MULTICOMPOSERS KI KHATTI-MEETHI BARFI!! (BAREILLY KI BARFI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Tanishk-Vayu, Samira Koppikar & Sameer Uddin
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Pravesh Mallick, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Tanishk-Vayu, Puneet Sharma & Akshay Verma
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 11th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th August 2017

Bareilly Ki Barfi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bareilly Ki Barfi is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, starring Kriti Sanon, Ayushmann Khurrana, and Rajkummar Rao in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Nil Battey Sannata’ fame Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari, and produced by Nitesh Tiwari and Shreyas Jain. The movie revolves around the Mishra family, who are in search for a suitable groom for their daughter, played by Sanon. The complexities and pressure of getting married is too much for Bitti, Sanon’s character, and she decides to run away. On the run, she finds a book, ‘Bareilly Ki Barfi’ at the train station, and picks it up, only to realise that the female protagonist thinks a lot like her! Thus she embarks on a quest to look for this someone who thinks so much like her. The story seems very content-driven, but that’s not to stop it from having some good music; in fact, most content-driven films have better music than others! Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari’s first film, ‘Nil Battey Sannata’, had an awesome album completely composed by a newcomer duo, Rohan-Vinayak. This time, the makers go for the multicomposer route. Tanishk Bagchi, Tanishk-Vayu, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar and Sameer Uddin are composing the music for this film. As I am expecting an overall good album, and since every name is a known name (even Sameer Uddin, who is the one who had done those remixes in ‘Bluffmaster’ long ago) I don’t think I need to say what I expect from each of them individually! So let’s help ourselves to this ‘Barfi’!


1. Sweety Tera Drama

Singers ~ Dev Negi, Pawni Pandey & Shraddha Pandit, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, Rap Written and Performed by ~ Pravesh Mallick

An aptly U.P. flavoured start to the album, the first song is a fun and upbeat dance number, along the lines of ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’s title song. Coincidentally, the man behind it is Tanishk, the composer of that song. The composition is very fun and enjoyable, and the composer has kept it relevantly short; such songs are least enjoyable if they ramble on for four minutes and longer. The shortness gives it a crisp feel, and leaves you wanting more. There is one mukhda and one antara, both composed entertainingly. The arrangements too resemble those of ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ title song, with the dholaks (Naveen Sharma), harmoniums and bulbultarang (Pradip Pandit) and quirky digital beats. The star music is amazing, especially that sarangi bit by Sangeet, that is so easy to miss! Tanishk adds very fun sound effects like that rap by Pravesh Mallick, then a random but funny “Myujik” that just plays anytime. His digital instrumentation is fun as well. The song has been sung by three singers and the rapper. The rapper, as stated before, brings out the U.P. flavour very well, and begins on a promising note. Dev Negi is his usual fun self, while Pawni and Shraddha, the two female vocalists, with two lines each, make a difference even with the little scope! Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics are fun too! A fun dance number that strives to be simple but sweet!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Nazm Nazm / Nazm Nazm (feat. Ayushmann Khurrana) / Nazm Nazm (feat. Sumedha Karmahe)

Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee / Ayushmann Khurrana / Sumedha Karmahe, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Arko steps forth to present his song, and as is the requisite whenever Arko composes for a multicomposer album nowadays, he gets to do the romantic song of the album. Well, since he is so good at making these, it seems logical. This song here, is yet another example of his romantic song composing skills. The composition is charming, but there is one small drawback, and that is that it takes a long time to grow. It consists of many twists and turns, and isn’t instantly hooking like most of his other songs. The second antara is particularly beautiful. The hookline manages to get the audience charmed. The lyrics though, are beautiful, and are another instance of how beautiful Arko himself writes!! The song appears in three versions, though, and one does feel that it is one too many. Arko doesn’t sing this song as well as he sang ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Dobaara), ‘Dariya’ (Baar Baar Dekho) or ‘Saathi Rey’ (Kapoor & Sons), and thus, his version comes across as slightly boring. The arrangements in this version also resemble ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ (Rustom) with those extra sugary Duff rhythms and synthesizer tune (Keys by Aditya Dev). It reduces the likability a bit. Ayushmann increases the ear-friendliness of the song with his trademark charming voice, and renders it with ease. His style of rounding the vowels makes the song sound so much like he has composed it himself. The variations he takes on many notes, which Arko had not, makes the song sound more layered. The arrangements too, get more Ayushmann-ish, with acoustic guitars (Krishna Pradhan), but the Arko-ness is retained with the amazing piano notes. Thankfully, the Duff rhythms are done away with. The last version happens to be a female version; a version I personally feel was least required. So Zee Music releases videos of singers singing covers of hit songs, and I almost know that this version will be used as that. Not to take it away from Sumedha though; she sings beautifully! Arko arranges this one with a soothing flute, but nothing else really stands out! A romantic song that features so many times, we have no choice but to love it!

Rating: 4/5 for Arko’s Version, 4.5/5 for Ayushmann’s Version, 3.5/5 for Sumedha’s Version

 

3. Twist Kamariya

Singers ~ Harshdeep Kaur, Yasser Desai, Tanishk Bagchi & Altamash, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

The next song has Tanishk coming back together with his partner with which he debuted, Vayu. They keep coming back together occasionally, and it is quite fun. Though their last song ‘Beat It Bijuriya’ could’ve been better, this one is a real treat. The composition is very simple, and if it were not for the amazingly quirky beats and arrangements, the song would not have sounded half as good. Of course, a very templated dhol rhythm accompanies the song, but a very quirky digital sound also comes along with that and everything sounds so innovative. The interlude is amazing, with the dhols and shehnaai. Rock guitars are really electrifying in the antara. The hookline, the way it is sung, is so cool. The pause between ‘Twist’ and ‘Kamariya’ really makes the difference. Im probably hearing Harshdeep Kaur in this zany avatar for the first time. I mean, she has sung upbeat numbers, but not so crazily funny! Tanishk-Vayu’s lyrics are a clever mix of Bhojpuri and Hindi and English. A song that calls for loud whistles and cheers in the theatre! U.P. folk meets techno music!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Bairaagi / Bairaagi (Samira Koppikar Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Samira Koppikar, Music by ~ Samira Koppikar,  Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

Samira Koppikar, who really pleasantly surprised me with her song in ‘Dobaara’ earlier this year, jumps onto the album next, with a melancholic song that is sung by –obviously — Arijit! The song is good, I can’t take that away from it. But somewhere the composition evokes so many memories of previous Arijit songs that were composed on the same rock lounge-ish template. It actually sounds like a Pritam song when that beautiful backing chorus comes in, and that’s probably the best effect of the song. The composition too, is beautiful, and hits the heart straight. I just don’t think I would listen to it a lot. The vocals are, obviously spot-on. What can be expected when it is Arijit? Fortunately, there’s another version, possibly for the music lovers. Samira sings this one, and it starts with a heavenly chorus by her. She sings in beautifully, and is first of all supported by a wonderfully soothing folksy string instrument, evoking memories of ‘Sahiba’ (Phillauri). Later that Punjabi feel is increased, when a nice dholak-led rhythm sets in. This version is definitely better than Arijit’s. The lyrics by Puneet Sharma are aptly romantic and melancholic at the same time. The word ‘bairaag‘ is a word I don’t think I’ve heard in a Bollywood song after ‘Laal Ishq’ (Ram-Leela)! Beautiful song, but might not stay with me for long.

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4/5 for Samira’s Version

 

5. Badass Babua

Singers ~ Abhishek Nailwal, Neha Bhasin & Sameer Uddin, Music by ~ Sameer Uddin, Lyrics by ~ Akshay Verma

A relatively newer addition to the album (as the composer Sameer Uddin wasn’t credited in the trailer or first poster of the film), this one is a funky “gangsta” song, probably made for Rajkummar’s character in the movie. The U.P. vagabond and rowdy feel is brought out with entertaining lyrics rendered with spunk by Abhishek Nailwal and the composer himself. The gangster feels are brought out by the rap, the techno beats and the overbearing sinister tone. The composition is catchy, but again, not a very lasting tune. The arrangements are more of what the song might be remembered for, if at all. The vocals are fine, and obviously the male singers have done an amazing job, or else, it wouldn’t have sounded so much like a gangster song full of attitude. Neha Bhasin is sidelined unfortunately, and reminds me of Ambili’s portions in ‘Hum Hain Bank Chor’ (Bank Chor). Entertaining, but not everlasting.

Rating: 3/5


Bareilly Ki Barfi is a relatively good multicomposer album. I think these days, the quality of multicomposer albums is definitely increasing, because makers now know the formula for it. You obviously need two upbeat numbers to increase the album’s hit status, and of course, a romantic song, a sad song (preferably by Arijit) and then a couple of versions. Zee seems to have mastered the formula, and they produce another album like ‘Behen Hogi Teri’, which is a mix of styles from different composers, yet comes together as a united album. With a mixed variety of songs, these multiple composers have come up with a nice, khatti-meethi Barfi!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 3 = 31

Album Percentage: 76.25%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Nazm Nazm (Ayushmann Khurrana) > Twist Kamariya = Sweety Tera Drama = Nazm Nazm = Bairaagi (Samira Koppikar) > Bairaagi = Nazm Nazm (Sumedha Karmahe) > Badass Babua

 

Which is your favourite song from Bareilly Ki Barfi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MUBARAKAN! A FLOP ALBUM HAS BEEN BORN! (MUBARAKAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Hassan Jahangir, Amaal Mallik, Rishi Rich, Yash Anand & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Badshah & Hassan Jahangir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th July 2017

Mubarakan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mubarakan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy of errors starring Arjun Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor, Anil Kapoor, Ileana D’Cruz, Athiya Shetty and Ratna Pathak Shah in the lead roles. The film is directed by the only director in Bollywood who still insists on doing comedies with a cast larger than a herd of cows, Anees Bazmee and produced by Ashwin Varde, Murad Khetani and Balwinder Singh Janjua. The film’s plot consists of such never-before-tried aspects like — double roles, a love quadrangle, a huge Punjabi family and Punjabi dance numbers. It is going to redefine Bollywood, I’m sure of it. 😏 If you didn’t get that sarcasm, moving on. The music is by T-Series, and that means multiple composers. Thankfully, one name out of the three composers, is a relief, it being the name of Amaal Mallik, the young composer proving his mettle out there. He gets two, upbeat dance tracks, so I hope those are catchy! The next two composers are Gourov-Roshin, returning after treating us to a small break from their remakes, and sadly they have three songs, and Rishi Rich with Yash Anand, who have composed the title song of the film. Let’s just get this over with, eh?


1. The Goggle Song

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam, Armaan Malik, Neeti Mohan, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A wedding song to start the album, this one is an enjoyable tune from Amaal. Not the best he can do for sure, but it still makes you groove to the beat. The beat itself is infectious, with the composer adding quirky sound effects making it sound better. The ensemble of singers does really well for a wedding song, and for once, Tulsi sounds better than Neeti. The lyrics are mediocre, but hilarious at times. A good wedding track, but not very innovative.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Mubarakan (Title Track)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Juggy D, Sukriti Kakar & Badshah, Music by ~ Rishi Rich & Yash Anand, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Badshah, Yamma Yamma Credits: Music by ~ R.D. Burman

“This is the Rishi Rich beat.” The song starts with this obvious statement, and an unexpected incorporation of some portions ‘Yamma Yamma’ (Shaan). The actual composition falls flat, but it is saved by R.D. Burman’s old song, which plays throughout, and its addition was quite creative. Vocals are horrible. Lyrics are horrible. Rap is horrible. Arrangements are not so horrible. (Mostly, it is the awesome oud from the old song). In short, a horrible song, but for the arrangements and the old song’s portions.
P.S. I wouldn’t call this a Remake as such.
Rating: 2.5/5 (0.5 bonus for using that old song wisely)

 

3. Jatt Jaguar

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Navraj Hans & Apeksha Dandekar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another typical Punjabi song, the Punjabi flavour accentuated even more by a mediocre composition that barely manages to grasp your attention, except at the hook. Even Vishal doesn’t sound as energetic as always, but Navraj does. Lyrics are typical. Arrangements are typical, but there are traces Amaal’s digital quirks. At many places the tune seems like some old song I can’t recall! 😥 Not the best Amaal can do.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Haathon Mein Thhe Haath

Singers ~ Papon, Altamash Faridi, Aditi Singh Sharma & Arpita Mukherjee, Backing Vocals by ~ Rinku Giri, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A typical Pakistani pop-esque song follows, and it immediately strikes me as Papon’s worst song after a long, long time. The composition is staid and clichéd, his vocals do not help at all. Aditi sounds over stylish as usual. Those typical digital beats add to the melancholia. Backing vocalists add to the staleness, especially the Sufi one. Lyrics are something you won’t even notice. A song that clearly doesn’t know where it belongs.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Hawa Hawa

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Prakriti Kakar, Original Composition by ~ Hassan Jahangir, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The hit Pakistani pop song remade, with a typppppical kuthu beat and rhythm! Mika singing increases the headache, and the new composition is just unbearable. The hookline is good, but the other parts fall flat. The female vocals by Prakriti sound good though. Lyrics belong to a Sajid-Wajid soundtrack. Why????
Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

Singers ~ Rinku Giri & Puja Basnet, Original Composition Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another Punjabi folksy song ends the album, this time a mélange of two Punjabi folk songs, ‘Kala Doriya’ and ‘Baari Barsi’. The composition doesn’t hook you at all; in fact it sounds like ‘Jatt Jaguar Part 2’. The new singer Rinku Giri is the typical Punjabi male singer affair, he sounds like Diljit Dosanjh. Arrangements are “louder louder”. Lyrics are typical. A song that relies on folk songs to propel it, but fails.
Rating: 2/5


Mubarakan is yet another feather in Bollywood’s cap of Punjabi albums. All of the songs are very staid, heard-before ones, that don’t really help generate any interest. Amaal does okayish in one song, but showcases his quirk in the other. The others perform subpar, with the exception of Rishi Rich, who has made quite a catchy song. But even with its catchiness I couldn’t rate it higher than 2.5. So, for anyone counting, Mubarakan! Another flop album has been born! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 51.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: The Goggle Song > Mubarakan = Jatt Jaguar = Haathon Mein Thhe Haath = Hawa Hawa > Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 20

 

Which is your favourite song from Mubarakan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A BREACH IN THE RAABTA!! (RAABTA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: JAM8, Meet Bros., Sohrabuddin & J-Star
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Kumaar, Jitendra Raghuvanshi, J-Star & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 3rd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Raabta Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raabta is an upcoming Bollywood romantic reincarnation drama, starring Kriti Sanon, Sushant Singh Rajput, Jim Sarbh, Varun Sharma and Rajkummar Rao. The film is the directorial debut of already many times successful producer, Dinesh Vijan. The film is produced by him along with Homi Adajania, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s official gist is this: “When a human being dies, they lose 21 grams from the body. This, they say, is the weight of the soul. The journey of a soul transcends over space and time… beyond the realms of this earth. This film tells the story of two seemingly ordinary individuals, going about their lives until their paths cross and they realize that they belong with one another. Unaware of a connection that was forged several hundred years ago, Shiv and Saira are inexplicably drawn to each other, and it takes them on a hysterical rollercoaster of love, intrigue, entertainment and life (twice over!). When two souls unite, they become one.” 😴 Hopefully, it is executed well. The music of the film is by JAM8, and a guest composition by Meet Bros. also features on the album. I guess we all know the controver(sies) surrounding the music of the film, due to that one guest song, so there is no point reiterating them. We all know who the actual composer of the songs credited to JAM8 is, but he wishes that his name shouldn’t be associated with ‘Raabta’ because of his policy to only compose for solo-composer albums, so there’s no point in naming him. I just hope the music company learns its lessons and reconsiders it’s actions!! On this grave (😄) note, let’s start with the music review of ‘Raabta’. 


1. Ik Vaari Aa / Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hai pyaar toh kayi dafaa kiya,
Tujhse nahi kiya toh kya kiya,
Tera mera yeh vaasta,
Hai iss zindagi ki daastaan,
Ya phir koi hamaara pehle se raabta?
Toh ikk Vaari aa, aa bhi jaa!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The album starts off with a very happy-go-lucky, romantic club number, with a lilting yet groovy sound. The composition has the stamp of Pritam all over it, and the way it flows is in the trademark way that almost all Pritam songs flow. The song’s melody starts off right with the hook, which is a wonderfully composed piece, that efficiently works in pulling you into the song. The antara following it, too, is very happy-sounding and charming, but it is the last stanza, which I call the ‘conclusion’ because it just doesn’t seem like an antara, is what steals the thunder. That part has been composed in a very entrancing manner, and is a major throwback to the corresponding ‘conclusion’ part in Pritam’s ‘Tu Chahiye’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The high-pitched bridge line that leads to the hookline, is just amazing. The arrangements are quite similar to Pritam’s previous club song arrangements, with the upbeat EDM portions, and that wonderful “chipmunk” that we heard in ‘The Breakup Song’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) last year. There is a Sajid-Wajid touch in the arrangements somewhere (‘Mukhtasar’ from ‘Teri Meri Kahaani’ and ‘Raat Bhar’ from ‘Heropanti’). But on a whole, the EDM has a very international touch to it, and it sounds like JAM8 is trying to recreate Pritam’s club arrangements in an international style. But because I always something out-of-this-world in a Pritam club song, and since this song is by his company, this song was quite underwhelming in that department. The pumped-up portions of the arrangements sometimes clash with Arijit’s super-high-pitch, and that sounds quite odd at times. That brings us to Arijit’s vocals. Definitely not the best he’s performed, but he still manages to carry the song in a quite charismatic way, and doesn’t drive you to sleep like he did in ‘Half Girlfriend’. But of course, the parts where he goes super-high-pitch, made me uncomfortable, and that doesn’t happen with every other singer. In the second version of the song which takes a sans EDM route, and is more reliant on guitars to propel it, everything that sounded wrong in the arrangements is set right. A slight rock guitar backdrop makes the song lighter than it was in the original version, and definitely more enjoyable. The company also replaces the fun chipmunk-like EDM with a nice vocal chorus, which gives off ‘Tum Mile’ vibes somehow,and immediatel removes all Sajid-Wajid vibes. As for the vocals, they have improved due to Jubin’s smooth treatment of the composition, taking care not to sound like he is straining his voice too much, and handling the high notes much better than Arijit did. And the small nuance he takes while singing “yaara” and all of its rhyming words, is just magnificent! In the conclusion stanza, Jubin gets to sing an entirely differently-tuned line that fits in perfectly and sounds as good as its counterpart in the original version. Oh, and it is a welcome change, considering that we have been hearing the original for over a month now. So this reprise is really one of the best reprises to have come out, ever! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are great, and suitable for a fun romantic number. I don’t know what I missed in the first version, but something is surely missing. To cover it up though, the Reprise takes a nice romantic twist!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4.5/5 for Jubin’s Version

 

2. Raabta (Title Track)

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Arijit Singh, Original Composition by ~ Pritam, Music Recreated by ~ JAM8, Original Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya, New Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Hadd se zyaada mohabbat hoti hai jo,
Kehte hain ke ibaadat hoti hai woh,
Kusoor hai, ya koi yeh fitoor hai,
Kyun lage sab kuch andhera hai,
Bas yehi noor hai,
Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”

– Irshad Kamil

The recreation craze continues as ‘Raabta’ (Agent Vinod) is recreated in this movie, which takes its name from that song. But how fortunate are we, that the man who made the original song, is the one who is remaking it (through his company, that is). The track, originally a romantic number, and probably the first time Arijit Singh actually came into large notice, though he had sung other songs before that, has now been remade into a dance track for the film. But this dance track is as far from a regular Bollywoodish dance track as you can imagine. It has a very quite and soothing vibe to it, and a very unexpected twist in the form of a nice interruption wherein JAM8 introduces to Bollywood, a new genre of music called ‘Tropical House’, which sounds like some techno Caribbean music. Anyway, the new composition that the group has made for the remake, is great. The mukhda, sung by newbie (in Bollywood) Nikhita Gandhi, is charming and scintillating, with its romantic vibes really reaching you. The way they have joined it to the hookline of the original song too, is quite cool. The time the song goes downhill is when, after the nice and refreshing Tropical interlude, Arijit comes back to reprise his portion, the antara from the original song, a part I felt didn’t quite merge with this song. Yes, I know that if the hookline adapted well into this song, every other part should too, but I just didn’t feel the antara this time. When it went back to the new composition, I started grooving to the beats again. So it was like a sudden disconnection from the song. But then, JAM8 makes up for it in the fantabulous (which is a very small word to describe it!) ‘conclusion’ part of the song, which has a lilting and entrancing tune. Especially the oddly-but-fantastically placed line, “Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”, is a wonderful bridge from the ‘Conclusion’ to the hookline. And the continuous EDM beats, really infuse life into the song. The composers also add wonderful piano notes occasionally, and the guitars that start off the song are so vibrant! So I guess I have already spoken about the arrangements as much as I could. Moving on to the vocals, Nikhita Gandhi, another singer from the Rahman camp of singers, joins Pritam’s camp for this one (quite similar a story to that of the other well known ‘Gandhi’ singer, Jonita — not sisters!) And she totally owns her debut. Yes, Arijit gets the major part in the song, but because she opens it so smashingly, the listeners get hooked and keep waiting for her voice to return. Sadly, it comes back only for the hooklines. Arijit is his usual self, trying to be charming , succeeding and also acing that aforementioned ‘conclusion’ portion. Irshad Kamil writes the new lyrics for this song, wrapping Amitabh Bhattacharya’s already awesome lyrics with an awesomeness of his own. A song that takes itself miles away from its original, neither better nor worse, but just at par, in a different genre. Barring the copy-paste antara, the song is quite good.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Sadda Move

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh, Pardeep Singh Sran & Raftaar, Additional Vocals ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Bhangra ke rhythm mein, tuney Bharatnatyam kyun milaaya?
Mere mehboob, dekho sadda move!”

– Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya

In the next song, JAM8 cuts out the whole international feel that was looming over the album all this time, to replace it with a street hip-hop number in Punjabi style. And I must say, how disappointed I was, hearing this song. The composer takes a very weird route with this song. There isn’t much by way of composition, but whatever is, sounds like very often recycled Punjabi lines used innumerable times. Like the antaras. And the mukhda just starts off so abruptly, it takes time to adjust to it. Actually, a rap starts the song, and it is quite obnoxious. Raftaar. That “Sadda Move Move” line by Raftaar is so irritating. The hookline of the song, too, isn’t too impressive. Arrangements are what lift the song up for me. That flute loop that plays every now and then is just insane — a glimpse of the trademark Pritam-ish insanity that JAM8 has so far, cruelly kept out of this album. The digital beats are quite groovy, but they don’t really provide anything new and innovative, which is what I would like to hear when I listen to a Punjabi street hip-hop number. The tumbi and “burrrhhhaaaa“s are the typical Punjabi people clichés, thrust into the song just to stereotype Punjabi music. But I must say, the dhols are quite engaging. The vocals are above average — Diljit sounds good but not excellent; probably the composition is barring me from liking his rendition too. On the other hand, his co-singer, Pradeep Singh Sran, who made it big in Bollywood with his song ‘Cutiepie’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), brings back his Labh Janjua-ish voice and steals the listeners’ hearts. Raftaar is strictly annoying, and his rap is least enjoyable. Overall the song has a strong Meet Bros-ish vibe. Legends Amitabh Bhattacharya & Irshad Kamil come together to write something that Kumaar or Shabbir Ahmed would’ve written by themselves, if they had been approached. Quite stereotypical, and ‘enjoyable’ would be an exaggeration. A clear dip in the level of the album. 

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Altamash Faridi & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Tere nishaan, yaadon mein hai,
Tu kyun nahin, taqdeer mein?
Naadaan dil, hai dhoondhta,
Qurbat teri tasveer mein.
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Dekhe khudaya, do aashiqaan diyaan tabaahiyaan
Ve badi lambiyaan si judaiyaan!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After three relatively happy-sounding songs, it was necessary, I guess, for the composers to bring in a touch of pathos in the album. So they bring a sad song sung by Arijit, which I feel is loosely modelled on Pritam’s ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), because of the slight Sufi touch to it. The composition, I have to say, is something that disappointed me highly. I just couldn’t find anything great in it. The song is trying so hard to be emotional, but manages to ve not even one bit emotional! And that almost never happens with Pritam songs. The first two stanzas are composed on the same tune, and that is a major drawback, because it is what makes the song sound very, very monotonous. The very first line of the song made me think, “What?” because the music that starts off the song is very promising! After that it becomes a crying fest, something so overdramatic I wouldn’t have expected it to be a song from a big banner films as ‘Raabta’. The hookline is so unidimensional, it hardly managed to touch my heart as an emotional song should. The composition ends with another “conclusion” stanza, and this time, that stanza is clearly trying to emulate the “conclusion” of ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) with its composition, arrangements and Arijit’s singing style. The arrangements of the song are also very heard-before, and stale arrangements. The Dholak rhythm has gotten so old and typical, I wish no composer uses it in sad songs anymore! The music that starts the song though, the violin one, is very good! And that is what made me believe the rest of the song too, would follow suit. Arijit sings this one with utmost lack of expression, almost like a robot. It seems he spent all his energy in ‘Ik Vaari Aa’. The Faridi brothers pitch in for a good but again, clichéd, Sufi interlude, that only makes the song sound more artificial. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are good, but not amazing. A sad song that makes me sad that it had to be in this film.

Rating: 2/5

 

5. Main Tera Boyfriend

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Neha Kakkar & Meet Bros., Original Composition by ~ J-Star & Sohrabuddin, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Na Na Na Na!

– J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi

Guest composers, Meet Bros, step into the album now, for their remake of the popular track of J-Star’s, ‘Na Na Na Na’. Now there’s a huge controversy regarding who stole the song from whom and blah blah blah. But besides all that, I think the whole nation is raving about the song and how catchy it is. The original was definitely one of the catchiest pop songs of that year and even now, and Meet Bros try to keep its catchiness intact. They have built a typical Bollywoodish composition around it, which sounds least like a Meet Bros. composition, and more like a Pritam one. How coincidental because JAM8’s ‘Sadda Movie’s sounded like a Meet Bros song. The Mukhda starts the song off on a very nice tune, and expectations rise right away. It is the antara that could’ve been better, and repeating each Antara twice was not needed; it just made the song that much longer. The hook… Do I need to speak about it! 😀 The arrangements too, are very similar to Pritam’s, complete with the chipmunk noises here too. The club sounds are great as well, and make the song enjoyable at all points. The vocals are energetic, with Arijit replenishing all his drained energy, and giving a very spunky rendition of the song. Is it just me, or does anyone else also think he sounds amazing in upbeat numbers as well!? Neha cannot match up to her co-singer’s level and performs a bit disappointingly this time. Meet Bros. also come and sing an interlude that would have sounded better had it stayed out of the album. 😥 And after that, there’s a lady’s voice that says “I Wanna be your boyfriend.” 😮 Kumaar’s lyrics are the usual type of lyrics that go into such songs. A song that I didn’t expect much from, since it was a remake, turns out to be quite foot-tapping!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Darasal

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Inkaar mein jo chhupa hai woh ikraar ho!”

– Irshad Kamil

Finally, to finish off the album, JAM8 bring an Atif Aslam romantic melody, something that is quite quintessential in recent T-Series albums. As soon as the song started, it reminded me of ‘Jeena Jeena’ (Badlapur) because of the similar pattern of the guitar piece. The composition is actually very sweet, and it is also slow-paced like ‘Jeena Jeena’, and would suit well for a waltzy arrangement too. But JAM8 choose to keep things minimal and grace the song with nothing more than a nice and sweet guitar riff, and occasional amazing strings. The tune, though slow-paced, grows on you instantly. It is instantly likeable, unlike all the other JAM8 songs in the album, which I took some time to get accustomed to (Except the Jubin ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). I loved the way how they repeated the last line of every antara twice, and the last line of the song thrice. The antara itself is very calm and soothing, and gives a very breezy feel to the song. In the Mukhda, the line where he repeats the words twice, is just outstanding! (“Teri Ada, Ada Pe Marta…” etc.) This is actually what is expected from an ideal romantic comedy. Sadly, it comes in at the end of this album! 😪 Atif’s vocals are some of the best I’ve heard from him in quite a while; he sings the song with a totally different charm than he sung his other songs of late. It draws the picture of the typical boy-next-door image in Bollywood rom-coms. Kamil’s lyrics are just beautiful! Some of them are just salute-worthy, like the one I’ve featured up there at the beginning of this song’s review. Finally, a cute romantic song that befits the film’s romantic aspects. 

Rating: 4.5/5


Raabta is an album I wouldn’t have expected (read, I would have expected much more) from a romantic film like this. Most of the songs are prohibited to be the usual fun-and-frolic that we associate with Pritam, for no specific reason. In fact, the dance song from guests Meet Bros is better than the dance song from JAM8 itself. JAM8 sticks to a very conventional route, save the title track, and only manages to deliver well in two songs in that conventional barrier (‘Darasal’ and ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). But I can’t take away from the album that, as an entire album, it is full of variety and sounds good. It is just lacking on the innovative quotient, and likeability quotient, and hence, the repeat value. ‘Raabta’ means ‘connection’, but there is a slight breach in this Raabta!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 + 3 + 2+ 3.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darasal = Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version) > Raabta (Title Track) > Ik Vaari Aa = Main Tera Boyfriend > Sadda Move > Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 = 17

 

Which is your favourite song from Raabta? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

PURAANA ZAMAANA NAYA HO GAYA!! (BEGUM JAAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Anu Malik
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir & Rahat Indori
♪ Music Label: Junglee Music / Times Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 14th April 2017

Begum Jaan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To hear “Murshida” on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy “Murshida” on iTunes CLICK HERE


Begum Jaan is an upcoming Bollywood period film, starring Vidya Balan, Ila Arun, Gauhar Khan, Pallavi Sharda, Mishti Chakraborty, Raviza Chauhan, Priyanka Setia, Flora Saini, Ridheema Tiwary, Poonam Rajput, Gracy Goswami, Pitobash Tripathy, Ashish Vodyarthi, Chunky Pandey and Naseeruddin Shah. The film has been directed by National-Award-Winnig Director Srijit Mukherji, and produced by Mahesh Bhatt, Vishesh Bhatt and Play Entertainment. The film is the official Bollywood remake of Srijit’s Bengali film, ‘Rajkahini’. The film, set in 1947, is about a brothel, and how the Radcliffe line that decided the borders of India and Pakistan during Independence, passes right through the middle of it. The struggle of the ladies at the brothel, and their fight for their home, os what constitutes the story. The concept seems great, and with great actors, it is sure to get amazing response. The music of the film has been composed by Anu Malik, and it is a perfect choice; he would be able to do the music of the era better than most of the younger composers. Anu himself says he hasn’t heard the music of the Bengali original film, so as not to be influenced by it, and I haven’t heard it either, so as not to compare. Anu Malik has composed five songs for the movie, with one of them having two versions, making it a total of six tracks. So let’s see how the album turns out!


1. Prem Mein Tohre / Prem Mein Tohre (Reprise)

Singers ~ Asha Bhosle / Kavita Seth, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

“Parde mein tohre, Chori chori chori chori, jiya jaaye na,
Parde mein tohre, chori chori chori chori, mita jaaye na,
Aata hai chhupke tu mere dar par,
Ghayal dil aur dhadkan banjar,
Ghayal dil aur dhadkan banjar!
Haldi mali jo ghaanv pe tohre, har zakhm mera hara ho gaya,
Yeh kya ho gaya?”

– Kausar Munir

Of course, this song was the one about which rumours were pouring in right from the day Anu Malik must have recorded it. And why? The answer is simple — none other than living legend Asha Bhosle had sung it. So headlines like “ASHA BHOSLE, LIVING LEGEND, GIVES VOICE TO VIDYA BALAN”, or “ANU MALIK AND ASHA BHOSLE COMBO BACK TOGETHER” popped up at me many a time. Yes, the song has been sung by Asha Bhosle, who was last heard in a forgettable (and already forgotten) song from ’31st October’. This song, however, has no chance to be forgotten. The composition is a serene, classical composition, which just touches your heart right away. Yes, it might take time to grow for some, because it is quite slow-paced, and, being a classical song, it has quite a paucity of aalaaps and murkis, but then, you can’t expect all classical songs to be replicas of each other, can you? So the tune that Anu Malik finally presents to us is amazing, though it has got some barriers in some places, like I said before, the slow pace. The composer makes up for this with the wonderful classical arrangements, which make a breeze of fresh air blow against your (ears???) face. The tanpura paves the way for something marvellous right in the beginning, and surely, a wonderful oud takes over, and booming, grand percussions join after some time, accompanied by the innocent sound of the paayals. One highlight in the arrangements is the wonderful second interlude, which features a RAVISHING sitar instrumental piece which just steals your breath! And the antara that follows is a musical masterpiece; something that only the old composers of Bollywood are capable of doing. That stanza has a wonderful tune, a wonderful strings background, and then, when the tabla finally joins the song (quite late, but still worth it!) you feel utterly satisfied with the song! The paayal jingle at the end of the song signifies a beautiful end to it. The song has two version, both of which have the same arrangements but differ in the vocals. One is by Asha Bhosle, while the other is by Kavita Seth. (By the way, I didn’t see any headlines saying “KAVITA SETH SINGS A SONG FOR ‘BEGUM JAAN'” before the album released.) Asha Bhosle’s version sounds more like a romantic song, with her very sweet voice, which is quite intact, as it was even twenty years ago, considering her age! When I first heard her version when it released I thought she hadn’t done some of the aalaaps properly, but then I heard Kavita’s version and automatically started liking Asha’s. Kavita sings the song more impactfully, demolishing any traces of it being a romantic song — she has sung a bit too loudly, and she misses even more aalaps and sings in a very plain and straightforward tone. It sounded weird at first, but it is passable. Kausar Munir’s lyrics are good but could have been better, more layered. A wonderful classical romantic song to start the album off.

Rating: 4/5 for the Original Version, 3/5 for the Reprise Version

 

2. Aazaadiyan

Singers ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Sonu Nigam, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

“Reh gayi rassi pe chunari,
Reh gayi khoonti pe kurti,
Reh gayi woh laaj kahaan?
Reh gaya gumbad mein Allah,
Reh gaya furqat mein Rabba,
Reh gaya woh Ram kahaan?
Hain hari se woh kahaan, hain galeeche woh kahaan?
Pehle chaman woh bataao kahaan?
Hind pe tha naaz jinko, hain woh kahaan?”

– Kausar Munir

A pathos-filled, heart-rending melody is what follows the semiclassical romantic song. This song describes the pain and suffering of the people, who had to migrate to the other side of the border, after the partition of India. And very graphically, Anu Malik has brought that pain right into his composition. Right from the moment it starts, till the moment it ends, the song has a composition that will make it hard for you not to flinch in pain, just by hearing it. The mukhda is wonderful, and the “aah nikli hai yahaan” verse is very pleasant-sounding, but it has been written cleverly, sarcastically. Clearly, the distress that the people felt on leaving their homes was paramount. The antara is what makes the song as heart-rending as ever; it has strings of melancholic notes that hit right at the heart. The way each line sounds different from the other is amazing. It reminds you of Anu Malik’s ‘Border’ and ‘Refugee’ days. The only drawback I can think of about the song is its duration — over six and a half minutes long. (Almost all of the songs of ‘Border’ and ‘Refugee’ too, were that long! 😄) But it is kind of repetitive to be listening to for so long. Anyway, since the composition is good, I’m cool with it. The arrangements are very impressive. The beautiful use of the shehnaai throughout the song leaves you amazed. Furthermore, the second antara has a wonderful Sufi rhythm to it, and the percussion throughout the song is just ravishing. The nagadas at the beginning are really great in giving you the feel that something epic is going to follow. The twinkly (xylophone??) sounds that the song abounds in, are pleasures to the ears. Anu Malik has outdone himself wih the use of strings and percussion in the song. The two singers make this song enrapturing. Rahat’s rustic voice sets the atmosphere for a pathos-filled song, while Sonu Nigam accompanies him with an aptly moving rendition — his parts reminded me a lot of ‘Sandese Aate Hain’ (Border). Finally, it is time to talk about Kausar Munir’s colossally great lyrics. I must not spoil it for you; so please listen to them very carefully! This song won’t be noticed by too many people, at least not in this era dominated by raps and club songs, but whoever does notice it, would definitely love it!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. O Re Kaharo

Singers ~ Kalpana Patowary & Altamash Faridi, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

“O re kaharon, Doli utaaro, pal bhar ko thehro toh zara,
Dil se lagaake, bas ikk dafaa ve, dene do gudiyon ko dua,
Teri bindiya nikharke, choodiyan bikharke, chunari mein chehke,
Tera kajra ho kaara, gajra ho pyaara, angana tera mehke.”

– Kausar Munir

Another poignant melody makes its way into the soundtrack, and this time it is a bidaai song, but of course, metaphorically. More about that later. The composition is a sinister and melancholic melody that effectively transfers its sadness to the listener. Anu Malik has composed this one with all his heart and soul, and again, it reminds me of some 90s song which probably Jaspinder Narula would’ve sung for him. The “teri bindiya nikharke…” verse is amazing, and very soulful. The title of the song comes as a bridge between two verses, or an ending to a verse, instead of using it as a hookline. The antara too has been composed very soulfully, and it instantly hooks you, especially the “soja soja gudiya soja” part. The arrangements infuse even more grandeur, in a very earthy way, into the song. The star of the arrangements is hands-down, the flute, which Anu has interspersed in between the poignant melody. The percussion is booming and very thought-provoking, and whatever is the intention of having it so booming and powerful, that intention has been served; the song is as impactful as it can get. I can just imagine what an impact it’ll have in the theatre. Again, Anu makes wonderful use of the paayals, and the strings, especially that wonderful crescendo of the strings in the beginning of the song, which really reminded me of Rahman’s ‘Rangeela’ songs. Kalpana Patowary, who is known as the Bhojpuri queen, has done such a song for the first time in her life, I guess! And she aces it! This avatar of hers is way better than all those weird songs she has sung before in Bollywood, and she handles all the nuances so expertly, that it is something to wonder why no composer has tried it out before. A big thanks to Malik for doing it. Altamash has a single line that plays multiple times, and it is like an interlude, not making much difference to the grand performance that Kalpana has already stolen away. Kausar Munir’s lyrics are literally bidaai lyrics, but there’s definitely a deeper meaning that could only be discerned after the film releases. I even have a theory, but let’s not hypothesize here. And I’m sure, wherever this song fits into the film, that scene would be enhanced manifold. Anu Malik concludes the song with a grand symphonic strings and flutes and percussion intersection. An extremely captivating composition, that amazes with its sinister sound.

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Holi Khelein

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Anmol Malik, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

“Mor pankhudi udi udi,
Natkhat bansi baji baji,
Gagan giri, gopi saji,
Vrindavan ki gali gali,
Kanha ke rang khili khili, kanha ke rang khili khili,
Holi, holi, holi, khelein brij ki har bala, brij ki baaalaaa!”

– Kausar Munir

The moment this song starts, you know that it is a playful song, and after all that serious romance and pathos that filled the previous songs, you are nothing but ready for it! And what a pleasant surprise you get when you find that it is a purely classical Holi song (as if that wasn’t discernible from the title, but then… Whatever.) Anu Malik composed this song very intrinsically, every note resounding in your ears after it plays. The overall sound of the song itself, is so delightful, and it just goes to tell you, that Anu has gone a long way after he did that ‘Do Me A Favour Let’s Play Holi’ (Waqt) song that is oh-so-infamous among Indians. Yes, it has an old-world-charm to it, but happens to please you very much, with its happy-go-lucky tune. Every line sounds different from the preceding one, and again, just as in ‘Aazaadiyan’, that’s what makes the composition so special. The antara is even better in terms of composition, where things calm down, and it is extremely soothing. The arrangements make the song sound even more exquisite. The percussion throughout the song gives a very grand feel to the celebratory song, and folk instruments like the nagadas, bansuri, rabaab, tablas, and dholaks. The rhythm is a very traditional Holi rhythm, being played in so many Holi songs, but it doesn’t bore you due to the more modern way it has been arranged. The vocals are great, but Anmol’s amateurish parts seem like an interruption into Shreya Ghoshal’s professional-sounding parts. Shreya sounds as ravishing as ever, and as always, hits the high notes beautifully. She sang the “holi holi holi yeh kyaaaa ho gaya” so beautifully, no wonder she is called the Nightingale. Anmol doesn’t sound hideous, but still serves as a kind of unwanted interruption. At the end wonderful kathak bols make up a beautiful conclusion. Kausar’s lyrics are very sweet, and the Krishna connection she has made makes the song even more beautiful to hear. A treat for classical music lovers!

Rating: 5/5

 

♪ Bonus Song

5. Murshida

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Rahat Indori

“Pehli shart judaai hai, Ishq bada harjaai hai
Dil pe kisne dastak di, Tum ho ya tanhaai hai
Tujhe bhoole baithe thhe, Phir se teri yaad aayi hai
Dil pe kisne dastak di, Tum ho ya tanhaai hai?”

– Rahat Indori

So this song just only released today, as a bonus track. It is a beautiful, breezy Sufi melody, and has a very charming touch to it. Anu Malik’s composition barely sounds like an Anu Malik composition, it sounded more to me like something composed by a Salim-Sulaiman, or a Pritam. The reason will be clear to you after you hear its mukhda. The same charm that accompanies the songs of the two aforementioned composers, is present in this song. Until of course, Anu Malik takes the unconventional route and switches track to an amazing Sufi detour, which is probably the most welcome detour of the world. The antaras are amazing, but a bit ordinary as compared to the rest of the song. One line in the antara gets all sinister and dark, reminding one of Vishal Bhardwaj. But then the mukhda, with its beautiful notes, returns. The rhythm in the mukhda, where the guitars are played so soothingly, in a play-stop-play-stop manner, is so infectious, you just nod your head along to that rhythm. The other arrangements too, are very impressive, especially that majestic sarangi that starts off the song. In the Sufi detour that makes up the hookline, amazing tablas play, and that guitar keeps rocking. Arijit sings in his trademark charming voice, and changes from a feathery whisper of a voice to a blooming voice very easily. His effortless rendition really etches a place for itself in your heart. This song has been penned by Rahat Indori, the Lyricist who has worked with Anu Malik so many times in his peak time in the 90s, and the latest in ‘Gali Gali Chor Hai’ (2012). He has written such a poetic song, as he always has done in the past, and I just became so happy on hearing the lyrics. A perfect song to close the album!

Rating: 4.5/5


Begum Jaan is like a throwback to the songs of yore. Barring the new bonus track, the album has evident shades of nostalgic melodies that remind one of the old Bollywood songs, and Anu Malik does a great job in recreating the 1947-ish era with his music. The album is full of poignant melodies that are high on the musical quotient, if not high on repeat value (for some). All I can say is, puraana zamaana naya ho gaya, yeh kya ho gaya! 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 4.5 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 = 26

Album Percentage: 86.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Re Kaharo = Holi Khelein > Aazaadiyan = Murshida > Prem Mein Tohre > Prem Mein Tohre (Reprise)

 

Which is your favourite song from Begum Jaan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

WAJAH REMAKES HAIN!! (WAJAH TUM HO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Abhijit Vaghani, Kalyanji-Anandji, Meet Bros., R.D. Burman, Gourov-Roshin & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Rajendra Krishan, Kumaar, Anand Bakshi & Dev Kohli
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 5th November 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 16th December 2016

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Wajah Tum Ho Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Wajah Tum Ho is an upcoming Bollywood crime thriller, starring Sana Khan, Gurmeet Choudhary, Rajniesh Duggal and Sharman Joshi in lead roles. The film is directed by Vishal Pandya and produced by Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Those two names are enough to tell us that it’s a T-Series production, and that we may expect some good songs, and some remakes. Sure enough, three out of the four songs on the album are remakes of old songs. Only Mithoon composes an original song, in three versions, while Abhijit Vaghani, Meet Bros, and Gourov-Roshin recreate old songs, Abhijit’s appearing in two versions. Abhijit is debuting as a composer in Bollywood, having been on the programming panel before, and going by his pop single, a remake of ‘Pyaar Manga Hai’ that released earlier this year, the sing might be good enough. The Meet Brothers are back after long as a duo, and I’m expecting a lot from their remake as well. Gourov-Roshin are just done giving me a shock with their atrocious techno music in ‘Force 2’, and they had remade a song there too, so I don’t expect much from this remake of theirs. Without further ado, let’s see how good the remakes, and Mithoon’s original song, is!


1. Wajah Tum Ho / Wajah Tum Ho (Male) / Wajah Tum Ho (Lounge)
Singers ~ Altamash Faridi & Tulsi Kumar / Altamash Faridi / Altamash Faridi, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Bikhre bikhre se thhey hum pehle, abb sawarne lage
Tumhare galiyon se rozana jo hum guzarne lage!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon starts off this ambitious album, that has set out to remake many classics, but he starts off the album on an original note — just in case the remakes, are safely protected deep inside the album by a five-minute long buffer period that consists of Mithoon’s song, which happens to be the title song of the movie. The song is a new, interesting take on this title. The title is actually taken from the song ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ (Hate Story 3) from Vishal Pandya’s last film. While that song, composed by newcomer (and already-goner) Baman, was composed on typical Bhattish lines, this one has a nice old-world-charm mixed with the omnipresent Mithoon touch. The composition is more of a soft and soothing one, in contrast to the sensual and intense one of that song. Of course there’s no reason to compare, so I should just stop. Back to this song, the mukhda brings it to a nice beginning, but it is in the hookline where it receives its shocks and jerks, and starts slowing down. Repetition of the song’s title so many times in a seemingly ultra-slow pace, isn’t your everyday idea of a soothing romantic song. The antara gets better because of more high notes, which kind of lessen the laziness in the composition. The song is included in three versions in the album — One being a duet between Altamash Faridi and Tulsi Kumar, while the other two are solely sung by Altamash. The duet version works because of the male and female voices, and I must admit, Tulsi sounds good in the song, if not great. Just like Amaal Mallik does, Mithoon has used her voice nicely here. Altamash sounds a bit sleepy in places but the high notes in the antaras let us know that he is very much awake. In the male version, though, it gets tedious to hear the song in a complete male voice. The lounge version is a different case altogether. Though it has been sung by Altamash solo, the arrangements in the lounge version are BEAUTIFULLLL! While Mithoon graces the other two versions with the same arrangements consisting of soothing and breezy acoustic guitars (Kalyan Baruah), he has something more mystical and magical in store for you in the lounge version. Of course, a nice lounge touch has been added to the song, and many things happen all of a sudden, which suddenly transforms that lazy composition into one sounding utterly beautiful! The arrangements consist of some beautiful guitar work (Joell Mukherji), while the flutes (Madhu Mukherjee) are brilliant. Nice percussions with the drums make the song sound complete. The sarod (also by Madhu Mukherjee) and tablas are what give the song more of a lounge touch, though! It is this version that finally brings out the beauty of the composition and makes it succeed. Sadly, I don’t think it will be promoted much! 😦 About the lyrics, I would rather say that they are very sappy and icky, instead of praising them by saying they’re nice romantic lyrics. 😛 Manoj Muntashir writes words like “Kahan pe tu ho shuru, kahan main khatam, pata na chale“. I’m like, “Are you a blob of clay? Are you mud? Are you sand? Or are you the European and Asian parts of Russia? Please tell me so I can solve that problem for you so that you don’t have to sing it in songs!” The lyrics are rather a nice get-to-know-yourself course. A middling start to the album, but the lounge version of this track is surely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Dil Ke Paas / Dil Ke Paas (Unplugged)
Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neuman Pinto / Armaan Malik, Tulsi Kumar & Shamita Bhatkar, Composition by ~ Kalyanji-Anandji, Music Recreated by ~ Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by ~ Rajendra Krishan

“(Male) Kal tujhko dekha tha, Maine apne aangan mein
Jaise keh rahi thi tum, Mujhe baandh lo bandhan mein

(Female) Ye kaisa rishta hain, Ye kaise sapne hain
Begaane hokar bhi, Kyon lagte apne hain
Main soch mein rehti hoon, Dar dar ke kehti hoon”

– Rajendra Krishan

Aah! Here are the “awaited” (by T-Series to release and torture us with) remakes, finally! Reading the name of the song, you won’t know that this song is a remake of “Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas” (Blackmail) because T-Series has cunningly named it in such a manner that you’ll never guess it. The music producer/arranger Abhijit Vaghani, who has earlier composed in Bollywood for ‘Chaarfutiya Chhokare’ with his partner Sameer, gets to remake this evergreen Kishore Kumar classic. Well, he hasn’t really composed anything new in the song, and Kalyanji-Anandji’s original composition has been kept intact (What a relief, that at least that has been done!) This song also comes in two versions, one that has the never-too-popular Arijit rendering it, and another tagged as “Unplugged”, which has his close successor, Armaan Malik singing it. They both are accompanied by the T-Series behnaa, Tulsi Kumar. The first version of the song really has everything going against it, in terms of the vocals, what with Arijit sounding like a terrible robot, while Tulsi gets her voice tripled and quadrupled. The original recorded voices will never reach us; we get the adulterated version of their voices, and the result is quite revolting! At least Tulsi sounds better than usual in her tripled voice, but Arijit sounds horrendous with his robotic voice, that is way too thin for it too be actually believed to be his. Neuman Pinto has a rap portion in the middle of this version, and it is just disgusting how such a rap can be shoved into a classic song like this! As if that wasn’t enough, Abhijit tries to make the song sound more sensuous (and fails too) by slowing the pace down by some kilometers per second. 😦 Armaan, in his version, gives us the pleasure of listening to a good, unadulterated rendition of the timeless classic, which we sadly couldn’t hear in Arijit’s voice. Thankfully, Armaan’s version is enough to make up for it, at least in terms of vocals. While in the first version, Arijit and Tulsi took turns singing one line each or something, this song is mostly Armaan’s, and Tulsi only sings the second antara, quite blandly, at that. Shamita Bhatkar’s backing vocals provide a good harmony to accompany Armaan, and it sounds good more so because the overdone harmonizations with the voices in Arijit’s version just failed to make a mark. The arrangements are better in the second version too, but they become quite boring after a while. At least real instruments like the guitar (Nyzel D’Lima) and violin (Manas Kumar) are brilliant here. The first version however, is overdone with techno sounds, and that kills the original old song. Rajendra Krishan’s lyrics from the original song have also been retained, thankfully. Except when Tulsi sings and they have to change the gender of the sentence, which was originally from the male point of view. (Like changing leta to leti). More of a revival, rather than a remake, but all that this so-called “revival” could do, is to make us return to the original classic!

 

3. Dil Mein Chhupa Loonga
Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Tulsi Kumar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Aise na mujhe tum dekho, seene se laga lunga
Tumko main chura lunga tumse, dil mein chupa loonga”

– Anand Bakshi

The Meet Brothers step into the album, hopefully in order to save it.. I mean, I really expect a lot from them after their work after their split with Anjjan. So this song happens to be a remake of R.D. Burman’s immensely popular ‘Aise Na Mujhe Tum Dekho’ (Darling Darling), and just hearing that this song has been remade, made me excited! But I must say, what I got wasn’t exactly what I was expecting. Of course, the hookline is amazing, what with more sensuality infused into its tune by slowing down its pace, but the padding is quite disappointing. The mukhda starts the song off on a faltering note, which gets stabilised only when the hookline arrives. The antara too sounds very generic and seems like an attempt to redo the ‘Aaj Phir’ (Hate Story 2) and ‘Tumhe Apna Banane Ka’ (Hate Story 3), which just seems more accentuated because of that slow-paced guitar-and-tabla arrangement that all three of these songs have. Anyway, the arrangements are good and suitable for the theme of the song. The acoustic guitars (Pawan Rasaily) sound nice and soothing, while those very typical tablas (in these songs) give it a more earthy touch, along with certain Arabic-sounding elements. The digital beats too, sound very typical. On the vocals front, ws have Armaan and Tulsi again, and Armaan sounds awesome as always, again reminding one of his rendition of ‘Tumhe Apna’ (Hate Story 3). The way he sings the hookline, he’s sure to get even more female followers. Tulsi, on the other hand, sounds atrocious trying to sound different. Meet Bros’ experimentation to make her sound more “you-know-what” fail when she starts sounding like Manjulika. Plus, that double-voice-overlapping thing doesn’t work with even Shreya Ghoshal, (remember ‘Mashallah’ from ‘Ek Tha Tiger’?) so how did the composers think it would work Tulsi? Lastly, the lyrics. Kumaar’s new lyrics suit the theme of the song, but aren’t really innovative; all the Bollywood clichés repeat themselves yet again. A revamp that could’ve been great, but ends up being mediocre.

 

4. Maahi Ve
Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Backing Vocals ~ Amit Gupta, Original Composition by ~ Anand Raaj Anand, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Dev Kohli, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Judke bhi tooti rahi ishqe di dor ve,
Kisko sunaaye jaake toote dil ka shor ve”

– Kumaar

The last song on the album is also a remake, but happens to be a remake of a relatively newer song, ‘Maahi Ve’ (Kaante). People are still coping with the craze of the old song, and T-Series decides to remake it even before the old song’s magic wears away. Anyway, that’s none of our business. The song has been recreated by composer duo Gourov-Roshin, the same duo who remade ‘Kaate Nahin Kat Te’ in ‘Force 2’ and Punjabi Folk song ‘Nachna Aaonda Nahin’ in ‘Tum Bin 2’. Both of those songs, they didn’t quite get it right, what with excessive techno sounds and loud noises overpowering he melodies. This time, not only is Anand Raaj Anand’s original tune sounding great in the hookline, but the padding hat the duo provides in the form of the mukhda and antaras, also sounds nice. It has been composed nicely, perfect for the lounge song theme and NOT excessively and unnecessarily sensual-sounding. It actually sounds like a sad song, like the old song did. I myself cannot believe that I liked the remake. Maybe it is because I didn’t really love the old song too much either.. though I did like it. The arrangements by the duo are cool, especially the minimalistic techno sounds in the hookline. There is not much more to hear in terms of arrangements, but the whole sound of the song is lounge-ish. The interludes are good, having some kind of Arabic music playing in both of them. Neha Kakkar, Gourov-Roshin’s regular Singer, renders this one perfectly. Who could be a better replacement for Richa Sharma than Neha Kakkar? (Well maybe Sonu Kakkar could, but “assi ki kariye!?”) Amit Gupta’s robotic voice might sound irritating at first, but you learn to ignore that as the song progresses. Kumaar’s new lyrics, thankfully, are not cheap, but they take forward the a!bience of he song nicely in connection with Dev Kohli’s original words. A surprisingly good remake!! #5StarHotelSong!!


Wajah Tum Ho doesn’t really cater to my likes. An album full of remakes of great classics, out of which two remakes do not live up to the standards of the original. One original song, which fails because of a certain female singer, but excels in one of its three versions. Not a very enticing summary of an album, is it? But will T-Series understand? No. They’ll always be adamant on ruining old songs to add into their films; so be it. The album reeks of stale compositions and/or boring arrangements. One song, by Gourov-Roshin, a duo that has only disappointed up till this song, stands out as a good one, though it will be forgotten in no time. All in all, it is an album depending on the remakes to propel it forward. 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Maahi Ve > Wajah Tum Ho (Lounge Version) > Wajah Tum Ho (Male) > Dil Mein Chhupa Loonga > Dil Ke Paas (Unplugged) > Wajah Tum Ho (Duet) > Dil Ke Paas

 

Which is your favourite song from Wajah Tum Ho? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Dangal, Chef: Pritam Chakraborty 

 

‘Dangal’ will be the last review of 2016!! 😀 I’m so excited! Stay tuned for a fun 2016 end-of-the-year wrap-up! 😉

LET HAPPY RUN AWAY, BECAUSE SOHAIL IS BACK!! (HAPPY BHAG JAYEGI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sohail Sen
♪ Lyrics by: Mudassar Aziz & Dee MC
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 28th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th August 2016

Happy Bhag Jayegi Album Cover

Happy Bhag Jayegi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Happy Bhag Jayegi is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com starring Diana Penty, Abhay Deol, Ali Fazal, Jimmy Sheirgill and Momal Sheikh in key roles. The film has been directed by ‘Dulha Mil Gaya’ director Mudassar Aziz, and produced by Aanand L. Rai and Krishika Lulla. The story revolves around a runaway bride… Sound familiar? Oh, then maybe you were alive when ‘Dolly Ki Doli’ released.. Something that the makers of this film must’ve thought happened ages ago! 😂 Anyway, what I’m concerned with, is the music of the movie, and when it is a very promising composer like Sohail Sen helming the music album, there should be no doubt that the album would be good. His last complete album was ‘Gunday’, as long as two and a half years ago. He also composed a song for ‘Housefull 3’ earlier this year, which became a fleeting hit. But this time, I’m sure he’ll come up with memorable songs, just like he did in his earlier solo albums like ‘What’s Your Raashee?’, ‘Mere Brother Ki Dulhan’ and ‘Gunday’. There are five songs in the album, and hoping that all five are great, here starts the music review for ‘Happy Bhag Jayegi’!


1. Happy Oye
Singers ~ Harshdeep Kaur & Shahid Mallya

Sohail Sen kicks off the album with a pacy song that suits the ‘runaway bride’ theme only too well. Pacy shehnaai-like electronic sounds start the song off on a fast note, after which Harshdeep, the lead singer starts off with a just as quick and fast mukhda. Sohail Sen’s composition, as I said, is suitably pacy, and thrilling, and talking if runaway brides, I can’t help but notice how similar the entire sound of the song is to the title song of ‘Dolly Ki Doli’. The concept of having a female singer narrate Happy’s story is quite innovative; usually it is a male singer! In spite of the very, very small similarity, the tune really works on you. It gets your ready for an energetic song, something that hasn’t been heard for quite a time in Bollywood. The Punjabi feel in the composition is mind blowing. Sohail has done it with the smallest intricacies right in place. Especially the hookline is really impressive. It is just magical, how the fast-paced composition works so well. A undertone of sadness and grimness persists throughout the song, and though the song sounds all female gangster-type at a glance, deep inside it sounds very emotional. (Sing it with half the tempo and see!) That undertone also does magic, but it isn’t really noticeable full-fledgedly, until the antara, which is like one of those 90s Punjabi songs that used to slow down for the antara to become emotional. That antara is just so beautiful. Arrangements are out-of-the-world. Though it seems to be nothing but a mess of electronic sounds and dhols, it is really much more. The starting electronic shehnaai-like piece keeps repeating throughout the song, and it binds together the various parts of the song. The dhols provide the necessary energy and dynamo to the song, while Sohail uses various standby attractions for the interspersed musical pieces. One of them has an unexpected dubstep piece, which actually follows a wonderful aalap by Shahid Mallya, with a Punjabi rhythm. The same interlude later impresses with a wonderful Irish-sounding bagpipe piece. See how Sohail crams everything into one interlude, and makes it sound gorgeous? The second interlude is also great, with a wonderful Spanish guitar piece backed by more EDM. All in all, Sohail’s arrangements are something only a genius could do! The vocals are interesting as well as impressive. Harshdeep on such a pacy track, is a first, and she graces the mukhda and antara with her energetic vocals only too well, while Shahid takes up the second antara, but doesn’t spread as much magic with his short appearance! Mudassar Aziz, the director, has written good lyrics revolving around the character of Happy, with a strong Punjabi influence. This is one of those title songs, that don’t really sound like the title song, but make a special place in your mind! A pacy track which starts off the album on a very high note! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Gabru Ready To Mingle Hai
Singers ~ Mika Singh, Neeti Mohan, Tarannum Malik & Danish Sabri, English Rap Lyrics by ~ Dee MC

The next song starts off on just as groovy and catchy a note as the title song. A dholak rhythm instantly places a Punjabi wedding scene into your mind, until Sohail cranks up the noise level, with a very energetic dhol, something that always makes you groove (unless doene atrociously!) Sohail’s composition is not too innovative and follows the usual Punjabi wedding song template, but is nevertheless catchy and likeable. The Punjabi flavour remains intact here too, and since it is done in a tasteful manner, it appeals. The mukhda has a cool ring to it, and that line “Bada killer tera style hai…” Which leads up to the hookline, is a winner. The first antara is nothing but a female rap, which sometimes sounds irritating, and other times sounds catchy. The second antara is a proper one, with an actual tune, and it is quite good as well. There is of course, another rap after the first antara, in the interlude. The tune of the Punjabi traditional wedding song that Sohail has composed to open the song, is the same tune as the hookline, and barring the tune of the hookline, I feel that everything else has been composed really well. The rap, had it been done a bit less, would’ve worked, instead of this overdone rap. Arrangements are quite energetic and just make you dance. (Thankfully you don’t have to lift your TAANG, like in Sohail’s last song — you know which!) The arrangement consists of mostly a very heavy and deep-sounding dhol, which is just awesome! The beats are awesome as well. The rap in the second antara has good beats as well, making it sound clubbish. Everywhere else, the DHOL is the highlight of the song. The vocals are good and give you a reason to repeat-listen the song. It is one of those songs where Mika hasn’t sounded like a dog, and clearly voices all the syllables (thankfully!) Sohail repeats his singer duo from ‘Taang Uthake’ (Housefull 3), and places Neeti as the lead female singer, while Tarannum Malik supports her in some raps. The “Don’t follow me like that..” rap is better than the interlude one, and both the ladies kill it in that rap. The other one is quite dull. Danish Sabri is nowhere in the picture, and seems to be involved in merely backing vocals. Mudassar Aziz’s lyrics are good again, and have everything required for a good Punjabi dance track. At the same time, Dee MC’s English raps are kind of weak, but thanks to the singers, they sound better! A song that could’ve been much better, but enjoyable even as it is!!

 

3. Aashiq Tera
Singer ~ Altamash Faridi

And Sohail finally gets back to his romantic side! With this song, he makes me dismiss all my doubts whether he would ever get back to romantic songs, and if he does, would he be as good as before — ‘Isq Risk’ (Mere Brother Ki Dulhan), ‘Jiya’ (Gunday) being my favourite songs by him! So, this song comes and restores my faith in him (this is just plain drama, and you should ignore me 😂) Anyway, the song is something that has a heavenly touch to it, and a very pure and innocent romance in it. The composition is beautiful, again heavenly, with nothing that could sound wrong. Every single note falls right into place. The high notes are so, so, so, so BEAUTIFUL! The mukhda is unmatchable, whereas the hookline is something with which the goosebumps are going to have a full five-minute party with (which is the longest party they’ve ever had!) The way Sohail repeats the “tera tera tera..” in the hookline, is just too mind blowing. The antara has a wonderful start, but then it sprouts into a wonderful Qawwali, which then takes the high notes route to get to the hookline successfully, and quite intriguingly. The way Sohail intermingles the slightly Baul sound of the hookline with a Qawwali sound, is too interesting. The arrangements are bliss, with harmoniums being its highlight. Other ‘roadside’ attractions include awesome tablas, dholaks, chimtas — mostly a Qawwali-esque treatment. There is a wonderful rabaab solo in the second interlude. Towards the end, just before the hookline, there is about a five second pause, until the hookline bursts out with the wings given by an electrifying rock guitar. That is one of the un-missable parts of the song. Altamash’s vocals strongly carry the entire song in a folksy and sophisticated, not to mention confident, manner, and he aces the song, especially the high notes that are so good! Mudassar’s lyics are pretty clichéd, but work nonetheless, because of the wonderful composition and arrangements. And of course vocals. Sohail sen back at romantic songs, and such a pure and inncoent romance, that it is an unbelievable detour from the everyday bollywood romantic songs! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Zara Si Dosti
Singer ~ Arijit Singh

Sohail brings next, another romantic song, this time in a very typical Bollywood romance zone, that you will be shocked how he made a very different romantic song and a very conventional one in the same album. When you hear the song, you will get what I mean. The composition that Sohail gives us here, sticks to the mainstream romantic songs so well, that I was pleasantly surprised. I was also taken aback at hearing a very stereotypically Jeet Gannguli-ish composition from Sohail. And I’m not complaining. Just as Jeet many a time impresses me with his typical songs, Sohail has impressed me BECAUSE he gave such a song! Even if this song had been composed by Jeet, I would have still loved it. The mukhda is very calming and helps the listener to gain interest in the song. It works, in contrast to many such songs that have released nowadays, where the very flat mukhda spoils the whole song. But here, Sohail gives a very intriguing mukhda, so that the rest of the song can be heard without any guilt of not liking the mukhda. The hookline forms most of the mukhda, but no complaints, because that is quite an entrancing tune! The “oh-oh-ohhh” tune that Arijit sings after the hookline every time, is just sooooo heart-winning! The ANTARA, more calm than the mukhda, is beautifully composed as well, and is a pleasant contrast to the otherwise loud and hard-hitting mukhda and hookline (which is kind of like soft-rock with the drums and guitars not too prominent). Sohail’s arrangements are so serene, and have played a very important role in making me love the song. The acoustic guitars support Arijit very beautifully, and the piano is another highlight in the mukhda. While these instruments take care of the mukhda, the antara is very serenely graced by more graceful instruments like flutes and strings — which make the song sound more lilting than it would’ve! Also, the harmonica is so pleasant! The drums and rock guitars towards the end, support the soft-rock composition. I can picture Arijit singing this on stage and people swaying their arms in the air — such is the impact of Sohail’s composition! Arijit himself is spot-on with the vocals, this time using his usual Bhatt-movie voice, but sounding very energetic and NOT drowsy at all! 😛 The director’s lyrics are good and thought-provoking, not to mention simple and hummable! Sohail in jeet’s costume sounds awesome!!! A lilting romantic song, which impresses unexpectedly! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Yaaram
Singer ~ Javed Ali

For the final song on the album, Sohail comes up with quite a soft and subtle Sufi tune, which is sweet and lovable. However, the composition sounds quite dated, with the Sufi composition resembling so many previous songs that have released in past years. Sadly, this one doesn’t excite as much as those did. The composition, on top of sounding dated, also sounds quite bare and could’ve been more layered instead of being this straightforward. It sounds as if some song meant to be sung by Sonu Nigam, and composed in the 2000s, has been released now! We know Sohail can do better, as we’ve heard him doing Sufi before! The hookline sounds weak, and heard-before. The mukhda is composed of the hookline, followed by quite a pleasant tune which again, unfortunately sounds out of its era. The antara makes the song get slightly better though, with its high notes and Javed Ali acing them. And the bridge from the antara to the hookline is so cute! Sohail’s arrangements however, are beautiful, with the keherwa taal playing on the tabla throughout the song. The flutes throughout the song manage to gain the listener’s attention, but didn’t really keep me hooked. The strings and dafli provide a good backing music to the song. The first interlude has a wonderful string instrument and flute duet, which is enough to make you say “Wow!” out of enticement! The second interlude has a modern-sounding acoustic guitar solo piece, which is equally intriguing! The vocals by Javed Ali somehow sound weak here! Usually Javed Ali’s sweet and soft voice impresses me, but somehow it didn’t manage to impact me here! In fact, I missed Sonu Nigam on this track! The lyrics by Mudassar are painfully dated as well… And aren’t really attractive! Sohail ends the album on quite a faltering note, with a song that might appeal to some, but might get others bored! However, the arrangements make for atleast one listen! 🙂


Happy Bhag Jayegi is Sohail Sen’s comeback to composing full albums, and after his last full album ‘Gunday’ which was awesome, he impresses quite a lot with this one. The album is full of variety, as his albums always are, and it is an album that suits the definition of ‘Bollywood Album’ very well. With two upbeat songs and three soft melodies, the album has something for every kind of music lover. Sohail seems to have worked hard to come back with a bang, and it also seems to have turned out successful! Two of the songs could’ve been better, but they are good in some way or the other. All I can say is, “Let Happy Run Away, Because Sohail Is Now Back!!”

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aashiq Tera > Zara Si Dosti > Happy Oye > Gabru Ready To Mingle Hai > Yaaram

 

Which is your favourite song from Happy Bhag Jayegi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Budhia Singh – Born To Run, Chefs: Hitesh Sonik, Sidhant Mathur & Ishaan Chhabra

THE SULTANATE OF VISHAL-SHEKHAR IS BACK TO REIGN!! (SULTAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vishal-Shekhar
♪ Lyrics by: 
Irshad Kamil
♪ Music Label:
 YRF Music
Music Released On: 31st May 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 
8th July 2016

Sultan Album Cover

Sultan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Sultan is an upcoming Bollywood sports drama film, starring Salman Khan and Anushka Sharma in the lead roles. The film has been directed by Ali Abbas Zafar, and produced by Aditya Chopra. The story revolves around a Haryanvi wrestler who goes by the name Sultan (Salman Khan), who has problems in his professional life. His struggle to get back into the wrestling scenario forms the story of ‘Sultan’. The story seems the usual Bollywood story for a sports film, but the execution is what matters. While we wait for the execution to come in front of our eyes, the music album is here for us to cherish. The album marks the comeback of duo Vishal-Shekhar, who disappeared after a mediocre album, ‘Happy New Year’ (2014). They gave that foot-tapping song in ‘Fan’, again for YRF earlier this year, again for a Khan, Shahrukh. This time they come back to compose for YRF’s ‘Sultan’, which is coincidentally their first Salman Khan film!! That’s kind of hard to believe isn’t it? Such a talented duo and composing for Salman for the first time! 😀 What was Salman doing all these years? Playing table tennis with Himesh and Sajid-Wajid? Apparently, he has moved on from his clichéd composers and after Pritam’s stylish and full-of-variety ‘Bajrangi Bhaijaan’, and Himesh’s old-fashioned, but enjoyable ‘Prem Ratan Dhan Payo’ last year, he comes back this year with a new choice of Vishal & Shekhar, who are geniuses when it comes to being innovative. Expectations are sky-high and there are so many reasons. a) Vishal-Shekhar’s comeback. b) Vishal-Shekhar’s first for Salman. c) Vishal-Shekhar composing for YRF.. (remember ‘Ta Ra Rum Pum’ and ‘Tashan’?) Something phenomenal indeed is expected. Something mind-blowing and something innovative — just because Vishal-Shekhar are on board. They have composed a big nine-track album, with seven songs, one version and one theme. Let’s see how many of them rise up like a real ‘Sultan’! Really hoping this comeback makes it really big (once again) for the duo after their rough patch recently, the last great album being ‘Hasee Toh Phasee’ (2014)! They must emerge as Sultans!


1. Baby Ko Bass Pasand Hai
Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Shalmali Kholgade & Isheeta Chakrvarty, Rap by ~ Badshah

The soundtrack opens up with a fun-filled dance number that has been composed by the duo to really suit Salman’s presence in it. The song starts off with a wonderful rhythm, that you can set your feete tapping to immediately, as soon as it starts. Composed of techno sounds, dhadd, and manjeeras,the rhythm really hooks you right away, and Isheeta’s folk portion doesn’t really help in making you run away from the song. In other words, the song starts off really catchily, just as it should!! Vishal-Shekhar have really moulded themselves into a complete folksy manner, and delivered a composition that would easily connect with the masses. It is very typical, very Salman types, yet it instantly catches onto you. The hookline, kind of composed on the base rhythm of ‘Selfie Le Le Re’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan), impresses with its briskness. The techno noises after the short hookline are wonderful, and so is the playful flute! The mukhda by Vishal and Shalmali, really grabs your attention. Arrangements in the song are fabulous. The use of techno has been done really impressively. The brisk interventions of the flue are just lovely! They really stole my heart. Traditional instruments like harmonium, dholaks, manjeeras, tumbi, dhadd, impress as well in their small parts. Vishal-Shekhar really know how to fuse everything together into a catchy package. There is a rap by Badshah completely styled like an antara, as it is very cleverly joined with the hookline after it is over. Badshah’s rap is fun to hear, but I miss the very raw Haryanvi feel of Honey Singh’s Haryanvi rap here. Anyway, it is enjoyable. Shalmali sings in her soft voice, which I like better than her other, low-pitched voice. She does the Haryanvi accent very well. She too, has a small stanza to sing after a bit of Badshah’s rap, after which Vishal comes back for the hookline. For Vishal, I’ve no words to express how much I loved his rendition. He sings with the same infectious energy, that he puts into all his other songs, so it is not a surprise. The way he sings the hookline, though resembling his rendition of the hookline of ‘Selfie Le Le Re’, still sounds so mind blowing and cool. Irshad Kamil is back to his fun, enjoyable lyrics. He can easily mould himself to write so many different types of lyrics and they always appeal! He takes the hookline and writes such fun-plus-funny lyrics around it, a usual male v/s female battle as we have in Bollywood dance numbers many times. An infectious, catchy number, perfect as the first song in a Salman album. Vishal-Shekhar have composed a perfect song for Salman, right in their first stint for him! Energetic vocals, enjoyable lyrics, and booming arrangements all make this one a WINNER! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Jag Ghoomeya / Jag Ghoomeya (Female)
Singers ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan / Neha Bhasin

A beautiful guitar loop starts off the next song, and you know Vishal-Shekhar are back at doing their thing with the soulful romantic songs. The song is a romantic song, with shades of Vishal-Shekhar’s style, yet suiting Salman’s style perfectly. The composition is a breezy, love ballad with a really happy-go-lucky touch to it, and graced with a beautiful folk rhythm. The mukhda is very charming, and the hookline really lives up to its name — it hooks you completely. The rhythm of the hookline is just too catchy to dislike. It is the antara though, where Vishal-Shekhar really work magic. It has been composed in a manner that reminds you of Vishal-Shekhar’s work in ‘Tashan’, for some reason unknown. Maybe the folksiness makes it connect to ‘Tashan’. The line “jaisi Tu hai vaisi rehnaa” is very pleasant, and my personal favourite from the song. It has some charm in it. The female version has the tempo cranked down a bit, and that appeals so, so much! The duo excels in the arrangements too, as always. In the male version, their brilliance in arranging music is seen in the way they add folk guitars, acoustic guitars and rock guitars into the same song. Percussion is brilliant, with a folksy but electronic dafli and dholak rhythm backing the song. Shakers have been used very cutely. The first interlude has a very majestic strings portion which reminds one of ‘Zehnaseeb’ (Hasee Toh Phasee). It has a strong hangover of that song. However, the mandolin is what steals the show. It is very cute and pleasant to the ears. In the female version, however, Vishal-Shekhar really impress. They have arranged it very beautiful with almost nothing but a folkish guitar in the background. Percussion is very beautiful, and very less and soft too. For me, this is the winner even though it offers less! To talk about vocals, Rahat’s soulful voice brings that rustic feeling to the song (and also brings the Salman-iyat 😛 ) and sounds very familiar, yet appeals. Again, it is the female version which emerges as the winner. Neha has tried something new this time, with an innocent romantic song. Her husky voice perfectly makes for the rustic setting of the movie. The accent is something to fall for! I couldn’t help but miss Harshdeep Kaur here, though! Not that Neha’s rendition is bad in any way!! 😀 Her voice simply reminded me of Harshdeep’s and then I started wanting to hear the song in her voice. 😛 Kamil’s lyrics are sweet, simple, innocent; in short, amazing. Amazing simplicity and innocence in this romantic song. Something worth hearing on loop! For me the female version is better, but both are a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. 440 Volt
Singer ~ Mika Singh

I saw the title and singer’s name of the next song and told myself, “Finished. The goodness of this album is over. It’s all over, dude. You were an idiot to think that the album would be so great.” After all, I’ve not been liking Mika’s songs of late; the same, old, repetitive meaningless party tracks. But boy, was I wrong! The song is utterly enjoyable! Nothing less than that. Enjoyable to the fullest. Each and every second is something to cherish and enjoy. I don’t know what Vishal-Shekhar fed Mika before recording the song, but here he sounds very, very different! He doesn’t belch out his words like always, he doesn’t eat any of the syllables, and neither does he try to sound like a pop star. Instead, he pronounces everything perfectly, sings in a very soft textured voice, and tries to sound CUTE! And it works! He does sound cute. Don’t believe me? Hear it! The duo have given him a song quite unlike his style, yet perfect for him! It is a slow-paced, but very catchy and groovy song based on the filmi Qawwali template. It is one of the most entertaining Qawwali spoofs I’ve heard this year. And then there’s that ‘Fake Ishq’ (Housefull 3). [Okay, now ‘Housefull 3’ has really become an example, hasn’t it? Sorry! 😅😅 Couldn’t resist from writing that, though!] Vishal-Shekhar have composed something that is immensely attractive, something that doesn’t only have a catchy hookline to do all the work, but a hardworking (in getting us addicted!) mukhda and very diligently composed antaras. The antara is a very weirdly addictive, slow piece that you can’t get out of your head. The part in the hookline when Mika repeats “Chhoone Se Terey” is just so crazily gooooddd! (Can’t think of a synonym for ‘good’. That’s why I elongated it. No time! 😂 ) The way Mika sings in a Haryanvi accent fulfills my dream of hearing him sing that ever since he didn’t sing the title track of ‘Boss’. (Which I had thought he had sung when I first heard it). The duo’s arrangements are very creative. The rock factor works really well in filmy Qawwalis, so there it is. The harmonium and tablas are also awesome. A wonderful electronic substitute for the tabla has been added by the duo, which you can hear at 2:47 in the song. That space is usually taken by the tablas in any Qawwali. While he first interlude has a full-on rock guitar solo, the second goes the calm way with a Spanish sounding tune on strings and tablas. Irshad Kamil writes very entertaining lyrics, perfectly suitable for a lovestruck Romeo. The hookline is so funny, yet creative. “Lagey 440 Volt Chhoone Se terey”. Now don’t say I unnecessarily hate the lyrics of ‘Hous– oops! ENTERTAINING to the core!! Something very creative and innovative! P.S. Mika as a Qawwali singer sounds awesome! #5StarHotelSong!! (P.P.S. Sorry for the essay)

 

4. Sultan
Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Shadab Faridi, Backing Vocals ~ Abdul Sajjad, Zuber Hashmi, Arun Ingle, R N Iyer, Mandar Aapte, Kaustubh Datar, Rahul Chitnis, Nitin Tupe, Swapnil Godbole, Mangesh Chavan, Nitin Karandikar, Vijay Dhuri, Jitendra Tupe, Mayuresh Madgaonkar

The title song, arrives quite late into the album, and starts off very softly. Later, a voice quite like that of Vishal Dadlani joins the rock guitars that start off the song, and sing some motivational lines. We’re kind of figuring out what’s going on, when suddenly, an electrifying Sukhwinder Singh takes things into his hands and with him, the song goes uphill, and how! An energizing electric guitar hook starts playing, to be joined later on by energetic drums and a wonderful chorus. The composition is also just ad energetic, and definitely motivational. The duo redo their own ‘Tashan Mein’ (Tashan), but in a very different manner. A way better version of the seemingly unbeatable song, in terms of dynamism and vigour. The hookline is very unconventional as it ends abruptly with the chorus singing “Rre sultan”. The khoon and mitti refrain is very catchy, and suits the theme, doesn’t it? All the parts of the song are energetic, and full of the spirit to work and win. The rock arrangements are not over the top, and because of the commercial nature of the rock song, it will appeal to all, unlike other rock songs which aren’t so commercial. You can barely hear anything besides the rock guitars and drums, which I must say, are very classily done. There are some parts in the antara when the rock simmers down, but other than that, rock is everywhere. Sukhwinder and Shadab are a fit duo to sing the song, with Shadab getting very less in comparison to Sukhwinder. Sukhwinder is clearly the king of all this. A wonderful techno-sargam entertains highly in the first interlude. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are highly motivational and more than a character-themed title song, like Salman’s other title songs where the leading hero is a larger-than-life supercop (Ahem, ‘Dabangg’!), the song sounds like a pure motivational and inspirational song. The energy of Sukhwinder and Shadab combined with the energy of Vishal-Shekhar’s guitars and drums, and the intelligence of Kamil’s pen, makes for an enjoyable and worthy listen! One of Salman’s best title songs!! He’ll be like “Achho title song paayo .. Paayo… Aayo.. Laayo… Gaayo.. Bio —” Where’d that come from? 😕 #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Sachi Muchi
Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan & Harshdeep Kaur, Backing Vocals ~ Marianne D’Cruz, Nisha Mascarenhas, Rajiv Sundaresan & Neuman Pinto

Now, the next song is really beautiful. Vishal-Shekhar create a very happy-go-lucky romantic song, very unconventional. The song starts with a wedding baaja type band, playing the tune of the hookline, which sounds really out-of-place, and confusing. However, things clear themselves up when the song starts after the band moves on. A wonderful banjo + harmonica instrumentation sets things into place, and creates a very American folk ambience. (You know, cowboys. 😛 ) Without thinking about what cowboys are doing in Haryana, I start grooving to the feel-good, breezy music. However, it took me very long to really start grooving a lot to the music. The song grows on you as slow as a snail. But when it finishes growing upto however much it wants to grow, it sounds very good to the ears. The same thing happened to me. The composition, though a little weak, sets in after a few listens and seems to very attractive. The Western breeze in the arrangements is something not heard recently in Bollywood. (I don’t really like it when it comes in Bollywood music, though. Sounds boring, generally, too!) Mohit and Harshdeep sing the composition perfectly, with the right amount of gusto. Especially in the hookline, “yeh khwaab hai, chaahatein…. Tere kehne Se li Maine parvaazein”, Mohit along with the backing chorus sings very awesome. The harmonica and banjo sound mind-blowing. The lighthearted composition works really well after some time, just that it takes some time to mark its place in the otherwise commercial album. Irshad’s lyrics are just as lighthearted as needed. This time, a two-sided love song. 😀 A song with less appeal, but will slowly emerge as an undoubted #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Bulleya
Singer ~ Papon, Backing Vocals ~ Altamash Faridi & Shadab Faridi

While Mika sang a filmy Qawwali earlier in the album, Papon is here with a full-fledged traditional Qawwali of his own. Vishal-Shekhar have composed a totally sweet, innocent composition for this Qawwali, fit for mehfils. Papon starts off with a very lovely AdLib, after which Vishal-Shekhar kick in with the beautiful Qawwali rhythm, complete with the Faridi brothers singing in a heavenly manner, and a harmonium striking the chords of our hearts. Papon rejoins with very sugary lines written wonderfully by Kamil. He renders them very beautifully, and those waah’s cant stop from escaping from your mouth. The way the duo connects this part to the hookline, is when you really get transported to another world. And the hookline is what keeps you there. And you stay there for the remaining duration of the song. A beautiful entrancing arrangement of dholaks, tablas, dafli, harmonium and chimtas, complements Papon during his heavenly rendition. The foot-tapping rhythm is what makes the song sound so beautiful. The rhythm in the hookline is indescribable. It is also the composition that has brought out the bliss in Papon’s voice. Vishal-Shekhar’s divine and spiritual composition is what makes you love everything about the song. The interlude has a wonderful rock guitar portion, which doesn’t sound out-of-place in the spiritual song at all. The Faridi bros are excellent in their spiritual interventions in the song. Lastly, Irshad is a genius. He has written such impressive romantic, spiritual and sad lyrics, which are excellent. It is like a request from the boy to his lover, instead of the usual sad romantic songs where the boy assumes that the girl is leaving him and starts wailing. 😂 The way the spiritual touch has been put into the lyrics, is wondrous. Divine, spiritual and blessed. Something to hear on loop! Perfect ‘Coke Studio’ material from Vishal-Shekhar! Papon, you are a rockstar!!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. Tuk Tuk
Singers ~ Nooran Sisters & Vishal Dadlani

This song starts with a weird AdLib like one in a Qawwali. I am guessing that has been sung by Shekhar. Anyway, the AdLib makes way for some entrancing, divine techno music. It is so beautiful, that you can’t stop from swaying. Piano, chimes and techno sounds have been wonderfully fused together to make something really addictive and entrancing. The Nooran Sisters start off with their usual folksy Punjabi rendition, which starts off really promising. And then, it drops down so fast. The hookline arrives so fast, you are not sure what actually happened. Suddenly, the techno trance breaks and you find yourself in a very typical Punjabi tumbi-dhol arrangement (with very low volume, like Amit Trivedi’s style) with a very averagely composed hookline. It takes quite some time for the song to pick up pace again, and that is when Vishal comes in with his out-of-this-world rap! His rap is actually meaningful. The song is another meaningful, inspirational one, which completely grips you until the part I mentioned arrives. After Vishal’s raps though, the Punjabi part sounds perfectly fine and acceptable. It is the “re bole dhola dhol tadak dhin” line that plays the spoilsport in the song. It just sounds out-of-place here. Everything else falls into place perfectly. Even the antara, which has a Punjabi folk arrangement, sounds great. So why does that hookline sound odd? The flaw is in the abrupt composition. The EDM and techno music is really addictive, and the programming on the Noorans’ voices is very cool. The fusion is really something to appreciate, and something other composers must follow soon!! Irshad’s lyrics are very inspirational, and the metaphors are very clever. Something that would have been exceptionally innovative, but spoiled by the hookline!!

 

8. Rise of Sultan
Singer ~ Shekhar Ravjiani, Backing Vocals ~ Abdul Sajjad, Zuber Hashmi, Arun Ingle, R N Iyer, Mandar Aapte, Kaustubh Datar, Rahul Chitnis, Nitin Tupe, Swapnil Godbole, Mangesh Chavan, Nitin Karandikar, Vijay Dhuri, Jitendra Tupe, Mayuresh Madgaonkar

To close this very much awaited album, we have something on the lines of a theme song. Again motivational in spirit, this track takes the khoon-mitti refrain of the title song and has it crafted into a wonderful background piece. The composition as we know it, it purely motivational and so it has a very positive effect in this track. It makes the song sound so otherworldly. Shekhar leads the vocals with a horde of backing vocalists following him, without which it would’ve sounded lifeless. What I really want to praise is the MINDBLOWING percussion. They are so energetic and vigorous, you can’t help but love them. The rock guitars do not leave this opportunity of showing their prowess either, and impress yet again, along with their new companion, the percussion. The song suits the storyline of the film, as it starts slow and gets high-spirited towards the end, with the strings and brass kicking in later on. It is symbolic of the “Rise” of the character, Sultan. A perfect title, I must say! An INVIGORATING end to the impressive album! #5StarHotelSong!!


Sultan turns out to be way better than expected. Yes, I know my expectations were huge anyway, but not so high! I had never expected such a great album, especially when there is Salman’s commercialism to cater to. But Vishal-Shekhar really prove themselves. They are experts in music arrangements, and they use this plus point to raise the level of each and every song in the album. If there is a typical Salman dance number in ‘Baby Ko Bass Pasand Hai’, there is also a spiritual Qawwali in ‘Bulleya’ and an enjoyable track in ‘440 Volt’. An album full of variety, and I’m thinking, one of Salman’s best albums since 2010. Ali Abbas Zafar has brought out the best from the duo, considering the movie’s genre. If Vishal-Shekhar can deliver so well in a film that doesn’t need such good music, I can’t even imagine what they will do in films like ‘Banjo’ and ‘Befikre’ coming later this year! 😉 The sultans of Bollywood are back to reign!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bulleya > Jag Ghoomeya (Female) > 440 Volt > Sultan > Jag Ghoomeya > Rise of Sultan > Baby Ko Bass Pasand Hai > Sachi Muchi > Tuk Tuk

 

Which is your favourite song from Sultan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Note: ‘Sultan’ will be included in July 2016 monthly awards 🙂

Next “dish”: Raman Raghav 2.0, Chef: Ram Sampath