BHANSALI’S MUSICAL GRANDEUR!! (PADMAAVAT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sanjay Leela Bhansali
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Siddharth-Garima & Swaroop Khan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st January 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th January 2018

Padmaavat Album Cover

 

Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes


Padmaavat is an upcoming Bollywood period film starring Deepika Padukone, Shahid Kapoor and Ranveer Singh in lead roles, and Aditi Rao Hydari, Jim Sarbh, Raza Murad and Anupriya Goenka in supporting roles. The film is directed by Sanjay Leela Bhansali and produced by himself along with Sudhanshu Vats and Ajit Andhare. So the film has been in the news for the past three months and so, and as happy as I am that it is finally releasing, I can’t stop wondering what Bhansali himself must have gone through during all this. Anyway, on to the music. Bhansali had started off in ‘Khamoshi’ with a composer duo that was quite famous back then — Jatin-Lalit. With his next film though, he started to push debutants, and we got Ismail Darbar and Monty Sharma. However, with “Guzaarish”, he started composing his films’ music himself, and that tradition has carried on to his fourth film after “Guzaarish”. The results were phenomenal everytime he composed for a film himself, and I’m expecting, of course, this one to be no less!!


Before going into the songs, two things I notice immediately are how late the music has released, since music plays such an integral part of Bhansali’s films, and the second thing I notice is corollary to that — it has only six songs, breaking the usual Bhansali tradition of ten songs — it seems this movie hinges more on its script than its music. That being said though, the album is a treat for lovers of music from different regions! Now, let’s see how the songs fared for me.
The minor blemishes in Ghoomar (will get to them) are wisely covered up by an enticing Rajasthani folk chorus and arrangement, which doesn’t make it necessary to delve deeper into the song for any criticism. The starting and end chorus portions let by Swaroop Khan, complemented by the wonderful female chorus — Aditi Paul, Tarannum Mallik, Pratibha Baghel & Kalpana Gandharv, are brilliant and rich in their sound, grand as an SLB song can only be. The blemishes referred to earlier are mainly whenever Shreya goes into ultra-high pitch, as in the antara. Percussions are delightful, with the dhols and khartals stealing the show, and the subtle sarangi and shehnaai too, make their presence felt. The only other song on the album that sounds Rajasthan-based is Holi, a folk song of the Manganiyar and Langa communities. Richa Sharma’s stupendous rendition figures well amidst the Mughal-e-Azam-esque music, with Shail Hada’s wonderful Aalaaps making the Mughal-e-Azam-esque feeling stronger! The tablas and all other percussions too, for that matter, are wonderful here, as is the sitar, and even the wonderful peacock sounds.
The next part of the album sounds wholly and solely Middle-Eastern, in keeping with the Khilji Dynasty sound. Khalibali seems to be a celebratory number in the villain’s lair, where the villain is lovestruck at first sight of you-know-who. And if the film had been produced by Disney, the song would not have been out of place. Not that it is out of place here too, but can’t imagine Khilji dancing to this just as I couldn’t imagine Bajirao dancing to ‘Malhari’ until I saw it. The song itself is quite enjoyable, with an overbearing Balkan touch, and nice Arabic warbling in the backing chorus. Shivam Pathak has a nice time crooning the song, and gets the evilness of Khilji quite perfect. Shail Hada complements him well. I just don’t know why it starts like a song from a movie like “Robot”. The arrangements are great — the Arabic violins, percussions give it an enjoyable touch.
More enjoyable as a Middle-Eastern themed song is Binte Dil by Arijit, breaking the usual Arijit-SLB song stereotype. The warbling by Arijit here is amazing, but gets awkward after a point. The oud and percussions are well done. The song starts promisingly but slows down in the middle portions, where Arijit sounds strained. The compositions of both these Khilji songs are quite ho-hum too, frankly.
The other two songs fit neither in the Rajasthan category nor the Middle-Eastern themed category. That being said, Ek Dil Ek Jaan is a wonderful Sufi romantic number, sung wonderfully by Shivam Pathak, the lucky man who gets to sing for both the male leads. The song is highly propped on his vocals, because otherwise it is a typical SLB Raag yaman number, almost a mix of ‘Laal Ishq’ (Ram-Leela) and ‘Aayat’ (Bajirao Mastani) in equal proportions. The best of the album also features here; Nainowale Ne by Neeti Mohan is a wonderful romantic number, which is heavily inspired by classical music. Neeti’s rendition is one of her most cute yet mature renditions yet. Bhansali increases the song’s richness by adding wonderful musical arrangements like the sitar, santoor, peacocks (again), matka, and the beautiful backing chorus towards the end and in the interlude. The song is way too short, and I wish it were much, much longer!! Siddharth-Garima’s lyrics are beautiful too, with a mix of innocence and sensuousness.

On a concluding note, you might have noticed I wrote almost nothing  about the lyrics in the album — thats because barring Siddharth-Garima’s ‘Nainowale Ne’, the lyrics are nothing but the usual, run-of-the-mill material.


Not as intriguing as Bhansali’s other albums, but definitely has a place of its own, with so much musical richness in the arrangements!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:8.5 + 8.5 + 8 + 8 + 8 + 9.5 = 50.5

Album Percentage: 84.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  Nainowale Ne > Holi = Ghoomar > Khalibali = Ek Dil Ek Jaan = Binte Dil

 

Which is your favourite song from Padmaavat? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

GRAND BUT BLAND!! (BAAHUBALI 2: THE CONCLUSION – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: M.M. Kreem
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th April 2017

Baahubali 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Baahubali 2: The Conclusion is an upcoming Indian epic historical fiction film, starring Prabhas, Anushka Shetty, Rana Daggubati, Sathyaraj, and Tamannaah Bhatia. The film has been directed by S.S. Rajamouli, and produced by Shobu Yarlagadda and Prasad Devineni. The film is being distributed in Hindi by Karan Johar’s Dharma Productions. The film is a sequel to 2015’s super-duper hit ‘Baahubali: The Beginning’. Technically this one is a prequel and (SPOILER ALERT FOR ALL WHO HAVEN’T WATCHED THE FIRST FILM, IF ANY OF YOU EXIST) shows the story of Baahubali himself, as opposed to his son Shiva’s story in the first film. It also gives the answer that all India is awaiting — Why Katappa Killed Baahubali. The makers have even made it into a trend called #WKKB. 😂 Anyway, the music director of the film is the same man who did the first film (of course!), M.M. Kreem. The first album was very situational, but three songs nevertheless stood out, out of seven. This album is smaller in size, with five songs, and I also hope it is better in terms of quality too. What I’m expecting is grand, royal and majestic music. And I’m pretty sure I will get it too. Without further delay, let’s jump right into the album to this much-awaited film of 2017.


1. Jiyo Re Bahubali

Singers ~ Daler Mehndi, Sanjeev Chimmalgi & Ramya Behra

“Gali gali teri lau jali, jiyo re Baahubali,
Praanon se badhke humko hai, tu pyaara,
Sab gaayenge, dohraayenge, abb tera jayjaykara!”

The album starts off aptly with a grand, anthemic title song giving the titular character, Baahubali, a larger-than-life image, projecting him as a Superman. The composition by Kreem is quite similar to his other such songs that were included in the first movie. It flows freely, the only impediment it face being the anthemic “Aisa, woh aisa, jaise parvat avichal sa” chants, that kind of restrict the flow of the song. The female portion has been composed very beautifully, and also the mukhda by Daler Mehndi. The rest is very passable, and forgettable as soon as you finish listening to the song. Kreem uses the strings section from ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ from the first film, a very clever inclusion because that portion was like the definition of the song, and the theme song of the film. That brings us to Kreem’s arrangements, which are, very suitably, full of grand war-based sounds, like the booming percussions and impressive strings. The chorus portions are least effective however, and fail to raise the interest of the listener. Vocals are grand, and Daler Mehndi aces the mukhda and hookline. He has just as much scope in the song as Bombay Jayshri had in ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ and Kailash Kher in ‘Jal Rahi Hain’ (Both songs from the first film, in which these singers had negligible portions compared to the chorus, who took away the most part of the song). Similarly, here, Ramya Behra in her stunning antara, and Sanjeev Chimmalgi in his antara. Again, I reiterate that the chorus portions, though important in keeping with that whole war theme of the movie, sound very mediocre. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics take the grandeur to another level. Only partially impressive in every department except lyrics, in which it is completely impressive!

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Veeron Ke Veer Aa

Singers ~ Aditi Paul & Deepu

“Oh oh re raja, veeron ke veer aa,
Nainon se tu na door hona,
Main toh hoon teri, phir kaisi deri,
Le jaa jahaan tera thikaana,
Haath se ye haath jod lo na,
Hai saath dono ko behna,
Bas teri hai Devasena!”

As soon as the song starts, I got reminded of a construction site, metal clanging against metal, hammers and construction tools at the go. It reminded me a bit of ‘Manohari’ from the first movie. Turns out it isn’t a construction song though, as the lyrics clearly indicate. Anyway, first things first — the composition. M.M. Kreem provides this very weird-sounding composition, which sounds seductive at places (as it is supposed to be), but falls flat in others. The “na na, na na, na na” loop sounds amazing, and the mukhda hooks you, but, as happened in the first song, you will lose your interest in the antara. It just has such a haphazard composition which you can’t keep track of, so you just give up. The bridge line between the antara and hookline though, is cleverly done. The vocals are good, not great. Neeti Mohan would’ve been perfect for the song. I’m still waiting for Aditi Paul to come with another stellar song like ‘Ang Laga De’ (Ram-Leela). That being said, she manages to convey the romance nicely, and does the seductive-Devasena thing properly. Her companion, Deepu, also does well. Kreem’s arrangements barring the construction site sounds are fascinating; a very nice assortment of strings and brass instruments give the song a much-needed grandeur. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are functional for the situation. Good but not great.

Rating: 3/5

 

3. Soja Zara

 Singer ~ Madhushree

“Gopiyon ke peeche, phire tu nisdin, palchhin,
Thhak gaye paanv tere!
Saans zara le le, ruk jaa Kanha, thham ja,
Maan bhi jaa pagle!
Saanvare! Baawre!
Kal bhi hongi ye rang raliyaan,
Kal phir aana oh re chhaliya,
Dooba yeh din, chal so jaa!
Kanha soja zara, oh Kanha soja zara!”

Now this is what I was waiting for from this album. A song with a very charming old-world 90s charm to it, this one is a nice and sweet romantic song, using the example of Radha-Krishna, like so many romantic songs like to do in Indian songs. Kreem’s composition is majestic and magnificent, obviously based in a Carnatic Raaga, and the result is just enticing! The mukhda pulls in the listener right away, wih its lilting and upbeat tune, two qualities we don’t quite get in the same song nowadays! The mellifluous hookline is a respite from the jarring hooklines of many recent songs, and the antara is just fabulous with its sweetness double than that of the mukhda. The composer also decorates the composition with wonderful arrangements — on a catchy beat that almost sounds Caribbean if the Carnatic melody is removed from the song! The flute stands out, as it should if the song is based on Lord Krishna! Guitars too, have been played very enticingly, and you can’t not like them! The duff gives a nice old-fashioned-sounding beat to the song. The flute show in the second interlude is MIND-BLOWING!! Madhushree (after a long time!!) proves herself yet again, and though I was initially wishing Shreya Ghoshal had sung this one after hearing its Telugu version, I’m satisfied with Madhushree’s rendition as well. The backing chorus in this song surpasses any backing chorus I’ve heard this year! Their conclusion to the song from 4:00 onwards in the song, ends the song on a beautiful note. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here are as cute and sweet as those two words can get! MAGNIFICENT!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Jay-Jaykara

Singer ~ Kailash Kher

“Kya kabhi ambar se, surya bichhadta hai?
Kya kabhi bin baati, deepak jalta hai?
Kaisi hai yeh anhonee, har aankh hui nam,
Chhod gaya jo tu, kaise jiyenge hum?
Tu hi kinaara, tu hi sahara, tu jag saara,
Tu hi humaara suraj, tu hi taara,
Jay-Jaykara, Jay-Jaykara,
Swami dena saath humaara!”

Kailash Kher, who had sung two songs in the previous film’s album, out of which I loved none, rather got bored by both, returns in this album to sing yet another melancholic song, something I get really apprehensive of hearing. However, to my pleasant surprise, this song is actually better than all the other melancholic Kailash Kher songs out there. The tedium hits you initially but wears off with the advent of that war-chant-like chorus in the interlude after the mukhda. The composition is soulful, but I wouldn’t exactly call it heart-rending. Again, the humming from ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ is incorporated into this song. From the antara, the song sounds very lively, and not melancholic. Kreem’s arrangements help to make this easier, the booming percussion providing an awesome beat, and the strings infusing grandeur and a majestic quality to the song. Kailash Kher has sung well, in his trademark style, and he has been well supported by the chorus singers, who take it away in that interlude I wrote about above. The lyrics make out to us that it isn’t exactly a sad song, it is rather a plea from the subjects to their king Baahubali. And Manoj Muntashir has written them so well, they actually compel you to focus on them instead of the composition for most of the time! A song with great lyrics, a good composition and supported by amazing arrangements, but lacking in repeat value. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Shivam

“Kya mrityu uss maha samar ki janani hai,
Jiska, varnan, srushti karti,
Kya ambar ki nagari se woh rakhwala aaya,
Jiske paanv choome dharti?”

Another melancholic-sounding song starts, but yet again, the beginning deceives us as it changes course soon enough. This song is like a short background score, an anthem of sorts. There is very less by way of composition, and so, it doesn’t quite stay with you as a listener. The arrangements too, are minimal except for a nice background percussion that gives the song its anthemic quality. The santoor that starts the song is great. The chorus again takes centre stage for most of the song, but the lead vocals are by Kreem’s son, Kaala Bhairava. The lyrics have very little substance, but are very well written. A song made to be heard in the cinema hall.

Rating: 2/5


Baahubali 2 is an album that fits in with its predecessor. The songs do not make much sense or appeal to one without the visuals. The case was similar with the previous album. At least that one had two to three amazing songs to hear as audio songs. Here? Just one. I’m happy at least that one song is outstanding! A soundtrack that sounds grand, but deep down below, is bland!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 3 + 5 + 3.5 + 2 = 16.5

Album Percentage: 66%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Soja Zara > Jay-Jaykara > Veeron Ke Veer Aa = Jiyo Re Bahubali > Shivam

 

Which is your favourite song from Baahubali 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

AMAAL’S ‘NOOR’AANI ALBUM!! (NOOR – Music Review)

Music Album Details

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st April 2017

Noor Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Noor is an upcoming Bollywood drama starring Sonakshi Sinha in the titular role and Purab Kohli, Kanan Gill, Shibani Dandekar in supporting roles. The film, directed by Sunhil Sippy and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Vikram Malhotra, is based on Pakistani author Saba Imtiaz’s novel, ‘Karachi, You’re Killing Me!’ which is the account of a Pakistani journalist and her misadventures in both her profession and her love life. The film takes the setting to Mumbai, of course, or else who knows who would have to incur the wrath of You-Know-Who. Anyway, we are here for the music. So, the music of the film has been given by Amaal Mallik, making it his second ever completely solo album after ‘M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story’. Of course, I expect something fresh and light-hearted in keeping with the movie’s promos and theme. After two good songs in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ earlier this year, it is his second venture this year and hopefully it will get just as amazing a response.


1. Uff Yeh Noor

Singer ~ Armaan Malik, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Aditi Paul, Abin Thomas, Shishir Samant & Akshay Jadhav, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Seedhe seedhe sab chale, par ye tedhi chale,
Afra-tafri ho jahaan, ye bas nahi miley,
Paagalon se zyaada paagal, miley zameen aur maange baadal,
Kahin se jaake zara akal laa,
Uff ye Noor, Wallah!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The first song happens to be an apt title song, a song that enlightens us on what we can expect from the character of Noor in the movie. And it does give us quite a detailed insight on that, as well. Amaal’s composition is not only buttery and light-hearted, forcing you to groove to it, but it is also instantly catchy. A very Amit Trivedi-ish vibe accompanies the composition, and that hookline is one of the cutest stuff I’ve heard in a while. The groove that the song carries with it, is just unmatchable. The composition of the antara is just amazing. What helps the composition big time are the arrangements, trying to lighten the mood even more, what with the amazing brass instruments — the trumpet (Ketan Sodha), the Saxophone (Shyaam) and the trombone (Blasco). These three instruments remind one of another song from the genre, ‘Suno Aisha’ (Aisha) which was by Amit Trivedi. There’s an amazing flute portion (Tejas Vinchurkar) towards the end of the song, that’s very easy to miss, so listen carefully, and there is also another flute/woodwinds portion in one of the interludes, which is amazingly played! Occasional strings and those two dholak beats (Akshay Jadhav) at the beginning of the hookline, are some easily missable additions that Amaal has added into the song. Of course, you can’t talk about this song without talking about the instrument that gives it most of its fresh vibes, which is the guitar (Meghdeep Bose). The vocals by Armaan are amazing, and show his versatility; of course he doesn’t just sing romantic songs! It is probably one of his best performances. He controls our emotions of fun and laughter so well in this song, and also conveys the character of Noor very perfectly, as does lyricist Manoj Muntashir. The lyrics are where the similarities to ‘Suno Aisha’ end officially. In ‘Aisha’, Aisha was placed on a pedestal and how her ego was raised when Amitabh Bhattacharya wrote stuff like “Tum ho kamaal, tum bemisaal, tum lajawaab ho Aisha.” On the other hand, Manoj is doing nothing but hurting Noor’s ego, by saying stuff like “Kahin se jaake nayi shakal laa, and “Aankhon mein gussa bhara hai, chehre pe baarah baja hai“! Jokes apart, Manoj does a great job writing the lyrics! A nice protagonist-oriented song, with innumerable fresh vibes!

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Gulabi 2.0 / Gulabi Redux

Singers ~ Amaal Mallik, Tulsi Kumar & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated & New Composition by ~ Amaal Mallik, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal!!!”

– Kumaar

We are all familiar with probably the most famous Rafi song ever, ‘Gulabi Aankhein’ (The Train), a song that almost everyone, from the kids, to the grandparents in India, know by heart. Why wouldn’t we know it, considering that it has been through so many remakes and recreations and revamps by the likes of Atif Aslam, Raghav Sachar and of course the wonderful performance by Sonu Nigam in London. Well, now, the makers of ‘Noor’ make sure we get yet another version of the song, this time, a club revamp. Well, this song actually un-grew on me. I used to like it (just like) the first time I heard it, but it just slipped away after that; I couldn’t bring myself to love it any more, and whatever I liked also started to seem ordinary. The good thing about this remake is, that it only retains the hook of the old song. However, the tune that works as padding, is a bit weak, except the “haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal” loop. The antara is super-ordinary, something I never expected from Amaal. The numerous interruptions going “gulabi, gulabi“, sound boring after some listens. There is an English female rap though, that is quite entertaining. The arrangements are mostly EDM, which is loud for the most part, but I will still maintain that it is better than all the noisy cacophony we find ourselves tripping to nowadays. Vocals are okay-ish as well, and the two versions differ from each other only in terms of vocals, the first one sung by Amaal, the second by Yash Narvekar. Still, Yash has backing vocals in the first song, and Amaal has backing vocals in the second. 😄😄 The two songs sound pretty much the same. The female singer is Tulsi Kumar, supposedly singing in a newly thick voice she has obtained. I just hope she doesn’t think that voice is good, and I hope she stops using this kind of voice. The additional lyrics by Kumaar are functional considering it is a club song. A cacophonous remake, which I hadn’t expected!

Rating: 3/5 for Gulabi 2.0, 3/5 for Gulabi Redux

 

3. Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai

Singer ~ Sukriti Kakar, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Mohini Gaur, Shishir Samant & Meghdeep Bose, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Yeh sabhi mausam ho rahe apne
Kal talak thhe jo ajnabi
Yeh safar yunhi le chala aage
Piche ab raahein na rahi!
Saari khwahishein,
Dil ki yeh farmaishein,
Tune suni iss tarah,
Koi duaa, jis tarah, sunle Khuda!”

– Kumaar

The next song turns out to be a very light-hearted romantic song, something that we know Amaal is an expert at, especially after ‘Sau Aasmaan’ (Baar Baar Dekho). This song is quite similar to that one in terms of overall feel of the song; a very sprightly and vivacious sound helps you forget your worries for the entire length of the song. The mukhda starts off quite abruptly, but you get used to it. The hookline is the peak of the song, obviously. But it is the antara that really surprised me pleasantly. I’ve never heard an antara starting so calmly and without making any ruckus like “Oh, I’m the antara now, you guys!” In fact, it just merges in so well with the interludes, you feel it is some extra stanza in the interlude, until it is so long that it has to be an antara. The arrangements add to the lightness of the song, the guitar (Ankur Mukherjee) played in this very MJ kind of way, is so oddly placed in such a song, yet so wonderful-sounding. The vocals are nice as well, Sukriti sounds cute in her very energetic rendition. I couldn’t help missing Neeti though, who usually sings such songs. Then I realised it would just sound like ‘Sau Aasmaan’ Part 2, so I started accepting Sukriti’s voice after that. 😂 The way she sings the sargam, in the first interlude is very beautiful. Kudos to Amaal for composing that. The backing vocalists really have a spectacular job, repeating the lines of the hookline after Sukriti. Lyrics are just as happy and boisterous as everything else, and suitable for the theme of the song. An enjoyable romantic song!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Hai Zaroori

Singer ~ Prakriti Kakar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Nasamajh thhe hum, jo yeh bhi na samjhe,
Waqt aane par, sab badalte hain!
Manzilein kya hain, aur raaste kya hain,
Log pal bhar mein, yahaan rabb badalte hain!
Kisi ke vaaste kahaan, kinaare aayi kashtiyaan,
Yeh dooriyan hai bas dooriyan!
Ke chori chori chupke se chupke se rona, hai zaroori,
Ke paani paani ankhiyon ka, ankhiyon ka hona, hai zaroori,
Reh gayi aarzoo ik adhuri,
Ke kabhi kabhi aisa bhi, aisa bhi hona, hai zaroori!”

-Manoj Muntashir

A sombre and pensive melody brings up the rear of the album, and it is a sheer delight to the ears. In spite of the song being pensive and slow-paced, it touches your heart in a way that probably no song has, recently. The song has a very beautiful tune, which makes you feel as if you are flying high in the sky. The composition has a very Western classical touch to it, and the arrangements just support the same feeling. The mukhda itself is so hard-hitting, you can’t help but listen further. And that hookline, that’s what can be charged legally for making people go crazy and making them speechless. The antaras carry forward the serious feel of the song perfectly, and it makes for a great listen overall. That bridge line between the antara and hookline is so heartbreaking! The arrangements as I was saying, are amazing. They ooze out grandeur like a leaking pipe. The live strings are so overwhelming (in a positive way), it transports you to a whole different world. You will feel like you are sitting in an Orchestra Hall in Europe. The slow pace is made up for by the grand arrangements, which make sure nobody has the audacity to dismiss this song by calling it boring. Twinkly sounds, heavenly wind instruments and amazing guitars (Joell Mukherjee) in an interlude, constitute the rest of the arrangements. Amaal’s piano notes are amazing, and he plays them like little treats throughout the larger treat that the song is. Prakriti steals the show, and after ‘Bheegh Loon’ (Khamoshiyan), it is her second song where she gets the opportunity to shine by herself. Her graceful, lilting voice in this song is something that I frankly never expected her to pull off, and she has!! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are a spectacular piece of poetry, and it is after such a long time that I’m hearing a sad song that doesn’t go overboard with its sentimentality. I’m ready to be sad for a day, listening to this song on loop! Amaal surpasses his own ‘Kaun Tujhe’ (M.S. Dhoni) with this one!

Rating: 5/5


Noor is a charming album. With just four tracks, it still has the most variety I’ve seen in recent albums. With not song sounding even close to the next, Amaal provides us with a mixed bag, wherein anything you pick out from it, will be a treat to the ears. Barring one. Of course, everything has some flaws. Here, it is the club song. I’m sure Amaal would’ve been better off producing an original club song than remaking an old song! Anyway, the rest of the songs are a breeze of fresh air, something that has dwindled nowadays, what with music makers following some unnecessary clichés that will make their music hit for a week or so. But this album seems like something that will stay on my playlist for sure. ‘Noor’ means ‘light’, and the songs are so light-hearted, so I call this album Amaal’s Noor-aani album!! Bright and light!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 20

Album Percentage: 80%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hai Zaroori = Uff Yeh Noor > Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai > Gulabi 2.0 = Gulabi Redux

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes in 2017: 09 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Noor) = 10

Which is your favourite song from Noor? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE MOZART OF MADRAS AND THALAIVAR STRIKE BACK! (LINGAA – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by:- A.R. Rahman
♪ Lyrics by:- Gulzar
♪ Music Label:- Eros Music
♪ Music Released On:- 5th December 2014
♪ Movie Releases On:- 26th December 2014

Lingaa Album Cover

Lingaa Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Lingaa is an upcoming dubbed action thriller movie, which has already released this Friday in Tamil and Telugu. The film, directed by K.S. Ravikumar and produced by Rockline Venkatesh, stars Rajinikanth, Anushka Shetty and Sonakshi Sinha in lead roles, with Jagapati Babu in a negative role. The movie, sure to go unnoticed in the north until it plays on TV 😂 has also received mixed reviews in the south. However, the reason I have to review it is surely valid. Here is the reason: Music is by the one and only ‘Mozart of Madras’, A.R. Rahman. This year Rahman has been on a roll, with one album releasing after the other — ‘Highway’, ‘Kochadaiiyaan’ (Tamil, Telugu and Hindi), ‘Lekar Hum Deewana Dil’, ‘Kaaviyathalaivan’ (Tamil), ‘I’ (Tamil; Hindi & Telugu yet to release) and also his non-film album ‘Raunaq’. Not to mention the two Hollywood soundtracks, ‘Million Dollar Arm’ and ‘The Hundred-Foot Journey’!! So it is clear that he has been one busy man this past year, so let’s see whether he could take out enough dedicated time to provide a spectacular soundtrack for the Thalaivar in this album! 🙂


1. Ranga Ranga
Singers ~ S.P. Balasubrahmanyam & Jaspreet Jasz

The Maestro starts off the album with a grand affair — a kind of introduction song for the character of Rajini in the film. And who better to sing it with the required grandeur, than the one and only S.P.B!? With his unique and weighty (on particular words and syllables) voice, he steals the show for himself! The attitude of a boss is clearly reflected through the song, and I guess that’s all that’s needed for a Rajinikanth intro song! Rahman’s arrangements are worth listening and talking on and on about. He has given the song a beautiful feel of a mixture of Spanish, Arabic and a wonderful 70s-80s Bollywood retro touch as well. The brass portions have been carried out well, and the backing vocalists are awesome. I guess the backing chorus is comprised of the same people as the Tamil version, with the replacement of Aaryan Dinesh Kanagaratnam with Jaspreet Jasz. The composition is a catchy one, with many interesting elements, the Spanish guitars being one of the main attractions of the song, giving it that Flamenco touch. Gulzar has evidently tried his best to dub it and also make it sound natural, and it has turned out pretty good, except for the fact that in some places the lyrics aren’t fitting that properly into the rhythm, causing just a teensy-weensy disturbance, but overall turning out to be a good attempt — I mean, I don’t think dubbing is all that easy! A grand opening to the album, with a senior once again proving his talent! Kudos to SPB and double thumbsup for Rahman and Gulzar! #5StarHotelSong!

 

2. Chalke Re
Singers ~ Aditi Paul & Srinivas

A very pleasant strings orchestra welcomes us to the next song, a beautiful romantic duet by Aditi Paul and Srinivas. Aditi, who got her big break in Bollywood through Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s ‘Ram-Leela’, features in her next Hindi song, this time composed by A.R. Rahman! And she still sounds just as melodious. Rahman has composed a splendid song, on the 90s template. The dafli beats act as attention-grabbers and surely make you instantly love the song. Rahman always uses the matka in a very beautiful way and in this sing he has done no less! Throughout the song, he has infused nice orchestral strokes and all on a traditional Indian template. The shehnaai portion is magnificent, also enhanced by the percussion and the sitars. Another thing you must pay close attention to, is the wonderful sargam by the female backing vocalists, and the Jathi or the tabla bols in one of the interludes. Srinivas does seem a bit uneasy to sing in Hindi, but only a little. The composition is overall nothing new; we have heard this type of stuff many times from Rahman, but everytime it comes covered in a new wrapping and still attracts our attention towards itself — that would be the magic of the Maestro. Gulzar’s lyrics sound as if they are not at all dubbed, but the lyrics of an originally Hindi song! Wonderful dubbing done by him! Another appealing romantic song from Rahman, sung wonderfully and with just as splendorous arrangements! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. India Re
Singer ~ Javed Ali

Rahman’s typical grand patriotic introduction kicks off the next song, with a nice choir and impressive percussion as always. Then comes the awesome orchestra and Javed Ali, with his booming yet calming (I have no idea how they go together, but they do, in this person named ‘Javed Ali’! 😂 ) voice starts singing the sweet and patriotic composition. At places he sounds like Rahman himself. Rahman has placed an awesome backing vocal chorus, which really increases the beauty of the song. The second interlude witnesses Rahman give us a majestic orchestral treat. The antara That follows is just as awesome! The entire mood shifts and gives the feeling of determination and commitment, that is to come together as compatriots. The arrangements just keep getting better and better as the song progresses and so does the composition. The hookline is very catchy and full of grandeur, yet sounding sweet at the same time. As I have said before, the backing vocals make it sound even more sweet. Javed’s variations have come out brilliantly. Gulzar has written awesomely patriotic lyrics, and they actually sound great in the tune! Again, it sounds as if it is originally a Hindi song! 😃 This one is an ingenious patriotic composition by Rahman! The arrangements are so magnificent that the cinema-gfoers will be in for a wonderful surprise! #5StarHotelSong!

 

4. Mona Gasolina
Singers ~ Mano & Neeti Mohan

Sometimes the effect of Rahman’s music doesn’t strike you after the very first listen, but it gets stronger and stronger with each time you hear it later. Well, this song here has exactly the same problem (I mean this in a positive way) The first time I heard it, I was like, “Okay, this is something different, ummm… But what exactly is it??” The next time, “Rahman is an expert at bringing something new to the industry!” The third time, which is supposed to be a lucky number, I was literally singing along with the lyrics and grooving to them! Of course, all this happened while hearing the Tamil song, so by the time the Hindi sing released, I was ready to attack! 😂 Anyways, as you must’ve already deduced from my rave about the song, Rahman has tried something new and wacky and crazy and insane and everything you can think of. Just as ‘Mawali Qawwali’ from ‘Lekar Hum Deewana Dil’ was a brilliantly wacky song, this song also steals your breath away after you start liking it. After you start liking it, you won’t stop humming it! Rahman has brought to notice the naughty side of Neeti’s voice, and Mano has sung extremely well, with that rough texture to his voice. The hookline, the Mukhda, the antara, all are wonderfully composed. The arrangements are something else I should rave on and on about. With the opening flute, and some weird noises that follow, the song opens on an utterly crazy note. The pigeon sounds that can be heard throughout the song are just so…. Weird! And awesome! Neeti has an awesome combination of smooth and thunderous voices that she can make with that awesome voice of hers, that instantly appeal to you. The little nasal bit in the antara is just breathtaking! The percussion that Rahman has done is so strong and grand! The guitar portions are also wonderful. Rahman has even used classical Carnatic instruments like thavil in the song! Gulzar’s lyrics, though unintelligible at some places due to Mano’s pronunciation, are just as wacky as the song. So now, before I reveal all the secrets of what this song has in store for you, go hear it!! This song finds itself at the peak of insanity! And also the peak of cathciness and innovativeness! In my opinion, the best song of the album! Another #5StarHotelSong!!!

 

5. Din Dooba Hai
Singer ~ Haricharan

A melancholic orchestra triggers the next song, a sad song rendered soulfully by Haricharan, a very talented young singer of the South. Of course, the composition is also very soulful, and appeals to you, but only to a certain extent. After the first antara ends, and you find that there is another one to come, you would actually get very bored for the rest of the song. Haricharan has sung the song very nicely, with lots of feel and expression, but since the song is so monotonous and dull, the required effect doesn’t really come. He sounds a bit like Mohd Irfan at places, with his smooth and clear voice. In fact, I have a doubt that Irfan himself has sung the song. Rahman’s arrangements are again, very beautiful and he has tried to enhance the composition, at which he only succeeds to some extent. Gulzar has dubbed the lyrics amazingly, and the lyrics do give some reason to hear the song, other than the nice vocals and arrangements. Due to the length, it turns out to be boring and tedious!


Lingaa is another soundtrack in which Rahman proves yet again that he is the one and only Rahman. This time, without doing too much of experimentation, he succeeds to win over the listeners’ hearts. With the exception of one song, all of the songs have the power to control your brain and male you repeatedly press that repeat button. Though being a dubbed soundtrack, it still sounds original, thanks to the amazing work by Gulzar. All the songs have been recorded and arranged beautifully, leaving no scope for criticism in that aspect. I would say — Another addition to the hit record of Thalaivar and Mozart of Madras!! 

 

Final Rating for This Album:- सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note:- The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

 

Which is your favourite song from Lingaa? Please vote for it below! 🙂

 

Next “dish”:- Mumbai Delhi Mumbai, Chefs:- Sawan Dutta & Rohan Rohan