KRIPAYA DHYAAN DE, YEH ALBUM SUNN LE! (LOVE PER SQUARE FOOT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sohail Sen
♪ Lyrics by: Gopal Datt, Anand Tiwari, Abhishek Dhusia, Sahir Nawab, Sumeet Suvarna, Abhiruchi Chand & Jamil Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 14th February 2018

Love Per Square Foot Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Love Per Square Foot is a Bollywood rom-com that premiered on Netflix this Valentine’s Day. The film stars Vicky Kaushal, Angira Dhar and Alankrita Sahai in lead roles, and is directed by Anand Tiwari, and produced by Ronnie Screwvala. The film’s music has been composed by Sohail Sen, back after a long time; his last was ‘Happy Bhag Jayegi’ in 2016. Let’s hope his musical style is intact and he delivers yet another enjoyable album!


Sohail Sen’s return to music composition after one and a half years doesn’t hold as much magic as his previous outings used to. That being said, this album takes some time to warm up to, and in the first listen, doesn’t create much of an impact.
Proceedings are kicked off by the entertaining Mumbaiya rap song Yatri Kripaya Dhyaan De, a tribute to all things Mumbai. The residents of the metropolis would feel a certain pride once they listen to this song, as will the train station announcers. The rap by Mumbai’s Finest (Abhishek Dhusia, Sahir Nawab & Sumeet Suvarna) is entertaining, a bit in the style of DIVINE, and thankfully fits snugly into the song. Lively beatboxing starts off the song, but the song kind of loses its connect in the initial one minute or so, until it settles into its place. After that, it is really enjoyable. I love the way Sohail introduces a nice Maharashtrian-flavoured bhajan segment towards the end, and a nice Ganpati dhol taasha rhythm in the interlude. The vocalists seem to be newcomers, but do a great job in conveying the youthfulness of the city.
Udit Narayan, the evergreen singer, the only singer who hasn’t seemed to age, returns after quite some time, with Ishq Mein Bajti Hai Ghanti, an upbeat wedding song led by the quintessential brass band. Sohail also composes it in a typical 90s tune, to help Udit get more comfortable, probably. It still works thanks to the catchy rhythms and composition and of course, the vocals! Nothing particularly new here, though. The lyrics are funny though, comparing love and marriage.
Benny Dayal and Shivangi Bhayana get the weakest song of the album, Chicken Dance, a song whose composition falls all over the place, though the initial adlib is entertaining. The electric guitars do not work at all, and it ends up being a clumsy party number with no recall value. Benny thankfully has the magnetism in his voice to help listeners keep listening, but Shivangi doesn’t have that quality yet!
Aashiyana is a beautiful romantic song, the only song of the album whose lyrics (by Abhiruchi Chand) make a huge impact on the song. Altamash Faridi and Tarannum Malik, regulars on Sohail Sen albums, know how to do justice to his music, and so the results in the vocal department are amazing. I commend the composer for not going for Arijit though there was a huge scope, because Altamash’s voice brings a freshness to the song, though slightly over-nasal. Tarannum sings her part beautifully too! The antaras are the best parts of the song, composed in a tune that is easily hummable. The reason the lyrics stand out so much, is the conversational way they have been written, seeming like a tribute to Gulzar, who is also mentioned in the song!
Maqbool Hai, the other song by Altamash, is a nice mellow number, starting off with an operatic piece, and seguing into a very Bhatt-ish but very hauntingly catchy melody that wins your heart over. Again, Altamash sings his heart out, creating beautiful effects. The Rahman touch is audible in the song as well, and somehow it sounds like a song that resembles songs from 2008-2009. It still sounds fresh though.
Rekha Bhardwaj ends the album with two versions of a classically-based melody Raaz Apne Dil Ke, a song that fares better and seems more lovable in its Indian Version, with arrangements that complement the composition — tablas, played in a soothing rhythm, and a wonderful tanpura setting the mood for a wonderful classical listen. The Western Version sounds like the composition is uncomfortable with the clumsy “doo doo doo da” with which the song starts, not to mention the digital beats in the background. Not the very best examples of fusion, but there is still a hint of classical music (sarangi) here too, which makes it bearable, at least.


Sohail Sen has done better than this previously, but overall, the album is enjoyable, with a mixed variety of songs, and none being utterly bad!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 7 + 5.5 + 8.5 + 8 + 8 + 6.5 =

Album Percentage: 72.86%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aashiyana > Maqbool Hai = Raaz Apne Dil Ke (Indian) > Yatri Kripaya Dhyaan De > Ishq Mein Bajti Hai Ghanti > Raaz Apne Dil Ke (Western) > Chicken Dance

 

Which is your favourite song from Love Per Square Foot? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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