NOT QUITE BLACK SHEEP ANYMORE!! (BAA BAAA BLACK SHEEP – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Superbia (Gourov-Roshin-Shaan), Jaidev Kumar, Sajid-Wajid & Abhijit Vaghani
♪ Lyrics by: Sunil Sirvaiya, Rajesh Manthan & Jalees Sherwani
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd March 2018

Baa Baaa Black Sheep Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baa Baaa Black Sheep is a Bollywood comedy film starring Maniesh Paul, Manjari Fadnnis, Anupam Kher, Kay Kay Menon Annu Kapoor in lead roles. The film is directed by Vishwaas Pandya and has music by Superbia, which is Gourov-Roshin-Shaan’s band. They have given one full album in the past (‘Coffee with D’) which was terrible, but this one seems to be slightly better! Let’s see!


Superbia’s stint in music composition continues after the cringeworthy album to “Coffee With D” (2017). This time, they start the album off with much more promise, recreating a sort of medley that T-Series calls ‘Mixtape’. They recreate Abhijit Vaghani’s recreation/amalgamation of Galla Goriyaan/Aaja Soniye, the two original songs respectively by Harbhajan Mann (a pop single) and Sajid-Wajid (from ‘Mujhse Shaadi Karogi’). I must say, the song works to whatever effect the makers wanted. It is an enjoyable Punjabi club number rendered surprisingly enjoyably by Mika Singh, and Kanika’s voice is as always, addictive. I just wish ‘Aaja Soniye’ had more parts in the song than it does. Harbhajan Mann’s composition to ‘Galla Goriyaan’ does the rest of the work, making this an enjoyable dance song.
Heer, the romantic song, is also surprisingly well sung by Mika Singh, who has sung such numbers in the past, and should sing them more often. Not that it is a soulful number, but still softer than the songs he’s known to sing, like the previous song on the album. Mahalakshmi Iyer is heard after a long, long time, and is pleasant to the ears. The only fault if any, in this song, is the irritating repetition of the hookline, which almost demolishes whatever fun we were having listening to it. The arrangements are nice, with amazing guitar work, but not never-heard-before. Lyrics are functional.
The song that tries to be its own “Ek Do Teen” (Tezaab/Baaghi 2), except this time, counting age instead of days, is Angelina, a typical 2000s type of song sung very 2000s-ishly by Sonu Nigam. The effect of the Latino touch in songs has been wearing off these days, and it just makes them sound dated. The vocal onomatopoeia is just cringeworthy, too.
Then there are two songs that up the quirk quotient, except one does it the right way and the other, the bad way. Baa Baaa Black Sheep is as cringeworthy as a title song can get, sounding contrived at every note. Shaan sings like he had no choice, and the female backing vocalist just sounds weirdly happy singing whatever lines she’s given. The lyrics are just bad, so there’s no point of talking about them.
Ram Leela, on the other hand, had me in splits when I heard it for the first time, especially because of the hilarious “dhikichyaoun” after every hookline. 😂 This one has to be heard to understand, and all I can tell you is that it’s kind of a spoof of the Ramayana with enjoyably funny lyrics.


Superbia’s second full album turns out to be balanced between bad and good, but largely just an album that you’ll forget after listening to it, if at all you stumble upon it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6.5 + 5 + 4 + 6 = 31

Album Percentage: 58%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Galla Goriyaan / Aaja Soniye > Heer > Ram Leela > Angelina > Baa Baaa Black Sheep

 

Which is your favourite song from Baa Baaa Black Sheep? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Baa Baaa Black Sheep) = 17
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A WEDDING TO DREAD!! (VEEREY KI WEDDING – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Farzan Faaiz, Jaidev Kumar, Ashok Punjabi & Meet Bros.
♪ Lyrics by: Chandan Bakshi, Deepak Noor, Devendra Kafir, Ramkesh Jiwanpurwala, Kumaar & Faaiz Anwar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 27th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 2nd March 2018

Veerey Ki Wedding Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Veerey Ki Wedding is a Bollywood comedy film starring Pulkit Samrat, Kriti Kharbanda and Jimmy Shergill. The film is directed by Asshu Trikha and produced by Rajat Bakshi and Parmod Gomber. The film’s music album contains music by Farzan Faaiz, Jaidev Kumar, Meet Bros and Ashok Punjabi. Let’s dive right in, I have no expectations as such from this album..!


So the album doesn’t start out as bad as expected; Mind Blowing, though suffering from an extreme case of Mika-ate-the-words-again syndrome, has an enjoyable South-flavoured rhythm by (newcomer?) Farzan Faaiz, with the ‘Chinta Ta Chita’ (Rowdy Rathore) rhythm being used for propelling the song further into the masses’ hearts. The backing chorus sounds so bad, it’s actually good. The typical horns are there too, so everything you need in a generic kuthu song is there — I just wish the lyrics (by two people.. quite talented, it seems, writing lines like “Maana Milky Milky Badi Hai Teri Kalaai“.) and singer were different!
Farzan’s other song Na Kasoor is a staid melody that isn’t bad, but isn’t good either. It’s more like an “Oh, it’s over already? When did it start?” song. While he borrowed the rhythm from “‘Chinta Ta Chita” for his first song, Farzan tries to make this one sound like “Jashn-E-Bahaara” (Jodhaa Akbar), and to that effect even ropes in Javed Ali for the vocals, and jingles bells in the background. Sadly, it turns out to be a disaster because he insists on including sounds like breaking of glass and other “modern” sounds. It’s just a mishmash of sounds that don’t go together. It’s like eating fish with tomato ketchup. (No offence if you do.)
Jaidev Kumar’s Hatt Ja Tau, a convenient remake of the Haryanvi folk song of the same name, is much more enjoyable, mostly due to Sunidhi’s powerhouse vocals. The musical arrangements sound fresh here, but Devendra Kafir writes lyrics that would make you blush. The composition too, being so happy-go-lucky, helps to make you ignore the lyrics, and Jaidev’s cheerful arrangements are fun too.
Another bad song on the album is given by Meet Bros. Talli Tonight, from the name itself you can tell that the song is doomed. Somebody called Deep Money (forgive me if he’s some sensation) sings the song very uniterestedly, while Neha Kakkar sings in a manner I’ve never heard her sing in — utterly bored and sleepy! The wannabe beats do not make you want to get up and groove, rather they would make you skip the song. Meet Bros’ rap is just cringeworthy. Or was that Deep Money?
The best song of the album, only because the others are so cringeworthy, is Ashok Punjabi’s Veerey Ki Wedding, which is essentially a 90s wedding song, that was destined to release in 2018. Navraj Hans provides the necessary spunk to the song, and the arrangements (dholaks, harmonium, tumbi) help make it fun and enjoyable. The ladies’ chorus led by Saloni Thakkar is also enjoyable. The backing vocalists though, sing so high pitched, as if they’re in some 90s song.


Some composers picked up from the middle of nowhere make this a wedding you should be dreading!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 5.5 + 7 + 5 + 7 = 30.5

Album Percentage: 61%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Veerey Ki Wedding = Hatt Ja Tau > Mind Blowing > Na Kasoor > Talli Tonight

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 13 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Veerey Ki wedding) = 14

SAME STORY ∞!! (HATE STORY IV – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Mithoon, Baman-Chand, Tony Kakkar & Himesh Reshammiya
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar, Rashmi-Virag, Sanjay Gupta, Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 23rd February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 9th March 2018

Hate Story IV Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Hate Story IV Is a Bollywood thriller (cough cough, ahem ahem) starring Urvashi Rautela, Karan Wahi, Vivan Bhatena and Ihana Dhillon, directed by Vishaal Pandya, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Vivek Bhatnagar. The film has music by Tanishk Bagchi, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Mithoon, Tony Kakkar and Baman-Chand. Now all of these composers have been working with T-Series for quite some time, but that doesn’t mean I expect too much from the album! The reason being that the ‘Hate Story’ franchise has never been strong on music, no matter how popular it has been.


Tanishk Bagchi’s remake spree which seems to be inexorable, continues just as strongly as it had started off. I can’t even remember when it started. ‘Humma’? ‘Tamma’? Who knows. But now he gets to Himesh Reshammiya’s bank of songs. The producers browse for a moment through Himesh’s repertoire, and finally pick out two of his songs, for Tanishk to recreate. Tanishk, reluctantly, complies. One of the recreations has backfired terribly — Aashiq Banaya Aapne ends up being a lazy club number, in which Neha Kakkar lazes around as if she’s reciting a poem instead of singing a song. Tanishk’s too loud programming stuns the ears, and the way he uses Himesh’s voice is terrible. Tanishk never does a remake without having Tapas Roy play the hook of the song on a mandolin or some other ethnic string instrument, and he does that here too, just increasing the heard-before-ness of the song. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are almost the only worthwhile stuff in the song. The second one, Naam Hai Mera, at least has good vocals and music, and if you forget that the essence and beauty of the original song, which was soulful, has been demolished, you will like it. Neeti’s powerful voice luckily propels this one to where it is, and Tanishk’s EDM is refreshing. It is the lyrics here, that spoil the song.
Moving on to the original numbers, Arko’s Boond Boond is the best of the lot, with a nice Latino vibe to it, but it is not all that innovative either. It sounds like Arko was trying to recreate the type of songs Bollywood made in 2006-2008, when we were obsessed with Latin American music. Jubin’s voice doesn’t suit the song a lot, but Neeti saves the day (again), while the lyricists Manoj Muntashir and Sanjay Gupta (the filmmaker??) have nothing much to do except search through old Bollywood songs and put together all the clichéd phrases they could find.
Mithoon’s first song of the year is highly disappointing — Tum Mere Ho tries to be a ‘Sanam Re’-esque love song, but ends up being sleazy and lazy. The vocalists Jubin and Amrita Singh only increase the laziness with their lazy voices, making me too lazy to write a review for the song. The only good thing here, are the percussions in the interlude. That’s a nice touch.
If that song was lazy, wait till you hear Mohabbat Nasha Hai, a typical Tony Kakkar cry-fest. But though his previous cry fests like ‘Khuda Bhi’ (Ek Paheli Leela) and ‘Mile Ho Tum Humko’ (Fever) have been quite good, this one, being a mishmash of all of them, and with the same boring beats, is just plain boring. In one of the versions, I can at least listen to Neha Kakkar when her part comes (she sings better here than she sang ‘Aashiq Banaya Aapne’), but in the Male Version I don’t even have that liberty. Oh well.
The other best song of the album, at par with Arko’s song, happens to be Baman-Chand’s Bhatt-ish melody Badnaamiyan. The Male Version by Armaan Malik fares much better, and that’s the one that is the best of the album. Armaan’s voice suits the romantic composition, and Baman-Chand’s arrangements are great, though heard before, especially the electronic tabla. Sukriti Kakar doesn’t do too well in the Female Version, and even the arrangements don’t support her, being the usual boring arrangements used for such songs.


With the fourth instalment in this series (fifth if you count ‘Wajah Tum Ho’), it is evident that T-Series, who seem to have been making the films only for the music, might stop making the films soon, because the music is certainly going down…!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5.5 + 6 + 7.5 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 + 7.5 + 6 = 47

Album Percentage: 58.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Boond Boond = Badnaamiyan > Naam Hai Mera = Badnaamiyan (Female) > Aashiq Banaaya Aapne > Mohabbat Nasha Hai = Tum Mere Ho > Mohabbat Nasha Hai (Solo)

 

Which is your favourite song from Hate Story IV? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

HALF-GENERIC, HALF-CREATIVE DIARIES!! (VODKA DIARIES – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Harry Anand, Sandesh Shandilya & Parvaaz Band
♪ Lyrics by: Khalid Ahamed, Kashif Iqbal, Aalok Shrivastav & Harry Anand
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 9th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 19th January 2018

Vodka Diaries Album Cover

 

Listen to this album: Saavn

Buy this album: iTunes


Vodka Diaries is a Bollywood crime thriller starring Kay Kay Menon, Mandira Bedi and Raima Sen in lead roles. The film is directed by and co-produced by Kushal Srivastava. The film’s album comprises music by Harry Anand, Sandesh Shandilya and Parvaaz. While I’m expecting nothing from Harry Anand because of his past works, I’m expecting quite a lot from Shandilya because of his past works. 😅 Parvaaz is a band that is debuting in Bollywood with this film, and hopefully they make a crackling debut!


Lead composer Harry Anand has composed for many an unnoticed (by me) film, and looking back at those songs, I can say I’m happy I didn’t notice them when they released. Here he starts off with a generic and yawn-inducing club song called Angoor, and you know it won’t just be about grapes. The digital sounds have been heard many times before, and the voice of the composer doesn’t help to make the song any better. It is a lame attempt at making a catchy club number about wine. Don’t even ask me about the “Oh Bae Bae Bae Bae Bae Bae-by” loop! He fares better, but only slightly better, in Heeriye, another generic club song, but this time singers like the late Labh Janjua help propel the song. Again, the song is about drinking, but the arrangements are better, if not fresher, than those of ‘Angoor’. Shalmali too, tries to help alleviate the status of the song, but it can only go to a certain extent, until which you are already bored.
Thankfully, Harry Anand doesn’t compose the rest of the songs, and those songs are the best in the album. Bangalore-based Parvaaz Band composes Beparwah, a retro rock song which would make you nostalgic if you listen to the 80s English rock songs. Lead singer Khalid Ahamed has a very distinct voice, which makes the song even more enjoyable, and the constant guitar and drum beats in the background help make the song catchy. A sinister vibe prevails all throughout the song, and it suits the thriller vibe of the movie. Lyrics are good as well.
Sandesh Shandilya, returning after quite some time, gets the best song of the album, Sakhi Ri, a semiclassical melody with Rekha Bhardwaj and Ustad Rashid Khan at their vocal best, crooning a heart-warming melody that is graced with the melodious flute, a regular in Sandesh’s music. The song takes some time to get attuned to at first, but it grows like slow poison. The aalaps by the lead singers are noteworthy, and the beautiful interludes have the best of musical arrangements, like the little digital loop. The strings have been used wonderfully, and the lyrics are also heart-touching. This will surely emerge as one of the best classical songs of the year, but sadly, it went unnoticed.


Half of the album is great and innovative and creative, while the other half is plain generic and boring.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4.5 + 7.5 + 8 = 23.5

Album Percentage: 58.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sakhi Ri > Beparwah > Heeriye > Angoor

 

Which is your favourite song fromVodka Diaries? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

WELCOME TO 2012!! (WELCOME TO NEW YORK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Shamir Tandon & Meet Bros.
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Kausar Munir, Sajid Khan, Danish Sabri, Charanjeet Charan & Varun Likhate
♪ Music Label: Pooja Music / Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 16th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd February 2018

Welcome To New York Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Welcome to New York is a Bollywood comedy starring Sonakshi Sinha, Diljit Dosanjh, Karan Johar, Boman Irani, Lara Dutta, Riteish Deshmukh and a bunch of whoever turned up at the 2017 IIFA Awards held at New York City. The film is directed by Chakri Toleti and produced by Vashu Bhagnani and Jackky Bhagnani. Now, the film seems to be a huge two hour long advertisement for IIFA, and no wonder it flopped. On top of that, the music is by people who aren’t very famous for giving great music (at least not anymore) — Sajid-Wajid, Meet Bros & Shamir Tandon. So let’s see whether the music of this film is just as farcical as the film itself seems to be!


A film that seems to be made on a whim, just because people happened to be available to make a film with, has music too, that seems to be made on a whim. What else can justify the creation of a song called Pant Mein Gun? Maybe the fact that Sajid-Wajid have composed it makes it a bit less shocking. The only good that comes out of this one, is that we know that Sajid-Wajid know how to play with EDM now. But that’s not good, either, considering how great they are at doing the live instruments thing. Diljit Dosanjh and Sajid himself belt this one out as if they’re robots, repeating the same lines over and over again. This is definitely one of those songs that are so bad that they are good! Highly recommended.
The other one by Sajid-Wajid is Nain Phisal Gaye, a quite entertaining song about a tailor fantasizing that she is stitching clothes for Salman Khan. How interesting. 😐 Well, Sajid-Wajid’s composition is purely desi thankfully; they get the best out of themselves when they go the desi way, and has a kind of retro vibe to it. The lyrics by Kausar Munir are fun, though situational, with ample references to words that come across everyday in a tailor’s business. Payal Dev sings it effectively, and thankfully doesn’t repeat her horrific act from ‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’ (Kaabil) last year.
Shamir Tandon gets two songs as well, with Ishtehaar turning out to be the best of the album, but only because of it adhering to the conventional Bollywood sad song template, and roping in Rahat Fateh Ali Khan makes it all work. Dhvani Bhanushali, debuting in Bollywood with this song, makes it sure that she is here to stay for some time. Her voice is perfect for Bollywood! The flute has been played wonderfully in this song, and that’s pretty much all that is noteworthy!
Shamir’s other song, Smiley Song, is a song where the composer himself, along with Dhvani Bhanushali and Boman Irani take it in turns to try and imitate the laughter of a number of Bollywood celebrities — it gets highly irritating after a point.
The last song is by Meet Bros, a Punjabi number which sounds like we have all heard it many times before, bearing the name Meher Hai Rab Di. The song itself doesn’t have “rab di mehr” because of its laidback sound and typical lyrics and whatnot. Also, it is sung by Mika (don’t need to explain why that is an excuse for it’s being bad) and Khushboo Grewal, who hardly gets anything to sing.


As a means of timepass also, this album fails miserably! Welcome to 2012 I would say, when songs like these were oh-so-prevalent.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 6 = 29.5

Album Percentage: 59%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishtehaar > Nain Phisal Gaye > Meher Hai Rab Di > Smiley Song > Pant Mein Gun

 

Which is your favourite song from Welcome To New York? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

IF THE BHATTS MADE FILMS IN 1921… (1921 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Harish Sagane, Asad Khan & Pranit Mawale
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 22nd December 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th January 2018

1921 Music Review

 

Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes


1921 is an upcoming Bollywood horror (read romantic comedy) film, directed by Vikram Bhatt, and starring Zarine Khan and Karan Kundrra. The Bhatts have decided to start a new horror franchise with the new year, after the ‘1920’ franchise did well (barring the last film). With every film of the franchise, the music had gone more and more down hill, and maybe this was what makes Bhatt go with two debutants and a relative new talent for this one. Harish Sagane is the lucky boy who gets seven tracks in the film, while Pranit Mawale and Asad Khan get one each. So without any further ado, let’s see whether, first of all, the music suits the time period in which the film is set, and secondly, whether the music manages to spook you or make you doze off!


Now the music of ‘1921’ isn’t as bad as that of ‘1920 London’ was, but at the end of my second time listening to the album, I’m in a fix as to how I’m going to review this one, given that all the songs sound utterly the same! Let’s try this, though — hang in there!
The album has five actual songs, and four piano themes. At the beginning itself, I must say, that all the four piano themes are marvellous, actually taking us back to 1921 and further back. Three of them have been composed by the album’s lead composer, debutant Harish Sagane, and the other one is by Pranit Mawale. I don’t really know how to review them, but here goes:
Piano – Theme is a nice and calming piece, with the arpeggio working fantabulously in the background. The ominous sound that should accompany a horror movie is there, but never going over-the-top. Next comes something called Main Piano – Theme, which is more sinister than the previous one, both in composition and sound, thanks to the composer having used the low octaves gratuitously for the bass portions. The treble continues to play a lilting melody, as Bollywood is fond of adding into ghost songs. Crowd Gathering is another one based on a beautiful arpeggio (the loop heard in the background is called an arpeggio), and sounds very Beethoven-ish and symphonic. Pranit’s Aggressive Piano – Theme, has quite a weird name, because if the piano went aggressive, it would cause widespread devastation. The piece itself is not really “aggressive”; I guess they wanted to say “sinister”. It is the weakest of the piano solos.
Out of the five actual songs, out of which one is by guest composer Asad Khan, the best can’t be chosen, since, as I mentioned before, they’re all so similar! Sunn Le Zara as an audio song isn’t as interesting as its video, which, quite funnily, starts with a shot of Zareen Khan about to drink poison, until she hears (from kilometres away, through the glass windows of the mansion) the lead male actor sing “Jeene Ki Koi, Tu Wajah Dhoondh Le“, an advice which she seems to have taken quite seriously, because the next thing we see is that she has somehow entered the mansion to watch the man at his piano recital. The best part is when, at the end of the video, she throws away the bottle of poison into the lake, for the fish to choke upon. The look on her face is something like the look on one’s face when they throw a flying disc for their pet dog to fetch. Of course, the audio can’t be as entertaining as that!! The audio does have shades of “Ae Dil Hai Mushkil”s title track, in its high notes, piano and strings portions, and is on the whole, quite depressing. Kuch Iss Tarah, too, borrows heavily from the intense strings of the ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ title track. Newcomer singer Arnab Dutta is good, but his voice isn’t magnetic and attractive enough to bear it in three songs of the album. That said, Yaara, his third song, is another sleepytime song, spanning over six minutes, this time, sounding like a Jeet Gannguli meets Mithoon meets Ankit Tiwari song, if you can digest that! Aanewaale Kal fares best among Harish’s songs, only because its composition is not as dreadful and depressing as the others, and its singer, Rahul Jain, does a good job of not sounding like Arijit.
Arijit himself gets to sing Tere Bina for the guest composer Asad Khan, alongside an Aakanksha Sharma who is definitely not sounding her best. Of course, Arijit sings well, but what strikes me immediately as an oddity is the rock base of the song. It seems like a forced addition in the album, which, till now, was strictly confined to musical styles that were prevalent in 1921. Asad’s composition though, is refreshing!


And that’s why the musicians of 1921 are smarter than those of the last two 1920 movies (Adnan Sami had done a good job for the first one) — there’s no forced Bhatt-ish rock.. not that it produced amazing results, really, other than the piano pieces.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 7 + 7 + 6.5 + 5.5 + 5.5 + 5 + 6 + 6 = 55.5

Album Percentage: 61.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Piano Theme = Main Piano Theme = Crowd Gathering > Aggressive Piano Theme > Tere Bina = Aanewale Kal > Sunn Le Zara = Kuch Iss Tarah > Yaara

 

Which is your favourite song from 1921? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

P.S. I’ve not included the piano solos for you. 😛

DECEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP (FUKREY RETURNS, FIRANGI, TERA INTEZAAR & MONSOON SHOOTOUT – Mini Music Reviews)

It is time for my Round-Up for December 2017, which is slightly delayed due to me being so busy, but better late than never, right?

December 2017 Round-Up

This Round-Up includes the following music reviews:

1) Fukrey Returns – Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, Gulraj Singh, IshQ Bector, Shree D & Laxmikant-Pyarelal

2) Firangi – Jatinder Shah

3) Tera Intezaar – Raaj Aashoo

4) Monsoon Shootout – Rochak Kohli, Viveick-Mayur, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry

The music review for “Tiger Zinda Hai” will be posted separately.


♦ Fukrey Returns, But Ram Sampath Doesn’t! – FUKREY RETURNS Music Review

♪ Music by: Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, IshQ Bector, Shree D, Gulraj Singh & Laxmikant-Pyarelal
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Late Anand Bakshi, Aditya Sharma, Satya Khare, Raftaar, Rohit Sharma, Arsalaan Akhoon, Shree D, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba & Vipul Vig
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 16th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 8th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


So Fukrey has returned. Sadly, the man behind “Fukrey”s enjoyable music, Ram Sampath has not returned, and after his underwhelming stint in ‘Raees’, he doesn’t get a chance to bounce back with a franchise that was initially his. Anywho, let’s judge on what we have been given.
Prem-Hardeep, the original composers of ‘Kala Chashma’ before Badshah remade it in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’, get a chance now, to ruin somebody else’s song. Laxmikant-Pyarelal’s ‘O Meri Mehbooba’ (Dharam Veer) gets ‘remade’ into Mehbooba, a banal club song which starts and ends with the Fukras being rejected by a random girl in the club, who happens to be singing in Neha Kakkar’s voice. Yasser Desai gets one line that repeats over and over again, and it is frankly the best line of the song. Raftaar’s rap is too stereotypical. Jasleen Kaur Royal’s Peh Gaya Khalara, though fitting into her now-overused Punjabi dance number template, is quite enjoyable, with the sweet vocals by herself and Divya Kumar, Akasa Singh & Akanksha Bhandari accompanying them. The arrangements are what make the track more enjoyable, and also the quirky lyrics.
Familiar territory is entered in Ishq Bector & Shree D’s semiclassical Raina, which, though quite soothing, gets tedious due to its length (it is the only song on the album over three minutes long, and goes up to over four minutes long!) The arrangements help propel it forward though, and also Shree’s vocals. Shaarib-Toshi enter the Bollywood scene after a long time with a delightful Punjabi melody, Ishq De Fanniyar. The male version by Shaarib is great, but the Female Version has all the feels, hence scores higher. The beautiful melody seems like a wonderful sequel to the first movie’s ‘Ambarsariya’. The lyrics are sweet as well, not to mention amazing accordions in the arrangements.
The techno sounds come along with the last three songs, bunched up together, out of which two are by Sumeet Bellary (composed for ‘Fuddu’ last year), and one is by (another person who re-enters Bollywood as a composer after a loooooong time, longer than Shaarib-Toshi), Gulraj Singh.
Sumeet’s two songs rely on weird techno gimmicks, which fail to propel the songs forward. Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai is a quirky friendship anthem, but is pulled down by lack of catchiness in both music and composition. Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai is like a title song, but gets all over the place in no time. The arrangements are slightly better here. Both songs are sung by Gandharv Sachdev, wit Shahid Mallya joining him in the latter song, and aren’t all that well sung.
Gulraj does well in his title song, Fukrey Returns, with a nice catchy musical loop, and heavy use of brass and techno sounds which makes his song sound even better. Siddharth Mahadevan on the vocals is a bonus.


Not as great as the first movie’s album, but still a commendable album considering the amount of new talent on there. But nevertheless, I wish Ram Sampath had returned!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 68.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishq De Fanniyar = Ishq De Fanniyar (Female) > Peh Gaya Khalara = Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai = Raina = Fukrey Returns > Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai > Mehbooba

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 43 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Fukrey Returns) = 44


♦ Quite A Desi Album! : FIRANGI Music Review

♪ Music by: Jatinder Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Devendra Kafir, Ashraf Ali & Krishna Bhardwaj
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


The song with almost the least amount of Punjabi words (second only to ‘Gulbadan’, which comes later on in the album) in its lyrics, Oye Firangi, starts the album off, and Jatinder Shah steals your heart right away. The charming melody immediately gets you grooving — thanks to a little EDM twist in the hookline — and though it is very simple, it is amazing thanks to the programming, and Sunidhi’s marvellous voice. There comes a British-era ballroom style orchestral portion at the end, but I wish the composer had extended that into another antara instead of ending the song with it! Another charming but heard-before melody, Sahiba Russ Gayiya, starts from where ‘Channa Mereya’ ended, with a similar structure and arrangement. Rahat’s voice is a boon to the song, and it’s the first song of his in a long time that doesn’t get on my nerves.(Ahem, ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’!) I love the way he pronounces the hookline. The Unplugged Version sung by Shafqat Amanat Ali, is funnily named ‘Sahiba (Male)’, as if Rahat’s version wasn’t by a male singer. The song itself is an improvement on the original, in that we get to hear Shafqat’s impeccable aalaaps, and though the choice of Shafqat doesn’t make it sound less like a Pritam song in general [Shafqat is just as much of a Pritam camp singer as Rahat is!] it surely does sound less like ‘Channa Mereya’, because the electric guitars have been toned down. Acoustic guitars play the larger role here. However some factors make both versions balance out at the end.
If ‘Sahiba’ had ‘Channa Mereya’ written all over it, Tu Jit Jawna has ‘Bhaag Milkha Bhaag’s title song all, and I mean ALL over it! Daler Mehndi, who I wish had sung the BMB number too, sings this one, and so it is quite bearable, but otherwise, it falls flat and sounds hollow in its emotion. It is also lyrically a counterpart to ‘Oye Firangi’, except Daler paaji doesn’t call him a ‘Firangi’ (foreigner), while Sunidhi did.
Gulbadan is a Qawwali-esque number, sung by Mamta Sharma. Good to hear her sing a different kind of song, though I’m sure the video will be the same kind of Bollywood ‘item number’. The hookline is greatly composed, with amazing arrangements by Shah, but again, falling into the too much tried-and-tested category of arrangements. I guess the best that comes out of this song is hearing Mamta Sharma’s gentle voice, because she thankfully hasn’t been made to sing in the annoying loud voice of hers.
But the album’s best is the wonderful folksy number, Sajna Sohne Jiha, which transports you back to the Punjab of the olden days. Wadali Bros’ Qawwali ‘Ve Sone Diya Kangna’ has been given a nice reinterpretation by Shah, and it works so well. The rhythms at the beginning really bring out the song’s folksiness, and Jyoti Nooran’s strong voice helps propel it to the finish line, where it emerges the winner compared to the other songs of the album!


A very desi album to the film ‘Firangi!’

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sajna Sohne Jiha > Sahiba Russ Gayiya (Shafqat) > Oye Firangi = Tu Jit Jawna = Gulbadan = Sahiba Russ Gayiya



♦ No Intezaar for This Album! : TERA INTEZAAR Music Review

♪ Music By: Raaj Aashoo
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 11th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


After a long time (or is it the first time?), one single composer gets a chance to compose an album for a film starring Sunny Leone. Somehow, she debuted smack in the middle of the multicomposer craze and so, got mainly multiple composers to compose for all her films! Raaj Aashoo handles the album.
The title track, titled Intezaar Title, instead of a more apt ‘Tera Intezaar’ (Obviously, because that’s the film’s name), is a dreary 2000s melody, sung by Shreya Ghoshal too, as if she is still in her debut year. Adding to the ennui, is the Qawwali-ish chorus. Raaj’s composition is good, but dated. The arrangement is the best thing about the song, especially the flute. Another very typically 90s melody, Khali Khali Dil, sees Payal Dev and Armaan Malik at their clichéd best. The digital sounds do not help make it more ‘modern’ or anything, and even the harmonica fails to create any impact. Quite a similar sound follows in the dreary Mehfooz, another song straight out of Nadeem-Shravan’s music-bank. The guitar work makes it sound like a version of Mithoon’s ‘Sanam Re’ title track, sans the tablas. Yasser gets a version, and, sounding like Arijit as always, manages to make it sound genuinely interesting. The arrangements here too make this song much more interesting than ‘Khali Khali Dil’. The song appears in two more versions, one by Palak Muchhal and the other by a new singer named Hrishikesh Chury. Palak’s 2½ minute long version fares better than Hrishikesh’s normal length one, because of the pleasant arrangements. Also, Hrishikesh tries to sound like Kumar Sanu.
The best song on the album, Abhagi Piya Ki, becomes the best only because the others don’t deserve it. It appears in two versions, a banal one sung jarringly by Kanika Kapoor and Raja Hasan, and a slightly better version sung much better by Payal Dev and Javed Ali. The tablas that went missing from ‘Mehfooz’ seem to have come to this song, and they play in surplus. The semiclassical touch to the song is good, but the 90s melancholia seems to have followed the composer like a thundercloud whenever he sat to compose for this film.
The only song that does not sound anything like a 90s song is Sexy Baby Girl, and it doesn’t work because it tries to sound uber-cool with its lead singer Swati Sharrma, like always, trying to add unnecessary style to her words, resulting in a disaster. Also, the lyrics are cringeworthy.


This is not an album anyone would have waited for. 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 53.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Abhagi Piya Ki (Javed/Payal) > Abhagi Piya Ki = Intezaar Title = Sexy Baby Girl > Mehfooz = Mehfooz (Palak) > Mehfooz (Hrishikesh) = Khali Khali Dil



♦ Surprising Monsoon in Winter!!: MONSOON SHOOTOUT Music Review

♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Viveick Rajagopalan, Mayur Narvekar, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry
♪ Lyrics by: Sumant Vadhera, Kartik Krishnan, Deepak Ramona, Chinmay Harshe, Rohit Bhasy, Neeraj Sharma, Vinit Gulati, Nidhi Gulati
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th December 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 15th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


Rochak gets two songs, and reminds us why he’s one composer that keeps popping up in numerous albums scattered over the year’s span. It is because of his strong melodies. Pal is a cherishable melody which, though predictable, does give you goosebumps, and makes you want it to rain. Arijit’s heart-touching rendition is enough to make anyone fall for the song. On the other hand Miliyo Re is a very Sachin-Jigar-ish romantic song, with Monali and Rochak behind the mic, with vocals that aren’t amazing, but are functional. The composition is good but very commonplace; not as distinct as Rochak’s other songs this year.
Viveick-Mayur present their only song Andheri Raat next, a haunting song with weird Marathi rap, and awesome Punjabi-flavoured male vocals. Neha Bhasin kills it behind the mic, as does her co-singer, Rajiv Sundaresan, doing the aforementioned Punjabi-flavoured portions. The Marathi rap by Aklesh Sutar is funny, and quite weird too.
The other three songs are quite situational, all by newcomers, with neither one exactly standing above the others. Chinmay Harshe’s Miss You Balma, by Akriti Kakar, is experimental but has you questioning “Why??” because the jazzy composition and the rock arrangements don’t really gel well with each other. Akriti aces the vocals though, singing in an unusually (for her) low pitch. The other duo, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry, present two songs, one being a folksy item song Maachis Ki Teeli, in which the very unconventional choice of singer, Bhavya Pandit, whi hasn’t ever sung such a song, proves to be great, as she adjusts to the song’s folksiness very well. Her co-vocalists provide good company as the loafers interjecting occasionally. The last song Faislay has a quite dated tune, and a very mismatching digital loop that starts it off, but Mandar Deshpande’s singing brings it up.


An album that is good, but still will be a wipeout.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pal = Miliyo Re > Andheri Raat = Maachis Ki Teeli > Miss You Balma = Faislay



Hope you liked this section of reviews! The review for ‘Tiger Zinda Hai’ will be out soon!