NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

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NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1 (ITTEFAQ, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR, RIBBON, RAM RATAN, SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA & JULIE 2 – Mini Music Reviews)

November 2017 Round-Up #1

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1

This round-up covers the following albums of November 2017 releases: ‘Ittefaq’ by Tanishk Bagchi, ‘The House Next Door’ by Girishh G, ‘Ribbon’ by Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai, ‘Ram Ratan’ by Bappi Lahiri, ‘Julie 2’ by Rooh Band, Viju Shah & Javed-Mohsin, and ‘Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Zain-Sam-Raees, Rashid Khan & Anand Raj Anand.

The ones that haven’t been covered in this post will be included in the next round-up for November, or will be written about in a separate post all for themselves.



♦ Intense & Intriguing, Ittefaq Se: ITTEFAQ Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Anjaan, Tanishk Bagchi & Groot
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 23rd October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the song: Saavn
Buy the song: iTunes


The only song from this film is a Atmos-Pop remake of “Raat Baaki” (Namak Halaal), named Ittefaq Se. Tanishk Bagchi is back to his remaking streak, after some nice original music in “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” with partner Vayu. He keeps the original song intact, and that’s good, and he mysterious vibe that accompanies the song goes well with the setting of the film. The beats are nice as well. The only place the song lacks is the vocals, where Jubin sounds like he always does, and is starting to sound monotonous now, and Nikhita eats up her words while producing an over-stylish voice. I would have preferred Neeti Mohan on this one. The change in lyrics from “Pyaar Se” to “Ittefaq Se” actually fits in really well!


A good remake, that called for better voices behind it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Song: 3.5 

Song Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 38 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Ittefaq) = 39


♦ As Always, Romance Predominates: THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR Music Review

♪ Music by: Girishh G
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Vayu Srivastava & Chen-Yu Maglin
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 16th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the album: Saavn
Buy the album: iTunes


Girishh G starts the album off with a dulcet Mithoon-with-Bhatts-like melody, O Mere Sanam, that impresses because of its complexity, like every other Mithoon melody. Benny Dayal sings in his trademark husky tone for romantic songs, and the hookline is something that gives you goosebumps. Girissh’s piano is the highlight of the arrangements, while Shakeel Azmi’s lyrics are beautiful with a delicious assemblage of Urdu words. Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai is aptly disturbing, demonic as it is, and the composition is frankly very bad. It is Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics that make the song disturbing, and not because it is scary! Because it is cringeworthy. Suraj Jagan spoils the vocals, his co-singer Shilpa Natarajan could’ve done just fine without him. Xiao Xiao Ma is a haunting Chinese lullaby-ish number, which is good as long as it lasts, volatilizing shortly afterwards. The last track, The House Next Door, is a short instrumental piece, which again has the problem of not being captivating, despite the wonderful use of strings.


Not the best album for Girishh to debut in Bollywood with!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 1.5 + 3 + 3 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध।< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Mere Sanam > The House Next Door = Xiao Xiao Ma > Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai

 



♦ Cute Little Ribbon: RIBBON Music Review

♪ Music by: Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Sagar & Puneet Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 31st October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Mikey McCleary presents a Sufi rock song, Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai, to start off the album, and also introduces a new singer Aniket Mangrulkar, a singer who is a much better tuned rock singer than the much-in-demand Amit Mishra. The composition by McCleary is irresistible, especially in the hook parts. The rhythms are spot on, and the lyrics too, are meaningful. Sagar Desai, the second composer, comes with a dulcet number, Har Mod Par Umeed Hai, which couldn’t have been better sung by anyone other than Jasleen Royal with her sweet voice. The composition is slow and jazzy, and so it takes some time to love, but it is at par with the first song on the lyrics front.


This seems to be the season for short and sweet (and most importantly, script-driven) soundtracks.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai > Har Mod Par Umeed Hai



♦ Bappi’s Music Ratan Has Lost Its Shine!: RAM RATAN Music Review

♪ Music by: Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Deepak Sneh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


So, I only heard this album because the music composer was Bappi Lahiri, and I should’ve realised he is so irrelevant these days as far as composing goes. Nevertheless, here’s the “review” — a highly uninterested one, at that. Nand Lala starts off thinking it is ‘Bairi Piya’ (Devdas), but then goes off into a ‘Maiyya Yashoda’ (Hum Saath Saath Hain), and then becomes cheesier than any Krishna song ever. Palak’s cheap vocals do not help. The composition is bad, as expected, and Bappi doesn’t give anything great in the arrangements either. Instead he adds a cringeworthy English “rap” in the interlude! 😣 Nagada Nagada is the most dated 2000s Gujarati dhol mix, and Raja Hasan and Bhoomi Trivedi are made to sing like pop artists making a Garba album to be sold outside temples. Yeh Hai Dance Bar is as cheesy as its name — and Bappi is singing it himself. He tries to make it full of techno sounds but it flops. Jal Jal Jal Rahi Hain Raatein, starts off as if it could be the best of the album, with the irresistible sensuous tabla beats that R.D. Burman used in ‘Jaane Do Na’ (Saagar), but as soon as Sadhana starts with her outdated voice, it goes downhill. Mohammed Irfan too, sings like Bappi Lahiri! It turns out to be the most cringeworthy song on the album.


Bappi Lahiri clearly has lost his Music Ratan!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 1.5 + 0.5 + 2 = 6.5

Album Percentage: 32.5% 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Why don’t you just skip it? I might be the only one in the world to have had the honour of listening to it!



♦ Reprise Versions Zaroor Sunna: SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA Music Review

♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Raees-Zain-Saim, Rashid Khan & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kunaal Vermaa, Shakeel Azmi, Kumaar & Gaurav Krishna Bansal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of the three versions that Jogi appears in, any layman would pick Shafqat’s version as the best – owing to his seasoned voice and classical prowess, and amazing nuances, not to mention Arko’s clever usage of wedding sounds at the beginning. The duet version is spoiled by Yasser trying to ape Shafqat’s singing style, and Arko’s typical duff rhythms with harmonica. The female version by Aakanksha Sharma is good too, where Aakanksha sounds like a better version of Palak Muchhal. The overall composition, though, is typical of Arko now, and he needs to move on from this. It is the sister of ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ and ‘Nazm Nazm’. Kaushik-Akash-Guddu compose Main Hoon Saath Tere for JAM8, another song that relies on the company’s previous success, ‘Zaalima’. The digital tune is tweaked, and Harshdeep gets kicked out, and some notes undergo permutations and combinations, and voila! We get this song. The hookline reminds me of some song, but I cannot remember at all which one! Arijit’s singing is very dull and he seems asleep, but Shivani Bhayana’s female version is pretty good, with different arrangements. The song falls flat in the antara though. It is Pallo Latke by newcomers Raees-Zain-Saim, which surprisingly becomes the song of the album, as an individual song (not including the various versions). As a remake of a Rajasthani folk song, it is surprisingly good, and will do until we get to hear some real Rajasthani folk music in “Padmavati”. Jyotica Tangri sounds amazing here, sweeter than she does in her Neha Kakkar avatar. Yasser spoils the song again, along with Fazilpuria’s annoyingly interrupting rap. The Dr. Zeus-esque tumbi seems out of place in a Rajasthani song though. Rashid Khan returns after a loooooooooong time, to give another typical romantic song Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki, again in three versions, out of which once again, Shafqat’s steals the thunder. The composition is nothing special, it is Rashid’s usual sweet as sugar tune which is oh-so-predictable. Asees sounds sweet in her version, while newcomer Asit Tripathy also does well. Asit’s version scores high because of the beautiful Rajasthani arrangements — the ravanhatta being most prominent. The lyrics resemble those of ‘Main Rang Sharbaton Ka’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and are good enough until they become very cringeworthy with the Hinglish portion. Last on the album is veteran Anand Raaj Anand’s angsty rock song (in two versions) Mera Intkaam Dekhegi about a boy warning his girlfriend (ex-girlfriend??) that if she rejects him, she will have to see his revenge. Oh, the melodrama. She should just say, “Oh alright, let me get my camera too so the world can see it too.” Krishna hurts the ears with his painful rendition, and Anand’s was skip-worthy right from the beginning.


An ensemble of composers bring five pleasant, but heard-before songs, and are forced to make innumerable versions of them, to make sure we never forget them. No wonder the newcomers steal the cake. 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 1 = 37

Album Percentage: 67.27%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jogi (Shafqat Version) > Pallo Latke = Jogi (Duet) = Jogi (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Asit) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Shafqat) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Female) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Male) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Krishna) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Anand)

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 39 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana) = 40

 



♦ Raunchy Diaries: JULIE 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Viju Shah, Rooh Band, Atif Ali & Javed-Mohsin
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan & Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 18th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Rooh Band & Atif Ali’s debut in Bollywood starts off with quite a corny title song Oh Julie, which is good enough as far as the arrangements and rhythm go, but the vocals and lyrics pull it down; stuff we have heard time and again. Their second song Koi Hausla Toh Hoh, also sung by their leading vocalist Anupam Nair, is the everyday Pakistani pop, something even the Bhatts would resist from including in their albums now, with staid lyrics like “Saanson Ka Chalte Rehna Hi Toh zindagi nahin”. Veteran composer Viju Shah’s stint of three songs for this album is devoid of much electronic disturbance. The romantic song Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai, is a typical 90s melody, in which the singer Mistu Bardhan sounds like Sadhana Sargam does in her live concerts. The voice is harsh to the ears. The reprise version Aise Kya Baat Hai, in Palak Muchhal’s voice, is better only because the voice is more ear-friendly. Otherwise, the song is just as flat and dated. His third song happens to be a raunchy item number, Kharama Kharama, sung by Pawni Pandey, and which surprisingly fares much better, thanks to the irresistible South Indian rhythm. Again, it is bogged down by a typically 90s composition, and the lyrics obviously. Javed-Mohsin, nephews of Sajid-Wajid, present the last song, Mala Seenha, sung by Mamta Sharma, a tedious rehash of their uncles’ item songs with the singer. Again, the rhythms are the only worthy parts of the song.


An album that you will automatically avoid.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 + 3 = 15

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kharama Kharama = Mala Seenha > Aise Kya Baat Hai = Oh Julie > Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai = Koi Hausla Toh Hoh



 

Hope you enjoyed this Round-up! Second one coming soon!!

DUOS GOOD(WAAH), SANDEEP-ANU JUDWAA!! (JUDWAA 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Meet Bros., Sandeep Shirodkar & Anu Malik
♪ Lyrics by: Dev Kohli, Danish Sabri & Sonu Saggu
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 29th September 2017

Judwaa 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Judwaa 2 is an upcoming Bollywood comedy movie, starring Varun Dhawan (x2), Jacqueline Fernandez and Taapsee Pannu. The film is directed by David Dhawan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. The film’s title indicates that it a sequel to 1996’s ‘Judwaa’, because in this era of intolerance, we sadly cannot tolerate a remake which would just make the 90s kids conscious of how old they are that a movie from the 90s is being remade! Anyway, the film looks like a typical David Dhawan film, and that means mindless fun. The music in a David Dhawan film is usually light too, and recently it has been Sajid-Wajid who have been composing for his films, but because it is the latest trend, Dhawan also tries the multicomposer formula for this album. Sajid-Wajid are part of the album; his albums are incomplete without them, but only one song this time. The other two composers are Meet Bros., composing an original track, and Sandeep Shirodkar (a well-known background score composer) gets to remake two songs from Anu Malik’s original album to ‘Judwaa’. Sandeep had scored the BGM for ‘Chashme Baddoor’and ‘Main Tera Hero’ so we know how he got onto this album, and not Tanishk Bagchi, the usual go-to for remakes. So let’s see how good this album is!


1. Chalti Hai Kya Nau Se Barah

Singers ~ Dev Negi & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Anu Malik, Music Recreated by ~ Sandeep Shirodkar, Lyrics by ~ Dev Kohli

Obviously, the makers open the album with the remake of ‘Tan Tana Tan’ and very creatively name it ‘Chalti Hai Kya Nau Se Barah’. Now, the composer who has been roped in for this album, only to do the remakes, Sandeep Shirodkar, has kept most of the song intact. The only aberration he does to old song, is that he cuts out two lines of the antaras, in both antaras. And the song still sounds good. Also, he makes the pace of the song quicker, making it more enjoyable in today’s times. I appreciate how he didn’t add any composition of his own, and though it doesn’t make the song excellent either, at least it doesn’t add any atrocious new sounds to this song. All the iconic pieces from the old song, like the “Tyaun Tyaun” music that begins it, and the female singer repeating the hookline after the male singer, have been retained, and that will increase the song’s nostalgia value, for the 90s kids, who now will realise they’re eighteen-plus year olds. 😄 Also, Sandeep’s sounds are glitzier than Anu’s from the old song, and definitely has a lot more going on, like the amazing electric guitars, synthetic strings and the whole club setting. The singers do justice to the song, and Dev Negi surprises, singing a song I never thought I’d hear him sing. On the other hand, Neha Kakkar’s portions seemed forced into the song, just for the sake of giving Jacqueline and Taapsee something to say. The lyrics by Dev Kohli have been retained completely. A good remake with nothing much tampered with.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Suno Ganpati Bappa Morya

Singer ~ Amit Mishra, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

Since this album is basically an album of remakes interspersed with an equal number of original songs, the first original song appears now. Sajid-Wajid, after that atrocious album ‘Daddy’, return here, with a director who always gets the best out of them. However, I’m not too sure of that after listening to this song. The composition is a good one, with only the hookline sounding contrived. The antara especially has an amazing composition; something Sajid-Wajid should do more! I particularly loved the fast paced line in the antara. Amit Mishra delivers the song with an equal amount of zest, and presents the picture of a naughty Varun Dhawan’s character very well, through his slight gimmicks throughout the song. Sajid-Wajid, as always, though, score with their arrangements. The foreign band Pandora, was an amazing inclusion here in this (supposedly) Ganpati song. The band brings in cool instrumental pieces like that signature trumpet of the song, the amazing percussion that starts the song off, and of course the scintillating Spanish guitars in the antara. An amazing beatboxer performs in the beginning of the song too. Thankfully, this Ganpati song doesn’t get abominated by Sajid-Wajid’s typical dhols, though they do make an entry at the end of the song. The lyrics are unnerving, especially the hook lyrics. But again, what can we expect from a Casanova like Raja? 😂 Not the best David Dhawan has gotten from Sajid-Wajid, but definitely a good song.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Oonchi Hai Building 2.0

Singers ~ Anu Malik & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Anu Malik, Music Recreated by ~ Sandeep Shirodkar, Lyrics by ~ Dev Kohli

I’d like to start by congratulating the makers on naming this remake in an extra-creative way by adding a ‘2.0’ at the end of the song’s name. I’m waiting for Rajinikanth in Shankar’s ‘2.0’ by the way, and these people aren’t helping! Sandeep returns to remake another “gem” from Anu’s original soundtrack for ‘Judwaa’, and sadly, or happily, I don’t know, this one is utterly bad. The original was bad itself, I don’t know how they even thought of remaking it. A cringeworthy replacement of lyrics now makes the female refrain “aaja aaja aaja mere swagger waale raja“, which Neha Kakkar sings so beautifully, “Swagger” sounds like “Sagar”. Anu Malik has clearly redubbed vocals for the song, and it’s not sounding any better. Also, Sandeep adds too many extra noises, that make the song sound yucky. And that extra long, never-ending antara, oh God! I would say SKIP it, but you’re not going to end this year without it falling onto your eardrum in some way or the other.

Rating: 2/5 {I don’t even know why I’m rating it so high so -0.5} = 1.5/5

 

4. Aa Toh Sahi

Singers ~ Meet Bros. & Neha Kakkar, Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap by ~ Roach Killa

The second original song on the album, and the last song on the album, happen to be the same thing. Meet Bros. enter now, with a groovy song following the Tropical House genre, with some delicious EDM to tease our senses. Sadly enough though, along with that, they serve us some of the same old hip-hop stuff that we have been hearing for five years or so. The hookline has been composed nicely, and makes sure that people will get hooked to the song. It is the mukhda that might just prevent the song from growing though. The arrangements sound a lot like those from ‘Nashe Si Chadh Gayi’ (Befikre), and when I checked the music credits, I found out why. Mikey McCleary has programmed the track, and that’s where the amazing international sounding beats came from. The vocals are good enough, and though this is Neha’s third song on the soundtrack, she sounds the best here. Meet Bros, who are pros at imitating Mika, but sounding better than Mika while doing so, do it here too. Roach Killa’s rap is forgettable except that it sounds a lot like Badshah’s ‘Mercy’. Lyrics are middling, using the patriotic “Dil Diya Hai Jaan Bhi Denge” line as a romantic one. 😆 Good, not great. But it definitely had the potential with the amazing beats!

Rating: 3/5


Judwaa 2 is one of the weakest David Dhawan albums, and the reason seems to be that half the album has been made by remaking the songs of ‘Judwaa’. With lack of innovation or creativity, a good album cannot be expected. What ‘Main Tera Hero’, ‘Chashme Baddoor’ had were a) solo composers, and b) original songs. That being said, the duos who made the original songs, Sajid-Wajid and Meet Bros have done well, but Sandeep has done his best to try and make his songs judwaas of Anu’s originals!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 1.5 + 3.5 + 3 = 11.5

Album Percentage: 57.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: ‘Chalti Hai Kya Nau Se Barah = Suno Ganpati Bappa Morya > Aa Toh Sahi > Oonchi Hai Building 2.0

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 33 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 35

 

Which is your favourite song from Judwaa 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOT A VERY IMPORTANT ALBUM!! (VIP 2: LALKAR – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sean Roldan
♪ Lyrics by: Raqueeb Alam
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 26th June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th August 2017

VIP 2: Lalkar Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


VIP 2 (Lalkar) is an upcoming Tamil film that has been dubbed into Hindi, starring Dhanush and Kajol, directed by Soundarya Rajinikanth and produced by Dhanush and Kalaipuli S. Thanu. It is an action comedy, and a sequel to 2014’s ‘Vellailla Pattadhaari’. Knowing nothing about the first film or its music, except for the fact that it had been composed by talented young composer Anirudh, I’m diving into this album. It has been composed by Sean Roldan, another relatively new composer in the South, who I’ve heard has composed really good music for ‘Power Paandi’ earlier this year. Let’s hope he does the same for his first technically Hindi album!


1. Life Of Raghuvaran – Chal Re Raja

Singers ~ Rahul Nambiar & Yogi B, Backing Vocals ~ Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan

Sean Roldan starts the album with a rock song that doesn’t quite impress. The composition is all over the place, very hard to grasp, and understand. The hookline too, is literally very odd and weird. It reminds me of a same kind of song from ‘Kabali’, which was mediocre as well. The pulsating arrangements at least provide some entertainment in the song. Sean Roldan manages to create an enticing and hard-hitting rock rhythm, and the electric guitars (Josh Mark Raj) and drums (Ramkumar Kanakarajan) especially have been played amazingly to ensure that followers of heavy metal would love this song. Sean fuses this with folk instruments like the thavil (Hariprasad). The vocals are not quite welcoming in the song either; they are very crude, and supposed-to-be full of attitude, but it comes across as fake. The English rap sounds like an unwanted interruption in the proceedings of the song. The antara is better; its tune has a kind of Carnatic touch to it, or so I felt. (“Phir Se…”) The lyrics, or at least those that were intelligible, seem to be an inspirational and motivational song slash title song. Not a very enticing rock song, but the arrangements are splendid!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Angel Of Raghuvaran – Tu Mili Hai

Singers ~ Abhay Jodhpurkar & M.M. Manasi, Backing Vocals ~ Vasanth, Sean Roldan, Sudha & Ravi G. 

As soon as this song starts, it reminds me so heavily of ‘Jadoo Rawan Rawan’ from ‘Kabali’. The composition is based on the same raag, I guess. The composition itself is that kind, which haunts you too, but doesn’t leave a lasting impact on your ears. As long as it plays, it sucks you in and you find it impressive, only to forget it right away after it is over. It still is a very good composition; it’s just that it sounds so heard-before, and way too heavy to hear again. I see that Roldan has tried to infuse a kind of Tango-like rhythm, to fuse it with the Carnatic composition, but it fails. The arrangements are heavenly; the strings (Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra) are ravishing, while the twinkly sounds are just marvellous. The flute (Vishnu Vijay) and the strings are what upholds the arrangement though. Drums (Ramkumar Kanakarajan) and trumpets (Jaigopi & Ben) increase the multidimensionality of the arrangements. The vocals are functional; Abhay Jodhpurkar does well as the male singer, but M.M. Manasi sounds kind of out of place here, with her thick voice. The lyrics are the same old romantic lyrics that we find in these songs. A good composition, but too many times heard-before!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Torture of Raghuvaran – Main Ga Raha

Singer ~ K.G. Ranjith, Backing Vocals ~ Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan

This song sounds interesting right from the beginning, where it starts off in a kind of humorous way, and right enough, it opens up into a hilarious song about men singing about not wanting to get married! The Carnatic backdrop of the song makes it all the more funny to listen to, and the composition too, seems to be Carnatic-based. The hookline is instantly likeable, and cute. The backing vocalists (Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan) do well, and increase the comic value of the song. They complement the lead singer, K.G. Ranjith, who sounds a lot like Ayushmann Khurana, very well. The arrangements are fabulous. The traditional wedding brass band (Ben & Jaigopi) has been played against the backdrop of wonderfully rustic Carnatic folk music, complete with nadaswaram (D. Balasubramaniam), and the wonderful kuthu-style percussion (Two Man Army), which actually suits this song. I pity how Bollywood misuses and overuses that rhythm. The lyrics are extremely funny too. An enjoyable song!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Raghuvaran Vs. Vasundhara – Doori Zara Banake

Singers ~ Benny Dayal & Shaktishree Gopalan, Backing Vocals ~ Maria Roe Vincent & Sudha

This song sounds like a face-off between men and women kind of like ‘Thug Le’ (Ladies Vs. Ricky Bahl). The composition starts off quite abruptly, and doesn’t actually suck you in until Benny’s lines come in. The arrangements are beautiful! It starts off like a retro funk song with trumpets/brass instruments, and nice digital sounds. It later escalates to a nice and beautiful violin-oriented song in the interlude, where the Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra shows its wonderful skills yet again. The Guitars by Sean Roldan are very impressive too. The composition after the interlude is still below par, and doesn’t really hook you still. The two vocalists do well, especially Benny Dayal, who is incidentally the only Bollywood singer on this soundtrack. The lyrics make the song sound like it is a kind of face off between the two lead characters. Good with its arrangements, but falls flat with the tune!

Rating: 3/5

 

5. Vasundhara – The Empress Arrives

(Instrumental)

This instrumental is quite a grand one, for the entry of Kajol’s character. The feel that strikes you right when the song starts with those trumpets is that she’s a villain from a 1970s Bollywood film, whose music is composed by R.D. Burman. But then those EDM beats arrive and make the song even more interesting. A mysterious ‘Pink Panther’-esque portion follows, which is hinged on just the trumpets (Jaigopi). There is nothing much to hear here, except the mysterious yet whimsical sound of it all.

Rating: 2.5/5


VIP 2 (Lalkar) is yet another dubbed album that we will hear and forget. Forget the dubbed aspect of it; I’m sure it won’t be a memorable album even down south in its original language! Sean Roldan, I’ve heard great things about, but sadly, my first encounter with his music was not all that great! Not a very important album! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 2.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 62%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Torture of Raghuvaran (Main Ga Raha) > Angel of Raghuvaran (Tu Mili Hai) > Raghuvaran Vs Vasundhara (Doori Zara Banake) > Life of Raghuvaran (Chal Re Raja) = Vasundhara (The Empress Arrives)

 

What is your favourite song from VIP 2 (Lalkar)? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MUBARAKAN! A FLOP ALBUM HAS BEEN BORN! (MUBARAKAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Hassan Jahangir, Amaal Mallik, Rishi Rich, Yash Anand & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Badshah & Hassan Jahangir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th July 2017

Mubarakan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mubarakan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy of errors starring Arjun Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor, Anil Kapoor, Ileana D’Cruz, Athiya Shetty and Ratna Pathak Shah in the lead roles. The film is directed by the only director in Bollywood who still insists on doing comedies with a cast larger than a herd of cows, Anees Bazmee and produced by Ashwin Varde, Murad Khetani and Balwinder Singh Janjua. The film’s plot consists of such never-before-tried aspects like — double roles, a love quadrangle, a huge Punjabi family and Punjabi dance numbers. It is going to redefine Bollywood, I’m sure of it. 😏 If you didn’t get that sarcasm, moving on. The music is by T-Series, and that means multiple composers. Thankfully, one name out of the three composers, is a relief, it being the name of Amaal Mallik, the young composer proving his mettle out there. He gets two, upbeat dance tracks, so I hope those are catchy! The next two composers are Gourov-Roshin, returning after treating us to a small break from their remakes, and sadly they have three songs, and Rishi Rich with Yash Anand, who have composed the title song of the film. Let’s just get this over with, eh?


1. The Goggle Song

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam, Armaan Malik, Neeti Mohan, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A wedding song to start the album, this one is an enjoyable tune from Amaal. Not the best he can do for sure, but it still makes you groove to the beat. The beat itself is infectious, with the composer adding quirky sound effects making it sound better. The ensemble of singers does really well for a wedding song, and for once, Tulsi sounds better than Neeti. The lyrics are mediocre, but hilarious at times. A good wedding track, but not very innovative.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Mubarakan (Title Track)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Juggy D, Sukriti Kakar & Badshah, Music by ~ Rishi Rich & Yash Anand, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Badshah, Yamma Yamma Credits: Music by ~ R.D. Burman

“This is the Rishi Rich beat.” The song starts with this obvious statement, and an unexpected incorporation of some portions ‘Yamma Yamma’ (Shaan). The actual composition falls flat, but it is saved by R.D. Burman’s old song, which plays throughout, and its addition was quite creative. Vocals are horrible. Lyrics are horrible. Rap is horrible. Arrangements are not so horrible. (Mostly, it is the awesome oud from the old song). In short, a horrible song, but for the arrangements and the old song’s portions.
P.S. I wouldn’t call this a Remake as such.
Rating: 2.5/5 (0.5 bonus for using that old song wisely)

 

3. Jatt Jaguar

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Navraj Hans & Apeksha Dandekar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another typical Punjabi song, the Punjabi flavour accentuated even more by a mediocre composition that barely manages to grasp your attention, except at the hook. Even Vishal doesn’t sound as energetic as always, but Navraj does. Lyrics are typical. Arrangements are typical, but there are traces Amaal’s digital quirks. At many places the tune seems like some old song I can’t recall! 😥 Not the best Amaal can do.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Haathon Mein Thhe Haath

Singers ~ Papon, Altamash Faridi, Aditi Singh Sharma & Arpita Mukherjee, Backing Vocals by ~ Rinku Giri, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A typical Pakistani pop-esque song follows, and it immediately strikes me as Papon’s worst song after a long, long time. The composition is staid and clichéd, his vocals do not help at all. Aditi sounds over stylish as usual. Those typical digital beats add to the melancholia. Backing vocalists add to the staleness, especially the Sufi one. Lyrics are something you won’t even notice. A song that clearly doesn’t know where it belongs.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Hawa Hawa

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Prakriti Kakar, Original Composition by ~ Hassan Jahangir, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The hit Pakistani pop song remade, with a typppppical kuthu beat and rhythm! Mika singing increases the headache, and the new composition is just unbearable. The hookline is good, but the other parts fall flat. The female vocals by Prakriti sound good though. Lyrics belong to a Sajid-Wajid soundtrack. Why????
Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

Singers ~ Rinku Giri & Puja Basnet, Original Composition Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another Punjabi folksy song ends the album, this time a mélange of two Punjabi folk songs, ‘Kala Doriya’ and ‘Baari Barsi’. The composition doesn’t hook you at all; in fact it sounds like ‘Jatt Jaguar Part 2’. The new singer Rinku Giri is the typical Punjabi male singer affair, he sounds like Diljit Dosanjh. Arrangements are “louder louder”. Lyrics are typical. A song that relies on folk songs to propel it, but fails.
Rating: 2/5


Mubarakan is yet another feather in Bollywood’s cap of Punjabi albums. All of the songs are very staid, heard-before ones, that don’t really help generate any interest. Amaal does okayish in one song, but showcases his quirk in the other. The others perform subpar, with the exception of Rishi Rich, who has made quite a catchy song. But even with its catchiness I couldn’t rate it higher than 2.5. So, for anyone counting, Mubarakan! Another flop album has been born! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 51.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: The Goggle Song > Mubarakan = Jatt Jaguar = Haathon Mein Thhe Haath = Hawa Hawa > Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 20

 

Which is your favourite song from Mubarakan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

PARTIAL MUSICAL ROBBERY!! (BANK CHOR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Kailash Kher, Shamir Tandon, Baba Sehgal & Shrikanth Sriram
♪ Lyrics by: Adheesh Verma, Gautam Govind Sharma, Kailash Kher, Ambili Menon, Varun Likhate & Baba Sehgal
♪ Music Label: YRF Music
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 16th June 2017

Bank Chor Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bank Chor is an upcoming Bollywood crime comedy, starring Riteish Deshmukh, Vivek Oberoi, Bhuvan Arora, Sahil Vaid, Vikram Thapa and Rhea Chakraborty in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Luv Ka The End’ fame Bumpy, and produced by Ashish Patil. The film is apparently a comic caper about someone who chooses the wrongest day possible, to rob a bank. Along with two sidekicks who do not know how to even pick a lock. It looks like a spoof on YRF’s own ‘Dhoom’ franchise, and it would be hilarious, I’m sure. The music album is another multicomposer album, as is the norm nowadays. Kailash Kher, Rochak Kohli, Shamir Tandon, Baba Sehgal and Shrikanth Sriram are behind the music. Kailash Kher knows how to compose for comedies, as he proved to us in ‘Chandni Chowk To China’s, so expecting something just as cool as ‘Phatte Chak Lein De’ which was in that film. Rochak Kohli takes the lead, as he has three songs in the album, and after his cool music for ‘Naam Shabana’, a thriller, it will be interesting to see how he moulds himself for a comedy. It’s not that he hasn’t composed for a comedy before, though — remember ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’? Hopefully his songs here are better than those. Shamir Tandon, who has barely impressed me ever before, gets one song, while rapper Baba Sehgal is back with this album, with a single song. Shrikanth Sriram has an instrumental piece to his credit. Hopefully these five men have put together an album that is catchy as well as humorous and sticking to the theme of the movie. Let’s see!


1. Hum Hain Bank Chor

Singers ~ Kailash Kher & Ambili Menon, Music by ~ Kailash Kher, Lyrics by ~ Kailash Kher, Rap Written by ~ Ambili Menon

Kailash Kher, known for his legendary Sufi songs, kicks off the album with its title track, a song that banks on repetitive shouts of the movie’s “clever” title, to propel it forward. Sure enough, the continuous repetition of the title of the film in the way Kailash does it, manages to elicit a few guilty laughs from the audience. The tune as such is very, very artificial and generic, something that wouldn’t have got even one listener if it hadn’t been for the repetitive gag that is the repetition of the “hook”. And I must specify one thing: if you come across this song and you’re like “Oh, how nice, Kailash Kher is back at composing! Let’s give this a go, maybe it’s a Sufi fusion track!”, I’m sorry to tell you that you will be disappointed, so it’s better not to dive into this one with those outrageous expectations, because you know this is a comedy film. And anyway, he has done music for another comedy film in the past, “Chandni Chowk To China”, in which his songs were quite enjoyable too! Looking at it from that point of view, the song is quite enjoyable. The only fun part in the actual composition is the “Jab chori kar loon, chor ke ghar chori, chori karke khoob karoon munhjori!” That line in the antara is the only catchy part of the tune. The arrangements are quite cool, too, by the way. The saxophone is just amazing, and some comedic sound effects entertain the listeners throughout. Kailash’s husky, high-pitched voice is perfect for the song, and he manages to at least sing his faulty composition right. And yeah, since “Bank chor” doesn’t really sound like what he clearly intends it to sound like, he pronounces “Bank” as “Bhank” so that it does. His companion, Ambili, raps something somewhere in the middle that really doesn’t go well with the rest of the song. Kailash pens down the lyrics himself, and I must admit, some of the lyrics are just as hilarious as a song’s lyrics can be. {Which isn’t much; I mean, how loud can you laugh out because of a song!!} An apt song for the film, but not a repeat-listen song! 

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tashreef / Tashreef Unplugged (Cups Version)

Singer ~ Rochak Kohli / Rochak Kohli, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Adheesh Verma

Rochak Kohli steps in now, with his first song out of the two he has composed for the film. And this song, is one of the most innovative stuff we have got from a comedy film of late. If only the makers of ‘Housefull 3’ had roped in Rochak. Anyway, the song is a breezy, feel-good song, about the protagonist who is clearly not feeling very good. The composition is highly innovative and creative, with a country flavour that I’ve lately noticed Rochak uses a lot, like he did in most of his songs from “Hawaizaada”. The composition sounds odd at first, but later, it grows on you amazingly. The arrangements really stand out right away. The guitars are what bring in a nice Goan flavour, similar to that “Crazy Mode” of Pritam’s songs, like ‘Agal Bagal’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and ‘Chicken Kuk-Do-Koo’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The very weird additions of noises like “Toing toing toing” and other hen and pigeon sounds make the song sound lovely in a very different way. And also cute! The ukulele also sounds beautiful, and makes the arrangements sound very creative. Rochak sings in various different noises, as told earlier, but even when he’s singing in the normal way, it sounds very different from how he usually sings, and it is amazing! He keeps the pitch low, and it makes the song even more effective in bringing out the stress of the protagonist. An unplugged version is actually true to its name (sounds a lot like an unrefined cover version), and the cups that were used in the original too, are more prominent here, due to it being unplugged. It has less of a repeat value though. Adheesh Verma’s lyrics are very impressive, because they’re actually funny in an intellectual way. A highly creative song from a composer who has always meddled around with this kind of arrangement, but never gone up to this level. And now I doubt whether he can outdo himself after this!!

Rating: 4/5 for the Original, 3/5 for Unplugged Version

 

3. BC Rap Knockout: Mumbai Vs Delhi

Singers ~ Naezy & Pardhaan, Music by ~ Shamir Tandon, Lyrics by ~ Varun Likhate

Next up we get something, which at least I have only seen in YouTube videos till now. And it is a Rap Battle. Yes, it is perfectly alright to add the word ‘Epic’ in there, because the song is really an epic showdown between a resident of Mumbai and one of Delhi. There’s no composition as such, as the whole song is a Rap Battle. The arrangements by Shamir Tandon are cool as the backdrop of the battle, and they’re completely digital. What is actually worth hearing the song for, though, are the two amazing rappers behind it. Naezy stands for Mumbai, and Pardhaan for Delhi, and then we get to hear a hilarious competition about which city is the best. The whole attitude which the two rappers carry about themselves is what hooks the listeners to the song, even if it is merely on audio (as of now). Some of the lines they throw at each other are so outlandish, you end up laughing out loud, or at least smiling. And all the credit for that goes to the Lyricist, Varun Likhate. He has penned down an efficient rap battle, and it really sounds very genuine. A nice rap battle.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Jai Baba Bank Chor

Singer ~ Nakash Aziz, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Gautam Govind Sharma

This song is the second song by Rochak Kohli on the soundtrack, and after the very creative song, ‘Tashreef’, I bet nobody would have qualms in saying that this one disappoints big-time. The composition is very mediocre, and something we have heard many times. On top of that, Rochak equips a very stale Mumbaiya rhythm to act as the arrangements. Very loud arrangements, and not programmed well enough, makes it sound even more irritating. Nakash’s singing is as usual, energetic and full-hearted. Sadly, the composition doesn’t support him. Gautam Govind Sharma’s lyrics are sad to hear too. A disappointment from Rochak Kohli.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

5. Bae, Baba Aur Bank Chor

Singer ~ Baba Sehgal, Music by ~ Baba Sehgal, Lyrics by ~ Baba Sehgal

This song starts with beats making it sound as if it is a song from an English zombie film. Baba Sehgal is back in Bollywood after quite some time, and he has made this rap song. That makes it the second complete rap song in the soundtrack. This one grips you from the beginning just because of that Zombie-ish background. The rap isn’t too impressive, but you manage to keep listening just because of that background sounds. There is a nice rap in the interlude where Baba Sehgal sings random Spanish names. There isn’t much more by way of arrangements, either, other than that Zombie-ish background, and random sounds of people shouting, lions roaring and whatnot. This time, the shouts of ‘Bank chor!’ aren’t as effective as they were in Kailash Kher’s song. Baba Sehgal raps fine, but the lyrics are very boring. Another stale track, relying on a tune in the background and Baba Sehgal’s name to make it work.

Rating: 2/5

 

6. Mela – The Bank Chor Theme

(Instrumental), Music by ~ Shrikanth Sriram

Someone called Shrikanth Sriram produces this instrumental piece which is so boring, you will be surprised. It is basically the same sounds playing over and over again for five and a half minutes. There is a weird trumpet-like sound playing the main part, and cool percussion in the background, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, … You get the point.

Rating: 1/5


Bank Chor‘s music album starts off quite promisingly, but then just diffuses into a typical, monotonous and trying-to-be-funny kind of zone. I must salute Rochak Kohli though, for his creativity in ‘Tashreef’, and Kailash Kher for his versatility in the title song. The other songs, barring the rap battle by Shamir Tandon, are easily forgettable. An album that only partially manages to steal your heart

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 + 2 + 1

Album Percentage: 51.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tashreef > BC Rap Knockout: Mumbai Vs Delhi > Hum Hain Bank Chor = Tashreef Unplugged (Cups Version) > Bae, Baba Aur Bank Chor > Jai Baba Bank Chor > Mela – The Bank Chor Theme

 

Which is your favourite song from Bank Chor? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THODI DER AUR THEHER JAAUN??? (HALF GIRLFRIEND – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Tanishk Bagchi, Rishi Rich, Farhan Saeed, Rahul Mishra & Ami Mishra
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Arafat Mehmood, Tanishk Bagchi, R. Rekhi, Veronica Mehta, Yash Anand, Yash Narvekar, Ishita Moitra Udhwani, Kumaar, Anushka Shahaney, Laado Suwalka & Kunaal Vermaa
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 27th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Half Girlfriend Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Half Girlfriend is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama film, starring Shraddha Kapoor and Arjun Kapoor. The film is directed by Mohit Suri, and produced by Shobha Kapoor, Ekta Kapoor, Mohit Suri and Chetan Bhagat. The film is an adaptation of Chetan Bhagat’s 2014 super-hit novel {In that everyone started hitting it after reading it, so it became super hit} of the same name. I have read that book and didn’t think much of it. And I’m not going to waste time on the plot. So let’s see who is behind the music this time. Now Mohit Suri is always up for new musical talent, and he brought Arijit Singh, Ankit Tiwari and Ami Mishra into the limelight with his previous film albums. I must say, ‘Ek Villain’ and ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ were better off than ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was full of clichés. And now this movie seems like it will be a complete detour from the usual type of music we hear in his other films. Maybe, just maybe, the songs with the lead characters staring at each other for infinite amounts of time, and shots of Shraddha Kapoor crying her eyes out, will not be removed and maybe we will be spared the melodrama that exists in all other Suri movies. But then again, maybe not. Maybe Mohit Suri will make Chetan’s rom-com into a romantic drama just like his other films. And of course, maybe the music will follow suit. That is confirmed as soon as I read the name of the first music director, Mithoon. He has collaborated with Mohit Suri in almost all of his movies, and the only collaboration I didn’t like of theirs, was ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (‘Aashiqui 2), after which I loved the sings from the next two movies. He gets three tracks here, but all are based on the same song. Tanishk Bagchi, the latest composer going tons of places this year, gets a single song here, and hopefully he opens his account with Mohit Suri fabulously so that we get to hear him in more Mohit Suri albums. Rishi Rich, after a long hiatus after the ‘Hum Tum’ song, returns {he has two more albums upcoming this year!} and he gets two tracks. Next up is Ami Mishra, who debuted with ‘Hasi’ from ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ in 2015, and vanished after that. He gets one song too. Then we have the debutants. Rahul Mishra with one song (I have never heard of him so can’t say what I’m expecting), and Farhan Saeed, who is debuting only as a composer; he has sung a couple of songs previously, and in this album, he gets to compose two tracks, out if which one is a version of the other. So with an astounding ten tracks to review, I must start right away.


1. Baarish

Singers ~ Ash King & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk Bagchi & Arafat Mehmood

Tanishk gets to open the album with his only song in the film. The song is a romantic song, with a tune that will have any Bollywood music lover hooked right away — because it adheres to all Bollywood sensibilities so obediently. The composition is like a trademark Bollywood romantic composition, and sweet too, at that. The mukhda makes the song start in a very sweet way, but that bridge from the mukhda to the hookline, which goes “Aankhon Ke Darmiyaan…” comes so abruptly, you are baffled for a moment. But afterwards, it is nothing but an uphill journey for the composition. The antara is how antaras in romantic songs traditionally are — calm and soothing. Again, an abrupt pause has been added at the end of the antara, which could’ve been avoided since the two lines fit together perfectly even without a pause! The tune for the mandolin loop that plays throughout the song is just so lovely! The hookline itself is yet again, something that will appease all Bollywood lovers, especially 90s music lovers. The arrangements which Tanishk has used in the song work in favour of the song, and as I said, that mandolin loop is sooooo catchy and hummable. The santoor starts off the song wonderfully, and it suits the ‘rainy’ theme of the song. The flute and strings too, add to the beauty of the song. As for the vocals, Ash King does well, but we have heard more outstanding renditions from him, in front of which this seems so ordinary. Shashaa just has to hum a line in an interlude. Tanishk & Arafat Mehmood wield the pen and produce utterly nonsensical words, defying all the laws of grammar. And however serious they might be trying to sound, it just sounds ridiculous. A song that sticks to those criteria that would make it a hit in Bollywood, but doesn’t dare to go experimental.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Thodi Der

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Farhan Saeed, Music by Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The next song in the album is another romantic song; the only difference is that this time, both of them love each other — in the first song it was like one-sided. Like tape. This song marks Farhan Saeed’s Bollywood debut as a composer, and it is actually a re-work of his own pop single of the same name. Thank goodness, he brings in a female singer to sing this one with him, and it is none other than Shreya Ghoshal. She handles the nuances very well, and her saccharine voice suits the composition very well. Farhan too, sings his parts well, but it doesn’t have the same impact. The composition itself, sounds very nice to the ears, but clearly has something missing and like the last song, only caters to people who like traditional, typical, same-old-kind of music. The hookline has a great tune though. The arrangements are better off here, with a wonderful sarangi taking care of the people who want variation in the song, and that sarangi solo in the interlude is not to be missed. The guitars are evidence of the fact that the song would’ve sounded so bland without the sarangi — they’ve been played that boringly. It would’ve been quite nice to hear a Sufi treatment given to the song, like tablas/dholaks and the like. A harmonium can be heard, but in very miserly quantities. Occasionally the sarangi reminds you of ‘Roke Na Ruke Naina’ (Badrinath Ki Dulhania), and I even started humming its antara, after the mukhda of this was over. Kumaar’s lyrics are not great, and there are places where they’re about the day not being able to live, and the night not breathing when the two characters aren’t together. Good for a couple of listens, but not something to repeat over and over again.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Tu Hi Hai

Singer ~ Rahul Mishra, Music by Rahul Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Laado Suwalka

The piano notes of the next song start and instantly you think ‘Bhatt’. Even though they aren’t in any way associated with this film, the piano notes just scream ‘Bhatt’ at you — “BHATT! BHATT! BHATT!” And when you continue listening to the song, you realize that the piano notes were right and you should have listened to their warning cries. Rahul Mishra, a debutant helms this track, and tries to make it as bland and dead as ever. The composition is a trademark Bhatt-ish one, and even though those songs sometimes do impress me, this one falls into category of them which I utterly despise right from the first time I hear them. The hookline is something decent, and that’s pretty much it, because it has been composed so drearily. Dreadfully slow, the song seems to get nowhere and leaves no impression on you after it ends. And the duration doesn’t help, because five and a half minutes is pretty long, for a staid composition. The only part of the song that seems impressive (only to an extent, because it is nothing new) is when the chorus singers try to make the song a Sufi song, and they succeed, but then Rahul starts with the Pakistani pop stuff again. Rahul Mishra’s vocals are quite good; he should carry forth his singing in the industry. The arrangements sound like a terribly-slowed-down version of the arrangements of the ‘Sanam Re’ title track. That tablas and electric guitars arrangement got old after just one song — ‘Sanam Re’. The lyrics by Laado Suwalka are even more typical than the composition. Not a very impressive debut, but hopefully somebody likes it and gives Rahul Mishra another chance.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

4. Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga / Pal Bhar (Chaahunga Reprise)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shashaa Tirupati / Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon steps in with the next track, and that’s something I was looking forward to, because he has been giving somewhat impressive songs in Mohit Suri’s film albums. However, when I played the song, the result was so anticlimactic I can’t express it in words. Mithoon’s composition sounds like a very desperate attempt to recreate the magic of ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (Aashiqui 2), a magic which I was immune to anyway, so this song too, didn’t affect me with its supposed magical composition. Of course, the song will become a rage nevertheless. Come on! It is Arijit and Mithoon after all! The song fares well for the mukhda, after which it seems to disassemble itself and both antaras sound like a different song altogether. Especially the female antara, seems like Mithoon strung together some completely unrelated notes to construct it. The first antara is slightly better, and it is a relief they’ve repeated it like thrice in the Reprise Version. But the drawback of the Reprise is that there’s no mukhda there. Also, the words and tune don’t match, creating that “Dubbed Music” effect, when you understand the song is dubbed because the words don’t fit well into the composition. Arijit gets into his dull mode here, and in some places you really feel that he drifted off to sleep. Shashaa in her antara does well, but not excellent. The arrangements are also boring. In the first version, they are fine, until those ‘Tum Hi Ho’ beats take over and you go like “Oh Goddddd! Not again!”. I loved the piano notes in the beginning though, and the santoor interlude. There’s a place before Shashaa’s antara where a wonderful flute mesmerizes you. But after that, there’s a staccato piano piece that sounds so random, haphazard and horrible. The Reprise gets the arrangements better. It starts with some weird harp-like sound, and a sound like water dripping from a leaking pipe, and Arijit’s voice is programmed such that you’ll actually believe he’s in some dingy underground basement where a pipe is leaking. But the better part of the arrangements is later, when strings are added in. Otherwise, everything is almost the same as the first version. So both versions have their own plus points. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are definitely the highlight of both the tracks. They surpass Mithoon’s arrangements, his dull composition and Arijit’s dreary rendition. One read through them and you’ll be stunned. Mithoon in his uncreative form.

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 2.5/5 for the Reprise

 

5. Lost Without You

Singers ~ Ami Mishra & Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Ami Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kunaal Vermaa & Anushka Shahaney

A bit of freshness seems to enter the album with the next song, Ami Mishra’s contribution to the album. It is a song with half-English, half-Hindi lyrics, and with a rock backdrop. The composition of the Hindi parts again, sticks to the normal Bhatt music criteria. The only way the song sounds fresher is due to the English parts, which are interspersed with the Hindi portions quite gratuitously. There’s a catch to that too, though. The “singer” behind those English parts, Anushka Shahaney, seems to be putting on a very artificial accent, something that will barely impress you once you hear it, and it sounds like nonsense because you can’t make out her English. Meanwhile, Ami continues droning on his Hindi portion, which isn’t quite different from his other song ‘Hasi’ (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Especially the “aaaaa aaaaa” sounds very similar to ‘Hasi’. The arrangements consist of very typical rock elements, the guitars and drums playing throughout the song. There is an interlude where Ami has added some oriental sounding guitar-like sound. The Hindi lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, are again, nothing innovative, and you barely pay attention to them as the song continues to play. Anushka Shahaney, who has written whatever she rambles herself, should’ve sung in such a way that we could’ve understood what she had written. Ami Mishra disappoints this time, but at least something is fresh here — the addition of English parts, even though they’re unintelligible. The album is just going more and more downhill.

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Stay A Little Longer

Singer ~ Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Anushka Shahaney, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Farhan Saeed returns, this time with Anushka Shahaney. And they spoil ‘Thodi Der’ for us. This song is basically an English version of that song, as is evident from its name.. a direct translation from Hindi to English. The composition, I already liked before, but here, even the little nuances that featured in the Hindi version have been gotten rid of, because it’s English right? And English songs can’t have nuances in them right? The song just sounds mediocre, even more so because of the way Anushka sings them in that accent. Her lyrics this time can at least be made out — but they sound very ridiculous. And of course, they don’t fit into the tune, so she has to sing “come” as “cu-uhm”, “love” and “lu-uhv”, “new” as “nyu-oo”, and she has to add “Oh”s and “Ah”s anywhere randomly. Ishita Moitra Udhwani helps her with “additional lyrics”, a term which I don’t understand because can’t two people write a song together? Or did she just replace one word by another so she deserves less credit? 😏 The only thing better here, is the arrangement, which has not only sarangi, but a very opulent symphonic orchestra towards the end, something that wouldn’t have suited in the Hindi song, but something which this English version didn’t deserve, frankly. Supposed to be soothing, but the singer makes sure it is anything but that. At least the arrangements respect us.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Mere Dil Mein / Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta / Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Yash Anand & Yash Narvekar, English Lyrics ~ R. Rekhi & Veronica Mehta, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Rishi Rich comes into the album very, very late, with a song you can call the title song of the film. And it is the only so-called upbeat number in the entire album. As such, we are bound to love it, especially people like me who were bored to death by the previous songs. The song is essentially a hip-hop number, with a groovy beat, and Rishi Rich informs us right at the beginning, “This is the Rishi Rich beat”. The song starts with some dialogue by someone sounding like Kangana Ranaut… Don’t miss it! The hookline is insanely catchy, and that “I gotta let you know…” line too, is very catchy. The composition is very repetitive though, and these two things are repeated over and over again so many times, you get annoyed after some time. There are not many more things constituting the arrangements, except that trippy beats and various weird sound effects. Veronica Mehta, who also featured in Rishi Rich’s “Hum Tum” song, at least sings in a more believable accent, but again, many of the words are not decipherable. Yash Narvekar, on the other hand, sings the male portions well, and I think Bollywood has a new Benny Dayal now. In charge of the lyrics are two people each for English and Hindi lyrics. 😂😂 And again, that additional lyricist, Ishita Udhwani, helps them, but they seem to not want to place her in the main lyricist’s list. Poor girl. There’s another version called the Dialogue Version, which has some of the most cringe-inducing dialogues from the film. That ‘Sentiyaa Gaye Hum Toh‘ dialogue is so cheesy! The dialogues come across as very annoying, and it is so evident that Arjun Kapoor wasn’t the right choice for playing this village boy. 😑 At least this song breaks the seemingly neverending spree of depressing songs!

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 1.5/5 for the Dialogue Version

 

8. Half Girlfriend (Love Theme)

(Instrumental, Music by Mithoon)

An instrumental track by Mithoon arrives to finish the album off. Mithoon provides us with a love theme, similar to the love theme he gave in ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was, I admit, a soul-stirring track. Here, he gives us an instrumental with selected lines from “Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga” played on the piano. Since I loved the piano notes in the song, I loved the first part of this track, where everything is just on plain piano. Later on, the orchestra pitches in, and brings a haunting and grand feel to the track. A choir can be heard as well, trying to make it sound even more haunting. After that comes a flute part which is beautiful. The orchestra returns to support the flute, and the song ends on a very grand note, like every instrumental should. Though I didn’t like the actual song which this track is based on, I thoroughly enjoyed the instrumental, and four and a half minutes just flew by.

Rating: 3.5/5


Half Girlfriend is a half-baked album. You know, when you fry something and it remains raw inside? That’s what this album is like. The makers have gone into such trouble making ten tracks for this movie, and sadly, not even one is memorable. All of them stick to typical clichéd song-making styles, and even a simple would be memorable, only if the composition were better. Tanishk and Farhan’s songs stand out by far, the rest seem to lag behind. I’ve heard a lot of good things going around about this album, and I waited. I heard it thrice like I do for any album before writing its review. And then I heard it while reviewing and that’s when I really understood how good (read bad) it is. Now I can’t wait any longer for my brain to like this album, can I? Thodi Der Aur Theher Jaaun? No way!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 1.5 + 3.5 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 53%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thodi Der > Baarish = Half Girlfriend (Love Theme) > Lost Without You > Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga = Pal Bhar = Mere Dil Mein > Stay A Little Longer > Tu Hi Hai = Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

 

Which is your favourite song from Half Girlfriend? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂