ANU NOT ZORDAAR! (INDU SARKAR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Anu Malik & Aziz Nazan
♪ Lyrics by: Puneet Sharma, Sanjay Chhel & Aziz Nazan
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: Not Yet Released as an album!
♪ Movie Released On: 21st July 2017

Indu Sarkar

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Indu Sarkar is a Bollywood historical / political thriller film, starring Kirti Kulhari, Neil Nitin Mukesh, Tota Roy Chowdhury and Anupam Kher. The film is directed by Madhur Bhandarkar and produced by Bharat Shah. It is set in the Emergency period in India, from 1975 to 1977. The film has opened to mixed reviews, and while some are praising the hard-hitting nature of the storyline, others are putting it down for its melodrama. Anyway, I, being a music reviewer, am spared from giving any views on the movie which I haven’t even watched, and don’t intend to either. I am focusing on the music. The most influential composer of the 90s, Mr. Anu Malik, has scored the soundtrack for the film. He did well in earlier this year’s ‘Begum Jaan’ so I’m expecting the same here as well! Saregama, the music company, after releasing four songs as singles, hasn’t released all songs in a single album, so I’m assuming this is the album, with four songs. Let’s see how Mr. Malik has composed for this!


1. Chadhta Sooraj Dheere Dheere

Singer ~ Mujtaba Aziz Naza, Composition & Lyrics by ~ Aziz Nazan, Music Recreated by ~ Anu Malik

Aziz Nazan’s famous Qawwali gets remade by Anu Malik, and sounds quite bleak and dull. The composition is good (no new composition by Malik) but the nine-minutes length makes it sound tedious. The vocals (by Aziz Nazan’s son) are good, and so are the lyrics. Anu remakes it with apt arrangements for a Qawwali, and also rock elements. Duration bogs this one down!
Rating: 2/5

 

2. Yeh Awaaz Hai

Singer ~ Monali Thakur, Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

A sweet and sugary composition, evoking memories of ‘Lag Jaa Gale’ and ‘Salaam’ (from Anu Malik’s own ‘Umrao Jaan’ album), again too high in duration — eight minutes. Monali’s voice makes things sound bright, and the lyrics are beautiful and meaningful. The arrangements also resemble ‘Aazadiyan’ (Begum Jaan). A song resembling many other songs, but good in its place.
Rating: 3/5

 

3. Dilli Ki Raat

Singers ~ Bappi Lahiri & Anmol Malik, Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

At first, I thought this was composed by Bappi, but the Panchamda vibe made me check again, and it was by Anu himself. The composition is terrible, and so are the vocals (especially Anmol’s), but the R.D. Burman vibe in the arrangements makes it bearable (only for a one time listen). The lyrics disappoint. SKIP!
Rating: 1/5

 

4. Yeh Pal

Singer ~ Amruta Fadnavis, Lyrics by ~ Sanjay Chhel

This song is slightly better in its composition; a soothing romantic waltzy song. The vocalist should’ve been Alka Yagnik or Asha Bhosle, but Amruta Fadnavis tries hard to do well. The arrangements are soothing, with the guitars and strings making it all the more soothing. The mandolin and accordion are outstanding too. The whistle makes it sound a lot like Anu’s trademark 90s songs. Sanjay’s lyrics portray love as a trap. A good song; but the vocals could have been better!
Rating: 3.5/5


Indu Sarkar is an album that Anu Malik seems to have scored very half-heartedly. Earlier this year, his fabulous score for “Begum Jaan” stunned me, and then this dull soundtrack after that, is very odd. The best song too, suffers of bad vocals. Anu Not zordaar!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2 + 3 + 1 + 3.5 = 9.5

Album Percentage: 47.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Yeh Pal > Yeh Awaaz Hai > Chadhta Sooraj Dheere Dheere > Dilli Ki Raat

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 21 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Indu Sarkar) = 22

 

Which is your favourite song from Indu Sarkar? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MULTICOMPOSERS GIVE A HUGE, BUT NANHA-MUNNA ALBUM!! (MUNNA MICHAEL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Danish Sabri, Sabbir Khan & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st July 2017

Munna Michael Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Munna Michael is an upcoming Bollywood dance/action film starring Tiger Shroff, Nidhhi Agerwal and Nawazuddin Siddiqui in central roles. The film is directed by Sabbir Khan, and produced by Viki Rajani and Eros International. The film revolves around a dance competition, in which a vagabond played by Shroff decides to participate, until he is entangled into teaching the local villain how to dance, and they both fall in love with the same girl. So, the typical *yaaaaaawwwwwwwnnn* Bollywood plot. The music is by multiple composers, featuring songs by Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu. I’m not excited about anybody’s song particularly, except maybe Tanishk’s solo song and Tanishk’s song with his ex-co-composer Vayu, who he partnered up with again for this song after 2015’s smashing debut for them, ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), so let’s just see what the album is about and we might just get surprised!


1. Main Hoon

Singer ~ Siddharth Mahadevan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is a tribute to Michael Jackson, since the film is a dance film and the main character is probably an MJ fan, if we can deduce anything from his name. Tanishk’s composition is bland. Hookline is oddly-placed, but the Antara has a bearable tune. Arrangement and mixing are chaotic, as if Tanishk was adamant on using all techno sounds there are. The impactful vocals dont help either. Lyrics worth avoiding. When an oddly placed hook spoils almost the entire song!

Rating: 2/5

 

2. Ding Dang

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Antara Mitra, Rap by ~ Parry G, Shivi & Danish Sabri, Music by ~ Javed-Mohsin, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri & Sabbir Khan

A tribute to Jackie Shroff (atleast lyrically). The generic composition leaves you unflinched. Typical tapori arrangements with random backing vocals of “Aah-aah”. Both vocalists fail to make the song better, and the rappers fail miserably. Lyrics are cheap, trying-to-be-funny but failing miserably again. The hook lyrics make you go, “Sorry, what???” Ding dung?

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Pyar Ho

Singers ~ Vishal Mishra & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A very soothing romantic composition but quite heard-before, and the arrangements too remind of some songs heard in the past. The strings, guitars and digital arrangement still win your heart, though. The composer himself has sung as if he wanted Arijit to have sung it and Arijit would have been apt. Sunidhi is her usual perfect self while Neeti Mohan seems to have done backing vocals, but hasn’t been credited! Lyrics are very staid and nothing new. Best of the album but nothing creative.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Swag

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya & Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

A very situational song for a performance of Nawazuddin’s character. And they have tried to make it sound so-called “cool”, but it doesn’t work much. That instrumental loop that keeps repeating throughout the song is catchy, and the digital beats are cool, but sound very similar to an English song that I can’t recall. Brijesh’s vocals are the fun part of the song, but Pranay’s interruptions could have been avoided. Lyrics are bad, again. Except for Brijesh and that instrumental loop, a forgettable song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Beparwah

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Nandini Deb, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is one of Gourov-Roshin’s rare songs that are not recreations, and surprisingly, it starts off quite promisingly, in a retro-sounding prelude. The composition is still good, but a duration of six minutes is way too far-fetched, because the song is also very repetitive, and after one antara the song gets too boring. Arrangements are the same techno sounds that featured in the other songs, and many times in the past too. A rock interlude somewhere in the middle makes your ears bleed. Siddharth Basrur does a good job, but his cosinger, Nandini Deb, doesn’t impress. Again, lyrics are unimpressive. It is a song Hrithik Roshan should have got in 1999. 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Shake Karaan

Singers ~ Kanika Kapoor & Meet Bros., Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

I see the credits for this song.. and I prepare myself for another ‘Baby Doll’. And sure enough, those pop sounds and ladies shrieking feature in this song. I admit that the composition is catchy but not as much as previous Meet Bros-Kanika songs. The sound is a welcome change from the overpowering disco theme of the rest of the songs. Kanika’s voice is enjoyable as always. Lyrics continue to be the sloppiest they can be! A welcome change from the overbearing techno sounds of the album, but not innovative at all! 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

7. Feel The Rhythm

Singer ~ Rahul Pandey, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Pranay M. Rijia & Sabbir Khan

Pranay’s next song is actually quite impressive. The composition is a perfect example of a catchy MJ-ish tune, complete with glitzy arrangements that Pranay aces. The techno sounds here and the techno sounds in the other songs differ so much in the freshness quotient. This one is on the lines of ‘Iss Tarah’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) and that’s how it impressed me. Rahul Pandey sings a bit like Yash Narvekar and Benny Dayal, and sings impressively too. Again, the lyrics are the usual. A nice and fresh-sounding dance song!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

8. Beat It Bijuriya

Singers ~ Asees Kaur & Renesa Baadchi, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

Tanishk-Vayu return after two years (‘Banno’; ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’) with another folksy song, this time with a techno twist, obviously. The song has a very superficial tune, and hard to grip. Also it sounds inspired from Tanishk’s own ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ Title track. The arrangements match those of their first song; folksy harmonium, dhols and other techno sounds make for an entertaining listen. There’s an amazing fiddle interlude. Asees sings like never before, with a grunge in her voice in the hookline. The lyrics are a kind of funny Hinglish that I couldn’t grasp at once. Entertaining but limitedly.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

9. Pyar Ho (Redux)

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Sunidhi sings this Redux of ‘Pyar Ho’ solo. It has a melancholic arrangement, with those slow and mellow piano notes, that gets quite boring to hear after some time. The strings are good enough though. Sunidhi’s solo rendition though, is a treat to the ears. The composition is the same, and the lyrics have been tweaked to make it sound sad. Not something I’d like to listen to often.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

10. Swag (Rebirth)

Singer ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

‘Swag’ had apparently died while the rest of the songs were playing, so its ‘Rebirth’ appears now. Now, whatever little elements ‘Swag’ had going for it, are all removed in this Rebirth. It has even been stripped of all melody (whatever little it had) and now sounds like a funky instrumental that makes you cringe because of the way Pranay chants those lines creepily. The arrangements are fresh here, but there’s nothing like a good tune or good vocals to accompany it. So that’s a wasted opportunity. I prefer the song in its last life.

Rating: 1.5/5


Munna Michael sounds like a very badly done ‘ABCD’ album. Then again, if ‘ABCD’ would’ve had such music, we wouldn’t have had a sequel. The overdose of (badly done) techno music really sounds useless. One song gets it right, but no others impress. When you can groove to only one song in a dance film’s album, the album’s got problems. Also, when a director or producer asks for “Give me one Kanika song, one tribute to Jackie Shroff, one to Michael Jackson, one funky Hinglish song, many wannabe retro songs”, the results are bound to be bad. ‘Munna’ is a name usually used for small kids. So may I say that these Munna Multicomposers failed miserably? 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 1.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pyar Ho = Feel The Rhythm > Swag = Beparwah = Shake Karaan = Beat It Bijuriya = Pyar Ho (Redux) > Main Hoon = Ding Dang > Swag (Rebirth)

 

Which is your favourite song from Munna Michael? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

UNWANTED GUEST GENRES!! (GUEST IIN LONDON – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Raghav Sachar, Stereo Nation & Amit Mishra
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, T.S. Jarnail, Arya Acharya, Navendu Tripathi & Saint Shah Hussain
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 2nd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 7th July 2017

Guest Iin London Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Guest Iin London is an upcoming Bollywood comedy starring Paresh Rawal, Kartik Aaryan, Tanvi Azmi and Kriti Kharbanda. The film has been directed by Ashwni Dhir and produced by Kumar Mangat Pathak and Abhishek Pathak. The movie is not the sequel to 2010’s sleeper hit, ‘Atithi Tum Kab Jaoge?’, but it is along the same lines, with a different guest (though portrayed by Rawal again), visiting a different family, and this time with his wife! If the funny quotient of ‘Atithi…’ is anything to go by, this film too would leave me in splits, and the trailer actually has already made me laugh and watch it over and over again. The only weak thing about that movie was its music — full of situational songs that don’t really make for listening outside of the movie. While it was Pritam and Amit Mishra (not the new singer, but a composer named the same) in that film, here we get Raghav Sachar and the same Amit Mishra composing. Raghav was last heard composing for ‘Rustom’, its title track. He rarely disappoints, and when he does, disappoints highly. Let’s hope he can bring some life into the album, because I have no hopes from Mishra!

P.S. Henceforth, for albums securing a score ‘Pa’ and below, I won’t be writing my extensive, long, trademark style review. It will be shorter.

P.P.S. This review is a bit longer in spite of the album not scoring above ‘Pa’, because I’m still not too used to condensing my matter. Will get the hang of it by the time I do some two-three albums!


1. Frankly Tu Sona Nachdi

Singers ~ Raghav Sachar & Tarannum Malik, Music by ~ Raghav Sachar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Raghav starts off the album with a very templated Punjabi number that barely hooks you the first time you listen to it, but gets better after a couple of times. The composition is something that would fit in the 2007-2008 era, and Raghav tries to jazz it up with his saxophone, but to no avail; it just makes the song sound forced. The hookline is the only thing that is catchy as such. The antaras have a very clichéd tune. The arrangements are, as I said, forced. You can’t put modern sounds on a Punjabi track to try to sound cool; it has to fit seamlessly, which it doesn’t in this song. The lack of proper percussion makes the song sound very lacklustre. The vocals are horrendous. Raghav’s autotuned voice is not something I’d want to hear everyday. Tarannum sounds like a robotic version of Sunidhi Chauhan. Kumaar’s lyrics are again, clichéd. He writes about earrings from Bareilly, so you can actually make out which era the song is from. Lacklustre Punjabi track that works slightly only because of its hookline.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Dil Mera

Singers ~ Ash King, Prakriti Kakar & Shahid Mallya, Music by ~ Raghav Sachar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Raghav follows it up with another very iffy romantic song. The composition sounds good; it reminds you of the 2006-2007 period again, but this time, it’s more of a pleasant reminder. It sounds like Himesh’s compositions of that time. The hookline is just a desperate repetition in hopes of people catching on to it. The arrangements are cool, with a techno base. The portion that sounds very oddly placed is Shahid Mallya’s “jaaniyaaa ve jaaniyaaa” portion; there’s no need to cram Sufi lines in every romantic song, because it doesn’t sound good. The goodness of the composition stays only till the mukhda, and in the antara, the song completely falls apart. Ash King sings well, but I have no idea what Raghav was thinking when he programmed Prakriti to sound like that. It sounds terrible. Kumaar’s lyrics are typical romantic song lyrics. We get stuff like “Meri saansein na chalengi bin tere, raatein na katengi bin tere.Another lacklustre song, with only the mukhda and Ash King working in its favour.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

3. Daru Vich Pyaar

Singer ~ Taz, Original Composition by ~ Stereo Nation, Music Recreated by ~ Raghav Sachar, Lyrics by ~ T.S. Jarnail, Rap Written & Performed by ~ Arya Acharya

Another “Tum Bin” song gets remade with this; this time it’s a club song. ‘Daru Vich Pyaar’ from ‘Tum Bin’ gets a disco-esque rehash, thanks to Raghav. This is Raghav’s comfort zone, and it is immediately evident in the song. He doesn’t spoil the song anymore than it was already bad. In fact, he adds the disco flavour and makes it a bit more likeable. The “O saajnaaa” could have been avoided though. Arya Acharya’s rap too, is better than the likes of Badshah and Honey Singh and Raftaar. Raghav’s saxophone too adds to the fun quotient of the song. The line “Meri ankhiyaan di pyaas bujhade”, is my favourite part of the song! The vocals and lyrics have been retained from the original. You can’t spoil an already not-so-good song, but you can cleverly tweak it to appeal to world music lovers, by adding disco and jazz elements.

(P.S. I hated this song when it released like a month ago, and only started liking it now while reviewing, seeing how mediocre the first two songs sound now!)

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Guest In London

Singers ~ Navendu Tripathi & Amit Mishra, Music by ~ Amit Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Navendu Tripathi & Amit Mishra

Amit Mishra now steps in, with a kind of rehash of his ‘Atithi Tum Kab Jaoge’ title song, with the same kind of bhajan-ish touch, and irritating nasal twang in the singing and annoying dialogues in between. The composition sounds like ‘Joote De Do Paise Le Lo’ (Hum Aapke Hain Koun), in places, and like the ‘Atithi Tum Kab Jaoge’ title song in others, of course. The vocals are irritating. If the composition can’t hold your attention, why would some irritating vocals do the same? The only fun part of the song is the “Udam udam” part, and the lyrics, but just this much. It was funny once; not anymore. 

Rating: 1.5/5

 

5. Rabba Meray Haal Da Mehram Tu

Singers ~ Sumeet Anand & Amit Mishra, Music by ~ Amit Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Saint Shah Hussain

The next song is a seven plus minute sad song, probably a traditional Punjabi devotional song. But no element of the song sounds appealing, and I’ve heard very appealing Punjabi folk songs. The song starts as if Ankit Tiwari is singing. And that asynchronous “harmonization” they do when they sing “Hussain”, just sounds horrible! The composition doesn’t help to gather your attention, and you would not even listen to it completely, as it is the same repetitive and dull stuff over and over again for seven minutes! 😑 SKIP!

 

Rating: 0.5/5


Guest Iin London is a horrible album, and that’s that. At least Raghav Sachar tries to bring some life into the album, as I forecasted, but his songs too, seem flimsy and do not stay with us for very long. And with a remake being the best song (according to me) you can see where the album lies compared to its contemporaries. I just have one doubt.. if the couple is only busy dancing at Punjabi weddings, singing romantic songs and going to clubs, why should they be so troubled by the arrival of a guest?? That’s three songs out of five that go out of sync with the main theme, and the other two are just bad. 😄 In fact, I would say this album is full of unnecessary, unwanted “Guest Genres” that weren’t called for by the script. 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2.5 + 3 + 1.5 + 0.5 = 10

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  Daru Vich Pyaar > Dil Mera = Frankly Tu Sona Nachdi > Guest In London > Rabba Meray Haal Da Mehram Tu

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 17 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Guest Iin London) = 18

 

Which is your favourite song from Guest Iin London? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

CRYBABYIEE WEDS NRI!! (SWEETIEE WEDS NRI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo & Shah Jahan Ali
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Dr. Devendra Kafir, Late Shyam Bhateja, Palak Muchhal, Shakeel Azmi & Banjara Rafi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Sweetiee Weds NRI Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

{P.S. The song “Shiddat (Reprise)” is sung by Mohd. Irfan on Saavn and YouTube, and Sharad Patel on iTunes. Since the former is there on two sites, I will review that}


Sweetiee Weds NRI is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, with the clichéd theme of a wedding. The film stars Himansh Kohli and Zoya Afroz in the lead roles, and is directed by Hasnain Hyderabadwala, and produced by Cyrus Dastur, Dhaval Patel, Sada Bhuvad, and Tariq Mohammed. I couldn’t care less about the plot of the film, so heading on towards the music front. We have a multicomposer album, as is the norm for T-Series, but it is shocking to not see any of the T-Series protégés working for the film. Except maybe Arko. Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo and newcomer Shah Jahan Ali are the other composers for the film. Jaidev just gave us a better-than-the-original mata-ki-chowki recreation of Badshah’s ‘Kala Chashma’, and he gets one song here. Palash, back after doing nothing in films for three years, gets five songs all of a sudden in this film. Let me break the suspense. It is actually two songs, one of them having four versions. Raaj Aashoo, who has composed quite passable music before, gets a song and its reprise too, while Shah Jahan Ali, newcomer, gets one song too. Let me specify that even Arko has one song only. So with five composers and ten tracks, let’s see whether this grand wedding is just all quantity or has some substance too.


1. O Saathiya

Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Prakriti Kakar, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Thankfully, the first song is composed by the person whose song I was waiting for and at least expecting something from, Arko. And sure enough, the song is a pleasant and enjoyable listen. The composition is a breezy one, and starts off quite pleasantly. The soothing quality of the song continues as it progresses, and the  peak point of the song is the “Humrahi” hook, which is like fresh air. (Don’t watch that part in the video song though! 😂) There is no antara as such, the mukhda is repeated twice in the song, once by the male singer Armaan and the other time, by the female singer, Prakriti. That’s why the song ends up sounding shorter than it is, because the mukhda is repeated twice and that’s it. The arrangements are breezy as Arko’s arrangements usually are. The Acoustic guitars, and shakers and those digital beats in the hookline, giving a ballroom feel, are amazing. The interlude consists of a nice, feel-good, guitar piece, followed by a refreshing flute portion, which is in turn followed by a sweet piano piece. The vocalists carry the song out with ease, Prakriti sounding amazing with the nuanced singing. Armaan sings in that slightly uncomfortable low pitch which he rarely sings in, in the beginning, but gets better in the high pitched hookline. Arko’s lyrics are typical romantic song lyrics, but suit the ambience of the composition. A simple but sweet and effective song.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kudi Gujarat Di

Singers ~ Jasbir Jassi, Sonia Sharma, Akasa Singh & KD, Music by (Original and Recreation) ~ Jaidev Kumar, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Shyam Bhateja, New Lyrics by ~ Dr. Devendra Kafir, Rap Written by ~ KD

Jaidev Kumar steps in here, and with another remake, after his remake of ‘Kala Chashma’ in the recent ‘Behen Hogi Teri’. As we know, this music company’s latest fad is to remake hit Punjabi pop numbers of the 90s, and after they remade ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ by Sukhbir, in ‘Hindi Medium’ last month, they choose ‘Dil Le Gayee’ by Jasbir Jassi to remake this month. And the ingenious naming system of T-Series starts again, naming this one ‘Kudi Gujarat Di’, which are just the words that appear right after ‘Dil le gayee’ in the song’s lyrics. However, I’m quite pleased with this remake. The main reason is that Jaidev Kumar, who had composed the original, which was in fact his debut, has recreated it. So he keeps the flavour of the song intact, and yet manages to add a pleasant club touch. The composition has been kept the same, and lyrics have been changed. Unlike the ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ remix, this one actually is a remake. The arrangements have been changed to good club arrangements that are actually enjoyable. The techno sounds here, make the song more viable for today’s audience, who is only behind club songs. The vocals are great too, with Jasbir showing that he is still sounding as young as ever. The female singers, get very less scope, and I don’t even know which of them has sung what. A rap by someone called KD sounds very spoofish and amateurish. The new lyrics by Dr. Devendra Kafir, who wrote ‘Bolna’ (Kapoor & Sons) before this, are fun but typical. An enjoyable remake. 

Rating: 3.5/5

3. Musafir / Musafir (Reprise) / Musafir (Remix)

Singers ~ Atif Aslam & Palak Muchhal / Arijit Singh / Atif Aslam & Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

The next song witnesses Palash entering film music after a long time; his last release was ‘Amit Sahni Ki List’ in July 2014 if I’m not wrong. And this song, he provides in as many as three different versions. The composition is a very typical, Bhatt-ish composition that at first seems very bland and boring, but sounds better the next time. And when you start liking it, you start listening to it frequently, and after listening to it a lot, you start hating it. So like almost all Bhatt-ish songs, this song has a quite uninteresting life story. Jokes apart, Palash’s composition, though nothing innovative, provides temporary relief like Zandu Balm and sticks in your head for that short while as if it has been stuck with Fevicol. (There, I managed to put ‘Dabangg’ references in my review.) The mukhda is very typical, and so is the hookline, so much so that the first time I tried to listen to the song, I didn’t go past the hook. The antara is nothing great either. But despite all this, the song somehow manages to get in your head. So it’s like a Rohit Shetty film — not perfect, but manages to get you watching ahead. The arrangements must be the reason we are able to go forward. Both actual versions (not counting the remix for now) have different arrangements. While the Atif Aslam version has a clichéd-to-the-core acoustic guitar setting with occasional electronic tabla beats, the Arijit Singh version has better arrangements, starting off with a flute, and progressing with a more unplugged-ish acoustic background, piano and guitars. The flute really impressed throughout the song, and Palash isn’t stingy with the use of the flute. Atif’s diction is very irritating in his version, and when he says “Gira” for “Ghira”,Batakta for “Bhatakta“, and “Dikka” for “Dikha“, you can’t help but cringe. Palak joins him to repeat the mukhda at the end of the song. Arijit goes solo in his version, and he rectifies all of Atif’s diction mistakes. However, Palash makes another mistake here, which is making Arijit sing the repeated mukhda at the end, making the song seem extra long. He could have stopped after the antara, or made Palak sing it for some respite from the overbearing drowsiness. The remix is a miserable attempt to quieten the two ever-at-war fan bases of Atif and Arijit, by cramming both into one song. But why would anyone want them to be together in a remix. And I can’t even say how sappy the vocal programming sounds when Palash uses it on Atif, making him sound like a goat. The beats are typical remix beats that make your ears explode. The lyrics by Palak are suitable for the song, but again, very typical and nothing innovative. I don’t even know whether I like this one or not, so I’ll say it’s somewhere in the middle.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Musafir, 3/5 for Musafir Reprise, 0.5/5 for Musafir Remix

 

4. Wedding

Singers ~ Shahid Mallya & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Palash’s second song is the wedding song of the album, very uncreatively titled “Wedding”. The composition is something that totally belongs to an Indian animated film for children. Come on, even children’s songs are composed more thoughtfully than this. The “Saiyaan Oh Saiyaan” refrain by Palak is very cheesy. Some of it is way too sweet to digest, and the lack of usual Punjabi arrangements, makes it even more bland. Instead, Palash uses weird-sounding techno sounds that make it sound very over-the-top. And of course, the typical brass band, which is also, unfortunately, digital. A weird EDM-ish interlude tries to makes things “cool”. Palash tries to bring in a folksy feel to the song by roping in Shahid Mallya to sing it, but he sounds so uninterested, it comes out through his singing. And the lines he’s made to sing! 😵 Palak sounds too, too, sweet, like the syrup in Gulabjamun if someone adds too much sugar. Her lyrics too, are straight out of a fairy tale; the cringeworthy Hinglish takes a toll on you by the time the song ends. When EDM and an overly sweet melody spoil everything.

Rating: 1.5/5 

 

5. Shiddat / Shiddat (Reprise)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Mohd. Irfan, Additional Vocals by ~ Priyanka Negi, Seepi Jha & Bhuvan Ahuja, Music by ~ Raaj Aashoo, Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

With Raaj Aashoo’s song, things take an even more downhill turn. Totally overloaded by a very overbearing melancholic sound, the song exhausts you by the time it is over. The composition is something even the Bhatts would shy away from nowadays. What’s more, the song spans for over five minutes, something utterly unbearable. And two versions. So it sadly has eleven minutes of unmerited footage in this already long album. The arrangements are typical digital beats that would be a rage if it were 2007 right now. The vocalists in neither version could keep the interest of the listener in place, till the end. Armaan, trying to be K.K., disappoints like never before. On the other hand, Mohd. Irfan in his version sings in a voice that defies the beauty of his real, silky smooth voice. The female backing vocalists are irritating throughout. I would rather not talk about the unstylish lyrics. Welcome to 2007.

Rating: 1/5 for Shiddat, 1/5 for Shiddat Reprise

 

6. Zindagi Bana Loon

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Shah Jahan Ali, Lyrics by ~ Banjara Rafi

Newcomer Shah Jahan Ali comes into Bollywood with this song, and brings yet another old-fashioned, slow-paced song into the album, much to the dislike of the audience. The tune is so complicated, with so many pauses in random places, and no indication as to whether it is a happy romantic or a sad romantic song, that you just forget about it after you hear it once. Shah Jahan Ali must have been feeling like Roop Kumar Rathod felt while composing ‘Agar Tum Mil Jao’ (Zeher), or M.M. Kreem while composing ‘Jaadu Hai Nasha Hai’ (Jism), because the song is like a wannabe version of those. The slow pace doesn’t help either. Neither do the arrangements. The guitars are played so typically, the lack of innovation makes you go crazy. Palak tries to bring nuances like Shreya Ghoshal into her singing, succeeding at none of them. She sings in such an unnaturally high-pitched voice, it even surpasses the cheesiness of ‘Kaabil Hoon’ (Kaabil). The lyrics of the song are cringeworthy again. Another staid composition.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

7. Kinara

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Finally the album comes to an end. But waiting right at the end for us, is another version of ‘Musafir’ by Palash Muchhal. This time it has been disguised under another name, ‘Kinara’ because the word ‘Musafir‘ doesn’t come in the new lyrics. But it is a version of ‘Musafir’. This album has so many versions of ‘Musafir’, which means tourist. As if the album is a tourist destination! The composition and lyrics are much the same, except one line in the hook, where the lyrics have been changed. The arrangements comprise an overtly sentimental combination of violin, piano and jingle bells. Palak tries again to imitate Shreya, when she does her Female Versions, like the one of “Sunn Raha Hai” (Aashiqui 2) and that of “Hasi” (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Even Palash tries to imitate the arrangements of the former, with those jingles and the occasional tabla. Clearly, the makers were under the false impression that the public would love ‘Musafir’ so much that they would hover around long enough to wait for a mediocre female version. 

Rating: 1.5/5 


It looks like the album of Sweetiee Weds NRI was finalized years ago. Dated melodies, arrangements that originated sometime before the dinosaurs, and a tracklist trying to imitate ‘Aashiqui 2’ with vocals that sound bland to say the least and the same vocalists used over and over again, this album isn’t really as good as the makers made it out to be when they were promoting it. Instead of Sweetiee Weds NRI, the name should’ve been Crybabyiee (you can throw a few more e’s in there if you want) Weds NRI!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 3 + 0.5 + 1.5 + 1 + 1 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  O Saathiya > Kudi Gujarat Di > Musafir (Reprise) > Musafir > Wedding = Zindagi Bana Loon = Kinara > Shiddat = Shiddat (Reprise) > Musafir (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 14 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Sweetiee Weds NRI) = 15

 

Which is your favourite song from Sweetiee Weds NRI? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A COMMANDO WITH LESS COMMAND ON TUNE! (COMMANDO 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mannan Shaah, Gourov-Roshin & Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Aatish Kapadia, Raftaar & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 3rd March 2017

Commando 2 Album Cover

Commando 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To but this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Commando 2 is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film starring Vidyut Jammwal, Adah Sharma, Esha Gupta and Freddy Daruwala, directed by Deven Bhojani, and produced by Vipul Amrutlal Shah. It is a sequel to 2013 sleeper-hit, ‘Commando’, which is still famous for its wonderful action scenes. That film had more of a rustic setting, wheras this one is a sleek, urban film. And that might reflect somehow in the music as well. Which is by the composer of the first movie, Mannan Shaah. I don’t know whether he did some other small albums during these four years, but I definitely didn’t hear any. He has composed three songs for the movie, while the guest composers Gourov-Roshin have “composed” another. It is a remake. My expectations are 50-50, considering that the music of the first film was good as per the movie’s theme, and that T-Series has changed over the years. And also, Gourov-Roshin have remade something, which succeeds only sometimes. At least I hope the Mannan Shaah part of the album is good. So let’s see how the album is, though I’m a bit apprehensive!


1. Hare Krishna Hare Ram

Singers ~ Armaan Malik, Ritika & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Sameer Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Hare Ram, hare Ram, Hare Krishna Hare Ram!”

– Sameer Anjaan

T-Series’ habit of rehashing old hits continues with the first song of the album itself. And the song isn’t a hit from the 70s, 80s, or even 90s! It is a (relatively) new song (can’t believe ten years have passed already!!) from 2007! The goat that gets sent to the slaughterhouse this time is ‘Bhool Bhulaiyaa’s title track, by Pritam! And the remake is in the hands of the people I least trust with remakes nowadays, Gourov-Roshin! (With Abhijit Vaghani doing the programming) So yeah, lethal combination. Now, the song’s new composition by Gourov-Roshin cleverly doesn’t stray too far away from the original one, and in doing so, sounds quite similar to the old one in totality. However, it sounds completely incomplete! The song starts off with a rapid rap from Raftaar (if you don’t know, his name means speed 😛 ) which is quite impressive as far as rap is concerned. Then comes the new mukhda, which, as I said, sticks very close to the original. The hookline is the only thing here that deserves to be heard, because of its original catchy and haunting tune by Pritam. The antara too, can’t survive without the old tune serving as a structure. So yeah, I bet the duo did a lot of put-this-note-here-and-that-there, and composed the new parts with the same notes, but jumbled up. The arrangements are quite cool, and there’s a nice tap dance part after the rap at the beginning, which sounds amazing. And that plucked instrument loop from the original has been incorporated in the places you would least expect it to be, sometimes played on some trumpet-like instrument. The beats are groovy. And that synthesiser loop that starts the song is mind blowing. Vocals by Armaan Malik are one of his worst performances ever. The makers have made him song in a different voice, yes, but it doesn’t suit him or the song at all. The female vocalist hardly gets scope to say anything, and that too, is unintelligible. Raftaar, as mentioned before, raps efficiently. The new lyrics by Kumaar are no weirder than the original by Sameer. 😀 Good as a song, but not as a remake as it doesn’t meet the standards of the original, which was way ahead of its time!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Tere Dil Mein / Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Armaan Malik & Shefali Alvares, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Aatish Kapadia

“Abb toh intezaar hai, bas tere jawaab ka,
Milta hai khayal kya, tere mere khwaab ka,
Mera dil toh ho chala, ikk khuli kitaab re…
Tere dil mein kya hai tu bataa re!”

– Aatish Kapadia

Composer Mannan Shaah takes over from here, and his first song is a dulcet romantic ballad, that instantly gets you hooked. The composition is one of the sweetest I’ve heard this year. Each month seems to be having its own ‘Best romantic Song’, and while January’s and February’s songs were ‘Enna Sona’ (Ok Jaanu) and ‘Bawara Mann’ (Jolly LLB 2) respectively, I would vouch for this one as March’s best romantic track till now. Mannan’s composition is heart-rending, especially the hookline, which has an innate Indian touch to it. It is just so emotional-sounding for some reason! And the line going “Tu hi mera sach hai re…” has been composed beautifully! The antara just continues with the beauty of the composition, and I especially loved the part where the antara bridges to the hookline! That’s when the maximum goosebumps showed up. The arrangements are amazing, with acoustic guitar riffs (Warren Mendonsa) forming the base of the arrangements, and a ravishing Strings section by the Chennai Strings Conducted by Sax Raja blows away your mind. Electric guitar, also by Warren Mendonsa, makes a cameo in the interlude, and that’s quite interesting to listen to too. The vocals by Armaan are cute and sweet, but his diction falters at places, like “kaab” for “khwaab“, and he hasn’t seemed to have got time to rehearse those intricate aalaaps in the mukhda and hookline! Sad, because that makes a technical glitch in such a beautiful song! Armaan is usually good, but I cant help but miss Arijit here. The song is like a modern equivalent to ‘Commando’s romantic song ‘Saawan Bairi’, but gets nowhere close to it in terms of compositional intricacy and perfection. Then again, that was a semiclassical composition. There is a “Club Mix” included in the soundtrack, which is basically a remix, with the original track played at a very high tempo, that barely does any justice to it. There’s a female portion in that track, which is sung by Shefali Alvares (I got that even before reading the credits! Yayyyy! :p ). The song makes for a nice club track, but doesn’t at all do justice to the surreal composition. And yes, I am rating that because if the makers want to degrade their album by adding unnecessary remixes, it’s not my fault! Note that it is the first remix in all of 2017, and that means we are changing! The remix has been essentially done to bring forward another antara, which wasn’t in the original, and unused. So if you want to hear that, hear this club mix. Otherwise, I will only suggest that you hear it if you work as a DJ. The lyrics by Aatish Kapadia are simply wonderful, and I really loved them, both in the original and the antara of the song that got used in the remix. A romantic song straight from the heart.

Rating: 4.5/5 for original, 2/5 for Club Mix

 

3. Seedha Saadha / Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Amit Mishra / Jubin Nautiyal, Music By ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Seedha saadha dil, Seedha saadha,
Mera Kam hai tera zyaada!”

– Kumaar

A melancholic rock song is the next song Mannan Shaah has to offer here, and from the way it starts, you can tell that it isn’t headed anywhere. The first version, at least. It has that feel to it right at the beginning, which tells you right away that it is a weird, unlikeable composition. And it definitely does start off that way. The composition is as colourless and dull as it can be, before the hookline. The only part the composition ever becomes likeable is in the hookline. The antara too, is decent, but because of the mukhda and other factors we’ll come to later, the song just doesn’t appeal to you. It is a pity that such a good hookline couldn’t get a better fitting part to it. Now for the other factors. Like Amit Mishra’s vocals. Amit Mishra. The one who stunned or entertained us with his renditions in ‘Manma Emotion Jaage’ (Dilwale), ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ (Dishoom) and the best, ‘Bulleya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), does nothing but disappoint in this song. His faltering voice doesn’t go with the composition, for which even K.K. would’ve worked. Jubin does way better in his version, but then, his version is a subtly arranged one, without as many hard-hitting rock noises as Amit’s version has. And I must say, Mannan’s composition sounds way better as a soft rock song, than a heavy rock song. Jubin’s soft voice had the right voice texture for it to come out right, which is why his version is way better. The arrangements in Amit Mishra’s version are too distracting, and the melody can’t be enjoyed as such. Whereas Jubin’s version has a wonderful, sway-inducing soft rock arrangement, enhanced by a synthesiser loop playing in the interlude. In a nutshell, you should go for the wholesome Reprise, than the incomplete and weird first version. Lyrics by Kumaar are good, but quite typical here. A sad song better felt in Jubin’s voice than Amit’s. It is basically a middling composition relying on voices to uplift it, out of which one clearly could not!

Rating: 2/5 for Original, 3.5/5 for Reprise Version

 

4. Commando (Title Track) / Commando (English Version)

Singer ~ Aditi Singh Sharma, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Commando, commando, commando, commando!” :p

– Kumaar

The last song of the album is the title track of the film. Of course, it isn’t exactly the title track because they don’t say ‘Commando 2’, but then whatever. The composition is yet another middling composition by Mannan, and I don’t get why it flies all over the place and has so many turns and twists, that nobody will be able to decipher or even enjoy it. The mukhda makes it start off like a very run-of-the-mill track, without any shine whatsoever. The hookline is the easiest possible way you could imagine to put a tune to the word ‘Commando’. The interlude sees the song going all fusion-y, and then there’s a tempo increases that gets the song taking off at last. From there, the song at least sounds decent. There’s a nice traditional percussion in that part, and it is followed by a nice electric guitar piece. The antara that follows is also better composed, and has the required attitude that is seen in the action scenes of the movie’s trailer. There’s an English Version, in which just the mukhda’s Hindi parts have been replaced by lines in English, and it was actually unnecessary. They could’ve secretly added it in the movie without giving us another audio track, like some filmmakers do for certain songs that are actually good. Aditi is at her pretentious best, and stylises the words so much that it sounds too false! Mannan’s techno sounds do fare well for the song though. Kumaar’s lyrics are just bland. One of the most boring title tracks of late. *Remembers Raees title song*. Or maybe not.

Rating: 1.5/5 for original , 1.5/5 for English Version


Commando 2 is such a letdown, I can’t explain it in words. Only one song matches any expectations, and that too isn’t as good as the best song of “Commando”. Gourov-Roshin’s remake is good except for the fact that is unnecessarily relies on Pritam’s song to propel it forward. Mannan’s other songs are below the standards he set for himself with the first film’s album. Also, unnecessary reprises bog down the album. This Commando lacks command over tune, and composition! And maybe, choice of singers too.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4.5 + 2 + 2 + 3.5 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 50% (How convenient!) 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Dil Mein > Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version) > Hare Krishna Hare Ram > Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix) > Seedha Saadha > Commando (Title Track) > Commando (English Version)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Commando 2) = 07

 

Which is your favourite song from Commando 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SUPERBIA’S TASTELESS COFFEE! (COFFEE WITH D – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Superbia (Gourov-Roshin-Shaan)
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 2nd January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 20th January 2017

Coffee With D Album Cover

Coffee With D Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Coffee With D is an upcoming Bollywood satirical film directed by Vishal Mishra, and produced by Vinod Ramani. The film marks the debut of popular comedian Sunil Grover, who we all know as “Guthhi” from the defunct “Comedy Nights with Kapil”, and now as Dr. Mashoor Gulati on “The Kapil Sharma Show”. Supporting sarcastic includes Zakir Hussain, Dipannita Sharma and Anjana Sukhani. The film is the story of a news reporter, Arnab Ghosh (which Sunil Grover claims, isn’t based on Arnab Goswami, and when any actor or actress or director says this, we know that it definitely is based on that person) who is going through a rough phase in his career, until he gets the golden opportunity to get back his TRP ratings — an interview with an underworld don name ‘D’ and we all can only guess who that ‘D’ is. The music for the movie has been composed by Superbia, which (don’t get too excited; it’s no foreign band or anything) is just a fancy term for Gourov-Roshin when Shaan joins them. So Gourov-Roshin-Shaan are behind the music of this, whose discography boasts of films like ‘Balwinder Singh Famous Ho Gaya’ (one song) and ‘Great Grand Masti’ (One song). Now they get the full album for his movie, and have composed four songs for it. Gourov-Roshin as a duo had worked previously for four albums, with three songs in ‘Force 2’, one in ‘Tum Bin 2’, one in ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ and two in ‘Kaabil’. One song from ‘Kaabil’ and the song from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ was listenable; others were strictly atrocious. So now, let’s see if the addition of Shaan does any special magic to this duo. Not that their songs in ‘Balwinder Singh Famous Ho Gaya’ or ‘Great Grand Masti’ were excellent either!


1. Coffee With D

Singer ~ Anu Malik

(No line from the song is worth writing here!)

The first song takes the form of a kind of theme song for whatever show Sunil Grover’s is the anchor of in the movie. The composition is so bland and boring and dull and icky, that it just suits as a theme song to some talk show. Superbia do a good job in stringing together the most weird-sounding notes, trying to give it a gangster-rap touch, but it is the mukhda itself that sets you off. The song could’ve worked just as well with only the mukhda , and then it would actually sound like a theme song. What’s more, the way they’ve repeated the hookline for so many times, that it actually sounds like some stupid talk show on Doordarshan is going to follow. The two unnecessary antaras take away any interest the listener might’ve gained from the mukhda. The composers don’t add anything enticing as far as he arrangements go. A stale and outdated sound looms over the whole song like thunderclouds. The digital beats sound veryyyyy outdated. Anu Malik is at his obnoxious best with his vocals, though he doesn’t sound like he did in his earlier songs — it is a different kind of obnoxious. Also, Sameer’s lyrics are horrible. Not at all meant for repeat listening!

Rating: 1/5

 

2. Ali Ali

Singer ~ Shabab Sabri

“Hoke mayoos koi, maangne waala na gaya,
Hey tune itna diya, mangaton se sambhala na gaya”

The next song is a Qawwali, one which closely sticks to all the trademark Qawwali clichés used in Bollywood. It starts off with a long and almost neverending ad-lib, which, but for the good lyrics, just sounds sleep-inducing. After that ad-lib, though, the trio hopelessly resort to the very typical Qawwali beats (which they could’ve brought some variations into!) that we heard already in ‘Bhar Do Jholi Meri’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The exact same beats, along with quite tedious arrangements of harmonium and tablas, which usually sound great, if done perfectly or innovatively (Like the Qawwalis ‘Allah Hu Allah’s and ‘Meherbaan’ from ‘Sarbjit’), but sound tedious here. Shabab Sabri sounds different in this song; usually, his voice sounds low-pitched and booming (I still love his rendition of Sajid-Wajid’s awesome rock Qawwali ‘Jadoo Tone Waaliyan’ from ‘Daawat-e-Ishq’) but here, he sounds quite high-pitched. To his credit, he has rendered he composition with the right amount of perfection required. Just that the composition and arrangements are too tedious to support him. Towards the end, the composers go for that quintessential rise in tempo that any Qawwali is incomplete without. Something that could’ve been interesting, though, they make it a repetitive portion, and it leaves the song ending in such a way that listener feels incomplete. Sameer’s lyrics might be something that might be working for the song, but it’s not that lyrics are what a listener first pays attention to, to decide whether he will like the song or not! A tedious Qawwali! Still waiting for a great Bollywood Qawwali! My favourite folk genre is betraying me these days! 😦

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Nation Wants To Know

(Named as ‘Teri Duniya Di’ on Saavn)

Singer ~ Shaan

“Hazaaron ke taadaad mein karodo ke ghotale,
Paisa power se jab chaahe jisse jo karwaale,
Har ghante breaking news,
At least a million views,
Arey ainvayi faltu issues banaaye asli mudde taale!”

The next song follows with the mediocrity, but only in terms of composition. The trio’s composition once again falls into their category of below average tunes. There isn’t anything catchy in the composition, and the only part that’s supposed to be catchy (‘Teri duniya di bajj gayi band…‘) seems dated. The rest is like a rap song, so it has almost no tune. The arrangements are another miserable fail from the trio’s sound, mixing various club beats with Punjabi dhols and seeing whether they work. Well, they didn’t. It just seems like a song from 2006. At least they haven’t overdone the club beats and it isn’t a bombardment to the ears, like Gourov-Roshin did in ‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’ (Kaabil). The song has been sung by one of the trio’s members, Shaan. And he has sung the song in a very different way than his usual style. At least he got rid of that sugary-sweet image he had created in so many songs of his that released nowadays. I’m still waiting for a good song from Shaan since ‘Chaar Kadam’ (Pk), but he seems more interested in judging ‘The Voice’. 😦 Anyway, he sounds mediocre here. The lyrics by Sameer Anjaan might be the best part of the song, which, in all my boredom, I forgot to tell you, is a satirical song. He sticks to the satirical theme and gives some nice lines to ponder on. Especially the second stanza, which I’ve written up in the ‘Lyrics Showcase’ portion, was quite good. Another mediocre song, but saved by the lyrics.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Tumhari Mohabbat

Singers ~ Aakanksha Sharma & Shaan

“Mujhe din lagega, bhale raat ho, tumhari mohabbat agar saath ho.”

So not even this movie escapes from the ‘Romantic Song Bug’ that has infected all the filmmakers these days. The next song is a romantic song, and I wouldn’t say it is too impressive either, but it is quite pleasant. Again, the composition sounds very old-school, in neither a negative nor positive way. It really didn’t matter much to me this time, probably because it was the first pleasant and non-repetitive thing to hit my ears in this album. The composition is like a 90s Jatin-Lalit song, and does quite well in catching your attention too. Sajid-Wajid (‘Saanson Ne’ from ‘Dabangg 2’) and Himesh Reshammiya (‘Dhoom Dhaam’ from ‘Action Jackson’) occasionally give such old 90s-styled songs, and now Superbia follows their lead. The hookline pleases you, if not impresses and fascinates. You think, ‘At least it is better than everything else in the album!’ The mukhda doesn’t quite intrigue, but the antara is relatively better, as far as the composition goes. The arrangements are cool too, with a heard-before but pleasant tabla rhythm gracing the hookline. Harmonica is a prominent instrument used throughout the song, and that’s another main attraction of the song. The vocals are good, and Aakanksha gets to sing the mukhda and one antara, while Shaan sings only the last antara, so it doesn’t quite seem like a duet. Shaan is back to his mushy self, but tries not to be extra-mushy, while Aakanksha tries hard to imitate Monali Thakur. And even succeeds in places. Sameer’s lyrics belong to the 90s like everything else does, but like you did everything else, you overlook that too, just because. A ‘chalta hai‘ type of song.

Rating: 3/5


Coffee With D turns out to be even worse than expected. Not even one song adheres to today’s music sensibilities, and none of the songs proves for a pleasant respite. The songs may be situational, but I don’t think he movie too will excel too much with such dated tunes. An album that is best forgotten (if you hear it, that is)! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 1 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 = 8.5

Album Percentage: 42.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tumhari Mohabbat > Nation Wants To Know > Ali Ali > Coffee With D

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes This Year: 03 (from previous albums) + 00 = 03

 

Which is your favourite song from Coffee With D? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

‘KAABIL’ OF BEING FORGOTTEN! (KAABIL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rajesh Roshan & Gourov-Roshin
♪ Lyrics by: Nasir Faraaz, Manoj Muntashir, Anjaan, Anand Bakshi, Kumaar & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd December 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 26th January 2017

Kaabil Album Cover

Kaabil Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Kaabil is an upcoming Bollywood action/romantic film starring Hrithik Roshan, Yami Gautam and Ronit Roy. The movie is directed by Sanjay Gupta, and produced by Rakesh Roshan. The movie is about two blind people who fall in love (God knows how…). And then dishoom dishoom happens and then it probably ends happily. Moving on to the music. The music has been composed by yesteryear hitmaker Rajesh Roshan, who has given quite a number of great songs in the olden days, but seems to have lost his charm with his last outing, ‘Krrish 3’. I mean, I don’t even know how it is possible that his music in ‘Kites’ (2010) sounded so much with the music of the time, and so modern and all, while three years later in 2013, when ‘Krrish 3’ released, his music sounded dated. You would think that’s impossible! Well, all we can hope is that he has composed great tracks for this album. Again, as always, T-Series gives us a shock by adding a composer duo in the music directors panel for the album. The duo is Gourov-Roshin, the go-tos for remaking and spoiling old songs. This time they have been given charge of two of Rajesh Roshan’s hits from the 70s and 80s respectively — ‘Dil Kya Kare’ (Julie) and ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana). So technically, Rajesh Roshan has composed the songs. Smart. Expectations are a bit more than zero, and given that the songs to be remade are of such a high standing, the remakes have to be good or else T-Series wouldn’t have added them.. or at least that’s what I think.. 😛 Anyway, since I have such less expectations from the first album of 2017 to release, I’m just diving into it very cautiously and sceptically.

Note: Before you start off, you might want to check out the new rating scheme with effect from 2017..


1. Kaabil Hoon / Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Nasir Faraaz

“Tere mere sapne sabhi, band aankhon ke taale mein hain,
Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa, woh Chaand ke pyaale mein hai,
Phir bhi sapne kar dikhaaon Sach toh kehna bas yehi…
Main tere kaabil hoon ya, tere kaabil nahi!”

– Nasir Faraaz

So this was the first song of 2017 to release, releasing in early December or so. You’d think that the makers had some reason behind releasing the song so early, but after hearing the song, you understand that the only reason was to get the songs released and aside, so the makers can concentrate on other ‘important’ stuff, like getting bad reviews. Veteran Rajesh Roshan offers nothing new in terms of composition. One might argue that he just tried to compose in his trademark style, and I agree, but it just doesn’t suit in today’s times. The mukhda is quite bland, but you start liking it after you hear the dreary hookline. And what’s more, it plays four times throughout the song! (Not the hookline, but the WHOLE mukhda!) The antaras are two very ear-splittingly high-pitched stanzas that irritate more than pacify. Look Mr. Roshan (and I hope you aren’t reading this..), we really appreciate you bringing forth the music of yore, but at least modernize it like Vishal Bhardwaj & Sanjay Leela Bhansali do! Yes, after a few listens, it gets listenable, but that’s only because we are so much rooted to our beautiful 90s music. 🙂 The arrangements are as typical and predictable as typicality and predictability can get. I don’t know if music programmer Abhijit Vaghani has chosen the beats (or maybe arranger Dhrubajit Gogoi), but whatever it is, it sounds like a desperate attempt to modernize the stale composition, by adding beats similar to Major Lazer and Justin Bieber’s pop single ‘Cold Water’. The dafli makes the arrangements sound sooooooo old-school. And whoever has arranged the song, has put in a mishmash of synth sounds as if his life depended on it, and horns wherever they shouldn’t have been. That guitar riff which the song starts off with resembles that hook tune of the aforementioned ‘Cold Water’ so much. And same with the trumpet. And the first time Jubin sings “Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa…”, there is an unexpected outburst of noise that wasn’t required. However, in the first antara’s beginning, there is a nice trademark Rajesh Roshan percussion, which pleases the ears. The composer ditches his recent regulars for such songs, Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal, to bring in two supposedly ‘modern’ voices, Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal, but Mr. Roshan! Songs don’t sound modern because of singers! You need a modern tune for that…! Jubin sounds suppressed for some reason, and drawls out the lines like he’s bored, making you miss Arijit’s voice for once. And Palak is hands down off tune. Everything she sings is way too high-pitched for her to carry off perfectly, and her voice comes across as cheap. Especially when she sings the hookline after the first antara. And both of their voices have been kept raw, as they were recorded, making it sound more like a scratch version of the song. And at the end, the singers are made to sing “la la la…” and “hey hey hey...”, as if they are from the 80s! Nasir Faraaz’s lyrics ooze of the 90s! What is “Tere Naam ko hi pukaarke, khanakengi meri choodiyaan“??? I highly doubt she’s wearing bangles in the song.. unless the second antara is shot at their wedding. In the sad version, Rajesh Roshan slows down the pace so much that it is tough to discern that it is the same song. Not that it sounds any better though. The arrangements there are minimal except for some strings. And it is just one and a half minutes long, so it is clearly made only for the background score. The lyrics have been tweaked too, with no better result. A song that would’ve created waves, had it been included in ‘Krrish’! Heck, even the ‘Krrish’ album sounds better!

Ratings: 2/5 for Original Version, 1.5/5 for Sad Version

 

2. Haseeno Ka Deewana

Singer ~ Payal Dev, Rap By ~ Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

“Sara zamaana, haseeno ka deewana,
Zamaana kahe phir kyun, bura hai dil lagaana!”

– Anjaan

Before the song released, I was having a tough time wondering how Rajesh Roshan would remake his own old song! And then it hit me, and my worst fears came true. T-Series had conveniently handed over Rajesh Roshan’s two old songs in the album to Gourov-Roshin! Unfortunately, there was no choice for us listeners but to hope the song would be remade well. The result, however, is atrocious. Gourov-Roshin follow the path they paved for themselves when they remade ‘Kaate Nahin Katte’ (Mr. India) in ‘Force 2’. They spoil this song, ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana) as well and present in front of us a bad mix of noises and horrendous singing. The mukhda and antara have been recomposed, and they sound horrible, nothing else. Even the original hook, which could’ve been the best part of the song, is spoiled by singing which is supposed to sound cool. The arrangements are nothing but a lot of unbearable noises, supposed to be club sounds. I don’t know if they want the clubbers to enjoy or die of some undiscovered ear disease. Random techno sounds grace the whole song, and it just sounds BAD! Payal Dev sings in her ‘Veerappan’ voice — an extremely harsh, cutting voice that does nothing but grate your eardrums. I don’t know what she’s up to.. on one side she sings gems like ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani) and on the other hand, bleats out songs like this. She also mauls the hookline, the hookline that anybody raised in a Bollywoodish background has grown up listening. And the last straw is when she sings the antara. (“Yeh kaaauuuuun keh raha hai..”) Raftaar, after his successful stint in ‘Dangal’s ‘Dhaakad’, reverts to his original form, and delivers a rap that proves that it was a mistake that he bagged ‘Dhaakad’. The lyrics by Kumaar are just your normal Bollywood item song fare, with the lady praising her flaws. And the boy agrees, somehow. Now that everyone must have heard it, I can’t even tell you to skip it. A horrific remake.

Rating: 1/5 (and that’s being generous)

 

3. Kuch Din

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Aksar ataa pataa mera, rehta nahin, rehta nahin,
Koi nishaan mera kahin milta nahin, milta nahin,
Dhoondha gaya, jab bhi mujhe, tere gali mein mila..
Kuch din, se mujhe, teri aadat ho gayi hai,
Kuch din se meri, tu zaroorat ho gayi hai!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The next song is a romantic song, with a lulling melody. It starts off well enough, with dreamy music on the piano and something like a church organ. But then Jubin starts singing and you realise the blaring problem in the song — Bad recording. The vocals might be good, but bad recording and mixing help to steal all credit from Jubin. The voice is all muffled; even songs recorded in the 1970s sound better! The composition is better this time, because of that lilt in the melody. Again, it is a signature Roshan tune, and reminds you of the beautiful music of ‘Kaho Naa Pyaar Hai’. The mukhda plunges right into the hookline, and succeeds in the mission of soothing you. The antaras are a nice extension to the already nice tune. At least it pleases the ears. The high notes in the composition are pleasant this time, and the composition as a whole is hummable. Arrangements are nice and soothing, but muffled due to that flawed recording. Strings and brass instruments bring a nice 90s flavour to the song. Again, Roshan takes the help of techno beats, but this time it is a bit toned down, and hence doesn’t bother much. The second interlude has a nice guitar portion, which sounds good in spite of being a bit dated. Jubin, as mentioned before, sings well here, adhering to Roshan’s tune loyally, and evoking memory of Abhijeet’s songs with Shah Rukh Khan, at places. As mentioned above, that recording spoils the feel. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are good, but nothing extraordinary. He sticks to the 90s style of lyrics-writing. A good, pleasant melody, with good vocals and arrangements, is spoiled by the bad recording and sound mixing!

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Mon Amour

Singer ~ Vishal Dadlani, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Kadam se kadam jo miley, toh phir saath hum tum chale,
Chale saath hum tum jahaan, wahi pe baney qaafiley!
Mon Amour!!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rajesh Roshan’s last song on the album takes the form of an upbeat Latino-flavoured song, that’ll surely get you up and dancing. The song starts off with a nice intro, taking the one of the repeating lines from the song having Vishal Dadlani sing it in a slow tempo, and it serves as a good buildup for the upbeat song that follows. The composition by Roshan this time too, is enjoyable. The hookline starts off the song, when the intro is over, and gets you ready for a nice dance song. The mukhda is what Vishal had sung in the intro, and it has a nice Spanish flavour to it, carried out very efficiently by Roshan. The antaras are as enjoyable as can be. They don’t seem like antaras, more like continuations of the mukhda, giving the effect that the whole song is a single stanza. All I can say is that they have been composed wonderfully. In the process, Rajesh Roshan tries to make a ‘Senorita’ (Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara) for this album, and succeeds to an extent. The arrangements remain loyal to the Latino flavour of the song, with guitars leading the way for some time, before handing over first command to the trumpets, which infuse life into the song after that short introduction is over. Percussion is topnotch, and it gives the Salsa feel very nicely. The xylophone that comes in the antara’s last line is so playfully awesome! I like how the title of the song stands alone in the song, with nothing to support it. It makes the song progress seamlessly from line to line. Vishal’s energy seems a bit diluted here, but nevertheless, the song sounds quite energetic still. Recording seems a problem here too, but it is ignorable because of the song being good. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here, are probably the only moderate lyrics on the album — not too old-fashioned (‘Kaabil Hoon’ and ‘Kuch Din’) and not toooooo modern (‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’). They are enjoyable though, making use of sounds like ‘Da ra di da ra’ and ‘Baila baila’ to make it sound more Latino-flavoured! A nice upbeat number, but I’m not sure whether it will be promoted enough to create an impact on the public!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Muusic Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si, iss duniya ki rasmein,
Na kuchh tere bas mein jaana, na kuchh mere bas mein!”

– Anand Bakshi

Another remake. Once again, a Rajesh Roshan melody of the golden era, and again, remade by Gourov-Roshin. This time, Roshan’s beautiful melody from ‘Julie’, ‘Dil Kya Kare’. Expectations were zero, and maybe that’s why I was pleasantly surprised by this one! The main reason I liked it was that the composers have tried to retain the flavour of the original, and not tried to change everything. The mukhda has been changed, and that’s about it. This tracks starts with a nice modern touch, similar to so many (good) English songs you hear nowadays, to such an extent that that person singing ‘Woah’ or whatever at the beginning sounds like Justin Bieber. :\ Is this soundtrack inspired by Bieber or what? Anyway, the new mukhda is a nice addition to the song, it just takes time to get used to it. The hookline follows the new mukhda, and the mukhda of the old song (“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si…”) takes the form of the first antara, as it is (except the ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein Julie‘ is changed to ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein jaana‘) and the hookline returns, bridged to the antara by one of the lines of the new mukhda. The first antara of the old song appears as the second antara in this track, and it sounds good in Jubin’s voice! And this time, the programming is good too! The duo’s arrangements are pleasant, surprisingly, and they don’t bombard the ears with a fusillade of unwanted noises. Instead, they’re quite calm club beats. Now these are club beats! Piano graces the second interlude with its presence, to a great effect. The finger snaps are intriguing throughout the song. However, what I missed is that drum which Rajesh Roshan had added in the background of the old song (which he has also used in the title track of this album, if I’m right). Jubin perfectly takes over from Kishore Kumar, but of course the original always is better. Now that we have to deal with it though, I must say Jubin has done a good job. He sings the “oonchi oonchi..” part exceptionally well. I don’t know whether it is autotune or not, but here, his high notes sound good. At least it doesn’t sound like a scratch version. The additional lyrics are quite functional, if not great. I’m still in love with the original ones! 😍 A pleasant redux. That’s a remake for you. I think Gourov-Roshin are better at romantic songs (except ‘Maahi Ve’ from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’) than idiotic item numbers that are remakes.

Rating: 3.5/5 


In Kaabil, Rajesh Roshan actually delivers better than his last ‘Krrish 3’. Out of three songs, two are pleasant and sound much better than what he had offered in his last album. Gourov-Roshin with their two remakes of his old songs, do a mediocre job in one, and better in the second. However, as a whole, the albums seems extremely dated and behind its time. Had the album released somewhere around 2005 or so, the songs might’ve gained more momentum and more hearts. But now, it just seems like another average album. A middling start to 2017!

 

Total Points of the Album: 2 + 1.5 + 1 + 3 + 3.5 + 3.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 48.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mon Amour = Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye > Kuch Din > Kaabil Hoon > Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version) > Haseeno Ka Deewana

 

ALERT! ANOTHER NEW SECTION!

Here is a remake counter, counting the number of remakes this year. :p Just for fun. 😉

Number of Remakes: 02

 

Which is your favourite song from Kaabil? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂