PRODUCERS KA HALKA HALKA GHUROOR!! (FANNEY KHAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Tanishk Bagchi, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Hasrat Jaipuri
♪ Music Label: T-Series / ‘Badan Pe Sitare’ on Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th July 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd August 20181400x1400bb3

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to ‘Achche Din Ab Aaye Re’: Saavn

Listen to ‘Badan Pe Sitare’: Saavn | Buy on iTunes


Fanney Khan is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Anil Kapoor, Pihu Sand, Rajkummar Rao and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan in crucial roles. The film is directed by Atul Manjrekar and produced by Rakeysh Om Prakash Mehra, Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Kussum Arora, Nishant Pitti, Anil Kapoor, P.S. Bharathi and Rajiv Tandon. The film is an adaptation of the Dutch film ‘Everybody’s Famous’, and it deals with the issue of body-shaming. The music of the film has been composed by Amit Trivedi, with one guest composition, (#NotARemake) by Tanishk Bagchi. This is Trivedi’s fifth album of the year, and out of the four previous ones, ‘Bhavesh Joshi Superhero’ and ‘Pad Man’s were the only solo albums, whereas in ‘Raid’ and ‘Blackmail’, T-Series had forced songs by other composers. Thankfully, in both the albums, the guest songs weren’t bad or frustrating. In fact, in ‘Blackmail’, it was Trivedi who wasn’t at the top of his game. Well, seeing as to how this album is 6/7th his, maybe this will be one of the better ‘multicomposer’ albums of his this year. Let’s dive in!


As is the norm, I usually get the guest composition done with at the beginnjng, or leave it for the very end; here, I will get it over with. So Tanishk’s guest composition Mohabbat, which has left many confused as to whether it’s a remake of Noor Jehan’s ‘Jawaan Hai Mohabbat’, (but which clearly isn’t a remake of that, if you pay attention to the tune), starts the album off. And it is one of the most disappointing original songs by Tanishk. First of all, he creates some weird sounds that hurt the ears, and continues it with grating programming of Sunidhi’s voice that makes her sound horrible! The composition is quite simple, and a bit catchy on and off, but for the most part, it is a very forgettable tune, that could’ve been propped up by Sunidhi’s vocals, if the composer hadn’t programmed it so badly! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are nothing great, and when the song isn’t interesting, the lyrics don’t really matter that much.

Amit Trivedi too, uses Sunidhi for his first song, Halka Halka, an EDM reimagination of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s famous Qawwali. The difference in Sunidhi’s voice itself shows you what Tanishk had done wrong in the first song. Anyway, the song as a remake, is quite creative — the composer adds a pacy drop to the song after the hookline, and I love the new padding he has composed before the hookline, as the mukhda; it has a beautiful tune, which Sunidhi delivers fascinatingly. However, I didn’t quite like that the hookline has been extended to four lines. The original hookline with two lines was good enough! Divya Kumar complements Sunidhi well, and against the EDM backdrop, both of them, a duo not yet tested by composers, sound magical, and I’m glad Trivedi did try such a contrasting pair for a song.

Trivedi is also made to remake Shankar-Jaikishan-Mohd. Rafi’s iconic Badan Pe Sitare and who better than Sonu Nigam to sing a version of that song? We’ve been hearing the man sing his take on the song ever since I can’t even remember when, and to hear a proper mixed and mastered audio version of him singing the song is a treat for his fans. Amit Trivedi does an awesome job recreating the actual raw orchestra touch of the original song — drums and trumpets owning the arrangements. And obviously, Sonu Nigam owning the song with his energetic and boisterous performance!

The original part of the album is not as exciting as the remake part, sadly, but Amit still manages to give one beautiful song, Achche Din, which has a sweet middle-class touch to it, in both lyrics and tune. Amit’s heartfelt rendition helps the song sound genuine as well, and it suits the setting of Anil Kapoor playing a taxi driver waiting for his fortune to get better. Irshad KamilsK lyrics have a sense of genuineness in them, which propels the song further and Amit’s use of clarinets (I.D. Rao) and flutes is wonderful. But what keeps the song together is the strong composition. The reprise version type of song, Achche Din Ab Aaye Re is the same audio file with a little additional coda at the end, where the lyrics have been tweaked to let us know that Anil Kapoor’s character’s fortune has sparkled.

The rest of the album is sung by Monali Thakur, who is the voice for Pihu Sand, who plays Kapoor’s daughter in the film. The first of the songs, Tere Jaisa Tu Hai, is straight out of the ‘Secret Superstar’ soundtrack, with a less stronger voice than Meghna Mishra. Monali Thakur seems to be struggling with the high notes in this song; the song itself has nothing new to offer beyond the soaring trumpet portions, but then, we heard something similar in ‘Main Kaun Hoon’ (Secret Superstar), so it doesn’t strike me as anything special. Irshad KamklsK lyrics are meaningful, but only good to listen to as long as the song plays; they are easily forgotten after the song ends.

The last song Fu Bai Fu is like those Bollywood medleys that used to feature in our movies, except, since the music label might not possess rights to all the songs, the composer has composed a song and the lyricist sprinkles different lyrics throughout that tune. The songs featured are quite fun to listen to, but nothing beyond that. The use of the Marathi folk song ”’ Bai Fu’ merely raises eyebrows — why was it needed? And was it needed? The arrangements are some of the most bland arrangements Trivedi has provided in recent times — a repetitive loop of the same sounds plays all throughout the song. Monali’s rendition is good in this song, though, and so are her imitations in the interlude. But again, why?


The whole album seems like the producers were way too overconfident with their movie, and in the process, their halka halka ghuroor seems to have made them pay no attention to the quality of the music album! A letdown of a music album for a movie that revolves around music!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 7 + 7 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 6.5 + 6 = 

Album Percentage: 67.86%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Achche Din = Achche Din Ab Aaye Re > Badan Pe Sitaare = Halka Halka > Tere Jaisa Tu Hai > Mohabbat = Fu Bai Fu

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 30 (from previous albums) + 02 = 32

Which is your favourite song from Fanney Khan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE MUSICAL SUPERHERO RESURFACES!! (BHAVESH JOSHI SUPERHERO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya, Anurag Kashyap, Babu Haabi & Naezy
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 1st June 2018

Bhavesh Joshi Superhero Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Bhavesh Joshi Superhero is a Bollywood action film starring Harshvardhan Kapoor, Priyanshu Painyuli and Nishikant Kamat, directed by Vikramaditya Motwane and produced by Reliance Entertainment, Eros International, Anurag Kashyap, Madhu Mantena and Vikas Bahl. The film is about a group of friends who set out to expose the water scams and other wrong activities in the city. When one of the friends dies, Sikandar (played by Harshvardhan Kapoor) sets out to become a vigilante and avenge his friend’s death and stop the corruption in the city. The film is quite different from what Motwane has made in the past, and it shows he is a versatile filmmaker, never repeating his formula. Of course, for music, he ropes in Amit Trivedi, after that one movie, ‘Trapped’, where he didn’t compose the music. Let’s see, what with all the soundtracks of his releasing this year, can Trivedi do a great job for a director whose films he is known to have done great music for?


The soundtrack starts off with a song called Hum Hain Insaaf that actually summarises the entire theme of the movie in three minutes — in a groovy rap track set to catchy beats and music by Trivedi, and rendered just as addictively by Babu Haabi and Naezy. Babu Haabi sounds much more amazing than he did two years ago in the songs of ‘Udta Punjab’, while Naezy sounds great as usual. Trivedi’s digital beats are catchy, especially the opening bars, which immediately attract your attention. The rap in this song actually doesn’t get boring at any point; it is fun also to listen to the lyrics, which are meaningful (written by Anurag Kashyap, Babu Haabi and Naezy together). The hookline has an anthemic ring to it, perfect for such a movie.

The other song that carries the change-the-world theme in its lyrics is Qasam Kha Li, because Bollywood superheroes can’t go without a dramatic oath ceremony. Just kidding, Phantom ‘Ph’ans. 🙂 Anyway, the song seems to have been quite easy for Trivedi, having composed ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’ (Raid) just recently. Maybe he called Papon over and said, “Let’s record two songs, both having the same blood running through them, and let’s see which one ends up in which movie.” That being said, this song is just as soulful and beautiful as the other, and clearly this fits into the ‘Bhavesh Joshi Superhero’ soundtrack more than the other song, and again, I was just joking about the “Let’s see which movie blah blah.” The strings and drums used by Trivedi are captivating throughout the song, and Papon’s sombre rendition is perfect for this retrospective number. Towards the end, Trivedi sets right what went wrong in Blackmail’s ‘Nindaraan Diyaan’ — he uses the rock template in a much better way than he did there (where he spoiled the entire climax of the song by overdoing the rock)! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are beautiful, and just perfect for what I’d imagine an Indian common man superhero to sing. 🙂

It is Chavanprash which has probably polarised audiences about this soundtrack; it is a super-cheesy and typical Trivedi qawwali-ish number with just as cheesy lyrics by Bhattacharya, but hey, I did enjoy it! Trivedi, first of all, is an expert at making such songs catchy, and he brings back his ‘Ghanchakkar’ self to make a kind of amalgamation of three songs from that soundtrack — ‘Ghanchakkar Babu’, ‘Allah Meherbaan’ and ‘Jholu Ram’. Divya Kumar’s effusive vocals make it known that you’re supposed to have fun listening to and crooning this song. And Amitabh’s lyrics, even the cringeworthy hookline, are fun! Trivedi adda those qawwali elements like the bulbultarang, and rock elements, and his signature quirky female chorus (Arohi Mhatre and Pragati Joshi) are ever loyal and give yet another enjoyable performance. The ‘satak’, ‘jhatak‘ effect in the antaras are so fun. Anyway, I love this song and you can judge me for it.

The best of the soundtrack comes with Tafreeh, where Trivedi starts the proceedings with a heady digital rhythm coupled with a nice guitar loop, and the Vikramaditya Motwane side of Amit Trivedi surfaces for the first time in this Vikramaditya Motwane soundtrack; the song instantly sends you back to the ‘Udaan’ soundtrack, more so because of Trivedi’s dreamy melody, than the arrangements. Also, he sings the ‘Chal Zaraa…” portion so amazingly, it’s hard not to get addicted! That beat he keeps up for the entire song in the background never gets repetitive. He even uses marching rhythms later on! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics have a certain message we all need to understand; the ‘carpe diem‘ philosophy resounding very vehemently throughout the song. Again, Trivedi does the rock parts well, and ends the song on a very entrancing high.


I won’t have many supporters for this statement, but I’m going to go ahead and call this Trivedi’s best soundtrack after a long time! Motwane really brings out the musical superhero that Trivedi really is! 😊

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 = 33

Album Percentage: 82.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tafreeh > Chavanprash > Qasam Kha Li > Hum Hain Insaaf

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhavesh Joshi Superhero? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SADLY, NO EMOSANAL ATYACHAAR!! (BLACKMAIL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Badshah, Guru Randhawa & Preet Hundal
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya, Badshah, Guru Randhawa, Sabi, DIVINE & Dhaval Parab
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 23rd March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 6th April 2018

Blackmail Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Blackmail is a Bollywood dark comedy, starring Irrfan Khan, Kirti Kulhari, Arunoday Singh and Divya Dutta in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Delhi Belly’ fame Abhinay Deo, and produced by Abhinay Deo, Ramesh Deo, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Now, the film’s music has been given by Amit Trivedi, with one guest composition each by Badshah and Guru Randhawa. Let’s see why I found that the two guest songs were better than Amit’s songs here!!


Now, who knows what blackmailed Amit Trivedi into accepting an album with two songs by other artists, something I believe he has never done after a certain point in his career! Anyway, he starts his part of the album with a pulsating, electrifying rap song Badla, an ode to the underdogs in the world, who wish to take revenge on the people who’ve been unfair to them. The song starts off entertainingly, with Amit singing in his trademark robotic voice, making the song actually sound as if it’s sung by one frustrated with the ways of the world. It’s the rap by DIVINE though, that lifts the song up and makes it what it is, and I’m glad Bollywood has started getting actual rap songs this year, starting from ‘Mukkabaaz’s ‘Paintra’. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics for the melody portion are functional; nothing great, but DIVINE and Dhaval Parab do a better job for the rap lyrics. Everything else like the techno sounds, is just as expected in a rap song.
Bewafa Beauty doesn’t work as much as the first song; Amit seems to be trying to hard to make it sound like a 90s song just because Urmila Matondkar features in the video! The singing by Pawni Pandey is jarring at places, and the whole song as such doesn’t sound at all like an Amit Trivedi song. The lazy pace of the song and its neverending length makes it seem all the more boring. The arrangements too, are typical for such songs — there is no innovation in the synth sound, the dholaks, and it ends up sounding just mediocre. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are the only high point of the song; they summarize the story of the movie in five minutes.
Nindaraan Diyaan starts as a nice sad song with a pleasant acoustic backdrop, very similar to Amit’s ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’ (Raid) that came earlier this year. Amit’s own voice works wonders for the song, and it gives vibes of the signature Amit Trivedi sound. But when the song breaks into rock for the entire second half of the song, it seems unnecessary and loud — it would’ve been better, had it been restricted for an interlude and not till the end of the song. Just like ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’, Amit adds a soothing backing chorus that finds its way through the mist of the rock and manages to soothe the ears. The lyrics again, by Bhattacharya, are the highlight of this song that sounds like any other Trivedi song, and has nothing much working for it other than that.
Trivedi’s last song Sataasat is a quirky song, again, falling in the trademark Trivedi quirky zone, but again, it fails to impress, even with its jazz sound, the slurred vocals of Trivedi and Amitabh’s lyrics. It joins ‘Nindaraan Diyaan’ in being a “good, but not quite there” song. I can’t even see myself revisiting these four songs anytime in the near future, which is unfortunate, because Amit Trivedi was in great form last year, and to see him give an entire chunk of songs with none standing out, is disheartening.
Surprisingly, or maybe not, the mass caterers please my sensibilities even more. Badshah’s Happy Happy really manages to make you feel happy, with the signature Badshah techno loop, and groovy rhythm, not to mention Aastha Gill’s playful vocals. In fact, the portions sung by her are some of the best in the song. The lyrics are just alright for this kind of a song, but at least the song manages to make an impression and stay in the mind.
Guru Randhawa’s Patola is less memorable, but my personal favourite. That cheesy 90s sound, which he adds to Preet Hundal’s pop single ‘Patola’, to transform it from a typical Punjabi pop song, into a catchy wedding song, really works! The similarity to ‘Suit Suit’ (Hindi Medium) is forgivable, mainly because Guru takes out Bohemia’s rap, and adds his own touch to the lyrics, to tweak them as per the requirements of the movie. The same cheesy sound that ‘Ishqyaun Dhishqyaun’ (Goliyon Ki Raasleela Ram-Leela) carried, this song too carries, and in such an innocuous way, that it does create an impact.


Once again, who knows what blackmailed Trivedi into signing such an album where he was to share the field with two immensely popular hit makers, who end up surpassing him too, this time, as unbelievable as it sounds. Sadly this album is devoid of the usual Trivedi ’emosanal atyachaar’!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6 + 8 + 7 + 8 + 8 =

Album Percentage: 74.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Happy Happy = Patola = Nindaraan Diyaan > Badla > Sataasat > Bewafa Beauty

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 01 = 19

Which is your favourite song from Blackmail? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE LYRICISTS’ SUCCESSFUL RAID!! (RAID – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Tanishk Bagchi & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir & Indraneel
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 1st March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 16th March 2018

Raid Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Raid is a thriller starring Ajay Devgn, Saurabh Shukla and Ileana D’Cruz, directed by Rajkumar Gupta and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Kumar Mangat Pathak and Abhishek Pathak. The film is about India’s longest raid in the 1980s, and I’m sure all of you have already watched the film; blame my laziness for the late music review. Anyway, the music has been composed by Tanishk Bagchi and Amit Trivedi, both having composed (rather Tanishk having recreated and Trivedi having composed) two songs each.


Once again, T-Series taps into the remake-producing compartment of Tanishk’s brain, but this time, the results are actually not bad! Two Qawwalis of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan have been chosen by the makers here, and Tanishk recreates each of them with finesse and most importantly, respect. Sanu Ek Pal Chain, a soft romantic number, turns out to be the polar opposite of the horrendous ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ (Baadshaho). Tanishk learns from his mistakes and this time the soul of the original song is kept intact. Tanishk’s composition skills are also tested here, because he makes his own antara, and does quite well at it too. The arrangements are similar to how Arko arranges his love songs, with the acoustic sounds being more prominent. Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s rendition is great, and thankfully not ear-piercing like ‘Baadshaho’, and the lyrics by Manoj Muntashir hit the right note.
If “Sanu Ek Pal” was remade well, Nit Khair Manga‘s makeover is splendid, and Tanishk shows some real creativity there. Again, Rahat and Manoj join hands with him for the vocals and lyrics respectively. But if you notice, Tanishk has many more original lines to compose here, and apparently has much more freedom to do what he wants, and it results in some mind-blowing arrangements. The hookline is the peak of the song, where Tanishk starts off with the typical Sufi tabla rhythm, only to stop it, and start it again. It continues in this stop-start fashion all throughout! The trend of playing the hookline on the mandolin is followed here, too, but it sounds great here, and not contrived like it does everywhere else. Rahat manages the vocals beautifully, his nuances on point and very intricate.
Amit’s half of the album is purely situational. What Amit couldn’t probably do, they made Tanishk handle, and what Tanishk probably can’t do, they let Amit handle, as he is, after all, a senior to Tanishk, and knows how to create situational songs!
Black is like the theme song of the movie, but Amit Trivedi gets the 80s setting of the film spot-on in his arrangements for this song. Sukhwinder handles such songs amazingly, and he does so here too. Since the song is situational, it doesn’t grow instantly, but the peak of the song is surely the high pitched line before the hook. The hook, trademark Trivedi stuff, is something that will set your head nodding in its rhythm. The interlude is entertaining too. Indraneel’s lyrics suit the theme well; I guess he is a debutant, have never seen his name as a lyricist before! Amit’s percussions are top-notch, and the trumpets help give the song an authoritative feel.
The other Trivedi song, Jhuk Na Paunga, is your everyday Bollywood patriotic song, but oh, does it work in its intent. Comparisons to ‘Tu Bhoola Jise’ (Airlift) are inevitable, but in its own place, the song works well. It starts off with a typical Trivedi guitar riff followed by a typical Trivedi trumpet piece, and as soon as Papon’s feathery voice kicks in, so do your goosebumps. The mellow hookline is enough to melt the heart of anyone who regards himself a staunch nationalist. Again, the percussions and brass instruments are the highlight of the arrangements, but Amit adds a wonderful tabla rhythm in the antara, which will steal your heart. The chorus towards the end of the song is fascinating — “Toofan Mein Jalti Hui…“. It is small touches like this that make this the best song of the album, but the main reason, is Indraneel’s lyrics. Though the composition might be inaccessible for many of the masses, nobody can say they didn’t connect with the poignant lyrics.


Both the music composers do equally well here, but the lyricists raid the music and take away the spoils!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 7.5 + 8.5 = 31.5

Album Percentage: 78.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Jhuk Na Paunga > Nit Khair Manga > Sanu Ek Pal Chain = Black

 

Which is your favourite song from Raid? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 13 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Raid) = 15

TRIVEDI IN THE SAFE ZONE! (PAD MAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 26th December 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th January 2018

Padman Album Cover

 

Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes


Pad Man is an upcoming Bollywood social drama directed by R. Balki, starring Akshay Kumar, Radhika Apte and Sonam Kapoor. The film is produced by Twinkle Khanna, SPE Films India, Cape Of Good Films, KriArj Entertainment and Hope Productions. The film revolves around the story of Arunachalam Muruganantham, a social activist from Tamil Nadu. The film is set to release a day prior to Republic Day, a day that is by default reserved for Akshay Kumar films. This time, Balki does not rely on his frequent collaborator Ilaiyaraaja to score music, but instead borrows his wife, Gauri Shinde’s go-to composer Amit Trivedi, who had scored for both of her films, ‘English Vinglish’ and ‘Dear Zindagi’. This is the first time he will compose for Balki and I believe, for Akshay Kumar too. I expect a lot from him after his successful ‘Qaidi Band’, ‘Secret Superstar’ and ‘Rukh’ last year! Let’s see how the music album for this film turns out!


After completing three albums last year, and using Arijit’s voice in two of them, Amit returns in the new year with his first song being an Arijit song. Aaj Se Teri is a heavenly romantic post-marriage number, whose lyrics by Kausar Munir (2017 is over but she’s still impressing us with her lyrics!) make it even better; the composition is a sweet 90s-ish tune, and Arijit sounding like Kumar Sanu in some parts makes it even better. The amazing arrangements include wonderful shehnaai (Omkar Dhumal) and Ethnic strings by Tapas Roy. The Pad Man Song shows that Amit really enjoys working with Mika, after ‘Sexy Baliye’ in ‘Secret Superstar’, and the result shows itself in an upbeat desi number, with an amazing ladies’ chorus (Deepti Rege, Mayuri Kudalkar & Pragati Joshi). The ladies’ chorus is in Trivedi’s ‘Ghanchakkar Babu’ (Ghanchakkar) zone, especially with the weird Chinese-sounding interruptions. The interlude is owned by the chorus though. The percussions in the song are amazing, and the harmonium (Akhlak Hussain Varsi) gives it a delightful U.P.-Bihar vibe, though Trivedi’s composition itself falls flat in places. The lyrics though, are a great subversion of the conventional image if a ‘superhero’, and make me believe that a ‘real superhero’ is nothing like that. Hu Ba Hu is a clubbish number that makes you wonder where the makers intend to place it in the film, but the signature Amit tune, vocals and arrangements (especially the mandolin, rabaab et al by Tapas Roy) hark back to ‘Queen’s ‘Badra Bahaar’ and ‘O Gujariya’ at the same time, and make it a very enjoyable listen. The onomatopoeia at the beginning is really catchy too, and works properly to suck you into the song. Also amazing are Munir’s lyrics, about two individuals striving to accomplish a joint mission, probably referring to the characters essayed by Akshay and Sonam.
Sayaani is the ‘Pad Man’ equivalent to ‘Dangal’s ‘Idiot Banna’, this time with four leading singers, including Yashita Sharma, Jonita Gandhi, Yashika Sikka and Rani Kaur. The backing vocalists also include Meghna Mishra, the young lead singer of “Secret Superstar”! The song itself seems like a mishmash of many wedding songs of Bollywood, and at one point it sounds exactly like a certain song, which I cant remember now! The ladies do sing amazingly though, and Trivedi’s arrangements make it more enjoyable, with the percussions yet again taking centre stage. Also enjoyable are the strings by Tapas Roy. The last song Saale Sapne is another trademark Trivedi affair, has shades of songs from “Queen” and the drums from ‘Gudgudi’ from “Secret Superstar” appear here too. Mohit Chauhan sings well, but the song seems too long to enjoy completely, and too typical. When the second antara starts, it starts to get tedious! Kausar’s lyrics are the only highlight of the song.


Amit continues to play safe, and stays in his comfort zone.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8.5 + 7.5 + 8 + 7 + 6.5 = 37.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Se Teri > Hu Ba Hu > The Pad Man Song > Sayaani > Saale Sapne

 

Which is your favourite song from Pad Man? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SHORT, SIMPLE, SWEET.. (RUKH – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Sidhant Mago
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: Not Released
♪ Movie Released On: 27th October 2017

Rukh Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Rukh is a Bollywood drama / domestic thriller, starring Adarsh Gourav, Manoj Bajpayee, Smita Tambe and Kumud Mishra in prominent roles. The film is directed by Atanu Mukherjee and produced by Manish Mundra. The film is a mystery drama, revolving around a son who is trying to cope with the death of his father, only to discover hidden secrets which lead to him investigating the actual cause of his father’s death. The music is given by Amit Trivedi who is fresh from the success of his album to Aamir Khan’s ‘Secret Superstar’, and it marks his return to scoring for non-mainstream cinema. Now, Zee has not yet released anything by way of a full album for this movie, but I cannot stall my future reviews due to lack of time, so I will post this and update it when (and if) some ‘album’ comes. The album, now of two tracks, is quite short, so let’s dive right in.


A very Amit Trivedi-like sound starts off the album, with a lilting, beautiful and soulful number called Khidki, sung by Mohan Kannan in his characteristic grainy textured voice. Trivedi’s composition resembles so many of his songs from movies like ‘Udaan’, and this is the trademark Trivedi sound, something that was evidently absent from his other albums this year, ‘Qaidi Band’ and ‘Secret Superstar’. Also, the method of Trivedi himself repeating the hookline after every time Mohan sings it, is the signature Trivedi style. The flute (Naveen Kumar) has to be pointed out, because it is just so marvellous and mellifluous. Beautiful lyrics by Sidhant Mago also stand out here.
Hai Baaki is more along the melancholic lines that the movie is structured upon, and composed in a very matured way, though keeping the Trivedi flavour intact. Again, what stands out most are Mago’s magical lyrics, enough to make you feel emotional. Arijit’s mellow singing is perfect here. The first part of the song, as unplugged as it seems, gives way to a clarinet oriented interlude which in turn veers into a guitar-led antara. But the true magic is towards the end when Trivedi also adds a nice digital touch to the music which makes the song soar very high.

Just like ‘Kai Po Che’ (2013), Trivedi delivers a short album that is nothing short of perfect, and also his best this year.


Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4.5 = 9 {Actually I’d rate them 5 each, but then album percentage is 100%, and that’s not right, at least not for this album! Sorry!}

Album Percentage: 90%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Listen to both! 🙂

 

Which is your favourite song from Rukh? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

KAUSAR MUNIR – THE SECRET SUPERSTAR! (SECRET SUPERSTAR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 18th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 19th October 2017

Secret Superstar Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Secret Superstar is a Bollywood drama starring Zaira Wasim, Meher Vij, Tirth Sharma, Raj Arjun and Aamir Khan. The film is directed and written by debutant Advait Chandan, and produced by Aamir Khan, Zee Studios and Akash ChawlaAfter the success of ‘Dangal’, Aamir Khan once again casts Zaira Wasim in the lead role here, in a story which is basically a young girl, Insia’s, journey to fulfilling her dream of becoming a famous singer. Great reviews have already started pouring in for the film, and I’m not going to rant about how Zee Music should’ve released the album for a musical movie much earlier than one day before the movie. Anyway, the music this time has been scored by a composer who has never composed for Aamir Khan. Amit Trivedi is choosing much more music-oriented scripts nowadays, as is evident from his choices of ‘Qaidi Band’ and now this. In ‘Qaidi Band’ he impressed a lot, managing to give the whole album a distinct rock touch, without making it sound monotonous. But this time, he needs to keep in mind the point of view of a 14-year old school going girl, and compose from her point of view. That might be tough, it might be easy, but we know it would not be something unconventional, like Trivedi is known to do. His quirkiness is expected to stay out of the album, but the soulful side of his is definitely expected to show itself in this particular album. So without further ado, because most of you are already in theatres watching the movie, or have already watched it, or are going this weekend, let’s jump into the music of ‘Secret Superstar’!


Main Kaun Hoon is the perfect self-discovery song to suit the film’s story and though the composition turns out to be quite underwhelming, barring the uplifting portion towards the end, it is debutante (15-years old only, at the time of recording the song) Meghna Mishra’s amazing vocals that redeem the song. The hookline is good, but very conventional at the same time. Given that the song has been written and composed by a young teenager though, it is perfect. The strings and drums and guitars by Trivedi make the song worthwhile. Kausar Munir’s lyrics here are just a snippet of the beautiful words that are to come in the rest of the album. Meri Pyaari Ammi follows with another staid composition, with unnecessary pauses that break the continuity of the song, and a hookline that is high-spirited but manages to get tiresome towards the end. Again, Meghna’s vocals are beautiful, but here it is lyricist Kausar Munir who makes the song cherishable due to her wonderful lyrics!
It is only in the beautiful folk-based Sapne Re that we remember that the album’s music is by Trivedi, because he bases it on a wonderful North-Eastern rhythm, one that we loved in his ‘Sawaar Loon’ (Lootera; 2013). Wonderful guitars and strings accompany the innocent composition; something that we would never have heard from Trivedi had it not been for this film which gave him the chance to compose from the point of view of a teenage girl. The folksy music gels well with Meghna’s sugary sweet vocals, and Kausar’s lyrics also keep the innocence of childhood intact. While in this song, the protagonist encourages her dreams to come true, she wills them to get locked up inside her heart in the polar opposite O Re Manwa. It is a beauty how two opposite situations arise in the same album, and through Kausar’s lyrics it is almost like a story unfolding in front of us. The composition itself is another one that doesn’t scream ‘Trivedi’, but can still be deciphered as a Trivedi song by the wonderful rock base, especially the way the guitars have been played. And as I juxtapose ‘Sapne Re’ with ‘O Re Manwa’, Amit also introduces a musical segment from ‘Sapne Re’ into ‘O Re Manwa’, as if trying to consolidate my assumption that these two songs are linked somehow! Meghna’s singing is toned down in a very subtle manner here, and she sounds so much different from her other songs here, mostly due to the lack of high octave notes.
The best song of the album though, is the dreamy Nachdi Phira, a song that stands out due to its motivational and inspirational sound. The composition starts off beautifully, with serene piano and strings working together to soothe your senses, until it breaks out into a high-spirited rock ballad, centred around Kausar Munir’s lyrics that create a nomadic touch. The antara of this song in particular, is beautifully composed, amazingly traversing the high octaves and hitting the heart at the right places. The lyrics of the mukhda of this song are used again in the cheesy Sexy Baliye, a song used to bring out the corniness of Aamir Khan’s character Shakti Kumaarr, a veteran music composer who isn’t in form anymore, as is evident from Trivedi’s spoofy composition. The arrangements are a mishmash of all kinds of sounds from all sorts of Bollywood songs — Punjabi pop, Bhangra and whatnot. It reminds me of ‘Switty’ (Delhi Belly). Mika sings aptly, and even if this weren’t a spoof song, he would’ve sounded the same. 😆
The only other male song on the album, I’ll Miss You is by another debutant, Kushal Chokshi. He gets to sing the romantic song which brings out the romance between Insia and Chintan. The song is refreshing, and has a trademark Trivedi touch, especially in the guitars in the hookline. Kausar’s lyrics will be especially loved by those who miss their school days. The school romance she cooks up in the lyrics is just so sweet, you will be reminded of your school days. Sunidhi Chauhan, who, coincidentally, I was thinking of when I thought who could have sung Meghna Mishra’s songs if this wasn’t a film with a teenage protagonist, gets the most lively song on the album, Gudgudi — a feel-good number that once again stands out because of its quirky lyrics. Amit’s composition is a wonderfully sprightly one, in trademark Amit Trivedi style, especially in the line before the hook. Mandolins and banjoes and harmonicas and brass instruments stand out among others, and give it a wonderful country sound. Sunidhi, ever-energetic, was the best choice for the song. Kausar pens amazing lyrics with so many everyday references, it is so fun to listen to.


Keeping in mind the setting of Secret Superstar, and the fact that the protagonist stirring up all this music is a young girl of fourteen of fifteen, the music is aptly conventional. Though I was a bit disappointed after Trivedi made that awesome rock album ‘Qaidi Band’, I soon came to terms with the fact that not always can he try something new like that. Here though, what actually shines is the amazing singing by debutante Meghna Mishra (I must say, great find, and also Kushal Chokshi!) and the splendid lyrics by Kausar Munir! The secret superstar here is the lyricist!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album (in the order they appear in the review): 4 + 3.5 + 5 + 4.5 + 5 + 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 = 34

Album Percentage: 85%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sapne Re = Nachdi Phira > O Re Manwa = I’ll Miss You > Main Kaun Hoon = Gudgudi > Sexy Baliye = Meri Pyaari Ammi

 

Which is your favourite song from Secret Superstar? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂