SHANTANU SCORES, OTHERS ARE FORCED!! (OCTOBER – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Shantanu Moitra, Anupam Roy & Abhishek Arora
♪ Lyrics by: Tanveer Ghazi, Swanand Kirkire & Abhiruchi Chand
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 28th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 13th April 2018

October Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


October is a Bollywood film starring Varun Dhawan, Banita Sandhu and Gitanjali Rao. The film is directed by Shoojit Sircar and produced by Ronnie Lahiri and Sheel Kumar. The film’s music is scored by Shantanu Moitra, Anupam Roy and Abhishek Arora, three composers who have recurring composed for Sircar’s films. Let’s see how well this album turns out!


Lead composer Shantanu Moitra really knows how to shed his Raju Hirani composition style when necessary. For Shoojit Sircar production “Pink” (2016), he created a pensive melody “Kaari Kaari”. This time, he starts the album off with the instrumental that has gained monumental success (especially since it is an instrumental), the October Theme. The track is full of beautiful violins (lead violin by Rohan Roy), a soulful piano (George Joseph, Artem Panteleev), not to forget the deep cello (Ilya Ten). Shantanu’s composition is beautiful, but the treatment he gives it with the instrumentation is what makes it redeeming.
That’s proved in the next song Chal, where the same tune, doesn’t create quite the same impact. Shantanu adds a very awkward 70s pop sound, not going quite well with the standard set by its instrumental version. Monali’s voice sounds very different, and Tanveer Ghazi’s lyrics create no impact whatsoever except a bit of occasional awkwardness. I must say though, the guitars (Ankur) are catchy.
It’s in Manwaa that the composer strikes gold. Sunidhi Chauhan’s voice is a perfect choice for the heart-warming semiclassical composition, and Shantanu’s trademark style of repeating an instrumental loop in the background works wonders as always. Swanand Kirkire pens soulful lyrics, while Shantanu accompanies Sunidhi’s voice with amazing arrangements — mostly digital beats, making it a wonderful fusion track. The composition of the antara is excellent, Sunidhi mastering the high notes as always. The song is hands down the best of the album, and most suited for the film!
Anupam Roy’s Tab Bhi Tu, in the initial couple of listens, sounds like the typical Bollywood Rahat cry fest, but after some time, I warmed up to it. It is definitely a new genre that Anupam Roy tried, and the composition, though maudlin and heavy to the ears, takes some getting accustomed to before you keep humming it all day. Shamik Chakraborty’s arrangements are the highlight here, with the electric guitars (Rishabh Ray) and drums (Sandipan Parial) standing out, and the flute (Sushanta Nandi) neutralising the rock. Tanveer Ghazi’s lyrics, again, create less impact.
Abhishek Arora’s song Theher Ja, is probably the one that suits the film the least, and though the composition is amazing, the composer ruins it with a techno beat, and electric guitars and the like. I would’ve preferred an unplugged version or a version with piano and violins against Armaan’s soothing vocals. Abhiruchi Chand’s lyrics are functional.


Considering that there were no songs in the film, the composers managed to give some good songs, but nothing more, except one I’ll love forever! What the result is, is that Shantanu, also the background score composer for the film, ends up composing within the film’s soundscape, but the others’ songs sound forced in just to create a music album! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 6.5 + 9.5 + 7 + 6 = 37

Album Percentage: 74%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Manwaa > October Theme > Tab Bhi Tu > Chal > Theher Ja

 

Which is your favourite song from October? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOT TOO JUNGLEE, BUT JUST RIGHT!! (DIL JUUNGLEE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Anand-Milind, Sharib-Toshi & Abhishek Arora
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arafat Mahmood, Guru Randhawa, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Vayu Shrivastav, Devendra Kafir & Abhiruchi Chand
♪ Music Label: T-Series / Pooja Music / Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: The music hasn’t released as a full album
♪ Movie Released On: 9th March 2018

Dil Juunglee

Listen to the T-Series songs: Gaana

Listen to the Pooja Music songs: Gaana


Dil Juunglee is a Bollywood rom-com starring Saqib Saleem and Taapsee Pannu in lead roles. The film is directed by Aleya Sen and produced by Jackky Bhagnani and Vashu Bhagnani. The film’s music is by multiple composers — Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Sharib-Toshi and Abhishek Arora. All of these composers have given something listen worthy in the past, and their style of music suits the romcom genre very well, so it’s probably going to be a fun music album.. let’s see!


Now, this album is somehow split between two music labels — T-Series, and the newly-conceived Pooja Music (belonging to Vashu Bhagnani’s Pooja Entertainment) whose digital marketing is being done by Sony Music. The makers probably wanted a remake of ‘Gazab ka Hai Din’ to feature in the album, but since its rights were with T-Series, that song had to be on T-Series as well, right? Because, obviously! And so I guess the Guru Randhawa song was a bonus add-on, like a ‘Buy one get one free’ kind of deal. So yeah, that’s how I guess this album ended up being on two different music labels. Anyway, since that has nothing to do with the music, let’s move on!
The first song on the T-Series part of the album happens to be composed by Guru Randhawa, along with co-composer Rajat Nagpal, the composers of ‘Ban Ja Rani’ (Tumhari Sulu) and ‘Suit Suit’ (Hindi Medium). While his previous songs in Bollywood have been rehashes of his pop singles, Nachle Na is an entirely original song, and no prizes to guess that it is his best and least contrived-sounding song in Bollywood.. (At the moment of writing this review, ‘Kaun Nachdi’ from “Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety” hadn’t released, which I now believe to be his best yet.) The beats are groovy, and the electronic loop, though harking back to ‘Aa Toh Sahi’ (Judwaa 2), is quite fresh-sounding. Vocals are good, and I’m surprised Neeti Mohan, of all singers was chosen for this song; she does a brilliant job, and surprises me at the same time. It is the lyrics that fall flat.
Now of course, since Guru Randhawa didn’t remake his own song, the music company had to call in someone who could remake some other song. So we have the more-than-part-time remake artist Tanishk Bagchi presenting Gazab Ka Hai Din, a remake of the song with the same name from ‘Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak’. I must say, he has done a good job providing the padding around the old hook; the mukhda is especially beautiful, but the antara is forgettable. But the addition of the old hook sounds so contrived, the beauty of the song ends there. For me, the mukhda of this song is the only memorable part! I wish he had been allowed to build a new song after this mukhda and not borrow from an old one! Jubin and Prakriti sound functional as always; nothing great in either of their renditions. The strings during the hookline are beautiful, they keep your interest intact through the boring parts of the composition. I also noticed that Tanishk has written the lyrics as close as possible to the old song, thereby keeping a small touch of it alive even in the new composition.
However, Tanishk’s other song Beat Juunglee, which features in the Pooja Music part of the album, is an amazing and instantly catchy one, and though he uses the iconic “Yaahooo!” from Shammi Kapoor’s ‘Chahe Koi Mujhe Junglee Kahe’ (Junglee), I’m happy that he hasn’t been made to recreate that number, because his original composition in this song is so insanely catchy!! Armaan Malik was the best choice for this, and the results show brilliantly. Prakriti Kakar gets not much to do, but does well in her one or two lines. Most insane though, is the programming by Tanishk, which has been getting better day by day. The electronic loop which starts the song is crazy and so are the percussions and horns throughout the song. Vayu’s lyrics are always entertaining and they are just that here as well. It just goes to show you how well Tanishk can actually compose when given the freedom. (As if last year’s ‘Shubh Mangal Saavdhan’ wasn’t proof enough!)
Sorry for rambling about that song, but the next song, by Sharib-Toshi, Bandeya, deserves just as much praise. Now this composer duo hasn’t been in the picture for a long time. And by in the picture I mean the way Tanishk is constantly in the picture, every month. The last song they composed was in the recently released “Fukrey Returns”, and now they return with another Punjabi song, this time a sad song sung by Arijit Singh. The composition is soulful, the arrangements heart-warming and the lyrics by Devendra Kafir amazing. The composition has the feel of Anu Malik’s ‘Mere Humsafar’ (Refugee) but the similarity is only in the first line of the hook. Arijit himself is quite at ease with this kind of a song, and is his usual soulful best.
The second best song of the album, after ‘Beat Juunglee’, has to be Abhishek Arora’s Dil Jaane Na, an amazing fusion track that starts off as a soft romantic number, but segues into a pumped-up electronic number with a groovy beat to it. Seasoned voices like Mohit Chauhan and Neeti Mohan are the perfect choice for the song, and they deliver well. I love the way composer Abhishek Arora makes the seamless transition from the soft portions of the song to the upbeat ones, and not just once but numerous times throughout the song. All in all, this song is a treat for people who like light and fluffy music!


The album was “Juunglee” after all, but I loved the Pooja Music part of it much, much, much more than the two songs on the T-Series label. Some things are just meant to be less “Juunglee” and hence less likeable than others!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 7 + 9 + 8 + 8.5 = 39

Album Percentage: 78%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Beat Juunglee > Dil Jaane Na > Bandeya > Gazab Ka Hai Din > Nachle Na

Which is your favourite song from Dil Juunglee? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 10 (from previous albums) + 01 = 11

OCTOBER 2017 ROUND-UP (CHEF, TU HAI MERA SUNDAY, RANCHI DIARIES, GOLMAAL AGAIN, JIA AUR JIA — Mini Music Reviews) + Important Announcement!!


The Important Announcement

Due to the scarcity of time, from now on, I will sum up the entire month’s reviews in a set of two articles each month, one usually around the 15th of the month and the other towards the end. Of course, certain albums that I feel need a separate post (either because they might have many songs, or be spectacular albums, or even if the movies are highly awaited ones) I will do so for those albums. I will reveal the chosen album for this month — it’ll be “Secret Superstar” — I don’t guarantee it’ll be rated very high, but because of the buzz surrounding it, it requires a separate post, I feel! Meanwhile, the usual monthly awards posts will sum everything up once again at the end of every month in the form of awards. I really hope this format helps me balance my schedule! And I can’t wait to return to my normal long posts — till then enjoy your luck of getting to read short reviews from my side!!


October 2017 Round-Up

So this post will cover the reviews for the all but two of October releases that have already released — ‘Chef’ by Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik, ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’ by Amartya Rahut (Bobo), ‘Ranchi Diaries’ by Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran, ‘Golmaal Again’ by Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George-DJ Chetas & Abhishek Arora, and ‘Jia Aur Jia’ by Sachin Gupta, Nisschal Zaveri & Sameer Nichani. There will be separate reviews for ‘Secret Superstar’ and ‘Rukh’, both by Amit Trivedi.



♦ A Delectable Treat For The Ears: CHEF Music Review

♪ Music by: Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik
♪ Lyrics by: Ankur Tewari & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to ‘Tere Mere’: Saavn
Buy ‘Tere Mere’: iTunes


Raghu Dixit starts off the album with Shugal Laga Le, a song having a heavy folk influence from Kerala. The backing vocalists provide that freshness associated with Kerala, and Raghu’s characteristic voice makes it all the more intriguing to listen to. In his arrangements too, he adds a dash of everything, and especially those percussions are mind blowing, along with the banjo. Ankur’s lyrics made me acquainted with a new phrase “Shugal Laga Le” meaning “find a hobby, or find something to do”. The next song by him is also reliant on folk music, this time Celtic/Irish. Banjaara is steeped heavily on the beautiful flutes that characterise Irish music, with amazing percussion and backing vocals yet again. Vishal Dadlani does great justice to the sing with those power-packed vocals. The song is one of those many motivational songs that Vishal gets to sing in Bollywood, except that this time, it has a whole new style to it. The mellow Darmiyaan, exudes a positivity in spite of the fact that it is a sad song — mostly because of Raghu’s ebullience. A splendid guitar backdrop makes it simple and sweet, and Raghu’s diction has to be lauded. Raghu takes forth the melancholia in a more Bollywood-ish way in Khoya Khoya, which I rank as the best of the album — underrated Shahid Mallya taking charge of the vocals in a very beautiful way, and Dixit’s composition has that old-world-charm to it. The sarangi is quite impressive here! The alternative rock set up will make this one loveable to many! Raghu’s last song on the album is the effervescent Tan Tan, rendered with spunk by Nikhita Gandhi, the only female vocalist on the album. In her texture, she gives off vibes of Shalmali and Shefali. Guest composer Amaal Mallik, whose song Tere Mere was also removed from the album later, produces a song you can immediately tell is by him. That doesn’t make its richness diluted, though — it’s still wonderful, with the nice dholak rhythm accompanying Armaan Malik’s beautiful voice. Also, Rashmi-Virag’s lyrics are amazing!
All in all, Chef is one of the best albums of the year in that it is a clever mix of melancholia, inspiration and romance. Raghu Dixit must sign more and more Bollywood films — I firmly believe that this is his best Bollywood album yet!

Total Points Scored by This Album (in the order mentioned in the review): 4 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 88.3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Banjaara = Khoya Khoya > Tan Tan > Tere Mere = Shugal Laga Le = Darmiyaan



♦ A Perfect Sunday Album: TU HAI MERA SUNDAY Music Review

♪ Music by: Amartya Rahut
♪ Lyrics by: Milind Dhaimade
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 29th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of Arijit’s two songs, the classically-steeped sad song Dhundlo Tum fares better, with an addictive strings orchestra accompanying it, and it quickly steers away from the Bhatt-ish genre that it starts off with. Had that continued, it wouldn’t have been half as good. The digital Sitar is beautiful. His other song, Thodi Si Jagah, is also classical-based for some initial parts, before it turns into an upbeat number that loses itself halfway through the song. The rock backdrop ofthe hook line couldn’t have been more clichéd. Arijit’s vocal prowess is clearly showcased in the song though. It is Amartya’s violin solo that impresses though, with its distinct classical tune. The title song, Tu Hai Mera Sunday, takes a pleasant Christmassy turn, with soft jazz making your ears happy. Shalmali renders it with a familiarity that makes you feel amazing. The brass portions have been done really well here, as are the drums. The clarinet and piano is wonderful too. It is nothing more than the lyrics that make it sound even more personal though. Ash King’s Yeh Mera Man is a pleasant departure from his previous song ‘Bandook Meri Laila’ (A Gentleman) and brings him back to his comfort zone. Again, a jazzy tune gives the song a kind of spring, and that whistle portion is so pleasantly surprising and charming, it is hard to dislike. The guitars are impressive here. Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai, a clubbish number sung by Nandini Srikar, is probably the weakest of the album, where the tune and the arrangement are just mismatched; the hookline sounds like this song was pitched for the situation of ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ (Don) before ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ was finalised.
Amartya’s best album to date provides us with a nice mix of classical music, jazz music and a banal club number! This album will go highly underrated and unnoticed though!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album (in order mentioned in the review): 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dhundhlo Tum > Thodi Si Jagah = Tu Hai Mera Sunday > Yeh Mera Man > Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai



♦ Uninteresting Diaries: RANCHI DIARIES Music Review

♪ Music by: Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran
♪ Lyrics by: Nickk, Manoj Muntashir, Tony Kakkar & Sattwik Mohanty
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 13th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Some newcomer Nickk is — he has just been made to make another ‘Baby Doll’, now that Meet Bros. just be refusing to do it. However, Fashion Queen has something in addition to the usual ‘Baby Doll’ sequels — an Arabic strings backdrop that just helps it as much as a car can help you fly. The new singer Raahi seems disillusioned with the ideals that it is okay to sing like Kanika Kapoor if you aren’t her. The composer’s rap is dumb. Helicopter‘s lyricist and composer Tony Kakkar uses the word ‘helicopter’ as a metaphor for ‘getting high’. 😶 Siblings Tony and Neha render it with as much mediocrity as they can muster. I can’t believe Tony is the same guy behind ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D) and ‘Khuda Bhi’ (Ek Paheli Leela), but then he has made ‘Ek Do Teen Chaar’ (Ek Paheli Leela) and ‘Do Peg Maar’ (One Night Stand). Jeet Gannguli’s Thoda Aur is the composer’s usual pathos-filled romantic number — you would think that after a year-long break, he would return with something pleasant. But it is the same old Arijit-Palak love story. And the irony is that this song sounds like ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D). So did Tony help him here instead of making his own song better? 😏 The last song is a banal Mika solo Godfather, composed by Pritam’s former assistants Bobby-Imran, which I couldn’t even finish once when I started to listen to it.
This is a Hodge-podge of the worst songs from the weirdest mix of composers ever.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2 + 1.5 + 3 + 0.5 = 7

Album Percentage: 35%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thoda Aur > Fashion Queen > Helicopter > Godfather



♦ Amaal Ka Kamaal (Again): GOLMAAL AGAIN Music Review

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George, DJ Chetas, Abhishek Arora, Anu Malik & Raamlaxman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar & Rahat Indori
♪ Music Label: T-Series [“Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 6th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 20th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate”: Saavn


The album to the much-awaited fourth instalment to the ‘Golmaal’ series starts with the Title Track, where South film composer Thaman S. is called in just to do that clichéd Kuthu rhythm we are all bored of. Brijesh Shandilya does well as the lead male singer, but Aditi Singh Sharma sounds utterly replaceable. She gets another song, Itna Sannata Kyun Hai, composed by Lijo George and DJ Chetas, where her part towers over her male co-singer Amit Mishra’s parts. The hookline is like a desperate scream in our ears, to make noise. The EDM after the hookline is so bad, I can’t describe it. Amaal Mallik, lead composer, gets two songs, where one is obviously a 90s remake. ‘Neend Churayi Meri’ (Ishq) is the privileged song, named by the company as Maine Tujhko Dekha. The song’s best part is that Neeraj Sridhar returns after a long time to sing a song that is tailor-made for his song. Sukriti Kakar complements him well, but the song is better as an individual song than it is as a remake. Had the hookline been original, it would have been amazing! Amaal’s second song happens to be the album’s best — Hum Nahi Sudhrenge gives those rays of positivity like ‘Apna Har Din’ did in ‘Golmaal 3’. Though the song is similar to Amaal’s other EDM numbers like “Sooraj Dooba Hai”, “Buddhu Sa Mann” and “Zindagi Aa Raha Hoon Main”, it works well because of its positivity and Armaan yet again sings charmingly! What Saregama holds of the album is an unplugged, slow-paced version of ‘Maine Pyaar Kiya’s Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate, sung very simply by Nikhil D’Souza and Anushka Manchanda, and arranged soothingly by Abhishek Arora (of Abhishek-Akshay) and Samyuktha Narendran. It doesn’t work too much though, in spite of not changing much from the old song.
The worst Golmaal album is held up solely by Amaal’s songs (or song).


Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 = 16

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hum Nahi Sudhrenge > Maine Tujhko Dekha = Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate > Itna Sannata Kyun Hai = Golmaal Again (Title Track)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 35 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Golmaal Again) = 37


♦ Nisschal O Nisschal, Aur Compose Karo! : JIA AUR JIA Music Review

♪ Music by: Nisschal Zaveri, Sachin Gupta, Sameer Nichani & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Mudassar Aziz, Raqueeb Alam, Vachaspati Mishra & Hasrat Jaipuri
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company [“Jia O Jia Reprise” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 17th October 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Jia O Jia Reprise”: Saavn


The songs by Sachin Gupta start off the album, and though they do not impress you immediately, you do get attuned to them on hearing them for a couple of times. Na Shukre is a wild rock song about carefree girls, and Smita Malhotra makes a rocking debut with her vocals in this, the rock guitars played wonderfully. Shivani Bhayana’s Naach Basanti, on the other hand, is a bit too rowdy to go with its amazing club arrangements, but apparently by the lyrics, it is supposed to be some sort of an ode to “Sholay”. Many of the small additions by Gupta in this song happen to catch your attention, like the techno sounds at the beginning, and the folksy portion at the end.
The newcomer composer, Nisschal Zaveri, steps in for the rest of the songs (with lyrics) and I must say, he does quite an amazing job in his first album itself. His lullaby-ish, classical-based Na Jaa appears in two versions, one in Asees Kaur’s voice, with a stark resemblance to her singing in ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Dobaara), while the other is in Nandini Srikar’s voice. Obviously, Nandini’s version wins my heart because of her seasoned voice and more classically inclined singing. The Tabla in this song has to be mentioned, as do the strings, guitars and mandolin. The arrangements overpower the voice of Asees in her version, another drawback of that version. Nandini’s version has everything that the music buff longs for in a good song.
Zaveri’s other song, released by Saregama, is a reprise of Shankar-Jaikishan-Mohd. Rafi classic Jia O Jia, and is an apt remake of the song, with an upbeat clubbish sound, one of the freshest remakes I’ve heard this year. The song feels like a splash of water on your face — despite being a remake, Zaveri uses his creativity to make it a bit unconventional, without being bogged down by the thought of what’s popular these days. The synth has been used amazingly, and the backing chorus singing “Jia O” after every hook is just sweet! Jyotica sounds amazing in this song, the least she has sounded like Neha Kakkar ever! But Rashid Ali, being heard after a long time, falls flat due to the excessive programming done to his voice. The Latino turn of sound midway into the song takes time to get used to, but is awesome!
The background score composer for the film, Sameer Nichani, gets one of his instrumental pieces added to the album, and it is called Jia Aur Jia Theme, and is heavy on Spanish guitars, played in a very sensuous way. It is extremely short at one and a half minute, but soothes your senses for all its worth.
A hidden gem of an album, wherein we find a new composer who must get many, many more songs in Bollywood!! Zaveri scores higher than Gupta here.


 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 23.5

Album Percentage: 78.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Na Jaa By Nandini > Jia O Jia Reprise = Na Jaa = Jia Aur Jia Theme > Na Shukre > Naach Basanti

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 37 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Jia Aur Jia) = 38


I hope that wasn’t too long (though I know it was) but this is what I’m going to have to do until I am a bit more free. I personally liked this method of reviewing and don’t mind continuing it forever too! So maybe, just maybe, you might get the “Secret Superstar” and “Rukh” reviews in this format too, but in separate posts and not clubbed together! Lets see! Till then, enjoy music! 😉