make it sound more effective. The arrangements are electrifying, with the rock guitars, drums, and Taufiq Qureshi’s amazing percussion lifting up the already amazing composition manifold. Tanishkaa handles the composition with maturity and cuteness, a deadly combination. How cool is it that motivational songs sung by kids are the most motivational! 😄 Kumaar’s lyrics are some of the best lyrics by him this year, and maybe in his career. The song I was waiting for arrives at the end!

Rating: 5/5


Hindi Medium is quite a decent album, overall. It is a Sachin-Jigar show all the way, and I wouldn’t have minded if the other two songs hadn’t been there. Anyway, those two are the reason this album will score very low. Though Sachin-Jigar leave me confused with one song, the other ones makes up for that completely. Abhijit Vaghani can keep on “remaking” songs, while Guru Randhawa will hardly be seen again in Bollywood, I guess, especially not as a music composer. They just added this song because they needed it. Anyway, since all the songs but one are Punjabi, why don’t we call the album Punjabi Medium? 😄

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 1 + 5 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ek Jindari > Hoor > Suit Suit > Oh Ho Ho Ho (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes in 2017: 10 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Hindi Medium) = 12

Which is your favourite song from Hindi Medium? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SHREYA + SUNIDHI = SHABANA!! (NAAM SHABANA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Meet Bros. & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 9th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 31st March 2017

Naam Shabana Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


P.S. The song ‘Dil Hua Besharam’ can be heard on Saavn, while its reprise ‘Baby Besharam’ can be heard on the YouTube audio jukebox. The Saavn link doesn’t have the latter whereas the YouTube jukebox doesn’t have the former. Thought it necessary to inform in case you get confused! 😀


Naam Shabana is a Bollywood thriller, starring Taapsee Pannu in the titular role, and Manoj Bajpayee, Prithviraj Sukumaran, Elli Avram and Taher Shabbir in supporting roles. The film has been directed by Shivam Nair, whose ‘Bhaag Johnny’ flopped in 2015. The film has been produced by Neeraj Pandey and Shital Bhatia. It is a spin-off to the 2015 super-hit film ‘Baby’, and shows the journey of Taapsee Pannu’s character Shabana from ‘Baby’, before she was roped in to be a part of the mission. The movie is definitely awaited, because of it being the first of its kind; Bollywood has been free of any spin-offs as such, and it is just wonderful that the first Bollywood spin-off is that of such a wonderful thriller. Anyway, let’s go over to the music, because we have a little more time to wait for the movie. We all remember that ‘Baby’ had been touted to be a songless film. Nevertheless, three songs had been included in its album — technically two, because one of the songs had a male and female version. Meet Bros. Anjjan had composed one promotional track, while M.M. Kreem, had composed the two-version track in question. The soundtrack was like an accessory to the film, and not something to cherish in your playlist for a long, long time. This movie seems to be different, in that it has four original tracks, with one having two versions, thus making it five songs. Rochak Kohli, who of late, just composed single additional songs that released after the albums of ‘M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story’ and ‘Wazir’ released, comes back with a substantial chunk of an album after a long time. He last composed three songs out of the five-track ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’ (which were quite ignorable) and before that, three out of ten in ‘Hawaizaada’ (which I still listen to!) So I am not quite sure what he can give in this album, where he has three out of five songs. The other two songs are two versions of the same song, composed by Meet Bros, without Anjjan. Hopefully, they don’t give something too-hard-to-grasp like ‘Baby’s ‘Beparwah’. So let’s see what kind of music this album to a much-awaited thriller, holds in hand!


1. Rozana

Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Inn aankhon se yeh bataa, kitna main dekhun tujhe,
Reh jaati hai kuchh kami, jitna bhi dekhun tujhe,
Rozana main, sochun yahi,
Ki jee loongi main besaans bhi,
Aise hi tu mujhe, milta rahe agar, rozana, rozana!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rochak decided to start the album off with a mellow, soothing song that would be enough to transport us to dreamland. The first song in the album is a romantic song that has a very beautiful composition; Rochak gets everything right in that he composes this one with the perfect Bollywood ideals of ‘romance’. Each and every note hits your heart and hits hard. The mukhda gives a nice headstart to the song, and the hookline is one which doesn’t care much about imposing itself on you but grows on you like slow poison just as I like it. The antaras hold all the magic of the song; the very powerfully lilting tune of the antaras just leaves you spellbound. The arrangements are quite minimal, but Rochak gives an impressive strings backdrop for most of the song, especially the strings in the interlude are very impressive. Guitars and piano soothe your senses like nothing else can. And also, Rochak has employed a kind of Marching rhythm to the antara. I don’t know why that’s there, but it doesn’t hamper the song in any way. The arrangements provide for a nice nighttime lullabyish listen. And the vocals are by none other than the melody queen, Shreya Ghoshal. She handles each word with utmost care, and the whispery way in which she sings the song proves yet again how wonderful she is as a singer. Unnecessary bouts of loudness can never be found when she is behind the mic. The lyrics by Manoj Muntashir are mind blowing, especially the paragraph I’ve showcased above! A MINDBLOWING start to the album, and it will definitely consolidate Rochak’s career in Bollywood.

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Zinda

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Ziddi raaston se paanv yeh, aaj bhi, jhagadna toh bhoole nahin,
Haare hain kayi dafa toh kya, aaj bhi, hum ladna toh bhoole nahin,
Aaj bhi dil baaghi hai, bas yehi kaafi hai,
Zinda hoon abhi, baaki hoon abhi,
Meri har saans mein thodi si zindagi hai abhi!”

– Manoj Muntashir

After the lulling romantic song, Rochak throws in a motivational kind of song next. This time, the composition is a bit weak. It sounds great in the first listen, but later on I found that it is quite typical and offers nothing new. The mukhda starts off the song on a slow pace, which only speeds up when the hookline arrives: the only portion of the song that remains with you after the song ends. Wonderfully composed on pensive sounding high notes, that part will definitely hook you on to the song and assure that you don’t leave it halfway. The antara that follows is also quite sombre, and doesn’t leave an impact on you, unless you hear it many times. On a whole, the song’s tune has nothing much to lap up. The arrangements also fail to offer anything different or innovative. The tune is already so laidback, but the arrangements refuse to make it more interesting, staying very minimal until, again, the hookline comes. Strings and guitars can be heard, but nothing stands out very boldly. Sunidhi Chauhan provides to the song, everything that the tune and arrangements could not. Her energy, though diffused in the song, manages to make the song repeat-listenable, even if only once or twice. Lately, she seems to have gotten stereotyped to these kind of songs. The lyrics by Muntashir, too, are good in their purpose of being motivational. A motivational song that fails to motivate a lot, but is functional to an extent. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Zubi Zubi

Singers ~ Sukriti Kakar & Rochak Kohli, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Rochak Kohli, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Mere dil, gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi,
Masti mein gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi!”

– Anjaan

Next up we have Rochak’s final song for the album, and it happens to be an upbeat club number. This one is a remake, of Bappi Lahiri-composed ‘Zooby Zooby’ (Dance Dance), and it is quite a decent remake too, at that. The composition, though faltering at the beginning, turns out to be quite catchy. The mukhda is what I have a problem with — it seems forced and a bit childish. But right from the first time the hookline is sung, till the end of the song, it is an enjoyable track! The great thing is that, like it used to happen before, only the hookline of the original song has been taken, while the rest has been composed afresh. The antara is a nice continuation of the sensuous dance song, but then that line from the mukhda, “humko hai jaan se bhi pyaari aashiqmizajiyaan“, comes back to irritate. The arrangements are fantastic discoesque arrangements, recreating the Bappi Lahiri era in today’s style. Rochak has added groovy beats, and that amazing programming effect he has added to his own voice when he sings the hookline, keeps me waiting for his parts to come! It makes him sound like an awesome robot. 😀 Sukriti also, has sung well, except the mukhda. (Again!) She sounded a lot like a fake Shefali Alvares there, and I found it quite irritating, as I would have if Shefali herself had sung it. The rest of the song, she shines. Kumaar reworks around Anjaan’s original hookline, and pens down aptly enjoyable lyrics. A good remake, spoiled by a mediocre first stanza.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Baby Besharam / Dil Hua Besharam

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas & Meet Bros / Aditi Singh Sharma & Meet Bros, Music by ~ Meet Bros, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

(Nothing to showcase, thanks to Kumaar’s lyrical masterpieces which you’ll read of later on in the passage)

The next song is yet another club song, this one by Meet Bros. The composition sticks quite close to Bollywood’s conventions of composing a ‘catchy’ club song. Right from the beginning Meet Bros “try” to get us caught on to the composition, which, unfortunately, is very staid. The mukhda is bad, and the hookline follows suit. The antara doesn’t provide much respite in this respect either. The arrangements are typical club beats, and it sounds like it should’ve released a year or two ago. Meet Bros have added this weird synthesiser tune, which sounds like the song is part of a comedy movie, an adult comedy to be precise. I wonder if this song was actually composed for some other movie before, and then moved over to ‘Naam Shabana’ Because it couldn’t find a place anywhere else. The vocals are what differentiate one version of the song from the other. It actually had released first in Jasmine’s voice, and that one is outright banal, sounding like it is trying to imitate ‘Yaar Na Miley’ (Kick). Aditi Singh Sharma, though not eligible to win a Best Singer prize or anything for her rendition, provides respite MERELY IN COMPARISON TO Jasmine Sandlas. At least her voice is more club-environment-friendly. Yes, she does spoil some lines with her unnecessarily stylish accent. Oh yeah, and she knows how to pronounce the “Baby” as “Bebe” (which you need to practise if you ever want to make it big in Bollywood as a club singer!), as opposed to Jasmine singing “Baby” as “Bebi”. The way they sing “beyyyyyysharam” is quite torturous. I guess it was first going to be included in ‘Besharam’ as the title track (that would explain the comedic arrangements), until Ishq Bector & Shree D saved us by stepping in. Kumaar’s lyrics feature lyrical masterpieces like “Rafaa dafaa sufi bandon ko karke nasha vasha karlo“, and “Thoda sa bigadne mein bolo na kya harz hai?“. *Slow claps*

Rating: 1/5 for Baby Besharam, 1.5/5 for Dil Hua Besharam


Naam Shabana is a decent album, but not great. Its predecessor had two songs, so it was okay that only one worked. This has four songs, out of which only one works perfectly, the others are decent, and one is bad. For a thriller, the album is apt, with a romantic song, a motivational song, and two situational club songs. However, it will have less of a connect with the audiences. Rochak has done a commendable job though! The only good thing I might remember about this album years later is that it has both Shreya and Sunidhi, modern stalwarts of the Bollywood music industry, lending their voices to the songs.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 1 + 1.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 58%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rozana > Zubi Zubi = Zinda > Dil Hua Besharam > Baby Besharam

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Naam Shabana) = 09

 

Which is your favourite song from Naam Shabana? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A TRIED-AND-TESTED MACHINE! (MACHINE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Dr. Zeus & Viju Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Arafat Mehmood, Niket Pandey, Ikka, Mohammed Irfan, Jasmine Sandlas, Shabbir Ahmed & Late Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 17th March 2017

Machine Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Machine is an upcoming Bollywood romantic thriller starring Kiara Advani and Mustafa Burmawalla, who is the son of Abbas Burmawalla. The directors of the film are Abbas-Mustan themselves, and the movie has been produced by Jayantilal Gada, Haresh Patel, Pranay Chokshi, Abbas-Mustan Films productions, and Dhaval Jayantilal Gada. The film revolves around two racing enthusiasts who fall in love. Abbas-Mustan’a films are known as very massy thrillers, and this seems to be no exception. Music seems to play a very important part in their films, and they make it a point to promote their films’ albums heavily before the movie’s release. And they’ve worked quite well with whatever compoosed they’ve worked with in the past. With the exception of their latest movie before this, ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ which had quite a dull album (and it wasn’t a thriller), many of their albums have been hits. They’ve collaborated with Jatin-Lalit (‘Khiladi’), Anu Malik (‘Baazigar’, ‘Baadshaah’, ‘Soldier’, ‘Ajnabee’), Himesh Reshammiya (‘Humraaz’, ‘Taarzan: The Wonder Car’, ‘Aitraaz’, ’36 China Town’) and Pritam (‘Naqaab’, ‘Race’, ‘Players’, ‘Race 2’). All of these albums were quite popular. However, the album to ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ was below even that. And it was a multicomposer album! This time around, the duo try to change that by roping in a single composer for five songs of the album, and a guest composer for one song. The man behind most of the album here is Tanishk Bagchi, who is currently riding on the success of his two enjoyable songs from ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. He has worked with the duo in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’, for one song (the best song of that album). The guest composer is Dr. Zeus, who also had a song in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’. I’m expecting quite a lot from Tanishk though, so let’s jump right in!


1.Itna Tumhe

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Can’t find any lyrics worth this space)

The soundtrack opens wih a romantic song filled with the Bhatts’ templated sound, but also paying “homage” to another old song, which, since it hasn’t been credited, has to be a “coincidence”. The song’s first line itself makes you instantly think of “Aakhir Tumhe Aana Hai” (Yalgaar), but all the coincidences flee at the end of that line, as composer Tanishk Bagchi sets the song to its very own composition that is quite catchy in itself. Now, Tanishk has never really given such a templated song before, at least not in the romance genre of songs, so it takes a little time to get accustomed to the fact that Tanishk has composed it. Till then, though, the song grows on you. The similarities in the first line of the mukhda notwithstanding, the rest of the song fares quite well as a romantic Bollywood song. Some places sound very heavily heard-before, but that doesn’t lessen the likeability in any way. The antara with its high notes sounds a bit uncomfortable to the ears at first, but sets in after a couple of listens. As a whole, it sounds like a song that the Bhatts had reserved but then never got a film to add it into. The English interlude by Shashaa Tirupati sounds very generic, but again, good enough. The arrangements are what makes the song even more likeable — the strings at the beginning are nice, and the digital beats are charming. Not to mention the cool twinkling sounds that Tanishk had added, which adds considerably to the ‘mechanical’ sound of the song, given that the name of the movie is “Machine”. Yasser Desai (who had dented last year with a couple of songs in ‘Beiimaan Love’ which I had no time to review) doesn’t quite fit in with the song, and his voice is kind of hard to digest; it sounds too robotic. Autotuned heavily, it is quite weird to listen to at first, but as everything else does, his voice also sets in later. Shashaa does her English interlude beautifully, but other than that, doesn’t have any other lines. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics are quite laidback, not to mention that the conscious effort to add the “..aana hai” and other rhyming stuff at the end of every hookline sounds a bit too forced! An above average start to the soundtrack, but gets the “Machine” theme right, because of the great arrangements and accidentally mechanical vocals.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Chatur Naar

Singers ~ Nakash Aziz & Shashaa Tirupati & Ikka, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Niket Pandey, Rap by ~ Ikka

(Utterly banal lyrics!)

Next up we get a party song, which is mandatory in every Abbas-Mustan film, so that they can show the actor driving up in a cool Lamborghini, and then the branded sunglasses of the actress. This time, without Pritam, they have to resort themselves to a quite low-standard party song (I believe that Pritam has given them the best party songs in the past) which tries to be a remake of the classic ‘Ek Chatur Naar’ (Padosan) but fails, because it sounds nothing like it except in bits and parts. And since they haven’t credited the old song’s musicians, I’m taking it to be a ‘spin-off’ like I did for ‘Mere Miyan Gaye England’ (Rangoon). The composition is upbeat and might (notice that I say MIGHT) get Gen Y dancing to its beats, which I still think are too loud for today’s music sensibilities. Though the composition is something I wouldn’t care to listen to again, the arrangements are quite youthful and lively. The beats really do make the song enjoyable, and Tanishk’s offbeat additions make the arrangements all the more weirdly likeable. Weird vocal tweaks added in the weirdest places are quite funny to hear. Otherwise, the composition is quite generic. The vocals are enjoyable as well. Nakash Aziz is enjoying himself in this party track, and his variations make the song worth listening. Shashaa Tirupati sings her lines like a typical club song singer, and she gets her voice programmed heavily as is the tradition in such songs. Ikka’s rap is very short thankfully, and it is not that great either. The other lyrics by Niket Pandey are another set of words more bent towards rhyming instead of making sense. Heard as a club song, it might work. But if you hear it thinking it is a remake, it will spoil the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Brake’An Fail

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rajveer Singh & Ikka, Music by ~ Dr. Zeus, Lyrics by ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rap by ~ Ikka

“Teri Meri Kahaani, duniya yaad karegi soch le,
Brake’An ne mereya fail te sajjna, rok saki te rok le!”

– Jasmine Sandlas

Dr. Zeus enters the soundtrack with his guest composition, another club/party song. Abbas-Mustan seriously can’t go without adding at least two of these in their albums! The song surprisingly, shows no resemblance to previous Dr. Zeus songs, and I was really surprised when I couldn’t find any of those screeching ladies and that trademark Dr. Zeus shattering glass in the song! The composition is quite a melancholic one, considering that it is for a club song. I mean, if he removed the club beats, it could just as well go as an undercover agent and place itself in a Sanjay Leela Bhansali soundtrack as the melancholic track. (Okay, just kidding!) The hookline “teri meri kahaani…” is quite catchy, and the rest of the song too, isn’t bad at all. The composition is actually catchy for once. It is one of those Dr. Zeus songs (probably the only one?) that doesn’t irritate. The arrangements are suitable for the song, and this time, Dr. Zeus aptly replaces those screaming ladies (from ‘Happy New Year’s ‘Lovely’ and ‘Ek Paheli Leela’s ‘Desi Look’) with car brake sounds, according to the theme of the movie, car racing. Jasmine’s vocals suit the song well, and the song wouldn’t have had the same impact with somebody else singing it. Rajveer Singh has quite little to contribute but Ikka has an extra long rap in the middle somewhere, which we just have to wait for it to end. Jasmine herself writes the lyrics for this one, and they are completely in Punjabi, and they seem quite meaningless, considering that it is a Club song. A good song from Dr. Zeus after all those screaming ladies and all that shattering glass.

Rating: 3/5

 

4.Tu Hi Toh Mera

Singer ~ Yasser Desai, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Very staid lyrics!)

Tanishk re-enters wih the fourth track of the album and one can’t help but think of Disney Princesses when this track starts. The arrangements really increase the Disney feel of the song. The composition is quite likeable until that jarring Pakistani pop styled line comes up and the hookline that follows too, follows the same template. The parts where the tempo is slow and everything actually sounds like a ballroom dance, are the best parts of the song, while everything else sounds below average, straight out of a Bhatt movie. The arrangements too, excel in the ballroom portions of the song. The sparkling sounds, coupled with the extravagant strings, set very fantastic arrangements to the song, and especially the beginning of the song, which is very waltzy, sounds amazing. But again, the parts before and during the hookline, sound very laidback and clichéd. There is a nice Spanish interlude which is enjoyable as well. Again, Yasser tries to be Arijit desperately, and one can’t help but sit and point out parts where he sounds a LOT like Arijit, which is almost the entire song. It would’ve been better for the makers to have just called in Arijit. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics here too, are very very heard-before and offer nothing new. A Bhatt-Disney fusion doesn’t work so well.

Rating: 2/5

 

5.Tera Junoon

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

“Jeena muhaal hai abb, tera sawaal hai abb,
De bataa, tu zara, kya naam loon main tere pyaar ka!”

– Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

Finally, here comes what I was expecting from Tanishk after he showed us his versatility in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. The composer takes his much-used desert-nomadic styled arrangements (he used it before in ‘Rabba’ from ‘Sarbjit’) and weaves a wonderful melody through it. The composition is just so melodious, it hooks you right away. It is one of those songs that you end up loving even though they are so ordinary, simple and heard-before. However, what made me love this one in spite of all these factors, was the simplicity of the composition, the fact that the déjà vu in the composition didn’t matter to the makers, and they just presented this song with a very simple coating. The arrangements are fascinating, with the mandolin rising high above everything else, even the strings. The claps give wonderful beats that are the highlight of the song. The overlying Arabic flavour works wonderfully in favour of the song. And the vocals are beautiful! Jubin sings in a way I’ve never heard him sing before, so much so that I hardly recognized him the first time I heard the song, until I read the credits! Well, it just goes to show his versatility. Arafat Mehmood is joined by Mohammed Irfan the singer to write this one, and I must say, the composition saved the lyrics, which resort to weird-sounding words to make it work. A great song hidden in an album of songs that are concentrated more in the “average” zone!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Cheez Badi

Singers ~ Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Viju Shah, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Tu Cheez Badi hai mast mast, tu cheez badi hai mast!”

– Late Anand Bakshi

The last song of the album was a later addition in that it released much later than the other five tracks did. And since I’m always so late in writing reviews, I get the advantage of adding such latecomer songs in my reviews. 😉 Anyway, about the song. As you might already have gauged by reading the name, the song is a remake (this time an official one) of the 1994 super-duper hit track by Viju Shah (who was one of the most innovative young composers of the time) ‘Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast Mast’ (Mohra). And the man who has been churning out one remake after another, Tanishk Bagchi, is in charge of this one. It was a relief to see him remaking it, instead of T-Series’ other go-to’s for remakes these days, Gourov-Roshin. So after two great 90s songs remade, Tanishk remakes this one with the club theme in mind. It starts off like an ordinary club song, but then that trademark “Pa ni saaaa…” from the old song comes in to indicate that it is a remake of that song. The composition contains almost nothing new except for a short line that Udit Narayan sings (he has redubbed everything for this song; his voice clipping hasn’t been retained from the old song). And yes, that line sounds quite odd in the song. It doesn’t gel in well with the rest of the song. The previous two remakes by Tanishk of course, had the old song’s tune retained, so this one is an odd one out that way. I liked the way he brought the old song’s antara’s tune to become the mukhda and then the antara too, of this version. The arrangements disappoint, with very everyday club beats. The mandolin playing the hookline’s tune provides respite, and so do the electronic tabla beats, but otherwise, the EDM is quite heavy, and too loud as well. The interludes both consist of very heavy EDM that is tough to digest with one of your favourite old songs. I enjoyed the small portion where Tanishk incorporated the old song though, in the second interlude. Vocals by Udit Narayan are awesome; he always manages to sound young! Neha Kakkar too, sings her parts well, without adding unnecessary nuances anywhere. Shabbir Ahmed’s additions to Anand Bakshi’s original lyrics are not any more crazy than the original, and the part which goes “zabardast dast” really calls for a cringe. Not one of Tanishk’s best remakes, but I would say it isn’t his “dosh dosh” as new lyrics have been added, unlike his other remakes (with the exception of the “Badrinath” title song).

Rating: 3/5


Machine seems to be an album miserably bowing down to supposed public demands. There’s a remake, three club songs, three Bhatt-ish romantic songs (of which one excels). Tanishk’s songs range from one sode of the spectrum to the other. If some are utterly boring, some are just as beautiful. Dr. Zeus gets it right with his sole song, but it won’t be something on my playlist for long. A tried-and-tested machine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 3.5 + 2 + 4.5 + 3 = 18

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Junoon > Brake’An Fail > Itna Tumhe = Cheez Badi > Tu Hi Toh Mera = Chatur Naar

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 07 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Machine) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Machine? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂