FORMULA FOR SUCCESS: SIMPLE REHNE DE!! (SIMRAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya & Vayu Srivastava
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 25th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th September 2017

Simran Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To hear “Baras Ja” on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy “Baras Ja” on iTunes CLICK HERE

♪ To hear “Baras Ja” on YouTube:


Simran is an upcoming Bollywood drama film, directed by Hansal Mehta, produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Shailesh R. Singh, and Amit Agarwal. The film stars Kangana Ranaut, Soham Shah, Mark Justice, Hiten Kumar and Esha Tiwari Pande in crucial roles. The film revolves around a Gujarati lady settled in the United States of America, who gets involved in crime. The film does seem quirky and very racy, and definitely very humorous. Now, Hansal Mehta usually does not rely on music to carry his films forward, as is evident from the fact that out of his recent film, ‘Shahid’ had just one song (not even released properly by a music label), and ‘Aligarh’ had no songs. Then there was ‘Citylights’, which, due to it being a joint venture with the Bhatts, had a stellar album by Jeet Gannguli. This film seems to be Hansal’s lightest film in a long time, and the result is that we can read the names of Sachin-Jigar in the credits, for music. Now, roping in Sachin-Jigar can’t mean anything except that Hansal wants great music for this film, doesn’t it? Accordingly, Sachin-Jigar have scored six songs for the film, and very situational too. Still, before I reveal much, let’s see how the music fares!!


1. Lagdi Hai Thaai

Singers ~ Guru Randhawa & Jonita Gandhi, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Doodho nahaao, phoolo phalo tum,
LED jaisi karna glow tum,
Sabko duayein yeh naseeb rakhna,
Jodi sada ye muskuraaye!
Maike ki photo ik kareeb rakhna,
Aisa na ho ki bhooli jaaye, jaaye, jaaye!
Jadon nache baby sajj dhajj, Lagdi hai thaai!”

– Vayu

It must be so difficult to compose for seven film albums in a year, but Sachin-Jigar are up and about, composing for the fourth album, which happens to be ‘Simran’. The first song matches Sachin-Jigar’s roots, as it is a Gujarati track by soul, but Punjabi by sound. Actually, it’s a beautifully thought out fusion of Gujarati and Punjabi, something nobody would ever be able to do this well and this seamlessly! The composition is perfectly suitable for a song that should make you get up and dance, and the desi touch, both Punjabi and Gujarati, add to the enjoyability of the song. Both the mukhda and the antara have been composed on the same tune, and Sachin-Jigar follow the trend to keep the song short and more appealing. The short length never hampers the beauty of the song. The hookline is amazing as well, but it is the arrangements that makes the song sound amazing. When it starts, you may be quick enough to dismiss it as yet another typical Punjabi number, added into the album just to be another ‘London Thumakda’ (Queen), but later you realise the magic, when the Gujarati dhols begin to awe you. The brass band (Trumpets by Kishore Sodha) is used very nicely here, and without sounding stale or heard-before, it provides a nice and fresh touch. But what is really amazing, is that wonderful flute (Naveen Kumar) which has been played in a very typical Gujju style, and it does nothing but inspire you to learn how to play flute! 😛 But I’m sure this kind of a flautist would take years to become so good! The vocals are amazing. At first, I thought Guru Randhawa has been chosen just because he has a history of many pop songs with T-Series, but turns out, he has given the Punjabi touch to the song very genuinely, and keeps aside all his pop song background for this one filmy song! Jonita is a surprise package; singing in Gujarati and all — though I think she is Gujarati. Anyway, she sings the old lady portions with as much ease as she does the lead heroine’s portions! In fact, she sings the Dadi Maa portions in Gujarati even better!! One thing I didn’t enjoy was the drunk part at the end, it seemed forced. Vayu’s lyrics are some of the most positive wedding song lyrics I’ve seen in Bollywood, a place where people come to weddings only to eat, drink and dance. But here, Vayu makes the characters sing things like “LED Jaisi Karna Glow Tum!” I swear, it is one of the most positive blessings I’ve heard in a Bollywood wedding song, and so less dramatic than the blessings they used to sing in songs like ‘Maahi Ve’ (Kal Ho Naa Ho) and all! All in all, this is a very enjoyable Gujju-Punjabi fusion, with amazing arrangements to accompany the energetic vocals!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

2. Pinjra Tod Ke

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Jannat ke saaye, jannat le aaye hai,
Baahon mein, ab zindagi,
Kismat ki dori jo, baandhi woh kholi,
Jeene chali, main abb zindagi,
Pinjra tod ke, tod ke, udd jaana hai,
Baahein kholke, kholke, udd jaana hai!”

– Priya Saraiya

The next song starts off as a mellow composition, with piano notes almost assuring you that this is going to be a sad number. However, it is wonderful to see how Sachin-Jigar seamlessly change the mood of the song, making it uplifting and motivational as the song progresses. That is almost like a symbol infused into the song by Sachin-Jigar. The lyrics by Priya Saraiya talk about breaking free of restrictions, and flying freely — so Sachin-Jigar have probably structured the song in a way to resemble that, starting off very slowly, but breaking free subsequently! What a wonderful form the song takes on, once you realise that! Sachin-Jigar’s composition is nothing new, it is the usual Sunidhi pathos, but it works wonders even though it is heard-before. After all, it isn’t necessary for things to be complicated to like them, is it? The hookline is very motivating, as is the second antara, a sprightly conclusion to the otherwise soft song. It takes on a more energetic tempo and composition, and even has more energetic arrangements, since the electric guitars and drums truly break out in that part. The rest of the arrangements have a soothingly Western touch — starting off with amazing piano, progressing into a euphoric acoustic guitar-led arrangement, until the aforementioned second antara arrives. The interludes contain a wonderful “Oley Oley“, by a backing vocalist I suspect is Jonita Gandhi, she sounds exactly like her. This type of song nowadays, usually goes to Sunidhi, and she aces it, as always. It’s nice to see her finally getting recognised not only as a singer of those upbeat numbers she was terribly typecast for in the late 2000s. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics, as mentioned before, are motivating and uplifting, in the true sense! This is probably Priya’s best work in a long time! A beautiful song, with a simple and heard-before vibe, but still manages to impress monumentally!!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Meet

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Tu hi mera meet hai ji,
Tu hi meri preet hai ji,
Jo labon se ho sake naa judaa,
Aisa mera geet hai ji!”

– Priya Saraiya

The next song happens to be a very happy-go-lucky romantic song, sung by Arijit, the kind of song Sachin-Jigar have usually done many times with Atif. Since their songs with Arijit have always been unconventional and never-heard-before, this comes as a surprise, as it conforms to the regular Arijit school of romance. However, the composition is really charming, and has you hooked (at least to the hookline) in the first listen. In the subsequent listens you “try” to get hooked to the mukhda and antara. Sadly, I still can’t recall the tunes of these portions immediately, even after having listened to the song at least six times by now. Does that mean the song is bad? Not at all. The song is amazing. Sachin-Jigar weave magic even with those notes that evoke memories of compositions by other composers, but doesn’t really evoke memories of any song in particular. It has the charm of an old Bollywood song, and it is the kind of composition to which we would say “Ah, the nostalgia”, after listening to it after a long time somewhere in the future. It is for this reason that the song gets such a huge repeat value even though it isn’t hooking as such. The hook has wonderful variations Arijit takes not every time, so they remain exclusive, but you keep waiting for the times he does take those variations! The arrangements are just as soothing as the composition; again, a wonderful piano piece opens the song, coupled with a magical and fairy-tale-like strings portion, until the Acoustic guitars come in to lighten up the mood. The whole thing sounds so fulfilling with that wonderful composition. The guitar riff repeats throughout the song. The interlude has a nice flute portion, which keeps you listening, if not hooked. Arijit aces such songs, and does so yet again. Again, I must mention those wonderful aalaaps of his, in the hookline. Priya writes amazing lyrics here too, but here they’re quite simple, even more simple than ‘Pinjra Tod Ke’, and has a plain and straightforward theme — love. A charming love song, with simplicity ruling it.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Single Rehne De

Singers ~ Shalmali Kholgade & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Mere dad bole karle shaadi, varna marr jaayegi boodhi daadi,
Shaadi kar, shaadi kar, shaadi kar, aakkho din shaadi kar,
Aur koi kaam nahi hai kya??”

– Vayu

A laugh riot arrives next, with a song that’s evidently about the main character trying to convince her father to let her stay single. There is actually very less by way of composition in the song, whatever little there is, just keeps repeating. The song is more like a rap, but it is the lyrics that hold it higher than it would have been. Vayu cracks you up with humorous lines that usually don’t find their way into songs; they are typical to scripts of rom-coms, but I find it very cool for them to find their way into a song. The production too, is good, but very repetitive again. Nevertheless, it goes with the unconventional nature of the lyrics. Shalmali Kholgade renders the rap with a feisty attitude, and Divya Kumar, relegated to the background does his one line well. Shalmali says the conversational portions of the song, at the beginning in such a funny, humorous way, that you start to get interested in the song due to her! Not a very fresh composition, but fresh lyrics and vocals, and even arrangements, which are sadly repeated too much!

Rating: 4/5

 

5. Simran

Singer ~ Jigar Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Chulbuli hai, chulbuli hai, nakchadhi hai, manchali hai,
Palak jhapakte falak churaa le apni Simran!
Jaani anjaani, thodi si deewaani,
Deewaana sabko banaa de apni Simran!
Ho, suljha ke hi khud hi yeh badhaye apne dil aur dimaag ki uljhan!
Oye oye oye Simran, alhad si Simran!
Na jaane tu chali re kahaan!”

– Priya Saraiya

The title song which we heard in the trailer is presented to us next, and it is this song which is actually the one that took the most time for me to like. The composition is very likeable, and has a lilting charm to it, in a very playful way, and has a charming ‘Barfi’-esque vibe to it, with the numerous sound effects and the whole description of the main character. The composition is great, if you look at it, but the arrangements confused me. Firstly, I was apprehensive about them because they were so similar to the ‘Barfi’ title track, with the whole accordion, mandolin and vocal sound effects, that I wasn’t sure if I liked them! I love ‘Barfi’, but I just felt weird about this song being so close to that. Later on, I started appreciating the arrangements, because of their lilting European touch and it was definite that Sachin-Jigar’s music would be inspired by Pritam’s as they were his disciples after all! Jigar has sung the song himself, and he has carried it out very well, and his raw, Un-autotuned vocals make the song even better as it sounds more natural and casual! The lyrics by Priya too, do a great job in acquainting us with the character of Simran, and her nature. A good title song, with an amazing arrangement.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

♪ Bonus Song

♪ Baras Ja

Singer ~ Mohit Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Jo nainon mein hai boondein,
Inhe rukhsaar ko, jee bhar ke chhoone de zara…
Ae dil, baras jaa, baras jaa na!
Abb toh aakar bhigo de tu mujhe!”

– Priya Saraiya

Now this song released later, a few days after T-Series had released the “Full Album”. Coincidentally, it had flooded in Mumbai on that day, and they came with a song called ‘Baras Ja’ the same night, so maybe they were waiting. 😶 Anyway, the song is probably the best, and least simple song on the soundtrack. It has a very complicated tune, but in spite of that, it is so easily loveable! It starts with a very sublime sound of the matka, and again, a soothing flute portion (Sachin-Jigar have really gotten it right with the flute in this album!!) that ensures you that this song was worth the wait! The composition is beautiful, very 90s, and very earthy at the same time, being very soothing. The antara is very, very amazingly composed, and Sachin-Jigar mix elements of Pritam’s and Rahman’s style of composition, to present to us a song, that is rooted to Indian music, especially in the arrangements. The song is decorated with beautiful flute pieces, and the Indian percussion really helps give it that earthy feel. Wonderful piano notes provide the much needed Western touch to the song too, but the Indian-ness overpowers it. Mohit Chauhan reminds us of his ‘Tum Se Hi’ (Jab We Met) days, and croons the song just as mellifluously. He does get a beautiful song all to himself after a long time, after having two songs by Pritam in ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’, sharing space with a co-singer in both of them. This is his first solo song after a long time! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics again, are very effective in bringing out the romance, and help give the song another thing to boast about. If it had been released earlier, it would’ve been easier for people to find, with all the other songs of the album, and got more audience! I am sad because this is definitely the best of the album!!

Rating: 5/5


Simran is yet another beautiful album from Sachin-Jigar. After three albums this year, out of which one was a multicomposer one, they strike gold yet again with their fourth one. I definitely think we can attribute the beauty of this album to one and only one reason — that it’s a solo composer album, and the director Hansal Mehta was clear in what he wanted. The freedom and creative liberty given to Sachin-Jigar is evident, because they’ve made some of the most beautiful melodies, without making things too complicated. That shows us how things can be made more attractive by following a simple formula — “Simple Rehne De!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 91.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Baras Ja = Pinjra Tod Ke > Meet = Simran = Lagdi Hai Thaai > Single Rehne De

 

Which is your favourite song from Simran? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Advertisements

TANISHK-VAYU KI SHAANDAAR DAAVAT!! (SHUBH MANGAL SAAVDHAN – Music Review)

How clever, how innovative and how unconventional! In keeping with the unconventional theme of this movie, the music company Eros Music (who before this, have never disappointed me in releasing music on time!) have thought of a very innovative music release strategy i.e, to not release the album as a “full album” even after the movie has released! Wow!! How nice! One of the composers of the album, Vayu Srivastava, (@purevayu on Twitter) though was kind enough to assure me that this was the last song; so going ahead with the review!

UPDATE (5th September 2017): Eros Now has now released the full OST, and it does indeed, only have five songs.


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 5th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st September 2017

Shubh Mangal Saavdhan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on ErosNow CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Shubh Mangal Saavdhan is a Bollywood film, starring Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar in the lead roles, directed by debutant R.S. Prasanna and produced by Aanand L. Rai and Krishika Lulla. The film revolves around the film’s leading man, who suffers from ‘erectile dysfunction’, what he calls a ‘Gent’s Problem’. The madness and mayhem that follows in the already engaged to be married couple’s life is the premise of the story. (Because the adults have found out as well!) So the theme is quirky and the film has been getting RAVE reviews, but there was no sign of the music album, even after the film had released! Eros Music seems to be following a certain promotional strategy, and I must say, it’s the worst promotional strategy ever, where the promotion carries on even after film release! At least Sony Music releases the album 11-12 hours before the film, leaving the music lovers satisfied! This irresponsible type of music release where the music released after the movie, is just plain weird. Anyway, the music album happens to be fast-coming-to-the-top composer duo Tanishk-Vayu’s first solo album, in which they’ve composed all songs, and even written all the songs! And whatever I’ve heard of Tanishk-Vayu’s music, it is always quirky and zany, and a brilliant mix of Indian and Western sounds, so I’m sure that they would provide amazing music for this film, about the wedding of two people from small middle-class families in Delhi! Let’s dive in and see how sumptuous their wedding feast turns out to be!


1. Rocket Saiyyan

Singers ~ Ritu Pathak, Brijesh Shandilya & Tanishk Bagchi

“Duniya palat doonga, tu na lena tension,
Tere hi liye hai meri sagli attention,
Dekho na baby dil ki wire ke length ko,
Chhukar dekho pyaar waale current ko!
Baatein kare phenke gulaab, hamare saiyyan,
Aisi velocity janaab, phawware saiyyan,
Rocket hamare saiyyan!!”

Tanishk-Vayu start their first solo album, with a quirky romantic song, with the peppiness quotient very high. The song is a quirky take on the quintessential Indian Wedding songs, and the duo’s small experiments all throughout the song make it so appealing. The composition, for one, is so crazy and zany, it appeals instantly, to people who are open to loving weird stuff, and I’m one of them! Right from the beginning, the duo uses quirky sounds to catch the attention of the listener, and it works in a weird way. The actual composition is very simple, and in some places I could tell they’re just trying to be overtly crazy and weird, but it just works so well, you don’t have time to think about it. The song has a mukhda and an antara, the mukhda by the female singer, while the antara is by the male. Both have the same, crazy kind of tune, and the hookline is very catchy, as it should be. However, it might just be reduced to a “Comedy” song. There is a certain quality in the arrangements as well — the quirk creeps into the music too, and alongside the usual wedding percussion, we get funny sounds like babies crying, and other computerised noises, that just act as nice attractions throughout the short song. The use of the shehnaai (Seems digital) in the interlude produces quite a humorous effect. The vocals are good for the type of song it is — Ritu Pathak, returning to sing after a long, long time, manages it very well, and a bit off tune too, producing a good, imperfect effect that suits the song very well. Brijesh Shandilya, the composers’ favourite, also does an amazing job, but has a very little portion. The lyrics by the duo too, are funny and cute. A song that might irritate a lot of people, but the quirk is what you have to look out for!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kanha / Kanha (Unplugged)

Singers ~ Shashaa Tirupati / Ayushmann Khurrana

“Roke mohe, toke mohe, kaate re dagar o re Yamuna ke tatt ki,
Laaj nahi, kaaj nahi, maare jo kankariya, toh phoote mori matki,
Vaak chatur bharmaave, prem jaar arjhaave,
Jo bhi kare, kare sab quick, quick, quick, quick!
Kahun main piya ji thoda karlo sabar par na, maane na,
Kanha, maane na!”

This next song happens to be Tanishk-Vayu’s most straightforward song of their career, conforming the most to conventional standards than any of their other songs that have all been quirky! Of course, that was called for here, since they had to compose a thumri, and you can’t really mess with thumris. They have a particular fixed structure, and a way of making them. That being said, the duo does a wonderful job in making their first semi-classical song, and they win half the battle with the strong composition itself! The composition is so free-flowing, like so many of the Radha-Krishna songs of Bollywood. I can just predict that this will make its place in the list of Great Bollywood Krishna songs. The hookline is just so sweet, and instantly likeable, and the composition of the entire thumri has a very tangible Rahman touch to it; it is impossible to dislike that. It freshens your mind up instantly, as good Indian classical music always does. The song is presented to us in two versions — one by a professional, and a female version, as conventional thumris usually are. That version is sung by the awesome Shashaa Tirupati, who uses her sweet voice to melt your heart singing the thumri. She’s getting really good classical based numbers in the Rahman camp as well this year, and now she gets to sing this one, which almost sounds as if it’s a spawn of the Rahman songs. The duo give the female version a beautiful, traditional arrangement, with amazing tablas, sarod, and awe-inspiring flute solos. It is a delight to the ears, and the richness of the music just can’t be forgotten for a long time. It starts so richly too, with the background vocalists singing a nice vocal rhythm, alongside the playful combo of the santoor and flute! But even with all the conventional-ness of the arrangements, the duo tries something unconventional, and adds drumbeats every time before the hookline, and that’s what makes the song even more interesting! The second version is by the leading man of the film, Ayushmann Khurrana, who seems to be singing at least one song in every film of his nowadays. Of course, since he can sing so well, he aces the song, but I never knew he could sing classical this well. Of course, it doesn’t sound professional, but it is good enough! The duo decorate this one with a beautiful guitar riff (Tapas Roy) and a nice loop on the ukulele that’s so captivating! So while one version is completely semiclassical, the other one follows a more “Unplugged” (as it is named) route, with the guitar playing the lead role. Last but definitely not the least, the lyrics of both versions are beautiful. I commend the duo for using traditional words like “sakhi“, “laaj“, “panghat“, “badra“, and making it sound more rooted. And on the other hand, the duo uses English words, creating a fun contrast. The Radha-Krishna story has been kept intact, and the romance of the protagonists uses that as a backdrop, and it is so beautiful to listen to! Kudos to Tanishk-Vayu for a wholesome semiclassical number, in two delightful versions!!

Rating: 5/5 for Shashaa’s Version, 4.5/5 for Ayushmann’s Version

 

3. Laddoo

Singer ~ Mika Singh

“Boli aisi ke, tamatar bhi mangayein toh lage jaise mushaayaron mein
Baitha sunn raha hoon usko!
Aankhein aisi ke, milaayein jab nigaahein, ye nigaahein dagmagayein,
Kuch samajh mein bhi na aaye dil ko!
Ho, jab se mohabbat uthi, seene mein ghus gayi Gupti,
Iss dil ke laddoo bant gaye!”

The duo bring back the quirkiness and unconventional quality of the album with this song, a romantic song sung by Mika! Now, before we start complaining about how Mika isn’t suitable for romantic songs, I would like to remind you about “440 Volt” (Sultan) last year, which was a romantic song that wouldn’t have sounded half as good if Mika hadn’t sung it. This time, Tanishk-Vayu compose a very quirky number and rope Mika in to sing it. The composition is again, a very desi composition, that will appeal to your sense if you love traditional tunes with an innate quirk. The mukhda is amazing, the antaras make sure you don’t make your attention wander elsewhere, but the hookline is the best part — it is so short and simple, as if they’re stating an obvious fact, “Iss Dil Ke Laddoo Bant Gaye!” and it’s over as soon as it starts. That’s the best part of this hookline; it doesn’t hover around for long and waste your time. The arrangements are very beautiful — a very traditional beat of manjeeras and dholaks among rich guitar riffs sounds very interesting, and never before heard. The shehnaai-like sounds are also very fun to listen to. The manjeeras give the song a very unconventional and traditional rhythm, and that is what made me listen very closely to the arrangements in the first place! Towards the end we get a fun shehnaai portion, and it seems to be a sweet conclusion to the fun-filled romantic song. The vocals by Mika are surprisingly amazing; the duo seem to have done a good job in giving him the right brief, and so he doesn’t eat up many of his words here! The way he sings the hook is a way nobody else could’ve done it! Tanishk-Vayu’s lyrics are fun as well, and the comedy element is intact even in this song. The quirkiest romantic song I’ve heard in a while!!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Kankad

Singers ~ Raja Hasan, Shashaa Tirupati, Rajnigandha Shekhawat & Arman Hasan

“Mere liye tu Ram na Ranjha, utna bahut hai, jitna sanjha,
Chhote bade sab tere, sapne hain mere abb,
Mere wale sapne toh, sach mein hain mere abb,
Tu jo rahega toh, saath dega toh, Rab se kya mangungi main,
Sab kuch toh paa lungi main,
Dil yeh kahin ladkhadaye agar toh thaam le na please!
Kankad bhi kabhi koi aa nahi sakta tere mere beech!!”

The duo wind up the album with a wedding song, but again, it is a very traditional wedding song, and full of emotion! The composition is very heavy on emotion as well; and it focuses on the emotion much more than it does on the enjoyment factor! At the end it basically just freshens your mind and makes you feel good. The makers had kept this song hidden until even after the movie was released, but I don’t understand why, because it was such a beautiful number!! The composition showcases Tanishk-Vayu’s versatility, and they prove that they can compose emotional numbers just as well as those upbeat comic numbers. The hookline especially is steeped with emotion — you can just feel the emotion through the earphones as it plays. The arrangements too, represent some of the duo’s most rich arrangements in terms of folk instruments and traditional sounds. The quintessential wedding chorus starts the song off, with a tumbi sound, and your interest is peaked right there. The dholaks, dafli, strings and a surprise element of the shehnaai in the interlude all provide an amazingly rich arrangement, at the same time keeping things very enjoyable and danceable on! The whole composition and arrangements have a very distinct Rahmanish touch to them! The vocals are beautiful, with Raja Hasan (after a long time, yo!) taking care of the male portions well, keeping the emotion intact. However, he could have been better in certain places.  The female singer, Shashaa Tirupati, has a very small part, but still manages to steal the lightning, as that part has been composed so thoughtfully by the composers, and it is full of tangible emotion. The various backing vocalists like the small child singing at the end, provide a nice “grand Indian wedding” feel to the song. But still, the lyrics which are so full of emotion, do not make you feel as if it is a conventional Bollywood wedding song; it is just too sweet for that! The lyrics are what make you realise the true meaning of the song, and I salute the makers for making this emotional song against the backdrop of the wedding. Last month we saw an emotional song against the backdrop of the Holi festival, ‘Gori Tu Latth Maar’ (Toilet: Ek Prem Katha), and this time, Tanishk-Vayu follow the same template, to make another beautiful wedding song full of love and emotion! A commendable job, to create an emotional wedding song! Not your everyday Bollywood Wedding song!! This ends the album on a very high note!!

Rating: 5/5


Shubh Mangal Saavdhan really proved how talented Tanishk-Vayu are. Usually, they appear in multicomposer albums where they hardly get enough scope to show their talent in composing for an entire movie, with a particular theme running throughout the movie. Here, when they get the chance finally, they make great use of the opportunity and provide us with an enjoyable album full of quirky music, and also some emotional music. Their method of fusing quirky sounds with traditional desi beats and tunes, really is the hallmark of their music, and it is what makes their music light, fluffy and a delectable treat to listen to! Thank you, Tanishk and Vayu, for treating us to such a delicious wedding feast of an album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 92%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kanha = Kankad > Laddoo = Kanha (Unplugged) > Rocket Saiyyan

 

Which is your favourite song from Shubh Mangal Saavdhan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

ROCK WITH A DESI TWIST! (QAIDI BAND – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir, Habib Faisal, Sidhant Mago & Peter Muxka Manuel
♪ Music Label: YRF Music
♪ Music Released On: 25th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th August 2017

Qaidi Band Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Qaidi Band is an upcoming Bollywood musical drama, starring debutants Aadar Jain and Anya Singh in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Do Dooni Chaar’, ‘Ishaqzaade’ and ‘Daawat-e-Ishq’ fame Habib Faisal, and produced by Aditya Chopra. The film tells the story of seven innocent under-trials, who form a musical band in prison. They get the chance to perform on Independence Day and their song becomes a national sensation. However, their hopes of acquittal are dashed when a local politician cancels their trials in hopes of winning the upcoming elections using their songs. The film explores how they secure their release with the help of their music. The director has made delightful films before, and I am sure this one will be great too. Meanwhile, the strength of a musical lies in its music. This time Habib teams up with his ‘Ishaqzaade’composer Amit Trivedi. Having been absent from the Bollywood music scene for eight months after ‘Dear Zindagi’ last year, Trivedi will finally open his account this year, before his music for yet another musical ‘Secret Superstar’, releases. This film was announced out of the blue, and what is special is that YRF relleased the album in one go! That made it all the better to pounce on it right away and gulp all the songs down together! So it was rather fun how the poster, trailer and album of this film released in such close succession! Anyway, let’s see how the Band of “Qaidi”s (Captives) fares!

P.S. Thanks to the AMAZING Vipin Nair over at www.musicaloud.com for the musician credits!


1. I Am India / I Am India (Escape Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Yashita Sharma / Amit Trivedi & Yashita Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Habib Faisal

Amit Trivedi starts off the album with a song that has the least amount of rock elements you would expect,in a film about a rock band. The song is basically a patriotic street-play kind of song, with an insanely catchy rhythm and composition, quite closely following the usual composition style of Trivedi. The composition is simple, very Trivedi-ish (if that’s an adjective now, after ten years of Trivedi being in the industry). The composition, though, isn’t what catches you at the first listen. The hook composition is cool and catchy, but the rest grows on you in successive listens. What really grabs you in the first place are the arrangements, vocals and lyrics. The song appears in two versions, differing in arrangements and vocals. The first version by Arijit & Yashita is what will get more famous among the public, because, obviously, it’s Arijit. But, plot twist! Arijit’s vocals have been kept so raw and untouched, that he sounds exactly like Amit Trivedi. The required amount of naughtiness, though, is present in his vocals. Yashita too, complements him well, with her nice and husky voice. This version has a nice prelude with a lot of percussion sounds (Sanket Naik) that resembles Taufiq Qureshi’s style of percussion a lot. A wonderful beatbox, by Alan D’Souza, something that we rarely hear in desi songs like this, also accompanies the prelude. And when the harmonium (Akhlakh Hussain Varsi, Feroz Khan) pitches in, you know Trivedi has some awesome street-smart song waiting for us. The percussion remains for he whole song, to entertain us, and what an entertaining percussion it is! The fusion between that percussion and he harmoniums, in the interlude, is a sight to behold. Towards the end we get the tempo upped, and that portion really sums up the song — the patriotic flavour comes out the best in those lines. The second version is nice too; here, Amt Trivedi himself takes over as the male vocalists, complemented by Yashita again. It doesn’t make much of a difference with his voice, because even Arijit had sounded like him. In this version, Yashita sings what Arijit sang in the first version, and Amit sings what she had sung over there. The arrangements are better here, with a nice dhol-taasha Maharashtrian touch given to the arrangements. The prelude is sloughed off here, and the song plunges directly into the mukhda. The harmonium and percussions, as stated above, are way more prominent, making it sound much more like an actual street performance. Habib Faisal’s lyrics are aptly patriotic; the comparisons are unthinkable, but when you listen to them it’s just a matter of fact. For example, India is a gol gappa, and Indians are the water inside! A patriotic song with quirky lyrics and a fun arrangement!

Rating: 4/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Escape Version

 

2. Hulchul

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Yashita Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

The rock kicks in, in full swing, with this next song, a rock ballad full of pain and emotion. The starts in a mellow way, characteristic of Trivedi’s romantic songs, so much so that you almost are sure that something calm is about to follow. But then a strain of melancholia, accompanied by the first bar of the mukhda, appears, and then the tune just breaks into a very energetic and hard-hitting rock song. The transition is very quick, but very seamless. The hookline is amazing, and the way the male and female vocalists alternate their lines, making it a true-blue duet, is amazing. More on the vocals later though. The composition continues to amaze — the lilting portions really stand out in the very high-octane arrangements. The electric guitars are the stars of the song, and the way they start, in the first hookline, is just shockingly beautiful! They keep playing throughout, and never fail to amaze. The drums (Jai Row Kavi), naturally, are amazing too. The interlude is all electric guitar, and it sounds amazing, as if we really are in a rock concert. The strong composition just helps the song to be put forth better to the listeners. The vocals are pitch perfect. Arijit’s raw and grungy vocals have been retained yet again, and his voice sans programming is such a beauty to listen to, especially in this era where composers can’t go without tweaking voices. Yashita Sharma complements him very well. Both of them sing the song so intensely, the emotion is almost tangible. Backing vocalists give a good push to the song. The lyrics are amazing here as well, with the band members expressing the desire to be let free. A touching song, but might take time to grow.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Phir Nayi

Singer ~ Yashita Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

Yashita gets a solo song to sing next; and I must say, she deserved it, and shines in it! Amit’s composition is fresh yet nostalgic. It doesn’t have any shades of his previous song (or not that I can think of) but it still seems so nostalgic and evokes a sense of happiness in the listener. The mukhda starts the song off very promisingly, and Amit, as usual, lives up to that promise, because what follows is no less beautiful. The hookline is nice, and I like the way the drums pause when the hook appears. It gives it a very important feel, and lets the magic of the composition be heard on its own. The antaras are wonderful as well, and it just helps more that Kausar Munir’s lyrics are so beautiful. It makes the song such a delight to listen to. The arrangements are splendid; the usual drums (Jai Row Kavi) are accompanied this time by mellifluous strings (Chennai Strings Orchestra — conducted by M. Kalyan). Of course, the guitars do appear, but here, they are relatively relegated to the background, as the strings and the flute (Naveen Kumar) are more intriguing. A wonderful santoor portion (Tapas Roy) is what draws the listeners into the song, and also features in the interlude; it seems so surreal in an album about a rock band! Yashita herself, carries the beautiful composition with elegance, never making the listeners get bored or lose interest. The grace with which she handles the notes is pleasantly surprising, as almost all her previous songs have been these upbeat numbers, whereas this one is a lilting feel-good melody! Full marks to everyone for this beauty of a song!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Junooni

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Yashita Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Sidhant Mago & Kausar Munir

Another high-octane rock song follows that surreal melody. This one too, starts off very melodiously, and suffers from a sever hangover of ‘Pashmina’ (Fitoor), as is clear from the guitar and flute beginning. Of course though, the flute (Naveen Kumar) is what makes us listen more enthusiastically, curiously, to know how this will turn into a rock song. Sure enough, with Trivedi’s genius, he manages to swerve the melody into a nice and energetic rock song. Though the full-fledged rock doesn’t arrive till the hookline here (unlike ‘Hulchul’ where it hardly took one line), it still works wonders. And the portion before he rock breaks too, is just magical. Amit’s composition for the antara, is just mesmerizing, and it is his trademark compositional style hat reflects in that antara. It is kind of noticeable how the composition style of the rest of the song is clearly non-Trivedi-ish, and follows the rock template to the tee. Nevertheless, the song turns out to be one of my favourites of the album. The second antara, is just another repetition in the same tune as the mukhda, but somehow it sounds better in the middle of the song, than it did at the beginning. And what can I say about the hookline! As soon as that rock hits you, you suddenly get goosebumps. Of course, it is a romantic rock song, and so it should be haunting and melodious along with the trademark rock characteristics. And it packages both the qualities perfectly. Arijit and Yashita yet again, prove their mettle, and this is actually one of the rare songs on the album where Arijit sounds like himself! Yashita sounds a lot like Neeti Mohan in her sweet and sugary voice, and that’s a plus point for the song. Again, both of their voices’ intensities drive the song way ahead of what it could have been, if it had been sung in a lifeless manner. Kausar and Sidhant Mago write a nice mix of romantic and passionate lyrics. A rock song that follows the rock template very sincerely, yet manages to impress!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Udanchoo

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Yashita Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

This next song was a bit weird, after the very templated sound of the previous three songs. That’s because this one is a clear Amit Trivedi song, which dates to go unconventional. Sadly, the composer seems to have gotten it topsy turvy. Not that it is a bad song, it is just less impressive than the others. The composition is an upbeat one, again, relying on rock guitars and drums to give it a good beat — and it succeeds. The composition is a bit weak, Especially the hookline, which seems forced. The antaras are amazing, fortunately. The arrangements have a retro touch — an 70s-80s rock touch. The kind of rock that was prominent in the West at that time. And that’s the strongest point of the song; that’s what will trick people into loving the song! Vocals are great again, with a lot of enthusiasm. I loved Arijit particularly in this song. The lyrics are clearly about escaping. Experimental, but doesn’t go the right way.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Jag Mag

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Yashita Sharma, Rap Written & Performed by ~ Peter Muxka Manuel, Lyrics by ~ Habib Faisal

Amit goes the experimental way with the next song as well. And I’m happy to say that this time, it works fantastically, as it usually does with Trivedi. The composition is a feel-good one, and instantly brings a smile to your face! The characteristic style of Trivedi shows itself right at the beginning of the song, and you start loving it then and there. The hookline is one of the cutest things I’ve heard recently. The antaras are nice and along the same lines — happy-sounding and pleasant. The arrangements are so minimal, but a continuous beatbox (Alan D’Souza) keeps going on in the background. Of course, Trivedi garnishes the song with guitars, percussion and his signature quirky digital sounds. (Something I’ve heard after a long time!) The vocals are string here as well — now I’m beginning to think I should just let you take it for granted that the vocals are beautiful in every song!! There’s a nice Caribbean-styled English rap midway into the song, and it is one of the most refreshing raps I’ve ever heard! At least it is something different! Peter Muxka Manuel renders it with a huge amount of confidence! The cute patriotic lyrics that feature in the song are the USP of the song. They’re so fun! A patriotic song that tells you that it doesn’t always have to be heavy and preachy to make a good patriotic song!

Rating: 4/5

 

7. Poshampa

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Yashita Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

Now the next song bursts into a very different side of the album; a very enjoyable, retro feel accompanies the catchy composition. It sounds like something out of an R.D. Burman album, and recreated by Amit Trivedi. The composition is vey catchy, and instantly has you grooving to the music. What draws you in at first though, is the amazing musical prelude that seems like a continuation of the wonderful ‘Mehbooba’ (Sholay), complete with the amazing trumpets (Kishore Sodha), rabaab (Tapas Roy), and of course, drums (Jai Row Kavi). It is this prelude that makes the listener keen on listening to the rest of the song, with rapt attention. The rabaab keeps on playing throughout the song, everytime the hookline is over, and it just gives amazing retro vibes. The amazing arrangements really help in transporting us to that era. The trumpet and percussion is what stands out prominently, and the interludes are amazing! I loved it when Trivedi decreases the tempo in one interlude, and graces it with a heavy Punjabi dhol, and it sounds amazing! Of course it goes back to the retro trumpet in no time! The vocals are amazing here (again!) and Arijit and Yashita sing at the top of their energies. The way Arijit sings the “I Don’t understand why” and “dafaa chaar-sau-bees boli” lines, is just so entertaining. The end of the song comprises an uptempo conclusion that just leaves the “jaa bhai jaa” hook permanently imprinted into your memory. The lyrics are evidently situational, but revolve around the escape theme again. A wonderfully catchy song, an entertaining mix of rock with a retro feel!

Rating: 5/5

 

8. Phir Wohi

Singer ~ Yashita Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

After that electrifying retro number, Trivedi decides to end with a mellow melancholic number. The song is basically the sad version of ‘Phir Nayi’, and is renamed ‘Phir Wohi’. {What a coincidence; we just had another sad song called ‘Phir Wahi’ last month in ‘Jagga Jasoos’!} Trivedi has contrasted this song from its original in such a beautiful way — of course the tempo is a bit slower, the tone has completely transformed from a happy-go-lucky one to a very melancholic one. Some of the elements he uses to do this, are, of all the things you would expect, PERCUSSIONS! Yes. Trivedi employs an irresistible march-past-like rhythm to signify the sad tone of the song. And it works so wonderfully! Also, in that version, Yashita sang very flamboyantly, but here, she sings very differently — and it creates a great effect! Some places, I thought she went off-tune, but then I understood it must be intentional, to signify the character sounding like she was crying — the way Trivedi made Neeti Mohan “cry-sing” in “Dhadaam Dhadaam” (Bombay Velvet)! Flute (Naveen Kumar) is yet another beautiful attraction here. Another beautiful addition, is a very satisfying backing chorus, which, in its low pitch, wins your heart in a jiffy. Kausar reprises her happy lyrics to make them aptly sad. A very apt reprise of a song that I would never imagine, would sound so good with a sad version!

Rating: 4.5/5


Qaidi Band is one of those Amit Trivedi albums, in which the composer doesn’t quite experiment too much, and plays with already established musical styles. Of course, he manages to make it sound amazing even then. The album is full of variety, and follows a very prominent rock theme throughout. Patriotism, fun, romance, happiness and melancholia is portrayed wonderfully through the songs, and that’s what makes it so special.  Habib Faisal and Amit Trivedi hit the jackpot yet again, this time with a desi rock theme!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4.5 +4.5 + 5 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 = 39.5

Album Percentage: 87.78%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Phir Nayi = Poshampa > Phir Wohi = Junooni = Hulchul = I Am India (Escape Version) > I am India = Jag Mag > Udanchoo

 

Which is your favourite song from Qaidi Band? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

JAB IMTIAZ MET PRITAM — AGAIN!! (JAB HARRY MET SEJAL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty, Diplo (Thomas Wesley Pentz) & Rocky Wellstack
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil
♪ Music Label: Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 3rd August 2017, 10:30 pm
♪ Movie Released On: 4th August 2017

Jab Harry Met Sejal Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Jab Harry Met Sejal is a Bollywood rom-com film, starring Anushka Sharma and Shah Rukh Khan, directed by Imtiaz Ali, and produced by Gauri Khan. The film is about two strangers who meet in Europe, and try to find the engagement ring of Sejal (Sharma’s character). Obviously, as is the main theme in an Imtiaz film, they discover themselves through the journey. I think even more exciting than the movie itself, is the music. Imtiaz has said in many interviews that he enjoyed doing the music of this film, and that’s showing in the final outcome. The film is a musical (not full-fledged like ‘Jagga Jasoos’) and has 13 songs, by Pritam, who was Imtiaz’s go-to music composer before Rahman. With this film, they reunite, and after ‘Jab We Met’ and ‘Love Aaj Kal’, two super-hit soundtracks by both of them, this is their third collaboration! Expecting just as much variety in this album, and also expecting the elements of whatever Imtiaz has picked up from Rahman while doing the music of those films (namely ‘Rockstar’, ‘Tamasha’ and ‘Highway’)! So I hope this album will be like a blend of Pritamish Imtiaz and Rahmanish Imtiaz! Plunging into the album very positively, hoping it will astound me!!

P.S. Thanks to my friend Chiranjeev Gorur for acquiring and sharing the full musician credits to the album! 🙂


1. Radha

Singers ~ Sunidhi Chauhan & Shahid Mallya

“Main bani teri Radha, maine sakhiyon se, ankhiyon mein rakhna hai tujhko piya, thoda zyaada zyaada!
Main bani teri Radha, tuney sapnon tadapnon mein rakhna hai mujhko piya thoda zyaada zyaada!
Main bani teri Radha!”

Pritam starts off the album with an amazingly energetic song that makes you want to dance right along to its tune, right away. Now I know everyone has heard this song many times by now, and it’s a huge hit across the nation. It is essentially a Punjabi folk-plus-EDM fusion track, and the way Pritam employs these genres, is spellbinding. The composition itself follows a very desi compositional format, in that it appeals to us Bollywood music listeners right away with its inherent catchiness and energetic vibe. The hook, especially, leads the song, as it should. But it is the mesmerizing antara that was the best part for me. Pritam gives it this rapid tune that you are only able to sing after repeated listening, and that’s how it grows on you eventually. A very amazing Punjabi flavour has been given to the Punjabi portions sung by the male singer. The high pitch might bother some, but it is way more comfortable than listening to a high pitch song by Arijit Singh like the recent ‘Ik Vaari Aa’ (Raabta). And if the first antara takes you by surprise, the second antara, which just released with the album version of the song, is pure bliss. The harmony between the two singers is blissful! The arrangements follow suit and Pritam fuses folk and EDM, like I mentioned above. The flute and khartal (which is a Rajasthan folk instrument, but apparently being used in a Punjabi song) open the song in a very light-hearted and feel-good way. Throughout the mukhda, it’s the flute and khartals that play. Until Pritam introduces the mandatory dhol (Sukanto Singha & Sunny M.R.) in the hookline, you won’t be able to even tell that the song is a Punjab-based song. (Because even the lyrics aren’t proper Punjabi; they’re kind of like a mix between Punjabi and Hindi). Another awesome folksy instance in the song is the second interlude where the sarangi is played, and muffled by the programming! The EDM programming by Sunny MR, and Rohan Chatham’s vocal cuts during the “Raa-aa-aa-aaa” portion, serves for a wonderful catchy hook, which would definitely make people hit the repeat button! The coexistence of the dhols and EDM sounds so good. The vocals are a class apart. Pritam reverts to a singer that used to sing many songs for him back in the day, Sunidhi. This is her first song for Pritam after ‘Dhoom 3’, and we know how much Pritam’s music has boosted after that! She sings it so mellifluously, you don’t even realise the rapidity of the tune. Especially the antara, for which she should get standing ovations from all of us listeners! Shahid is top-notch too, his heavy Punjabi accent reflecting through his singing and making the folksy portions of the song what they are. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are cute too, but there’s a certain Panipat line that had me surprised and worried and disappointed at the same time! 😂 It doesn’t even fit with the rest of the song! Anyway, overall he has written a cute little romantic song. Pritam’s experimentations almost never fail, do they?
Rating: 5/5

 

2. Beech Beech Mein

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Shalmali Kholgade & Shefali Alvares, Backing Vocals ~ Arjun Chandy & Akashdeep Sengupta

“Hai safar mein zameen, chal raha aasmaan,
Dono ki jo kahaani, ho ki na ho bayaan,
Begaani jagah mein nadaani, karein na, karein toh kahaan?
Jal dheeme, yeh pal dheeme, kyun hai jalte hua?”

The next song on the album falls under a genre that I feel Pritam always aces. A club song. However, this time it is different. The club song isn’t the normal Pritam club you would expect, with heavy EDM and Benny Dayal. Instead, it has a completely retro feel to it, and has been composed as a retro funk song! I can’t remember the last time Pritam composed a retro funk number, because it’s always EDM when he does club songs. So this seems like a very new thing from him. The composition is instantly catchy, and the unconventionality of it all makes it even more appealing! It starts with a very insanely catchy vocal loop repeating the name of the song over and over again, and it is from there that your interest increases. The mukhda (which is the hookline too), is cool, and so is the ‘Shola Shola..’ line! The hook repeats many times throughout the song, but it doesn’t sound repetitive. The crux of the song’s composition lies in the antara, though, where Pritam makes a disco song, melodious! And the cross line which it takes to get back to the refrain, is extra cool!! That’s that about the composition. But it is the arrangements, as always, that really suck you into the song. A groovy guitar (Warren Mendonsa & Ernest Tibbs) riff starts the song off, behind the “beech beech mein” repetitions. The fun arrives, however, only when the drums enter, because they’re so amazing! The drums in this song are really some of the best drums I’ve heard (in non-rock songs) this year! The brass instruments (Trombone by Andrew Lippman, Trumpet & Flugelhorn by Ludo Louis) do their thing by fascinating us in the interludes, and in the antara, they have a really special role to play, when things get a bit melodious. Their harmony is just so enchanting. So now you get why the song can be called retro! 😀 For the vocals, Pritam uses his go-to female singers for club songs, Shalmali and Shefali, both. Of course the male portions are by Arijit. All three sing well; Arijit leads the way while each of the female singers are relegated to the background except for one or two lines. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are fun. A song that should change the way we think about club songs in Bollywood!
Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Safar

Singer ~ Arijit Singh

“Iss yaqeen se main yahaan hoon,
Ki zamaana ye bhala hai, Aur jo raah mein mila hai,
Thodi door jo chala hai, Woh bhi aadmi bhala hai,
Pata tha, zara bas khafa tha!
Woh bhatka sa rahi, mere gaanv ka hi,
Woh rasta puraana jise yaad aana,
Zaroori tha lekin, jo roya mere bin,
Woh ek mera ghar tha,
Puraana sa darr tha,
Magar ab main na apne ghar ka raha…
Safar ka hi tha main, Safar ka raha!!!”

Imtiaz’s favourite theme, travel, makes itself prominent right from the title of the next song, and all throughout it as well. The song is titled ‘Safar’ (meaning Journey), and it is a journey in itself for music lovers. Pritam’s composition is a slow and lilting composition that grows on you slowly surely. The mukhda is very beautiful and soulful, and sets off the song on a very jazzy and slow rhythm that is magically appealing. The hook is simple but sweet, and effective in the song. The antara is an amazing high-pitched portion where Pritam’s lines flow into each other so seamlessly, you can’t tell where one ends and the other starts! Towards the end, there’s almost a half-minute musical portion, where I feel Pritam could have added a small conclusion stanza, like he usually does in songs. The arrangements are very beautiful and impressive, with a very urban touch — acoustic and electric guitars (Arijit Singh & Aditya Benia), being the main instrumentation! The guitar riffs are wonderful throughout the song. Arijit’s vocals are very raw and rustic, with the gritty texture standing out very prominently; it actually gives the song a wonderful travel-esque feel. The places where his voice cracks, are actually some of the most brilliant parts of the song! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are high on food for thought, and each and every line makes you think, connect and relate! The whole song is like a story that is being told about the character’s change of lifestyle. An unconventional song, which won’t be loved by one and all, but should be loved by the music lovers!
Rating: 5/5

 

4. Butterfly

Singers ~ Dev Negi, Jyoti Nooran, Sultana Nooran, Sunidhi Chauhan & Aman Trikha, Backing Vocals ~ Laddi Dhaliwal, Jelly Manjitpuri, Neetu Bhalla, Babita, Asa Singh, Amit, Tushar, Akashdeep, Abhishek, Manoj, Shubham

“Mujhmein ishq ya ishq mein hoon main,
Hua mujhe ehsaas re,
Khel raha hoon saath yaar ke,
Main khwaabon ki taash re,
Tu hi usko khoj raha hai, ae dil mere, yeh na soch,
Woh bhi tujhko dhoondh raha hai jiski tujhe talaash re!!”

This song starts right off with the boisterous Punjabi-ness that an Imtiaz Ali-Pritam combo always consists of. The song is a happy-go-lucky and cute Bhangra tune that really has you dancing to it right away. Pritam’s composition is very earthy and raw, and not superficial and hollow like most other Punjabi songs that release these days. The mukhda especially, starts the song off very beautifully, and you can imagine a village romance getting conjured before your eyes. The hook is the cutest part of the song, but catchy too. In the antara, things go haywire though, and you take time to understand the tune of those lines soon. The tune fluctuates so much, that it is quite difficult to grasp. However, both the parts of the Nooran Sisters, have been composed wonderfully, the one at the beginning, and the one that concludes the song on a very nice note. Both parts are heavy on the earthiness quotient and transport you to the fields of Punjab, with its melodious composition. The arrangements are the run-of-the-mill 2006-2009 era Pritam Punjabi arrangements, with loud dhols (Naseeb Singh), effervescent tumbi (Jelly Manjitpuri), a folksy alghoza (Gurpreet Singh) and of course, a nice technical production. The vocals are energetic, and Dev Negi as the forerunner makes things easier for the audience by not singing too loud, and keeping a gentle yet steady voice constant. Sunidhi disappoints, singing in such a high pitch that I can’t fathom. Nooran Sisters are the stars of the song, starting and ending it with a bang. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are quite staid for the majority of the song, but again, the Nooran portions have been written very well, with the “Woh Bhi Tujhko Dhoondh Raha Hai Jiski Tujhe Talaash Re” line translating the film’s tagline ‘What you seek is seeking you’, very efficiently. A fun and cute Punjabi song, but falls flat in places where it tries to do too much.
Rating: 4/5

 

5. Hawayein / Hawayein (Film Version)

Singer ~ Arijit Singh

“Banaati hai jo tu, woh yaadein jaane sang mere kab tak chale,
Inhi mein toh meri, subah bhi dhale, shaamein dhalein, mausam dhale!
Khayalon ka safar, tu jaane tere hone se hi aabaad hai,
Hawayein haq mein, wohi hai aate jaate jo tera naam le,
Deti hai jo sadaayein, hawayein, hawayein,
Na jaane kya bataaye, hawayein, hawayein,
Le jaaye tujhe kahaan, hawayein, hawayein,
Le jaaye mujhe kahaan, hawayein, hawayein,
Le jaaye jaane kahaan, na mujhko khabar, na tujhko pata!”

The next song took my breath away, the first time I listened to it. It is just so marvellous and so ideal and so dreamy. It is the ideal romantic song. A trademark Pritam tune, with the trademark Pritam guitars and Sufi template, and the legendary Arijit Singh singing it. What more can you ask for, to obtain a wholesome and pleasant romantic song? Well, I know, I can’t ask for anything more! The composition by Pritam is utterly fascinating, and hooks you right from the first listen. The mukhda starts off quite slowly, but as soon as the hookline plays, you know that the song is one of the best songs of the year! The hookline is something that conforms to every Bollywood music lover’s music sensibilities! There are two antaras; one with a new tune, which is beautiful too, and one with the same tune as the mukhda. The first antara has a wonderful line that goes on and on, and merges with the hookline so seamlessly. The part where the backing vocalists go “Hawayein, Hawayein” has been structured and placed so beautifully. It reminded me of ‘Daayre’ (Dilwale). Overall, Pritam’s composition here is so much close to his usual style of composition, but still so lilting and dreamy! The vocals by Arijit are top-notch, and he repeats the magic of many previous Pritam-Arijit collabs, in one song. The vocals have shades of ‘Gerua’, ‘Channa Mereya’, ‘Daayre’ and ‘Saware’, and it just helps you love the song even more. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are soothing too, and so poetic! Read out as a poem too, they will be just as impactful. In fact here, Pritam’s strong tune is overbearing. The song appears in two versions — an original, and a film version. Both have splendid arrangements. The first version sticks to Pritam’s trademark arrangement style, with the guitars strongly dominating the arrangements. The Acoustic guitars (Roland Fernandes) are relegated to the background as the electric guitars (also by Fernandes), do that wonderful neverending loop thing that they love to do in Pritam songs! 😄 The ethnic strings (Tapas Roy) provide an amazing first interlude that brings in the earthiness into the beautiful composition. Increasing the Indian-ness of the song, is the nice Sufi template employed in the hook portions, with the Duff and tablas sounding very appealing. The film version has a slightly more haunting arrangement, and sounds straight out of Coke Studio, with a beautiful Hang drum (Sunny MR), and ethnic strings (Tapas Roy) setting up a wonderfully haunting sound that sounds least like it is by Pritam. The Pritamish tune and the haunting Rahmanish arrangements really complement each other, though I never thought they could! A nice and charming wind instrument keeps playing throughout the song, and the guitars (Roland Fernandes) are amazing. All in all, both versions of this song are just as beautiful!!
Rating: 5/5 for Original, 5/5 for Film Version

 

6. Parinda / Parinda (Search)

Singers ~ Pardeep Singh Sran / Tochi Raina & Nikhil D’Souza

“Ikk pardesi, oh yaar banaya,
Main usnu dil de takht bithaya,
O seene de naal usnu laaya,
O apne dil da haal sunaaya,
O maar udaari kithe nikal gaya,
Maar udaari kithe nikal gaya,
Kade bigad gaya, kade machal gaya,
Kade nikal gaya ni hun taan,
Dhoondhan nain bichaare, ni aaj parinda maahi!”

Pritam ups the ante with the next song, a pulsating rock song that is really foot tapping. The composition is a nice, folksy, Punjabi-flavoured composition, that immediately grows on you. The hookline in particular is just beautiful, what with the amazing high notes. The mukhda and antara both have the same tune, and I love the fluctuations in the tune. The arrangements are high-octane rock arrangements, and it is probably the first time in a long time that I’ve enjoyed rock so much, in the first go! The drums by Alan Hertz are very, very exciting, and of course the guitars (Electric and Acoustic by Josh Smith & Nyzel D’Lima; Bass Guitars by Ernest Tibbs) complement the drums very well, as they always do! The lyrics by Kamil are completely in Punjabi, but very interesting, and I loved them. The two versions of the song only differ much in their vocals. Pardeep Sran in the first version oozes the Punjabi energy that should accompany such a high-energy song, and does an electrifying job! Tochi Raina, however, in the second version, brings a more toned-down version of the same, but still, it isn’t low in energy at all! Nikhil D’Souza has an English portion in this version, which sounds AMAZING! It also has an extra stanza at the end, which has a very energetic composition. Both these singers have worked with Pritam many times in the past, but this song marks them working with him after a long, long time, so I’m very happy!! The backing chorus in both versions is spot-on! Kamil’s lyrics actually contradict the upbeat nature of the song, and give a hint of emotion — the song is actually much more meaningful than it seems! A rock song that shows how fusion between Punjabi folk and Rock should be done!
Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original, 5/5 for the Second Version

 

7. Ghar

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Mohit Chauhan

“Khaali hai jo tere bina, main woh ghar hoon tera,
Ghoome phire, tu chaahe sab shehar, tu hai mera!”

The next song is what Pritam is all about. This is why people love his music so much. These kind of songs is why he has become so popular. It is a very soothing and calm, semi-classical kind of song, that depends solely on acoustics to propel it. The composition kind of resembles that of Pritam’s own ‘Tu Jaane Na’ (Ajab Prem Ki Ghazab Kahani) and ‘Daayre’ (Dilwale) and even the recent ‘Main Agar’ (Tubelight). The hook is what makes you get sucked into the song right away; it sounds so pleasing, that you just get lost in it. The first antara is the peak of the song, and the second one by Mohit is no less. The arrangements are very soothing too, with a lounge-ish treatment, complete with amazing electric and acoustic guitars (Warren Mendonsa) which give off the trademark Pritam touch, and a wonderful tabla (Jeetu Shankar) to complement that. The vocals are just too impressive. I think this is Nikhita’s career best, and after two hit songs from Pritam albums, she finally gets a huge portion in a mind blowing song! The way she introduces variations in the same line each time, shows her versatility, and hints at her classical training, if she has had any! Mohit, again, with Pritam after a long time (maybe because of the Imtiaz connection), does spectacularly in his high-pitched portions. Irshad’s lyrics are amazing, romantic lyrics with a thought-provoking concept. A soothing lounge-ish song that manages to touch your soul! The best of the album till now!
Rating: 5/5

 

8. Yaadon Mein

Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi, Mohammed Irfan & Cuca Roseta, Portuguese Lyrics by ~ Mario Pacheco

“Yaadon mein, jalte rehna, hai tera mera,
Yaadon mein, jalte rehne ko, miley hain kya?
Yaadon mein jeena toh sabse badi sazaa lagey,
Yaadon se, jaana ki faasley hain kya!”

A strong Latino vibe hits you right from the beginning of this next song, which happens to be a kind of Portuguese folk song kind of musical genre called “Fado”, and you get sucked in right away. The composition starts with a melancholic portion that sounds very similar to many Spanish/Portuguese folk songs we have come across in pop culture and other sources. And what a wonderful feeling it gives, to actually see a song like this being made for a Bollywood movie. Usually, whenever European or Portuguese styled music is used in Bollywood, it is for those dance numbers a la ‘Senorita’ (Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara), ‘Hawaa Hawaa’ (Rockstar), ‘Udi’ (Guzaarish), and though these were beautiful, too, the unexplored and soothing side of that compositional style really comes across beautifully here, and it sounds oh-so-operatic and chilling! The composition is beautiful, though it is mostly the hook repeating most of the time, but those variations in the hook just kill you then and there. The antaras are nice, especially the female one, and the Portuguese portion by Roseta is wonderful as well. That’s that for the composition. The arrangements by Pritam go beyond what Bollywood has tried in Portuguese music thus far, and goes to a more spine-chilling mixture of the traditional Portuguese guitars (by local guitarist Mario Pacheco) and Pritam’s wonderful strings. The beats get very Pritam-ish in Mohd. Irfan’s antara, but it is a refreshing turn of events. The Portuguese guitar obviously keeps us entertained throughout the songs, and instances of harmonicas are heard as well. The vocals are spot-on. Jonita starts off with a booming introduction, which I would never have believed was sung by her, if it weren’t for the credits! She has changed her voice so beautifully, to make it actually sound like a Portuguese singer. Sure enough, the actual Portuguese singer, Cuca Roseta, sounds very similar to Jonita, but gets a way smaller portion than her. Irfan does well in his parts, in what is also his first song for Pritam too! However, somehow, I felt a lack of connect during his part. The ladies bring that connect back. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are heart-wrenching. Mario Pacheco, the guitarist, has written the Portuguese lyrics. All in all, a wonderful song that mixes up the pathos of a typical Bollywood song, and the richness of Portuguese folk.
Rating: 4.5/5

 

9. Raula

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh & Neeti Mohan

“Aankhon ne khwaabon pe aise hai aitbaar kiya,
Jaise do anjaanon ne khulke ho pyaar kiya,
Hota tha pehle jo door kabhi,
Abb woh mujhe paas lage,
Jaane kyun achha sa lagey,
Dil ne jo iss baar kiya!”

A very trademark Pritam feel-good vibe sets in as the next song rolls in, after that poignant melody. This is another song to go with Shah Rukh’s Punjabi character in the movie — a fun and upbeat Punjabi wedding song. The composition is one of the cutest I’ve heard this year, and instantly has you hooked. The hookline itself is so cute, that everything starts sounding beautiful due to it. The first antara, is something straight out of a 90s Bollywood album, with a noticeable Jatin-Lalit vibe. The bridge from the first antara to the hook is kind of bumpy, but things are great from there. Neeti has the second antara all to herself, and it is pure bliss. Pritam composed that one in trademark 90s Rahman style, and I can’t believe it is by Pritam; the variations in tune sound like the Rahman of the 90s has composed it! It was a pleasant surprise to see Pritam in that form. The vocalists have fun themselves and transmit the energy and boisterous nature of the song to us through the earphones. Diljit is clearly having the time of his life, and his additions like “chak de phatte naap de killi“, are so fun to listen to. Neeti sounds amazing, especially in her solo portion. The arrangements are fun as well, and in a traditional Imtiaz Ali pattern, they are high on dhols, and very interestingly, also have beautiful brass instruments interjecting, with a trademark Laxmikant-Pyarelal vibe. Flamenco Guitars (Josete Ordoñez) are audible in the second interlude. The dhadd and Plucked instruments (Tapas Roy) in Neeti’s solo portion, are so cute! The repetition of the hookline’s tune on those plucked instruments is too cute as well! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are again, high on the fun quotient, and quirky as well, Especially with those “sangya” (noun), “visheshan” (adjective) and “sarvanaam” (pronoun) additions in Neeti’s parts. One of the most catchy Punjabi songs I’ve heard after ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ (Baar Baar Dekho).
Rating: 4.5/5

 

10. Jee Ve Sohaneya

Singers ~ Jyoti Nooran & Sultana Nooran, Music and A Portion of the Lyrics Traditional

“Kabhi kabhaar sandesa de de, Kya hai tera haal,
Rut pardesi rakhti hogi, shaayad tera khayaal,
Yahaan tere bin patjhad sa hai, har ek mausam hi..
Jee ve sohneya jee, chaahe kisi ka hokar ji!
Maana ke tu ab nahi mera, kabhi tha mera bhi!!”

The singers who enhanced ‘Butterfly’ manifold, Nooran Sisters, get a song all to themselves now, and coincidentally, the song is a built-up on their portion in that song. They sang “Jee Ve Sohneya Jee..”, in that song; here, the rest of the lines follow to make an entire song. The composition is traditional, but Pritam enhances it with his trademark Electric guitars (Roland Fernandes) and digital beats. That’s pretty much all for the arrangements. The stars of the song are actually its lyrics. Irshad Kamil takes the traditional lyrics as a basis to weave a poetic song that is about the relatives of a person who has gone and settled in a foreign land, pleading for him to come back. The lyrics just tug at your heartstrings and remind you of the iconic ‘Ghar Aaja Pardesi’ (Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge), which was also sung in an earthy manner. This song has increased the earthiness and rustic nature a lot, by having Nooran Sisters sing it. Their amazing voices really bring out the song’s essence even better! A song whose lyrics and vocals are what will help it to make its way into the hearts of everyone who listens to it!
Rating: 5/5

 

11. Phurrr (Film Version)

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan & Tushar Joshi, All Hindi Melodic Compositions by ~ Pritam, Music Programming by ~ Diplo & Rocky Wellstack

NOTE: There was another version of this song which Sony Music released a day before the album. That one was a mix by Diplo, which was terrible compared to the ‘Film Version’. You can listen to it HERE. The one included in the album is actually Pritam’s mix, with Diplo’s drop used from the remix of ‘Agony’ by Pinchers.

“Teri hasrat ho, ya ibaadat ho,
Tujhko paana hai, jo bhi soorat ho,
Har taraf sach mein, sach ki chaahat ho,
Lafz na ho pyaar, balki aadat ho!”

The album finally sheds itself of all the folksiness it had built up for itself (almost every song had some Indian-ness to it) and goes outright Western for this finale. The only thing in this song that is remotely and typically ‘Indian’ is how they say “Phurrrrrrr” to signify a bird’s flying. The song is actually very cool and it is an effort that should be appreciated! The composition is by Pritam, and half of the production by Pritam’s team, and the rest by Diplo. The composition itself is very paltry, but still sounds amazing with the whole Western treatment. It is trippy, no doubt. I mean, if people can withstand trash like “Swalla”, they can go through this without flinching! The drop by Diplo suits here very well, and sounds like it was always meant to be for this song. The entire digital treatment is something Pritam rarely does; he usually takes the help of guitars and live instruments, but it actually turned out pretty good. I loved those electronic tablas sounds. And the programming between 2:02 to 2:24 in the song, is just rad! I would like to appreciate the idea of a collaboration too, however good or bad it has turned out. You like the drop of some song, you contact that person and get him on board — that’s the professional way of doing things! A round of applause for Pritam and Imtiaz here! The vocals are good too. Mohit Chauhan is back for the second time in one album, and he renders the fun song with a swag that is unmatched. Tushar Joshi, Pritam’s new blue-eyed boy, does well too! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are very conveniently sidelined in the song, thanks to all that’s going on. If one were to still make a conscious effort to listen to them though, he wouldn’t find any hidden gem. A song that isn’t really enough to start a new collaboration wave in Bollywood, but will be remembered for its braveness.
Rating: 4/5


Jab Harry Met Sejal, no matter how late the album released, no matter how badly the film tanked, no matter how much Imtiaz disappointed everyone with the film, no matter how many people actually liked it, and no matter how late this review is going up, is really an album that should be applauded first of all, solely for the makers’ interest in creating an album that’ll cater to music lovers and music listeners. The amazing mix of world music and Punjabi music in this album, is spellbinding. It is such an excitement to listen to the album again and again, because every time, something new that we didn’t get before, pops up. The album also marks Pritam and Imtiaz’s reunion after eight years, and evidently, both Imtiaz and Pritam have evolved over the years. The knowledge Imtiaz got from Rahman’s style of work, has reflected in the album, and the sound that Pritam has developed for himself over the 2013-2017 phase of his career, also shows in the album. It is probably only “Butterfly” that smells of old Pritam and old Imtiaz. But in conclusion, I’m happy that Imtiaz met Pritam (Again)!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 + 4.5 + 5 + 4 = 61

Album Percentage: 93.84% {Making it surpass ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ and making it secure the top rank now!! 🎉🎉🎉}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: From Track 1 to Track 13 nonstop 🙂

 

 

Which is your favourite song from Jab Harry Met Sejal? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A PATRIOTIC VIBE THAT TOUCHES THE HEART!! (RAAG DESH – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rana Mazumder, Siddharth Pandit & Ram Singh Thakuri
♪ Lyrics by: Sandeep Nath, Revant Shergill, Rana Mazumder & Pt. Vanshidhar Shukla
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 25th July 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 28th July 2017

Raag Desh Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raag Desh is a Bollywood period drama, based on the Indian National Army set up by Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, and the war fought to liberate India from the British Government, which was fought on the shores of Irrawaddy in Burma. The film stars Kunal Kapoor, Amit Sadh and Mohit Marwah as the three INA soldiers who were court-martialled, Colonel Prem Sehgal, Colonel Gurbaksh Singh Dhillon, and Major Shah Nawaz Khan. The film is directed by Tigmanshu Dhulia and produced by Gurdeep Singh Sappal. This film, right from when its first look came out, I was not even expecting it to have music album. However, it does have four songs. The composers are relative newcomers. The leading composer, Rana Mazumder, is somebody we have heard singing in various albums for a long time, but with this film, he ventures into music direction and composed two songs, one in two versions. The second composer, Siddharth Pandit, debuted with ‘Laali Ki Shaadi Mein Laaddoo Hua Deewaana’ earlier this year; as a member of composer duo (Revant-Siddharth). Here, only he has composed, but Revant has written the lryics and sung the song so practically, they’re still together. I do not know what to expect from the album yet, but hopefully, it is a good patriotic album!


1. Hawaaon Mein Woh Aag Hai

Singers ~ K.K. & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rana Mazumder, Composition of INA Anthem by ~ Ram Singh Thakuri, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Nath, Lyrics of INA Anthem by ~ Pt. Vanshidhar Shukla

The album dives right into the patriotism, with a hard-hitting, anthemic song that just makes you feel proud to be an Indian. (Assuming you are one, otherwise, hello from India!) The composer cleverly makes use of INA’s anthem, “Qadam Qadam Badhaaye Jaa”, in a way that seems as if the two songs were meant to be together. The seamless transition from Rana Mazumder’s new composition, to the INA anthem, is wonderful. The song starts with an amazingly patriotic sound, with trumpet fanfare, progressing into a vibrant marching beat. The composition is just as abrupt and staccato as the beats; it jumps right into the patriotism with no dilly-dallying. It lifts your spirits instantly. A wonderfully melodious stanza in the middle by Shreya Ghoshal wins your heart. The instrumentation is grand and royal; with the brass band and the drum beats being the most prominent. The orchestra does a wonderful job playing the short notes in the upbeat portions, and the drawn-out and dreamy notes in the short melodious portion. Even rock guitars make their presence felt. Rana’s composing finesse is exposed when he goes seamlessly from the upbeat to the melodious portions. And the clever usage of the INA anthem is something I can go on and on about. The vocals are splendid. K.K. and Shreya Ghoshal, two vocalists we are used to having heard together so many times in the late 2000s, do a wonderful job. It isn’t a duet as such; K.K. leads the proceedings with a strong anthemic resonance to his voice, and the Backing chorus repeats after him. Shreya gets that one portion in the middle, but she aces it. When she sings her aalaap at the end of the song, though, you feel that it was worth hearing her for just that small portion! The lyrics by Sandeep Nath are aptly patriotic. A wonderful and motivating start to the album!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Tujhe Namaami Ho

Singers ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, K.K., Shreya Ghoshal & Rana Mazumder, Music by ~ Rana Mazumder, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Nath

As soon as this song starts, you know there’s something brilliant in store for you. The xylophone (santoor?) notes are enough to make you engrossed right away. And then, as Sunidhi Chauhan starts singing, you just get a chill sent through your body; it is so beautiful! Rana composes yet another mind blowing song; this time very heavily depending on the composition. The composition doesn’t let you down, and with its calm and composed nature, wins over your heart. The mellifluous tune is enough to have you listen to the song on loop. The antara beautifully traverses the high notes, and the four vocalists do great justice to the composition. The instrumentation is heavenly as well. Strings, santoor, and the sitar make up the main part of the arrangements. The orchestra especially, does an amazing job. The “Janmabhumi, Matrubhumi” hook has a wonderful show of strings in the background. About the vocals, whatever can be said is not enough. Rana’s decision to have four singers sing this song is quite a less-opted-for decision these days, but he manages all four of them very well, without using any autotune for any of them. Sunidhi sounds a lot like Kavita Krishnamurthy when she starts! She handles the calm notes beautifully like she always does. K.K. sounds great as always, and so does Shreya. The voice that stands out though, is Rana’s. We have heard him in many songs, and his earthy and raw voice is such a boon to this song; it give it such a humble feel! The chorus vocals are haunting, and give the song an amazing feel. The lyrics are as beautiful as patriotic lyrics can get! A heart-moving patriotic number that should get the recognition it deserves!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Ghar Chhaado

Singers ~ Rana Mazumder & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rana Mazumder, Composition of INA Anthem by ~ Ram Singh Thakuri, Lyrics by ~ Rana Mazumder, Lyrics of INA Anthem by ~ Pt. Vanshidhar Shukla

The next song is just the Bengali version of “Hawaaon Mein Woh Aag Hai”, and the song sounds so relevant in Bengali, Subhash Chandra Bose being a Bengali man himself. Rana replaces K.K. as the lead singer here, and sings it wonderfully. The Hindi lyrics from “Qadam Qadam” though, haven’t been replaced. Shreya’s Bengali is to die for, as always! Here, however, Rana does away with the earthiness in his voice, and renders it straightforwardly. A relevant reprise of the anthem.

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Teri Zameen

Singers ~ Shriya Pareek, Revant Shergill & Siddharth Pandit, Music by ~ Siddharth Pandit, Lyrics by ~ Revant Shergill

Siddharth Pandit, from composer duo Revant-Siddharth, another relatively new composer, brings up the caboose of the album, with a song that haunts you with its intensely patriotic vibe. The composition is just as lilting as that word can get. It starts right away, giving us goosebumps right from the first note. The line “desh ke maathe pe..” has been composed in such an ethereal way, and it shakes you with its haunting vibe. The song is more like a background number, but it sounds amazing in headphones. The “Qadam Qadam” song gets a little portion of this song as well, but Pandit gives it a different tune, unlike how it was incorporated with its own tune in ‘Hawaaon Mein Woh Aag Hai’. The mukhda’s tune repeats in the last stanza, and it haunts yet again. Though the song has almost the same hook running throughout (It has three hooks that repeat), it doesn’t feel boring even once. The arrangements are just as haunting as the composition. The percussion is breathtaking, and the chimey sounds, and the sounds of the plucked string instruments, all set up a very sublime ambience. The way the song starts, like a classical song, with the hum of the tanpura, and then folksy strings accompanying it, is probably the most catchy start to such a song ever. The vocalists do proper justice to the composition — Shriya Pareek, debutante, sounding a lot like Neeti Mohan, sings her portions in a spellbinding manner! The two male vocalists do well too, especially the one singing “Elaan kar Kakkar bhar”. The lyrics by Siddharth’s companion, Revant, are top notch as well, again, having to do with patriotism, of course! A perfect haunting finale to the wonderful patriotic album!

Rating: 5/5


Raag Desh was an album I was expecting very less from, to be frank. However, the outcome just blows my mind. Two newcomers (one almost newcomer), and both giving such heart-rending melodies to the album, is quite a rare thing to hear! I wish to hear more from them now!! All three songs (and the Bengali version) are beautiful and full of patriotic vibes, keeping with the theme of the film. A short and sweet album, with also serves as the medium for a smashing debut for Mazumder!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4 + 5 = 18

Album Percentage: 90%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tujhe Namaami Ho = Teri Zameen > Hawaaon Mein Aag Hai = Ghar Chaado

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 20 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Raag Desh) = 21

 

Which is your favourite song from Raag Desh? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE CASE OF THE INCOMPLETE ALBUM… (JAGGA JASOOS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th July 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 14th July 2017

Jagga Jasoos Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Jagga Jasoos is a Bollywood musical adventure film, starring Ranbir Kapoor And Katrina Kaif in lead roles. The film has been directed by Anurag Basu and produced by Siddharth Roy Kapur, Anurag Basu And Ranbir Kapoor. The film is a musical that revolves around the adventures of a teenage detective, Jagga. The musical format of the film makes it one-of-its-kind, and never before tried in Bollywood. After having watched the movie, I can only say that Anurag gets full marks just for trying the format and sucking us into this very innocent and beautiful world. Now, T-Series has bought the rights of only the full-length songs in the film, it seems, and so they’ve released a ‘full album’ comprising six songs. Pritam has done a wonderful job giving rhyme and tune to Jagga’s world. You might have already noticed that I haven’t written a rant about how late the album released — it is because I kind of expected the songs to release late just because they might give away the story of the film. Sadly, the deceitful makers only released six songs. So whatver, let’s just analyze the songs we all have been hearing for the past two months!


1. Ullu Ka Pattha

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Nikhita Gandhi, Ulule Vocals by ~ Vivienne Pocha, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hmm, confuse hai,
Dosti pe isse aitbaar aadha hai,
Rang mein dosti ke jo bhang ghol de,
Ishq ka bhoot sar pe savaar aadha hai!
Nigal sake nahin, ugal sake!
Sangemarmar ka bangla banaata hai,
Dil akbar ka pota hai!
Jaana na ho jahaan vahin jaata hai,
Dil ullu ka pattha hai!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam starts this colossal album with a song that jumps right into diversity, with a Spanish guitar wonderfully setting up a nice European flavour for us. And then Vivienne Pocha’s “ulule” vocals start and we are instantly hooked. Pritam’s composition is catchy, with a mellifluous sound. The rapid-paced portions are just amazing, and the way they drop into the smooth hookline is marvellous too. The “ulule” adds a tinge of craziness and zaniness to the song, giving something that children and adults alike can pick on to, as a kind of signature of the song. The antara has a beautiful composition, and keeps up with the Spanish feel of the song. The arrangements are just bewitching; the Spanish guitar as described earlier, is just a beautiful addition to the song; it transports you elsewhere. There’s a nice conclusion in yhe form of a Spanish guitar musical piece, and that part is something you ought not to miss, thinking that the vocals are over. Other instruments like drums and then digital beats provide a nice and groovy beat to the song. The vocalists do a great job; Arijit as always moulds himself into the required form and renders this quirky romantic song with ease, while Nikhita supports him well. Though I feel Shalmali would have suited better here! Anyway, that huskiness in Nikhita’s voice is what makes it sound amazing. I like the way how Pritam adds a welcoming drum portion before she enters; it sounds like it’s a welcome for her to come in the song! And of course, Vivienne, who gives the song a nice hookline in the form of her “ulule” backing vocals, does a fantastic job. Arijit’s vocals at the end of the song where he just experiments by making non-verbal sounds, sounds amazing. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are super cute, describing the heart as many things nobody could ever think of, like Shah Jahan, A hundred rupees change, and whatnot. A crazy and fun romantic song to start off this album; it has already created waves across the nation!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

2. Galti Se Mistake

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Chal muscle phulaana, thodi body banaana,
Tere chikne gaalon pe stubble ki fasal ugaana,
Arererereee, abey aye,
Chal beta shuru ho jaa guru,
Bagal uthaake thoda deo lagaana,
Kisi bagal waali ko mardaani khushboo sunghaana,
Chal upar ke do button dheele karke bataana,
Baalon wala seena dikhaana, baalon wala seena dikhaana!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam switches modes from European music to Indian music in the next song. Indian music itself is so diverse; here he picks a wonderful style of music to back the next song, and that is Assam’s Bihu Dance music. The fun Assamese percussion and wind instruments start off the song, until it takes a digital turn and the song starts. It is essentially a fun song being sung in the boys’ hostel, and that craziness reflects in the composition. The way the composition makes abrupt stops and starts, and turns unexpectedly, shows the same. I loved how Pritam infused the Bihu Dance theme into this kind of a song, that has no relation whatsoever to Bihu. The wonderful folk instruments they’ve used, against the backdrop of digitally produced sounds and a crazy composition, provides for a fun listen. The composition itself takes time to grow, because the song is so situation-oriented. The hookline is just so cute, you can’t get it out of your head. The antara is amazing, but what makes it more amazing is Amit Mishra’s stupendous rendition of it. He brings a very harsh quality to his voice, probably to be shown as the rowdiness of the boys in the hostel. Arijit joins only in the hookline, and the voice quality gets smoother, so you know he is singing. Amit sings the rest of the song brilliantly though! After the antara, Pritam introduces an almost one-minute-long folk interlude, after which the hookline just plays again. I feel that could’ve been shortened in length as that portion is just a mix of all the instrumental pieces we heard at the beginning of the song. Amitabh’s lyrics are again, hilarious. The antara is superbly funny! A fun song, whose composition takes a little time to grow, but till then, the arrangements and vocals help you love it!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Jhumritalaiyya

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Neelesh Misra

“Duniya yeh thodi thodi hai behtar lagey,
Dil ke naukar-o-chaakar lagey,
Jhuk ke pooche kya hai aarzoo!”

– Neelesh Misra

This soft romantic song is featured on the album next, and it is a song that made me love it right from the moment I first heard it. Pritam brings in an evident Coke Studio treatment for this song, which is tangible in the arrangements and unconventionally sweet composition. The composition is instantly likeable, only because of its amazing cuteness. The hook, ‘duniya yeh..’ has a distinct Coke Studio feel; it goes suddenly high-pitched in the otherwise low-pitched and calm composition. The “Ah-ha-haa” sounds so cute as well! The composition is what makes the song sound fit for a Disney movie. The antara has the same tune as the mukhda, with Arijit providing a bit of pleasant variation. There is a short conclusion line after a long interlude after the antara, which brings in the trademark Pritam touch to the song, and ends it on that very Pritam-ish note. The arrangements are complete with acoustic guitars, rock guitars, and drums, but all of this only increases the calmness of the song, making it a kind of peculiarly soothing alternative rock song. And that’s why I immediately linked it to Coke Studio. The backing chorus provides even more of that oh-so-tangible Pritam touch. The mukhda that is arranged solely on acoustic guitars and the groovy drum beats, sounds amazing and grips the listener right away. There is a nice banjo-like instrument portion in the hookline, which sounds amazing, giving the song a kind of folksy vibe. The second interlude is what showcases the most important part of the song, at least musically. It is here that we are served a wonderful rock guitar and drums combo that works so well, and then when the backing chorus joins in later on, you can’t help but sway with the vocals, as the wonderful drum beats accompany you. Arijit’s vocals are the perfect choice here; he exudes simplicity and charm, and renders the song spot-on. His vocal prowess is showcased in the song, especially in that short portion at the very end where his raw voice without any instruments behind it is exposed. And in the antara, the way he sings “rakh jaaunga“, is spectacular! A slight confusion is that Mohan Kanan could be heard in the song promo of this song on YouTube; but nowhere to be heard in this audio version. 😐😐 Neelesh Misra, who writes so infrequently, hits the bull’s-eye yet again, and some of the lines are funny in a cute way, while the others are very thought-provoking, like the one I’ve showcased up there below the credits of the song. A pleasant, breezy romantic song!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Phir Wahi

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Phir wahi, phir wahi, saundhi yaadein puraani, phir wahi,
Phir wahi, phir wahi, bisri bhooli kahaani, phir wahi,
Phir wahi, phir wahi, jhootha vaada,
Aasmaan ka mere, chanda, aadha,
Dil kyun joda agar dil dukhaana tha?
Aaye kyun thhe agar tumko jaana tha?
Jaate jaate labon pe bahaana tha, phir wahi!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After all those happy-go-lucky songs, it is time for a pathos-filled, heart-rending, sad song. And let me tell you, this one is a masterpiece! The composition takes the route of many former Bhatt-Pritam sad songs, but still has a sound of its own, thanks to Pritam’s wonderful arrangements. If the had arranged it just like his old Bhatt-ish songs, it might not have appealed so much at all. The composition is wonderful. It starts very slowly, and might not hook you at once, but right from the first instance of the phrase “Phir Wahi” in the song, it gets better. The emotion is almost tangible, and Arijit’s singing makes it even more so. I personally loved the tunes of the lines “dil kyun joda agar dil dukhaana tha..” and all other variants of it. The song has nothing more than the mukhda repeated twice, but its essence lies in that. It is emotional without having an overtly complex and twisting composition. The straightforward notes hit your heart instantly. The hookline is really emotional. And the song is actually about a son yearning for his father to come back, making it so much more layered than the usual boy missing girl Bollywood sad song. More on that when we speak about the lyrics. The arrangements are beautiful as well. There is a wonderful guitar played throughout the song. The way they stop-and-resume the guitar strums in the “aansoon pochhe hi kyun…” line of the antara, is just mind blowing!!! But even more spectacular than the guitar, there is also a WONDERFUL piano portion that starts the song. The interlude is a wonderful Coke Studio-esque portion, with amazing soft rock sounds of the drums, which continues for the rest of the song. The piano chords throughout the song are amazing. Backing vocals are beautiful wherever they can be heard. The alternative rock that features in the song after the mukhda is the trademark Pritam sound, which we heard in songs like ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani), ‘Saware’ (Phantom), ‘Daayre’ (Dilwale) and the recent ‘Main Agar’ (Tubelight). Towards the end, a wonderful saxophone enters that steals the show before the song ends. And again, that splendid piano loop that started the song, ends the song too. Amitabh’s lyrics just tug at your heartstrings. The love of the song for his father is beautifully reflected in the lines he’s written, with a bit of frustration on the son’s part for his father leaving him like that, and evident love in that frustration as well. A sad song unlike the Bollywood sad songs of these days.

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Musafir

Singer ~ Tushar Joshi, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Ho kahaani meri, tarjumaa ho tera,
Ho duaayein teri, sar jhuka ho mera,
Raaz mein bhi tere, sach chhupa ho mera,
Main kamaai jodun, karz adaa ho tera,
Yahaan mera tere siva, hai dooja nahin koi re,
Akela mujhe chhodke, na jaana yun nirmohi re!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam finally brings in another singer to sing the entire song, this time, a debutant! It’s really exciting when Pritam introduces new singers to us, because we know he doesn’t leave them for a long time, and keeps giving them opportunities to shine in his later albums. Tushar Joshi, who did sing a couple of backing vocal portions in Pritam albums prior to this, gets to enter Bollywood as a lead singer, and how! The song he gets is plain out of this world. A composition that is a trademark Pritam composition, yet invokes such pathos and emotion, this song grows on you in no time! The mukhda is wonderful; it repeats twice in this song too; I think that’s the norm nowadays — maybe composers don’t have the time to compose a new tune for antaras! Anyway, the composition is beautiful. After each stanza, a wonderful “Aye-aye-aye-aye” portion really gives you the goosebumps. The high-pitched line in the song, “yahaan mera tere siva...” is just too good! Pritam’s arrangements do not stray from his usual style of arranging such songs; a loud but soothing rock template backs the solid composition, with wonderful instances of piano, acoustic guitar and the necessary drums and electric guitars. Towards the end, a ravishing background chorus sings for about the last one and a half minute or so, coupled with an amazing guitar solo! At the beginning a nice and soothing piano loop plays, and quite like the previous song, ‘Phir Wahi’, it sucks you in completely! Tushar’s voice sounds very similar to Arijit’s in the high notes, but otherwise, it is sort of a cleaned version of Arijit’s voice, without the rough texture. Amitabh’s lyrics are yet another instance of his bravissimo; the man is a complete genius when it comes to such philosophical-slash-romantic songs! A beautiful composition evoking memories of songs like ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani)!

Rating: 5/5

 

6. Khaana Khaake

Singers ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Tushar Joshi, Geet Sagar, June Banerjee, Antara Mitra, Amit Mishra, Ashwin Kulkarni, Aaroh Velankar & Sunny MR, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Life ki simple si philosophy, yeh jaan lo,
Hum yahaan do din ke mehmaan hai, yeh maan lo,
Non-stop ek party hai, jahaan sabko aana hai,
Aur khaana khaake, daaru peeke, chale jaana hai!
Jeena toh unhi ka jeena kehlaaya,
Jo bhi bina chu cha, karke, khaake peeke chale gaye, chale gaye!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The next and final (😏😏) song on the album, is a laugh riot, whether you hear it on-screen or off. If you’ve watched the video, there’s an entertaining video to couple with the random and quirky song. But if you hear just the audio too, it doesn’t take away from the comic appeal of the song. The hook itself is a crazy, zany and wacky line, that by itself, helps us gather more interest to listen on. The composition is very simple, and has nothing much like a proper structure. All I know is that it has the hookline repeated thousands of times. The only thing that can pass as an antara, is Tushar Joshi’s portion in the middle, which has been composed and even sung, beautifully. But it has been written even more beautifully. Bhattacharya sees life as a party, where everyone has to eat, drink, and then leave! What an imagination! So can we say, “All the world’s a party. And all the men and women merely eaters and drinkers”? 😄😄 The song provides a lot of entertainment for the ears, for instance, there’s a nice haunting line in the form of the “khaali ghar mein chaaron aur sannata” line and its variants, and the entertaining lyrics, and to top it all, one of the female vocalists emulates a saxophone and succeeds in adding to the whimsicality of the song. Tushar Joshi in his portion, playback singing for Ranbir’s character, cleverly incorporates a bit of Jagga’s stammer before starting his line! That’s a nice effect! The simple digital metronomish beat that backs the song serves as almost the only instrumentation, besides the weird quirky sounds like a spoon clinking against a glass, and other zany sounds. Of course, this song tilts a little on the “Less Repeat Value” side! Welcome to a madhouse!

Rating: 4/5


Jagga Jasoos is an amazing album, full of variety, innovation and catchy music. Pritam and Anurag Basu recreate the magic of “‘Barfi!”, though in a slightly different and more massy way. The music has worked already and should work even more. My only regret is that, for a film that’s a musical and has such amazing songs in it, and had such hard work gone into it by all persons involved, the small songs haven’t released with the full album! Let’s hope they’ll release and we will get to relive Pritam’s and Basu’s magic of the big screen, on our phones! And let me assure you, these six songs are NOTHING compared to those! Anyway, this six-song album is a good showcase of Pritam’s range and versatility!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 4 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 91% {This is not the final rating; when the OST releases, I will review it average it out}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: From start to finish in the same order.

 

Which is your favourite song from Jagga JasoosPlease vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SACHIN-JIGAR’S PYAARA, AFEEMI ALBUM!! (MERI PYAARI BINDU – Music Review)

I would like to start by thanking YRF for releasing the full album early, but giving no such indication by uploading a jukebox or a complete OST on iTunes so that we don’t keep waiting for more! And thanks (this isn’t sarcasm) to Jigar Saraiya for confirming on Twitter, in reply to my question, that it is indeed the full album.

Update — 11th May 2017 — Today YRF released the “full album” on iTunes.


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir, Priya Saraiya & Rana Mazumder
♪ Music Label: YRF Music
♪ Music Released On: 25th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th May 2017

Meri Pyaari Bindu Album Cover

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Meri Pyaari Bindu is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com starring Parineeti Chopra and Ayushmann Khurrana in lead roles. The film is directed by Akshay Roy and produced by Maneesh Sharma. The film is about a writer played by Ayushmann, who, after being frustrated at the lack of critical appreciation his novels get, despite him being a successful writer, moves back to his hometown Kolkata to find inspiration to write better literature. Well, he has been writing his new book for three years. It so happens that he is reminded of one of his best friends, and stumbles upon a cassette of their favourite songs’ playlist. It is from here, that he gets Inspiration for his new novel. So, the crux of the film is quite interesting — it seems sweet and simple, and a look at the many “mini-trailers” (or chapters) they’ve released for the film will reveal that it is a bit quirky and very musical too. All in all, it is something I’m waiting for, and I believe everyone is waiting for. So without ruminating any more upon the movie, let us cherish the music till then, as that is the only way to get closer to the movie before the release. The music for the film has been given by a duo whose music I appreciate and adore, and they’ve got a fair share of high ratings on this blog (not to mention a few forgiveable not-so-good ones), and that duo is the dynamic duo Sachin-Jigar. So last year, since they concentrated on Gujarati film music, they could only manage to do one Bollywood film, ‘A Flying Jatt’s, an album which was amazing musically, but lacked repeat value. Of course, this year they are the busiest music directors on the block, with five films including this one. For this music album, they’ve composed six tracks, a perfect number for a musical in Bollywood. Hoping that these men surprise us just as they always do (though it won’t be much of a surprise) I’m diving into this expected-to-be awesome album!


1. Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin

Singer ~ Parineeti Chopra, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

“Raaste mein tum milo toh,
Haath milaane ruk jaana!
Saath mein koi, ho tumhare,
Door se hi tum muskaana,
Lekin muskaan ho aisi,
Ki jismein ikraar nahi,
Lekin muskaan ho aisi,
Ki jismein ikraar nahi,
Nazron se naa karna tum bayaan,
Woh jisse inkaar nahin!
Maana ke hum yaar nahin!”

– Kausar Munir

The album starts off with a song we have heard about a year ago, in the video where YRF announced the film. Parineeti was talking about how the makers insisted that she should sing the song. And right from that day, when I heard how beautifully she sings, I couldn’t wait for this day, when I would listen to the full song and review it. The song is essentially a ghazal, and Sachin-Jigar have composed it sooooo beautifully, that it reminds you of many 90s songs, or the 90s era in general, with its tune. The poetic words by Kausar Munir (more on them later) have been put to such a charmingly delightful tune by the duo, that it hardly seems like a sad song. The mukhda is so spectacular, it just pulls you into the song, and you won’t emerge out of it until the song is over. It is the antaras, though, that amazed me the most. Again, a spectacular tune, but this one sounds very layered, as if there are deeper meanings to it, which get revealed one by one, each time you replay the song. Also, Parineeti adds different nuances and variation in both antaras, so it almost feels as if both antaras are composed on the same tune, but still different. That brings us to her vocals. Parineeti’s voice has this rawness to it, which I haven’t heard in any of the actress-singers’ voices. (Well, maybe Priyanka Chopra and Shruti Hassan, but not beyond these). Her husky voice suits the ambience of the song so well, that it just transports you to another world. Of course, she is a trained classical singer, but her command over the tune is amazing considering that she must’ve not been in touch with singing for a long time. And an added bonus is that her voice hasn’t been autotuned! That’s brave, and I appreciate it. Not that it sounds bad anyway. Sachin-Jigar’s arrangements are out of this world. They recreate the 90s through the arrangements — that flute loop (Shreeram Sampath) is spell-binding! It has you hooked right from the first time it plays, and then it keeps on amazing you throughout the song. The folksy percussions (Arun Solanki) in the song are mystifying too. And the piano (Rinku Rajput), played so gracefully right when we don’t expect it, in small pieces all over the song, is so sweet! A special appearance by the sarangi (Dilshad Khan) in the second interlude is something you must not miss at any cost. (In other words, hear the full audio, not just the video promo!) Beside all these wonderful nostalgic instruments, the hardworking guitars (Krishna Pradhan) are sidelined, but they give a constant rhythm throughout, and if you listen carefully, they have an important contribution indeed. Now, I have saved the best for the last. And that is Kausar Munir’s lyrics. She gave us a wonderfully written album, “Begum Jaan” just last month. And she’s already at it again! Her words are so heartbreaking, it gives a whole new definition to sad songs. Both the antaras, not to mention the mukhda, have been written wonderfully! And Sachin-Jigar very cleverly knew how to put a tune to those words so that they don’t sound maudlin and melancholic. Splendid work by Sachin-Jigar and Kausar Munir. A sad song with a refreshing feel! My intuition tells me this will go on to be one of my favourite songs of the year, and probably all time.

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Haareya

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Khuli aankhon se dekha woh, haseen khwaab hai tu,
Dil mein jo utar jaaye woh, pyaari baat hai tu,
Tere naam ka nasha, nasha, hai zubaan pe chhaa gaya,
Iss bekhudi mein doobne se main khud ko na rok sakeya!”

– Priya Saraiya

While we had a wonderful old-world-charm in the first song, Sachin-Jigar bring in their favourite, a nice modern touch, to the next song. The composition is odd! And I say that in the best way possible! It has this offbeat touch to it, a tune that is mostly associated with rock songs these days. But no, Sachin-Jigar, the experimentalists that they are, use it for a romantic song! And it works, and succeeds with distinction. The mukhda starts, and you start to get interested in what will come next. When a song compels you to listen to it further because of that reason, it has to be interesting! And then the hookline starts. So low-key, so modestly, so inconspicuously and oh-so-subtly! Unlike the hooklines in which the tempo, instrumentation and vocals go higher in pitch, loudness and whatnot, this one is exactly the opposite. It gets subtle and quiet after a huge and suspenseful buildup to it. It takes a genius to pull that off successfully, and therefore Sachin-Jigar must be geniuses! They could very well have added some rock elements in that hookline, but they refrained from doing so. And it just increased the appeal of the song manifold! Yes, a composition that suits the rock genre, has nothing but a simple (but very infectious, mind you) guitar riff in the arrangements. And I must mention Indrajit Chetia here, for his AMAAAAZZZZING guitar work throughout the song! Ayushmann’s Arijit’s (you’ll see why I did that) vocals are so impressive! The man brings in such a convincing imitation of Ayushmann’s voice, like the way he pronounces each word while singing and the slight nasal twang, that one would initially be confused whether Arijit has sung the song or Ayushmann. He gives his own voice a complete makeover and modifies it just to suit Ayushmann, and how crazy is that? I’ve not seen this happen in quite a while. These days, either a singer’s voice suits an actor by default, or it doesn’t. But a singer tweak his voice for an actor? That’s so 90s! And so amazing! In the antara, he does that amazing transition between the low octave and high octave, so effortlessly, that he does perfect justice to Sachin-Jigar’s composition, which I doubt anyone else could’ve pulled off. Guest lyricist Priya Saraiya writes in a mix of Punjabi and Hindi, and presents yet another amazing piece from her side. A lovestruck man’s emotions are depicted clearly by her writing. A nice experimentation, where a composition tailor-made for rock, is given an acoustic and unplugged type of arrangement. Of course, special mention to Arijit!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Ye Jawaani Teri

Singers ~ Nakash Aziz & Jonita Gandhi, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

“Yeh jawaani teri, yeh jawaani meri,
Yeh jawaani teri, yeh jawaani meri,
Yeh jawaani teri, yeh jawaani meri,
J – j – jeene nahi deti!”

– Kausar Munir

Well, we had two romantic songs, one mature and the other slightly more youthful. Be prepared to go even further down memory lane, as we go back to the main characters’ college days and are treated to an amazing retro treat from Sachin-Jigar’s music bank. So basically this is the fun song of the album where the two protagonists are in college, having fun, without a worry. And Sachin-Jigar’s track reflects the same attitude in it. The composition sounds odd at first, but once you realize what it is, you’ll be like “Ohhhhhhh”, and then realize the cleverness of the music directors. The hookline is what the song relies on to propel it, and very aptly, it has been composed to the tune of the iconic Shammi Kapoor guitar riff. After you realize that, the padding, like the mukhda and antara, start sounding amazing thanks to you having discovered the theme of the song. Particularly the line that Jonita sings before the hookline arrives, with that nasal touch, has an amazing tune! The arrangements stick to the retro theme very well, and the guitars (Shomu Seal) steal the show, aptly supported by amazing trumpets (Kishore Sodha), saxophone (Shyamraj) and drums (Debashish Banerjee). It all gives that required retro feel that the song needed. In places, it reminded me of ‘Let’s Talk About Love’ (Baaghi), another good song of the same genre, but one which was suppressed by mediocre vocals and composition. The vocals too, suit the song well, though I thought Nakash could’ve been substituted by Vishal Dadlani and the song would’ve gone miles higher. Jonita sounds very different from what we have heard from her in the Rahman and Pritam camps. She does that aforementioned retro-nasal thing superbly, and ditches her thin and sweet voice to bring in a tinge of naughtiness and youthfulness for this one. Kausar Munir’s lyrics here are purely situational, and I can’t really praise them or the opposite. A fun youthful number, that might take some time to grow.

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Iss Tarah

Singers ~ Clinton Cerejo & Dominique Cerejo, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

“Tu ret si haathon se, aisi phisal jaati hai,
Mujhe rokna nahi aata, tujhe theherna nahi aata,
Tu sarphiri hawaaon mein, phirki si kyun phiri jaaye,
Mujhe baandhna nahi aata, tujhe thaamna nahi aata!”

– Kausar Munir

Another retro-themed number joins the album, this time a disco song, composed in a trademark Michael Jackson way. Sachin-Jigar take their experimentalism further ahead with this one, and produce a crackling dance song. The composition in the beginning is so less, it almost sounds as if the singer is reciting the lines like a little child recites a poem in front of the class. However, that’s what increases the appeal of the song. And then when the line by Dominique comes in, you are dazzled by its brightness. Brightness as in, Sachin-Jigar’s smart use of the disco elements to make the composition beautiful. And then comes the hard-hitting hookline, which is one of the best I’ve heard in a while, and also something very similar to Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s composition style, a trio who I believe established this style of music in Bollywood. The arrangements are entrancing, especially the trumpet (Kishore Sodha) that plays in the hookline, and steals the limelight right away. The disco-themed digital beats are amazing, and set up a groovy beat even before the tune of the song starts. The guitars (Paresh Kamath) are great too, as are Sachin-Jigar’s clever additions of finger-snaps and the trademark disco sounds. The hookline’s arrangements are out of this world. The vocals too, are mind blowing. Clinton Cerejo, after his successful stint as a music director in Bollywood last year (in three movies) returns to the mic, and nails the song. But the one who steals the spotlight is his better half, Dominique, in her very short portion, that repeats just twice in the entire song, but leaves a lasting impression, and makes you love her voice so much! And that part, as mentioned above, has been composed just as well! Kausar’s lyrics are full of contrast, and it is very interesting to listen to. A successful disco-based retro number, which I can’t wait to watch in the movie! 

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Khol De Baahein

Singer ~ Monali Thakur, Hindi Lyrics by ~  Kausar Munir, Bengali Lyrics by ~ Rana Mazumder

“Barse jo saawan, toh daudke tu aana,
Khud ko tu bheegna sikha de,
Barse jo saawan, toh lautke tu aana,
Khud ko tu bheegna sikha de…”

– Kausar Munir

After a sad song, a romantic song and two dance numbers, it is romantic time again, and this time we get a rather unconventional romantic song. The composition is so beautiful and cute, and it reeks of the Bengali culture with its tune. It has this lilting, lulling tune that just doesn’t let you get bored. Yes, it does take some time to fully grow on you, but when it does, it does so very fulfillingly, and you end up loving the song unconditionally. The mukhda in Bengali, starts off the song wonderfully, while the hookline in Hindi is cute and harmonious. There’s a beautiful short stanza in Bengali after that (“kokhono kokhono…“) which just sounds so endearing. And the antara too, keeps you listening. All in all, Sachin-Jigar’s composition is a winner. The arrangements are no less. On the most part, it is a soothing guitar-led instrumentation (Guitars by Krishna Pradhan), and though the guitars aren’t hard-hitting they are just as amazing as the guitars in ‘Haareya’. The piano notes at the end of the song are beautiful as the conclusion of the song. Monali is the perfect choice as the singer; she goes back and forth between high and low notes effortlessly, and pronounces the Bengali words immaculately. She sounds very cute as always in this lulling romantic song. Kausar’s Hindi lyrics are great, but when I asked one of my friends for a translation of the Bengali lyrics, I got to know that Rana’s Bengali lyrics are just as endearing. Modest and simple, but very strong in terms of composition and arrangements and especially vocals!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Afeemi

Singers ~ Sanah Moidutty & Jigar Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

“Dhaani si, dhaani si, sharbati paani si,
Dheere se dheere se, teri chaahat chadhti hai,
Thodi naadaani si, thodi shaitaani si,
Dheeme se dheeme se, teri aadat badhti hai,
Tu hai toh mere roobaroo, par kya karoon,
Yakeen hi nahi aata,
Shaam se subah karoon, dekha karoon,
Raha bhi nahi jaata!
Afeemi, afeemi, afeemi hai yeh pyaar,
Afeemi hai tera mera pyaar!”

– Kausar Munir

A very simple and humble song brings up the rear of the album. This song is a very sweet and beautiful romantic song, composed in a very trademark Sachin-Jigar way, keeping things sweet and simple. The composition starts off so effervescently, with that sprightly mukhda. And the hookline is a typical Bollywood romantic song hookline, nevertheless, it hooks you right away. The antara has been composed beautifully as well, one line strictly sounding very similar to a line from ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ itself, but that’s alright. Also, the hookline sounds like the line “Pooche jo koi, toh tera naam doon“, from Sachin-Jigar’s own ‘Tera Naam Doon’ (Entertainment). Overall though, the song is addictive! Such a simple romantic song, which was also great in its composition, was long-needed in Bollywood. The arrangements follow conventional arrangements, in that it contains everything you would expect in a contemporary romantic song — guitars (Kalyan Baruah), piano (Rinku Rajput), drums (Lindsay D’mello). But the flute by Hamtu is unexpectedly amazing, as are the strings that pitch in occasionally. I personally loved the way the hookline is arranged, on that simple guitar riff, and I love those small rattle-like instrument additions that sound so lovely! Vocals are perfect, with Sanah Moidutty finally getting a song where she is allowed to sing more than or equal to her male co-singer (who in this case happens to be Jigar himself) which she couldn’t do in her previous two songs, ‘Moto Ghotalo’ (Gori Tere Pyaar Mein) and ‘Tu Hai’ (Mohenjo Daro). Her voice is a nice and sweet voice with the vocal quality of someone who has the potential to make it big in Bollywood, where such voices are lapped up by music directors. Jigar himself accompanies her fantastically, and I believe the duo has programmed his voice less than they normally do, and that adds to the natural touch in the song. Kausar’s lyrics are fascinating, and it also marks the first time (probably; I’m not a database) that someone has compared love to opium (‘afeem’ = opium), after comparing it to stuff like alcohol, and hookah bars. A very ‘Afeemi’ (addictive) song!

Rating: 4.5/5


Meri Pyaari Bindu turns out to be just as great and musically rich as I expected it to be. Sachin-Jigar, after a hiatus in which they scored for one Bollywood film ‘A Flying Jatt’, which sadly didn’t have the potential to stay with us for long, they give us yet another taste of their awesomeness, after they had given us two of my favourite albums of theirs, ‘Happy Ending’ in 2014, and ‘Badlapur’ in 2015. Another feather in their cap, ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ might just be one of their best performances!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 28

Album Percentage: 93.34% {Surpassing ‘Poorna’ at 92.5%, that makes it this year’s best album so far!!}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: From start to finish in the same order.

 

Which is your favourite song from Meri Pyaari Bindu? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂