NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

THE CASE OF THE INCOMPLETE ALBUM… (JAGGA JASOOS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th July 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 14th July 2017

Jagga Jasoos Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Jagga Jasoos is a Bollywood musical adventure film, starring Ranbir Kapoor And Katrina Kaif in lead roles. The film has been directed by Anurag Basu and produced by Siddharth Roy Kapur, Anurag Basu And Ranbir Kapoor. The film is a musical that revolves around the adventures of a teenage detective, Jagga. The musical format of the film makes it one-of-its-kind, and never before tried in Bollywood. After having watched the movie, I can only say that Anurag gets full marks just for trying the format and sucking us into this very innocent and beautiful world. Now, T-Series has bought the rights of only the full-length songs in the film, it seems, and so they’ve released a ‘full album’ comprising six songs. Pritam has done a wonderful job giving rhyme and tune to Jagga’s world. You might have already noticed that I haven’t written a rant about how late the album released — it is because I kind of expected the songs to release late just because they might give away the story of the film. Sadly, the deceitful makers only released six songs. So whatver, let’s just analyze the songs we all have been hearing for the past two months!


1. Ullu Ka Pattha

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Nikhita Gandhi, Ulule Vocals by ~ Vivienne Pocha, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hmm, confuse hai,
Dosti pe isse aitbaar aadha hai,
Rang mein dosti ke jo bhang ghol de,
Ishq ka bhoot sar pe savaar aadha hai!
Nigal sake nahin, ugal sake!
Sangemarmar ka bangla banaata hai,
Dil akbar ka pota hai!
Jaana na ho jahaan vahin jaata hai,
Dil ullu ka pattha hai!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam starts this colossal album with a song that jumps right into diversity, with a Spanish guitar wonderfully setting up a nice European flavour for us. And then Vivienne Pocha’s “ulule” vocals start and we are instantly hooked. Pritam’s composition is catchy, with a mellifluous sound. The rapid-paced portions are just amazing, and the way they drop into the smooth hookline is marvellous too. The “ulule” adds a tinge of craziness and zaniness to the song, giving something that children and adults alike can pick on to, as a kind of signature of the song. The antara has a beautiful composition, and keeps up with the Spanish feel of the song. The arrangements are just bewitching; the Spanish guitar as described earlier, is just a beautiful addition to the song; it transports you elsewhere. There’s a nice conclusion in yhe form of a Spanish guitar musical piece, and that part is something you ought not to miss, thinking that the vocals are over. Other instruments like drums and then digital beats provide a nice and groovy beat to the song. The vocalists do a great job; Arijit as always moulds himself into the required form and renders this quirky romantic song with ease, while Nikhita supports him well. Though I feel Shalmali would have suited better here! Anyway, that huskiness in Nikhita’s voice is what makes it sound amazing. I like the way how Pritam adds a welcoming drum portion before she enters; it sounds like it’s a welcome for her to come in the song! And of course, Vivienne, who gives the song a nice hookline in the form of her “ulule” backing vocals, does a fantastic job. Arijit’s vocals at the end of the song where he just experiments by making non-verbal sounds, sounds amazing. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are super cute, describing the heart as many things nobody could ever think of, like Shah Jahan, A hundred rupees change, and whatnot. A crazy and fun romantic song to start off this album; it has already created waves across the nation!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

2. Galti Se Mistake

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Chal muscle phulaana, thodi body banaana,
Tere chikne gaalon pe stubble ki fasal ugaana,
Arererereee, abey aye,
Chal beta shuru ho jaa guru,
Bagal uthaake thoda deo lagaana,
Kisi bagal waali ko mardaani khushboo sunghaana,
Chal upar ke do button dheele karke bataana,
Baalon wala seena dikhaana, baalon wala seena dikhaana!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam switches modes from European music to Indian music in the next song. Indian music itself is so diverse; here he picks a wonderful style of music to back the next song, and that is Assam’s Bihu Dance music. The fun Assamese percussion and wind instruments start off the song, until it takes a digital turn and the song starts. It is essentially a fun song being sung in the boys’ hostel, and that craziness reflects in the composition. The way the composition makes abrupt stops and starts, and turns unexpectedly, shows the same. I loved how Pritam infused the Bihu Dance theme into this kind of a song, that has no relation whatsoever to Bihu. The wonderful folk instruments they’ve used, against the backdrop of digitally produced sounds and a crazy composition, provides for a fun listen. The composition itself takes time to grow, because the song is so situation-oriented. The hookline is just so cute, you can’t get it out of your head. The antara is amazing, but what makes it more amazing is Amit Mishra’s stupendous rendition of it. He brings a very harsh quality to his voice, probably to be shown as the rowdiness of the boys in the hostel. Arijit joins only in the hookline, and the voice quality gets smoother, so you know he is singing. Amit sings the rest of the song brilliantly though! After the antara, Pritam introduces an almost one-minute-long folk interlude, after which the hookline just plays again. I feel that could’ve been shortened in length as that portion is just a mix of all the instrumental pieces we heard at the beginning of the song. Amitabh’s lyrics are again, hilarious. The antara is superbly funny! A fun song, whose composition takes a little time to grow, but till then, the arrangements and vocals help you love it!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Jhumritalaiyya

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Neelesh Misra

“Duniya yeh thodi thodi hai behtar lagey,
Dil ke naukar-o-chaakar lagey,
Jhuk ke pooche kya hai aarzoo!”

– Neelesh Misra

This soft romantic song is featured on the album next, and it is a song that made me love it right from the moment I first heard it. Pritam brings in an evident Coke Studio treatment for this song, which is tangible in the arrangements and unconventionally sweet composition. The composition is instantly likeable, only because of its amazing cuteness. The hook, ‘duniya yeh..’ has a distinct Coke Studio feel; it goes suddenly high-pitched in the otherwise low-pitched and calm composition. The “Ah-ha-haa” sounds so cute as well! The composition is what makes the song sound fit for a Disney movie. The antara has the same tune as the mukhda, with Arijit providing a bit of pleasant variation. There is a short conclusion line after a long interlude after the antara, which brings in the trademark Pritam touch to the song, and ends it on that very Pritam-ish note. The arrangements are complete with acoustic guitars, rock guitars, and drums, but all of this only increases the calmness of the song, making it a kind of peculiarly soothing alternative rock song. And that’s why I immediately linked it to Coke Studio. The backing chorus provides even more of that oh-so-tangible Pritam touch. The mukhda that is arranged solely on acoustic guitars and the groovy drum beats, sounds amazing and grips the listener right away. There is a nice banjo-like instrument portion in the hookline, which sounds amazing, giving the song a kind of folksy vibe. The second interlude is what showcases the most important part of the song, at least musically. It is here that we are served a wonderful rock guitar and drums combo that works so well, and then when the backing chorus joins in later on, you can’t help but sway with the vocals, as the wonderful drum beats accompany you. Arijit’s vocals are the perfect choice here; he exudes simplicity and charm, and renders the song spot-on. His vocal prowess is showcased in the song, especially in that short portion at the very end where his raw voice without any instruments behind it is exposed. And in the antara, the way he sings “rakh jaaunga“, is spectacular! A slight confusion is that Mohan Kanan could be heard in the song promo of this song on YouTube; but nowhere to be heard in this audio version. 😐😐 Neelesh Misra, who writes so infrequently, hits the bull’s-eye yet again, and some of the lines are funny in a cute way, while the others are very thought-provoking, like the one I’ve showcased up there below the credits of the song. A pleasant, breezy romantic song!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Phir Wahi

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Phir wahi, phir wahi, saundhi yaadein puraani, phir wahi,
Phir wahi, phir wahi, bisri bhooli kahaani, phir wahi,
Phir wahi, phir wahi, jhootha vaada,
Aasmaan ka mere, chanda, aadha,
Dil kyun joda agar dil dukhaana tha?
Aaye kyun thhe agar tumko jaana tha?
Jaate jaate labon pe bahaana tha, phir wahi!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After all those happy-go-lucky songs, it is time for a pathos-filled, heart-rending, sad song. And let me tell you, this one is a masterpiece! The composition takes the route of many former Bhatt-Pritam sad songs, but still has a sound of its own, thanks to Pritam’s wonderful arrangements. If the had arranged it just like his old Bhatt-ish songs, it might not have appealed so much at all. The composition is wonderful. It starts very slowly, and might not hook you at once, but right from the first instance of the phrase “Phir Wahi” in the song, it gets better. The emotion is almost tangible, and Arijit’s singing makes it even more so. I personally loved the tunes of the lines “dil kyun joda agar dil dukhaana tha..” and all other variants of it. The song has nothing more than the mukhda repeated twice, but its essence lies in that. It is emotional without having an overtly complex and twisting composition. The straightforward notes hit your heart instantly. The hookline is really emotional. And the song is actually about a son yearning for his father to come back, making it so much more layered than the usual boy missing girl Bollywood sad song. More on that when we speak about the lyrics. The arrangements are beautiful as well. There is a wonderful guitar played throughout the song. The way they stop-and-resume the guitar strums in the “aansoon pochhe hi kyun…” line of the antara, is just mind blowing!!! But even more spectacular than the guitar, there is also a WONDERFUL piano portion that starts the song. The interlude is a wonderful Coke Studio-esque portion, with amazing soft rock sounds of the drums, which continues for the rest of the song. The piano chords throughout the song are amazing. Backing vocals are beautiful wherever they can be heard. The alternative rock that features in the song after the mukhda is the trademark Pritam sound, which we heard in songs like ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani), ‘Saware’ (Phantom), ‘Daayre’ (Dilwale) and the recent ‘Main Agar’ (Tubelight). Towards the end, a wonderful saxophone enters that steals the show before the song ends. And again, that splendid piano loop that started the song, ends the song too. Amitabh’s lyrics just tug at your heartstrings. The love of the song for his father is beautifully reflected in the lines he’s written, with a bit of frustration on the son’s part for his father leaving him like that, and evident love in that frustration as well. A sad song unlike the Bollywood sad songs of these days.

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Musafir

Singer ~ Tushar Joshi, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Ho kahaani meri, tarjumaa ho tera,
Ho duaayein teri, sar jhuka ho mera,
Raaz mein bhi tere, sach chhupa ho mera,
Main kamaai jodun, karz adaa ho tera,
Yahaan mera tere siva, hai dooja nahin koi re,
Akela mujhe chhodke, na jaana yun nirmohi re!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam finally brings in another singer to sing the entire song, this time, a debutant! It’s really exciting when Pritam introduces new singers to us, because we know he doesn’t leave them for a long time, and keeps giving them opportunities to shine in his later albums. Tushar Joshi, who did sing a couple of backing vocal portions in Pritam albums prior to this, gets to enter Bollywood as a lead singer, and how! The song he gets is plain out of this world. A composition that is a trademark Pritam composition, yet invokes such pathos and emotion, this song grows on you in no time! The mukhda is wonderful; it repeats twice in this song too; I think that’s the norm nowadays — maybe composers don’t have the time to compose a new tune for antaras! Anyway, the composition is beautiful. After each stanza, a wonderful “Aye-aye-aye-aye” portion really gives you the goosebumps. The high-pitched line in the song, “yahaan mera tere siva...” is just too good! Pritam’s arrangements do not stray from his usual style of arranging such songs; a loud but soothing rock template backs the solid composition, with wonderful instances of piano, acoustic guitar and the necessary drums and electric guitars. Towards the end, a ravishing background chorus sings for about the last one and a half minute or so, coupled with an amazing guitar solo! At the beginning a nice and soothing piano loop plays, and quite like the previous song, ‘Phir Wahi’, it sucks you in completely! Tushar’s voice sounds very similar to Arijit’s in the high notes, but otherwise, it is sort of a cleaned version of Arijit’s voice, without the rough texture. Amitabh’s lyrics are yet another instance of his bravissimo; the man is a complete genius when it comes to such philosophical-slash-romantic songs! A beautiful composition evoking memories of songs like ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani)!

Rating: 5/5

 

6. Khaana Khaake

Singers ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Tushar Joshi, Geet Sagar, June Banerjee, Antara Mitra, Amit Mishra, Ashwin Kulkarni, Aaroh Velankar & Sunny MR, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Life ki simple si philosophy, yeh jaan lo,
Hum yahaan do din ke mehmaan hai, yeh maan lo,
Non-stop ek party hai, jahaan sabko aana hai,
Aur khaana khaake, daaru peeke, chale jaana hai!
Jeena toh unhi ka jeena kehlaaya,
Jo bhi bina chu cha, karke, khaake peeke chale gaye, chale gaye!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The next and final (😏😏) song on the album, is a laugh riot, whether you hear it on-screen or off. If you’ve watched the video, there’s an entertaining video to couple with the random and quirky song. But if you hear just the audio too, it doesn’t take away from the comic appeal of the song. The hook itself is a crazy, zany and wacky line, that by itself, helps us gather more interest to listen on. The composition is very simple, and has nothing much like a proper structure. All I know is that it has the hookline repeated thousands of times. The only thing that can pass as an antara, is Tushar Joshi’s portion in the middle, which has been composed and even sung, beautifully. But it has been written even more beautifully. Bhattacharya sees life as a party, where everyone has to eat, drink, and then leave! What an imagination! So can we say, “All the world’s a party. And all the men and women merely eaters and drinkers”? 😄😄 The song provides a lot of entertainment for the ears, for instance, there’s a nice haunting line in the form of the “khaali ghar mein chaaron aur sannata” line and its variants, and the entertaining lyrics, and to top it all, one of the female vocalists emulates a saxophone and succeeds in adding to the whimsicality of the song. Tushar Joshi in his portion, playback singing for Ranbir’s character, cleverly incorporates a bit of Jagga’s stammer before starting his line! That’s a nice effect! The simple digital metronomish beat that backs the song serves as almost the only instrumentation, besides the weird quirky sounds like a spoon clinking against a glass, and other zany sounds. Of course, this song tilts a little on the “Less Repeat Value” side! Welcome to a madhouse!

Rating: 4/5


Jagga Jasoos is an amazing album, full of variety, innovation and catchy music. Pritam and Anurag Basu recreate the magic of “‘Barfi!”, though in a slightly different and more massy way. The music has worked already and should work even more. My only regret is that, for a film that’s a musical and has such amazing songs in it, and had such hard work gone into it by all persons involved, the small songs haven’t released with the full album! Let’s hope they’ll release and we will get to relive Pritam’s and Basu’s magic of the big screen, on our phones! And let me assure you, these six songs are NOTHING compared to those! Anyway, this six-song album is a good showcase of Pritam’s range and versatility!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 4 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 91% {This is not the final rating; when the OST releases, I will review it average it out}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: From start to finish in the same order.

 

Which is your favourite song from Jagga JasoosPlease vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MULTICOMPOSERS GIVE A HUGE, BUT NANHA-MUNNA ALBUM!! (MUNNA MICHAEL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Danish Sabri, Sabbir Khan & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st July 2017

Munna Michael Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Munna Michael is an upcoming Bollywood dance/action film starring Tiger Shroff, Nidhhi Agerwal and Nawazuddin Siddiqui in central roles. The film is directed by Sabbir Khan, and produced by Viki Rajani and Eros International. The film revolves around a dance competition, in which a vagabond played by Shroff decides to participate, until he is entangled into teaching the local villain how to dance, and they both fall in love with the same girl. So, the typical *yaaaaaawwwwwwwnnn* Bollywood plot. The music is by multiple composers, featuring songs by Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu. I’m not excited about anybody’s song particularly, except maybe Tanishk’s solo song and Tanishk’s song with his ex-co-composer Vayu, who he partnered up with again for this song after 2015’s smashing debut for them, ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), so let’s just see what the album is about and we might just get surprised!


1. Main Hoon

Singer ~ Siddharth Mahadevan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is a tribute to Michael Jackson, since the film is a dance film and the main character is probably an MJ fan, if we can deduce anything from his name. Tanishk’s composition is bland. Hookline is oddly-placed, but the Antara has a bearable tune. Arrangement and mixing are chaotic, as if Tanishk was adamant on using all techno sounds there are. The impactful vocals dont help either. Lyrics worth avoiding. When an oddly placed hook spoils almost the entire song!

Rating: 2/5

 

2. Ding Dang

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Antara Mitra, Rap by ~ Parry G, Shivi & Danish Sabri, Music by ~ Javed-Mohsin, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri & Sabbir Khan

A tribute to Jackie Shroff (atleast lyrically). The generic composition leaves you unflinched. Typical tapori arrangements with random backing vocals of “Aah-aah”. Both vocalists fail to make the song better, and the rappers fail miserably. Lyrics are cheap, trying-to-be-funny but failing miserably again. The hook lyrics make you go, “Sorry, what???” Ding dung?

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Pyar Ho

Singers ~ Vishal Mishra & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A very soothing romantic composition but quite heard-before, and the arrangements too remind of some songs heard in the past. The strings, guitars and digital arrangement still win your heart, though. The composer himself has sung as if he wanted Arijit to have sung it and Arijit would have been apt. Sunidhi is her usual perfect self while Neeti Mohan seems to have done backing vocals, but hasn’t been credited! Lyrics are very staid and nothing new. Best of the album but nothing creative.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Swag

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya & Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

A very situational song for a performance of Nawazuddin’s character. And they have tried to make it sound so-called “cool”, but it doesn’t work much. That instrumental loop that keeps repeating throughout the song is catchy, and the digital beats are cool, but sound very similar to an English song that I can’t recall. Brijesh’s vocals are the fun part of the song, but Pranay’s interruptions could have been avoided. Lyrics are bad, again. Except for Brijesh and that instrumental loop, a forgettable song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Beparwah

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Nandini Deb, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is one of Gourov-Roshin’s rare songs that are not recreations, and surprisingly, it starts off quite promisingly, in a retro-sounding prelude. The composition is still good, but a duration of six minutes is way too far-fetched, because the song is also very repetitive, and after one antara the song gets too boring. Arrangements are the same techno sounds that featured in the other songs, and many times in the past too. A rock interlude somewhere in the middle makes your ears bleed. Siddharth Basrur does a good job, but his cosinger, Nandini Deb, doesn’t impress. Again, lyrics are unimpressive. It is a song Hrithik Roshan should have got in 1999. 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Shake Karaan

Singers ~ Kanika Kapoor & Meet Bros., Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

I see the credits for this song.. and I prepare myself for another ‘Baby Doll’. And sure enough, those pop sounds and ladies shrieking feature in this song. I admit that the composition is catchy but not as much as previous Meet Bros-Kanika songs. The sound is a welcome change from the overpowering disco theme of the rest of the songs. Kanika’s voice is enjoyable as always. Lyrics continue to be the sloppiest they can be! A welcome change from the overbearing techno sounds of the album, but not innovative at all! 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

7. Feel The Rhythm

Singer ~ Rahul Pandey, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Pranay M. Rijia & Sabbir Khan

Pranay’s next song is actually quite impressive. The composition is a perfect example of a catchy MJ-ish tune, complete with glitzy arrangements that Pranay aces. The techno sounds here and the techno sounds in the other songs differ so much in the freshness quotient. This one is on the lines of ‘Iss Tarah’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) and that’s how it impressed me. Rahul Pandey sings a bit like Yash Narvekar and Benny Dayal, and sings impressively too. Again, the lyrics are the usual. A nice and fresh-sounding dance song!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

8. Beat It Bijuriya

Singers ~ Asees Kaur & Renesa Baadchi, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

Tanishk-Vayu return after two years (‘Banno’; ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’) with another folksy song, this time with a techno twist, obviously. The song has a very superficial tune, and hard to grip. Also it sounds inspired from Tanishk’s own ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ Title track. The arrangements match those of their first song; folksy harmonium, dhols and other techno sounds make for an entertaining listen. There’s an amazing fiddle interlude. Asees sings like never before, with a grunge in her voice in the hookline. The lyrics are a kind of funny Hinglish that I couldn’t grasp at once. Entertaining but limitedly.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

9. Pyar Ho (Redux)

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Sunidhi sings this Redux of ‘Pyar Ho’ solo. It has a melancholic arrangement, with those slow and mellow piano notes, that gets quite boring to hear after some time. The strings are good enough though. Sunidhi’s solo rendition though, is a treat to the ears. The composition is the same, and the lyrics have been tweaked to make it sound sad. Not something I’d like to listen to often.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

10. Swag (Rebirth)

Singer ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

‘Swag’ had apparently died while the rest of the songs were playing, so its ‘Rebirth’ appears now. Now, whatever little elements ‘Swag’ had going for it, are all removed in this Rebirth. It has even been stripped of all melody (whatever little it had) and now sounds like a funky instrumental that makes you cringe because of the way Pranay chants those lines creepily. The arrangements are fresh here, but there’s nothing like a good tune or good vocals to accompany it. So that’s a wasted opportunity. I prefer the song in its last life.

Rating: 1.5/5


Munna Michael sounds like a very badly done ‘ABCD’ album. Then again, if ‘ABCD’ would’ve had such music, we wouldn’t have had a sequel. The overdose of (badly done) techno music really sounds useless. One song gets it right, but no others impress. When you can groove to only one song in a dance film’s album, the album’s got problems. Also, when a director or producer asks for “Give me one Kanika song, one tribute to Jackie Shroff, one to Michael Jackson, one funky Hinglish song, many wannabe retro songs”, the results are bound to be bad. ‘Munna’ is a name usually used for small kids. So may I say that these Munna Multicomposers failed miserably? 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 1.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pyar Ho = Feel The Rhythm > Swag = Beparwah = Shake Karaan = Beat It Bijuriya = Pyar Ho (Redux) > Main Hoon = Ding Dang > Swag (Rebirth)

 

Which is your favourite song from Munna Michael? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NA PASAND AANA HAI MUSHKIL! (AE DIL HAI MUSHKIL – Music Review)

So, like two days before the movie releases, Sony Music decides to finally release this album! Good job, Sony and Keep it Up! 😠


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya
♪ Music Label: Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 26th October 2016
♪ Movie Releasees On: 28th October 2016

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil Album Cover

Ae Dil Hai Mushkil Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Ae Dil Hai Mushkil is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy / drama, which stars Anushka Sharma and Ranbir Kapoor in lead roles, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Fawad Khan in cameos, and special appearances by Shahrukh Khan, Lisa Haydon, Alia Bhatt and Imran Abbas. The film has been directed by Karan Johar, and produced by him along with Hiroo Yash Johar, his mom. The film’s storyline has been well debated on throughout the days of its promotions, and that leaves me with nothing to write about it here, and since the album has been released so “early”, I need to get on with the review like right away! So as you all may know, Karan Johar’s movies have always had awesome soundtracks that become the definition of his films. Be it ‘Kuch Kuch Hota Hai’ by Jatin-Lalit, ‘Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham’ by Jatin-Lalit, Sandesh Shandilya & Aadesh Shrivastava, ‘Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna’ & ‘My Name Is Khan’ by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, or ‘Student of The Year’ by Vishal-Shekhar, Karan has struck a great rapport with each music composer he’s worked with and the results have always turned out to be outstanding. This time, he chooses the hit machine Pritam Chakraborty to do the honors, and I think that was a great decision after the music of his production ‘Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani’ which had music by Pritam, became such a blockbuster. I also suspect that that was when he roped in or started thinking about Pritam scoring for his next film, that turned out to be ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’. Well, five of the music videos have already released, and from the last two months, the songs of the movie have been all over, literally! Pritam has scored six songs for the movie. So without further ado, let’s see how mushkil (difficult) it is to like this album! 😀 Or rather, how difficult it is not to like it! 😉


1. Ae Dil Hai Mushkil
Singer ~ Arijit Singh

The album kicks off with melancholy galore! And I really don’t usually like melancholy with a typical Bhatt wrapping in Bollywood music, but this song, is so different! First of all, forget about that Bhatt wrapping! Because this time, the Bhatt wrapping itself, has been given a very different touch! Pritam uses the same style he would use to compose songs for the Bhatt movies, but in the process, sheds all typicality. The melancholy represents the Bhatt style so much, but the arrangements all scream “Grand!!” The song seems like a put-together of ‘Janam Janam’ (Dilwale), and a very Bhatt-ish sound to it. I’m not complaining! The result is fantabulous! The composition is wonderful. Pritam starts off with an enticing mukhda that just screams at you to jump into the song, just as your grandmother tells you to jump into her house when you visit! 🙂 Everything about it is so alluring and convincing, that nothing could go wrong. A grand opening makes way for the very mellow hookline, which has become the daily food of most of the nation’s population over the two months since it has come out. The high-pitched line “Mujhe aazmaati hai teri kami…” is so fantastic, that it hurts to wonder how Pritam put together such contrasting lines as this and the starting line and the hookline. The first antara follows the high-pitch and angst and takes it to a whole new level, where it seems that Arijit seems uncomfortable touching those notes, but the result still sounds amazing. Pritam’s vision can’t go wrong, can it! 😀 The second antara follows a more sombre approach to being angsty, and the different, low-pitched composition is sooooooo beautiful, that it just immediately grows on you. The low pitch eventually gives way to more high-pitched lines, this time also, very magical. The hookline, which has different lyrics each time, is so wonderful, that you just can’t forget any of its versions. Pritam’s arrangements surpass everything else. The reason the song reminded me of ‘Janam Janam’ (Dilwale) was solely because of the arrangements. The nice little piano loop at the beginning of the song are so, so grand! On top of that, the grandeur is accentuated even more by wonderful, ostentatious, orchestral strings. The string orchestra consists of violins (Rolf Wilson, Morvin Bryce, Natalie Klauda, Ian Humphries, Raja Halder, Jan Regulski, Charles Sewart, Michelle Fleming, Debbie Widdup, Kate Robinson), violas (Meghan Cassidy, Timothy Grant, Eoin Schmidt Martin) and cellos (Ashok Klauda, Will Scholfield, Peter Gregson). The whole orchestral recording has been produced by Nikhil Paul George, and I must say, he has done a brilliant job putting together those wonderful sounds of the orchestra, not to mention the awesome job that Pritam did in composing them! The trumpet (Neil Brough) in the first interlude is so wonderful, and it imparts a kind of jazzy feel to the song. The oboe (Alison Teale) has been done very nicely, and it plays in the second interlude. Throughout the second antara, wonderful digital beats give the beats, and it sounds so otherworldly! Arijit’s vocals are amazing. He might be struggling a bit with the high notes, but manages to pull it off, and leave us spellbound with the magic of his voice. The way he mellifluously goes through the composition, both low and high portions, is commendable. Amitabh’s lyrics are quite ordinary, not bad and not excellent. They are, however, nice on the ears, due to a good use of Urdu. 😀 grand beginning to the album! Arijit is going to get his second career boost after ‘Tum Hi Ho’ with this one! And Pritam’s melody is just so… PERFECT!! 😀 #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Bulleya
Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Shilpa Rao, Backing Vocals ~ Arjun Chandy, Himanshu, Ashwin & Geet

The second song in the album is a more upbeat, fast-paced, rock-Sufi ballad. Pritam starts it off with a wonderful guitar strum, and then that strum breaks into a very impressive riff, which makes you groove to it right away. The dynamic nature of this composition perfectly contrasts the mellow nature of the previous one, and while that one was perfect as a soother, this one works as an energizer, in a very heavenly way. The composition instantly gets stuck in your head, with Pritam very nicely constructing it with traditional Sufi songs in mind. The mukhda is immensely catchy, and the magic of Pritam is infused into it in such a way, that it doesn’t take long for you to get tripping over it. Right from the beginning, Pritam might have been using some kind of telepathic connection, and as the song progresses, you’ll find that it unfolds just as you want it to, and that’s because you really love what’s going on! 😀 The mukhda is quite sober, but it’s not until the hookline when the composition gets really intoxicating. It reaches its peak there, and rises up to the mountain of high notes so easily, that you have no option but to listen with your jaw open in surprise and wonder. The first antara, sees the song get even better, with a very freely flowing tune that is something to fall for. This is definitely my favourite part of the song, and the way Amit Mishra brings a smile into his voice while singing it, is so cool! It gives way to the hookline perfectly. The second antara, is composed on a different set of notes, and is sung by Shilpa Rao very beautifully. The composition of this stanza is so heavenly, and perfectly suited for a female voice, especially that of Shilpa. I just loved the way it makes the energy of the song come to a complete halt for a while and the way it lets us in on a glimpse of heaven. The vocals by both singers are amazing. Amit Mishra is slowly emerging as a very versatile and well-ranged singer, with his voice perfectly acing those high notes in the hookline as well as the more mellow notes in the first antara. The vibe that his voice sends out while singing the words ending with “aaaar” like “yaar“, “pukaar“, “parvardigaar“, is just soooooo applause-worthy!! Shilpa Rao, who Pritam has made to sing after quite some while now (last being ‘Malang’ from ‘Dhoom 3’) sings the second antara angelically. Amit also ends the songs brilliantly with a portion that gives you goosebumps. The backing vocals by Ashwin, Himanshu, Geet and Arjun Chandy are great, and they complement Amit superbly in the main hook of the song – “murshid mera, murshid mera“. Amitabh’s lyrics are wonderful here as well — romantic and a hint of devotion. Pritam’s arrangements though, are the star of the song. That rock guitar (Roland Fernandes) is the biggest attraction of the song, and it plays almost everywhere! It is what makes the arrangements sound so energetic and dynamic. The drums, of course, are there, and can very well be missed due to everything else happening, but make their presence very well felt during the beginning of the hook every time, when they do a kind of rapid beat which is something to die for. The dholaks, on the other hand, sound very calming and soothing — resulting in a very smart fusion of rock and Sufi. Energetic, dynamic and something of an extravagant nature. Amit becomes the new rockstar of bollywood music, as Pritam presents this wonderful rock and Sufi clash! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Channa Mereya
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals ~ Keshia Braganza & Gwen Dias

It is the next song, that keeps up the emotional quotient of the album, with which we had started off the album in the title song, but this one takes that emotion to a whole different level. The composition has the capability to touch the strings of your heart and how! ❤ The song has been composed on a very trademark dholak beat, which can be heard in many such songs, and which instantly reminds me of Pritam’s own ‘Kabira (Encore)’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani). The composition is very sweet and heart-touching, and though it seems like it has been heard many times before, it still refreshes you quite magically from the inside, along with giving you this weird sense of sadness as it ends. The song starts with the mukhda sung by Arijit in an unplugged style, with nothing but the guitars supporting him, and then it gives way to that very touching dholak backing loop. The mukhda has a very emotional tune, and it just makes you want to sit and listen to it in peace, without any disturbances. Such songs are always masterpieces. Pritam did it last time in ‘Kabira’ and now here he is, at it again. The hookline is sooooo enchanting, that it just doesn’t get out of your head after hearing it for just one time. It is so immensely catchy, that it just sticks in there and all you can do about it, is to pamper it by singing it and humming it all day. You might not even realize when you start singing this song, it just comes so spontaneously to me. Now that’s a sign of a masterpiece. The first antara too, has such a sweet and lovable tune, that it is hard to ignore or forget, on hearing. The second antara actually takes the form of a kind of traditional style of singing folk Punjabi songs, and Arijit kills it! Pritam’s arrangements are masterclass. The dholak rhythm (Played by Iqbal Azad & Sanjiv Sen) keeps you listening, while the acoustic guitars (Roland) support the dholaks very well. Rock guitars (Roland & Amandeep) infuse the pathos into the song, making it sound trademark Pritam. In the first interlude, a very soul-stirring shehnaai (Omkar Dhumal) just connects with your heart, and the tune gets stuck in your head. Pritam employs some very sweet and angelic voices (Keshia Braganza & Gwen Dias) to sing the backing vocals, and you can hear them sing the hookline in a very heavenly tone. In the second interlude, they rule, and while they’re at they’re hookline, working to pave their way into our hearts with their awesome voice, there’s a very short and wonderful sarangi (Ghulam Ali Khan) in the background, which you would miss unless you’re hearing very carefully. It comes back during Arijit’s second antara, and once again, is very soft, so you have to strain your ears to hear it! Arijit’s vocals are fabulous, with each and every note making itself a home in your heart (God, your heart must be full now.. How will the blood enter and exit? 😦 ) With each of his variations, you can’t help but let out a “Waah“, and during that conclusion paragraph of his, well, he just aces it! The lyrics by Amitabh are mostly in Punjabi, but they are veryyyy touching. With lines like “Andhera tera, maine le liya, mera ujla sitaara tere naam kiya” (I took your darkness, and gave you my bright star, in exchange) and “Kitni dafaa, subah ko meri, tere aangan mein baithe, maine shaam kiya” (I turned so many of my days into evenings, waiting in your yard), Amitabh proves his mettle as a songwriter. Each line just makes its way so gracefully into your lungs. (Remember, your heart is full!) Heart-touching, and a masterstroke by Pritam! One of the best songs of the year for me! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. The Breakup Song
Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Badshah, Jonita Gandhi & Nakash Aziz, Rap by ~ Badshah

After those three songs that constitute the heartrending, emotional and cry-worthy songs of the album, things become lighter with a song that is another emotional, sobby song, disguised in a sweet, upbeat, club number. Pritam is an expert at such club numbers, and just two months ago, he gave us ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ (Dishoom) which was more of a sensuous song. This one here, is completely clean and sanskaari so much so, that the girl is actually happy about breaking up with her so-called ‘saiyaan ji‘! Pritam brings together his arrangements for songs like ‘Blame The Night’ (Holiday) and ‘Hey Mr. DJ’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and adds to it, a very desi melody, reminding one of the Kishore Kumar-Asha Bhosle duets of the 50s and 60s, where all the nok-jhok and cute teasing would please the listener. The song starts off very quirkily, with Nakash Aziz singing an introductory couplet in the voice of a chipmunk. And then the chipmunk, thanks to the clever vocal programming done by Pritam, goes on to sing a very funny and catchy tune, which turns out to be the characteristic tune of the song. (The one that starts at 0:18 and keeps playing occasionally throughout the song) After the froggy/duck-y tune in “Premika” (Dilwale), Pritam makes this chipmunk tune very nicely. 😂 And then we are introduced to the main character, a girl who’s just broken up with her saiyaan that morning, and she recites a quite interesting couplet, about how her boyfriend left her for a foreigner. And then, the tune that follows, is why I love Pritam so much! 😀 It is a very attractive tune that just lures you into the song right away. The mukhda is very catchy, and it plays entirely after every antara, too. The hookline is the best part of the song though. That tune!! The antara is a good continuation of the sweetness of the song, and keeps up the catchiness very well. There is a rap by Badshah in between the two antaras, and that, however, is so mediocre, that you don’t really pay attention to it. It seems like a forced addition into the song. The arrangements by Pritam are signature Pritam club song arrangements, with the EDM working its magic on you very strongly. The techno sounds become quite entrancing at certain points. The folk percussion is what infuses that wonderful desi feel to the arrangements, and Tapas Roy excels with that. The dholaks (Iqbal Azad & Yusuf Sheikh) are wonderful, and at places, wonderful jugalbandis of the dholaks and Techno sounds give birth to very impressive pieces of music. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are funny, and give you a nice entertainment throughout the song. His clever Hinglish gives your brain something cool to chew on, after all those philosophical and emotional lyrics in the previous three songs. I personally loved the part where he writes “Kalti hua jo saiyaan stupid tera, jeevit hua hai phir se cupid tera!” 😀 Unfortunately, Badshah’s rap becomes the only vulgar (or on the border of vulgar and profane) stuff in what would have been a very clean club number! :\ Last but definitely not the least, the vocals. Jonita wonderfully carries herself throughout the song as a girl who’s happy telling the world about how she got over her breakup, while Arijit very cutely essays the role of the boy who was clearly waiting for this breakup to take place! 😀 The way Arijit sings “Humko bin bataye toone yeh kab kar liya“, girls and ladies will die for him all over again! Jonita, once again, shows a different side of her voice, this time, a very sweet voice that we would fall for anytime! A sweet melody carried very impressively by Jonita and Arijit, whose chemistry turns out to be just amazing! And Pritam, please don’t stop experimenting like this!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Cutiepie
Singers ~ Pardeep Singh Sran, Nakash Aziz, Meenal Jain & Antara Mitra, Backing Vocals ~ Neetu Bhalla, N.K. Deep Kaur, Bhabita, Sunny, Himanshu, Ashwin, Kaushik & Sachin

The next song of the album, at first listen, seems like your everyday, typical KJo, Punjabi wedding song. But it is so much more than just that, which I understood by listening to it again and again. Pritam uses the Punjabi bhangra style to make this the most templatized song of the album, but the way he has played with the notes, is just too entertaining, enjoyable and outright fun! The song starts wonderfully with very typical Punjabi beats, a very fun ukulele loop, couple with the beats of a dhadd-like instrument. The composition is a fun-filled, energetic one, that reminds you of the craziness that Pritam is capable of infusing into his songs and subsequently, into us. This composition too, is a successor to his earlier crazy songs like ‘Saree Ke Fall Sa’ (R… Rajkumar), ‘Dhating Naach’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), ‘Badtameez Dil’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani), ‘Tukur Tukur’ (Dilwale), ‘Chor Bazaari’ (Love Aaj Kal) and sooo many others. The mukhda, which, as Pritam has generously written in the song credits, was based on a concept by the lyricist, Amitabh Bhattacharya, is very energetic and spunky, making a very effusive start to the song. The line just before the hookline, which goes “Boyfriend ki tujhe koi fikar nahin…” has been composed in such a fun way, that it will get you up and dancing. The Punjabi ladies sangeet that starts off the song, is so sweet and catchy, and also reminds me of two of Pritam’s earlier hits, ‘Saj Dhaj Ke’ (Mausam) and ‘Nagada’ (Jab We Met). The hookline is also very differently composed, but it doesn’t stand out in the song, rather it blend in with the rest of the song, and that is very good! The antara is a bit weak, but since it is so short, and works as the antara to a dance song, you ignore it, and the awesome cross line comes back to take you to the hookline. The arrangements by Pritam are top class, and the omnipresent Punjabi flavour brings a different kind of sweetness to the song. At the same time, some strong techno sounds help to enhance the quality of the sound, and the keys (Firoz Khan) tune is an awesome tune to catch onto. The guitars & ukulele (Mohit Dogra & Dev Arijit) help to bring the missing tumbi feel to the Punjabi song. The percussion, probably some electronic dholaks and dhadd, is fascinating. Towards the end, a very high-energy dhol rhythm supports the composition. There’s a part in the song when the dholak is played so rapidly, and beautifully (hear it at 1:22 and 2:56 in the song) that it just makes you go “Wow!” The main vocals by Pardeep, former ‘Raw Star’ contestant and singer of ‘Allah Hoo Allah’ (Dharam Sankat Mein) are very extravagant (Loved the way he sings “aaaye haaaye“), while Nakash supports him well (I don’t even know if Nakash has his solo portions or backing vocals, but I don’t think he has sung any solo portions, because it doesn’t sound like him). Pardeep is very vivacious in his treatment of the song, but it is at times like this, when I can’t help but wish that Labh Janjua was still here with us; he would ace the song! The additional backing vocals by Meenal Jain and Antara Mitra are awesome. (that’s the ladies sangeet!) Other backing vocalists Neetu Bhalla, N.K. Deep Kaur, Bhabita, Sunny, Himanshu, Ashwin, Kaushik and Sachin, do a good job with the “haay“s here and there in the song. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are a laugh fest, right from the ladies sangeet, to the actual lyrics of the main body of the song. His quirkiness from ‘The Breakup Song’ just seems to have increased, and the DESI-ness in his lyrics perfectly complements the desi composition by Pritam. A song that will cater to the masses, but won’t be dismissed by the classes, either! Quirky! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Alizeh
Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Ash King & Sashwat Singh

The last song of this much-awaited album, is a very sweet and divine-sounding romantic track, sung by three men whose voices sound more or less the same! 😀 The song starts off with a brilliant vintage Pritam electric guitar riff, and then progresses very seamlessly to the melody of the mukhda, which is opened by Ash King, but a wonderful relay is played between Ash and Arijit as Ash hands over the baton to Arijit after one line! Anyway, the composition is heavenly, and the mukhda wonderfully provides a start to the song. The hookline just brings that magic forward, and the way Pritam has broken the word ‘Alizeh’ (Which is Anushka’s character’s name in the movie) is spectacular! The composition instantly grabs you and you start humming it immediately. Pritam brings back his old-world charm, that we heard in so many of his songs (the most prominent coming to my mind right now being ‘Mere Bina’ from ‘Crook’). The antara wonderfully brings the song forward. The antara is very simple and sweet, but appeals to you very pleasantly. At the end of the antara, Sashwat does a wonderful vocal piece, and he can be distinguished from the other two with his bold and clear voice (kinda like Nikhil D’Souza’s voice). Towards the end of the song, he does a very interesting rap portion, which is very attractive, and finally, some rap that makes sense and fits into the song. Pritam’s arrangements are grand and match the grandeur of the rest of the album, this time, bringing a pleasant Western / European touch to the arrangements because of the wonderful sound of a church-flavoured organ instrument. The beats are digital, and very attractive. The drums too, are quite beautifully played, while Pritam uses his typical Western choir to enhance the sound of the hookline, complete with claps and a Western chorus. The guitars of course, play throughout and don’t fail to let you down. The vocals are very intriguing, and I must say, Ash King overshadows Arijit here, and that can be very well heard when they sing the same lines one after the other in the antara. On the other hand, Sashwat seems to say a lot with his two portions, one Hindi, and the other an English rap. The way Ash sings the lines in the hookline that go “Tera hun main, tujhe yaad hai naa” is just mind-blowing. His mellifluous voice really does a different kind of magic in the song. Amitabh writes perfect romantic lyrics, which are sweet and simple to understand. With this, the album ends of the same grand note as it began, with a very opulently arranged, melodious piece! Arijit, Ash and Sashwat complement each other very well, and Pritam makes the track a pleasant listen, full of love. #5StarHotelSong!!


Ae Dil Hai Mushkil turns out to be an album full of variety. The album has Pritam, the hit machine, showing his various sides of composing, and with two very emotional tracks, one high-energy romantic track, one dulcet romantic melody and two upbeat dance tracks, the album ends up being one of the best commercial albums of the year! With Arijit being the voice of Ranbir in the movie, I was expecting myself to get bored with his voice after the album would end, but Pritam’s wonderful melodies and the ways he made him sing differently in each song, didn’t make me do so. Also, the two songs that are sung by other male singers are fantastic respites from Arijit, while the last track where two other singers accompany Arijit, is also mind-blowing. So, all in all, this is an album which makes it difficult for you to choose your favourite song, and also makes it difficult not to love it! Pritam is truly back with a bang now!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Channa Mereya > Everything else 😀

 

Which is your favourite song from Ae Dil Hai Mushkil? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A DISHOOM LACKING PRITAM’S USUAL PUNCH!! (DISHOOM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Ashish Pandit & Mayur Puri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 15th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 29th July 2016

Dishoom Album Cover

Dishoom Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dishoom is an upcoming Bollywood action/adventure/thriller film starring John Abraham, Varun Dhawan and Jacqueline Fernandez in leads, while Akshaye Khanna plays the baddie. The film is directed by ‘Desi Boyz’ director, Varun Dhawan’s brother, Rohit Dhawan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala and Sunil A. Lulla. The film is about two cops, Kabir (John Abraham) and Junaid (Varun Dhawan) who are on a case to find a missing cricketer, who happens to be India’s top batsman and whom the makers have cleverly named as Viraj Kohli (played by Saqib Saleem). The two cops have 36 hours before an ‘India vs. Pakistan’ match (come on, how clichéd can you get!!) to find the man. The only reason I’m following this movie is — no, not the energy of Varun Dhawan or the action by John Abraham. And no, not because Akshaye Khanna is returning in a ‘villainous’ avatar after doing ‘Gali Gali Chor Hai’ in 2012 and disappearing. But the reason is because of the music. My personal favourite, Pritam Chakraborty is in charge, and I’m so excited to hear it, because he had given enjoyable songs for ‘Desi Boyz’ as well, and I’m hoping he has done so in his second collab with Rohit Dhawan too! The movie is expected to have some dance tracks, which I know Pritam does very well! So, here goes! Let’s explore the music album of ‘Dishoom’!!


1. Sau Tarah Ke / Sau Tarah Ke (Revisited)
Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Amit Mishra / Aditi Singh Sharma & Abhijeet Sawant, Backing Vocals by ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Himanshu Shirlekar & Akash, Arabic Choir by ~ Maher Al Halabi, Karim Khayat, Youmni Abou Al Zahab, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Hookline Lyrics by ~ Ashish Pandit

Pritam starts off the soundtrack with an energetic dance track just as expected, and really makes you dance with this one. The song starts off with a very unusually addictive vocal break, which just lures you into the composition so effectively. Pritam sure knows how to attract his audience in a classy way, and he does it here. That vocal break is toooo innovative, and also my favourite part of the song — fortunately for me, it plays everywhere throughout the song. Pritam’s composition is a fun one, with a few grey shades that add the mystery and shadow of the thriller/action film to the song. It is an item-song-ish composition, and you can almost call it one, but of course, everything is done so classily that you can classify it as a club song. The hookline has that folksy feel to it, that tells you that the movie (or at least the song) is set in the middle east. The mukhda doesn’t stand out too well during the first couple of listens, but later on, it grows tremendously. It repeats once more after the antara, to end up the song. The antara itself is a nice portion of the song, with a sensuous tune to it. Pritam conveniently uses club beats to enhance the reach of the song, and the booming bass in the song really helps to propel it ahead in the playlist of the listeners. And again, that wonderful vocal break! He uses EDM at places too, and towards the end, the hookline is played with the EDM sound, and sounds so dynamic! In the beginning, a very thrilling oud invites you into the song with that Arabic flavour. The ney by Sahi Shamat is wonderful as well. Both versions have only the vocals different, and everything else exactly, or almost exactly, the same. In the first version, Jonita startles with her performance — it being her first song of this kind. She has brought a naughtiness into her voice, which always used to sound so pure and innocent. It has that sharp texture to it, which it didn’t in her other songs. Amit Mishra, on the other hand, works well as a replacement for Nakash Aziz, sounding quite like him, but impressing nevertheless. In the second version however, Aditi Singh Sharma’s overstylised vocals are a pain to the ears. She hasn’t modulated her voice well and it comes across as too soft where it should’ve been more confident like Jonita’s! Jonita, who sang such a song for the first time, performed better than a singer who is known for such songs, and that’s pretty shocking! Abhijeet Sawant too, doesn’t work well with the composition. He seems to be trying to hard to sing in the way he’s required to. In both versions there’s this awesome Arabic hookline, sung by the Arabic choir I mentioned above. Kumaar and Ashish Pandit together have come up with quite enjoyable lyrics, that suit the theme as well as appeal to the audience. Nothing seems put of place according to Bollywood standards, and so I’m accepting the lyrics! 😂 Pritam opens the album with a great club song, that has the potential to be a chartbuster and also the club anthem of the year! The first version is definitely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Toh Dishoom
Singers ~ Raftaar & Shahid Mallya, Lyrics by ~ Mayur Puri

Next up, we have the title track for the movie, a theme song that is composed on sinister lines, with dark shades predominating in the composition. The composition is actually very less; it is mostly made up of Raftaar’s rap, which is in a tune that keeps repeating whenever the hookline isn’t playing, so in the mukhda and antara. Actually there is no mukhda and antara, as it is the Punjabi rap-styled tune that keeps playing on loop until the hookline comes to rescue it. 😀 The hookline, which is sung by Shahid Mallya and actually has a tune, is pretty good, and has kind of a sinister tune to it. It is actually the backing music that has the mysterious tone to it; the guitars which play in the background. Pritam has not impressed as such with the composition, as the song is very simple, and not of his level. Also, the credits in the jukebox read “Melody based on generic traditional punjabi folk progressions.” I don’t know how to interpret that! The rap is the most prominent part of the song, and that too, gets kind of irritating towards the end. However, as I said, the hookline is good. There is a rapid rap in the second interlude, and at that part I just completely zoned out of the song; it was so tedious to hear. Raftaar’s voice is not too impressive, of course, as he isn’t a singer. Shahid, on the other hand, tries his best to save the song, and manages to do so to a good extent. It is his “Toh dishoommm… Toh dishoommm” parts that I keep waiting for in the song. Pritam’s arrangements are good, and stick to the action theme of the movie, and perfect for a theme song for a heroic character. Especially those guitars and club beats. Some places, it sounds a lot like the ‘Desi Boyz’ title track too! Mayur Puri is back after ‘Bajrangi Bhaijaan’s ‘Selfie Le Le Re’ and ‘Chicken Kuk-Du-Koo’, and writes words that hardly make any sense. After impressing so much with so many songs, he disappoints very badly with this one, literally writing whatever comes to mind and adding a “Toh dishoom” at last to make it sound related to the movie. Lines in the rap sound pretty unbelievable as well. It’s pretty much how the person has a very bad personal life, but in a mock-heroic style, tries to explain how he will punch people when they do stuff he doesn’t like. All in all, a disappointing offering, with just the hookline being the saviour of the song!!

 

3. Jaaneman Aah (Version 1) / Jaaneman Aah (Version 2)
Singers ~ Aman Trikha & Antara Mitra / Nakash Aziz & Antara Mitra, Backing Vocals by ~ Ashwin, Akashdeep & Himanshu, Lyrics by ~ Mayur Puri

Claps, percussion and guitars start off the third song of the album, quire resembling ‘Afghan Jalebi’ (Phantom) in its overall treatment. After that, a bazooka-like instrument plays a tune that is what makes the starting interesting, and alluring. But from there, the song suffers a number of ups and down, never being consistent in its catchiness. The composition by Pritam is pretty bland and tasteless, and it is that kind of composition that depends on its arrangements to do its work of attracting the listeners to it. There is a line however, that really impressed me, in all its oddness and though it is kind of a misfit in the song. The line I mention, is the line just before the hookline, which, in the mukhda goes like “Ishq mein saare, ilzaam hai sacche.. “. The tune of that line is an oddball in the song, which is predominantly of a happy tune. But that line has a darker shade to it, which is why I loved it! The rest of the tune follows a really Sajid-Wajid-ish template of item songs, which I didn’t exactly expect from Pritam, after great songs of this genre like ‘Dhating Naach’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), ‘Gandi Baat’ (R…Rajkumar) and ‘Afghan Jalebi’ (Phantom). It is the arrangements that makes the song at least listen-worthy. The exciting dhols (Percussion by Dipesh Varma, Keyur Barve and Shikhar Naad Qureshi) help the song get the required energy, while that bazooka tune keeps playing throughout. Aditya Benia is great with the guitars, too. On the vocals front, again, we have two choices to choose our favourite from. In the first place we have Himesh Reshammiya’s blue-eyed boy, Aman Trikha. Singing for Pritam for the first time, it was bound to be a powerpacked rendition from his side, and that’s what we get, but we can’t help but miss Nakash. Pritam saves us the time that we would spend in brooding over Nakash not being there, and actually records the “Film Version” or “Version 2” of the song in Nakash’s voice. His infectious energy is unmatchable, and he sings well, putting in the punch that was lacking in the first version! 😀 The female voice in both versions is Pritam’s own blue-eyed girl, Antara Mitra. You can’t believe it is the ‘Gerua’ girl who’s sung it, but then you remember she sang ‘Saree Ke Fall Sa’ and ‘Kaddu Katega’ from ‘R…Rajkumar’ too, and then realize it isn’t such a big deal. She sings with the right vocal texture, but I’ve said this many a time jokingly and will say it again — she needs to find a comfort zone for herself in the industry! I can’t help but think she keeps changing her voice too many times and it is getting irritating now!! 😀 Jokes apart, her versatility is really commendable. It is Mayur Puri, the lyricist, who disappoints gravely. His lyrics in this song are nothing like what I like his lyrics for! The whole song is full of lines that a man sings to a lady, trying to convince her to marry him! Lines like “Do saal mein hinge tere bacche, mere bachhe” really make you cringe and think where Mayur’s splendid writing has gone in that one year! 😦 The song starts with the two characters playing ping-pong with names of relatives. I didn’t get that part of the song, either! Though Pritam has scored very well in the past with these songs, this time, he doesn’t really make the cut! Most of the credit for it goes to the disappointing lyrics!

 

4. Ishqa
Singers ~ Abhijeet Sawant & Antara Mitra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The album ends on a very celebratory note, with an Arabic-styled party song that has distinct shades of Pritam’s typical composition styles. The composition is really enjoyable though! The song, standing at a duration of just less than three minutes, 2:47 to be precise, is too short, and too catchy; I wish there was more! There is no distinct demarcation of hooklinebut there is one loop of a line, sung by Antara, which goes like “Zyaada main toh nahi kehti…” and that line is so insanely catchy!!! Pritam has composed the song very beautifully, given that it is so short. The mukhda and antara are both by Abhijeet, and he sounds way better here than he did in the second version of ‘Sau Tarah Ke’. Antara has just that one line which repeats many times, but as I said is really well sung by her, and really well composed by Pritam too. Another great thing is the arrangements. The Spanish guitars are the highlight of the song, while the Arabic percussion is really great. The Arabic strings are stunning as well! There is a great electronic interlude that is so insane! The whole thing together sounds very catchy and groovy. Kumaar’s lyrics are good, as well, again, without being cheap or anything. A finale that actually delivers what was expected throughout the album!! #5StarrHotelSong!!


Dishoom is definitely not what I expected. I rarely say this, but this time, Pritam did not deliver as much as I was expecting. He has composed all four songs as per the requirements to make a fun album, but I know he can do way better than this. Two songs, ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ and ‘Ishqa’ actually deliver what I expect when I hear the name ‘Pritam’. The other two seem very templated songs, with very less composition and more of a dependency on lyrics, which are bad, and arrangements, which excel. So, I would say, the Pritam Punch in this ‘Dishoom’ was lacking!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sau Tarah Ke > Ishqa > Toh Dishoom > Jaaneman Aah (Version 2) > Jaaneman Aah (Version 1) > Sau Tarah Ke (Revisited)

 

Which is your favourite song from Dishoom? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

UTTERLY UN’POSSESSIVE’!!! (1920 LONDON – Music Review)

Music Album Details:
♪ Music by: Sharib-Toshi, Kaushik-Akash (JAM) & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Kunaal Vermaa, Hasrat Jaipuri, Sharib-Toshi, Kaalim Sheikh, Azeem Shirazi & Prashant Ingole
♪ Music Label: T-Series [‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’ on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 21st April 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 6th May 2016

1920 London Album Cover

1920 London Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To hear ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’ on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To buy ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’ on iTunes CLICK HERE


1920 London is an upcoming Bollywood horror flick. It is the third installment in the “dreaded” 1920 franchise, and stars Sharman Joshi as the exorcist, Meera Chopra as the wife of the person who is possessed, and Vishal Kharwal as the person who is possessed. 😛 The film is written by Vikram Bhatt, and directed by Tinu Suresh Desai, who was supposed to debut with the upcoming Akshay Kumar flick, ‘Rustom’, but this happened to release first. The film is produced by Reliance Entertainment. There’s no point discussing the story, because there will be a twist somewhere or the other, so let’s move on to discuss about the music. The music has been composed by Sharib-Toshi (Now to be credits as Shaarib and Toshi) who haven’t really impressed highly with their previous works (maybe a bit in ‘Zid’ and ‘Jashnn’). Hopefully, this might be their best album, going by the music of the first and second parts of the franchise. The duo has three songs in the album. Debutants Kaushik-Akash are the guest composers, with two songs, representing a company known as JAM (Just About Music) which has been founded by Pritam. It is an A&R (Artists & Repertoire) venture by Pritam, under which he will launch new music directors and look after their development in the industry. This is his first go at the venture, and hopefully, it turns out successful, so that he will be motivated to introduce more newbies and we will get many new, talented composers! 😀 So, here I start hearing the music of ‘1920 London’ with great expectations! Let’s hope the music keeps up to expectations!


♪ BONUS SONG

♦ Gumnaam Hai Koi
Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Antara Mitra, Original Song’s Singer ~ Lata Mangeshkar, Music Recreated and Composed by ~ Kaushik-Akash, Original Composition by ~ Shankar-Jaikishan, New Lyrics by ~ Kunaal Vermaa, Original Lyrics by ~ Hasrat Jaipuri, Music Label ~ Saregama

Saregama is still at its silly behaviour, claiming rights to their old songs, if remade. That’s absolutely right, but kinda irritating by now. 😛 Anyways, they should be proud of the wonderful collection of songs they have in their kitty and the first song of the ‘1920 London’ album is yet another one of such famous old songs from them. This time, since it is a horror movie, nothing could’ve been better than this song to pick, and the makers have chosen it perfectly. The song I’m talking about is the haunting old song composed by maestros Shankar-Jaikishan, and sung by none other than Lata Mangeshkar, ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’ (Gumnaam). And the newcomers Kaushik-Akash get a chance to put forth to the world, their version of the classic haunting song. They get the general idea, which is to make the song haunting and totally ghoulish, right. The starting itself is wonderful with all kinds of sound effects — wind, screeching bats, and a whole lot of weird ghostly whispers. Antara starts the song with a line that sounds more of a backing vocal line. Once Jubin starts singing, you definitely will get goosebumps. His smooth voice has the right amount of haunt and romance and even dominance. He touches the high notes with such ease, it is hard to imagine. The duo has beautifully crafted his part of the song, which is their own composition. The only thing retained from the old song is the hookline, and that is helmed by Antara, not sounding like herself thanks to the heavy programming of whispers, trying to make her sound like a ghost, but kind of failing. I would’ve preferred it if she would’ve been allowed to sing freely without any programming done to her voice. Nevertheless, it has been sung great, in a whispery voice and I guess it was necessary to make it sound more scary. The duo has composed Jubin’s parts perfectly, and they’re the best parts in the song. The mukhda hooks the listener, while the antara does the job of not letting go, which means the attempt has been successful. Kunaal Vermaa (‘Hasi’ — Hamari Adhuri Kahani fame) writes nice lyrics here, but I can’t make out whether they’re romantic or haunting or both. The duo excel in the arrangements. As mentioned earlier, various sound effects grace the song, and it sounds awesome. They send chills down the spine, but of course it isn’t exactly spooky; after all, it is a song. Piano and strings gracefully lead the arrangements, while the rest is digital stuff. Owls, bats, ghouls form the sound effects part of the song, and it is commendable. A great first attempt for Kaushik-Akash, and a decent revamp of the classic. Jubin excels, while Antara gets very less scope to open up!


Now, the review of the ‘1920 London’ album, released by T-Series, consisting of four songs, with three by Sharib-Toshi and one by Kaushik-Akash. 🙂


1. Aaj Ro Len De
Singer ~ Sharib Sabri, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Sharib-Toshi & Kaalim Sheikh

The first song in the album starts off with a beautiful Middle-Eastern feel of the oud, starting off the song on a high. Sharib-Toshi go the familiar way, composing a song quite similar to all their previous works of this genre. I couldn’t help but think of all their other works. It is a romantic song with a very heavy melancholic touch. To be honest, I am already very tired and sick of all this from the duo. The hookline, though repetitive and typical, however, foes garner some interest from the listener, as do all of Sharib-Toshi’s melodies. It is in the parts surrounding the hookline, where the problem lies. Nothing has been composed in a very likable or catchy tune; in fact, it exhausted me to hear the song, which is just less than five minutes long (too long when the song has nothing new to offer!) The mukhda might interest listeners, but the interest wears off until the antara. Sharib’s voice is good, but I would’ve preferred somebody else to sing this song. His voice seems too soft and rustic for the composition, which hasn’t worked in its favour, sadly. The duo really works hard to make up for the lack in melody, by giving wonderful, awe-inspiring arrangements! The arrangements are something which I haven’t heard recently! With an Indian and Middle-Eastern touch, they touch the heart and sound really grand — the aforementioned oud, various string instruments, and I think a santoor, if that’s not the oud itself, being played on a higher note. The lyrics are exhausting and boring, too, trying to be too fancy. I wonder what Sharib-Toshi wrote and what Kaalim Sheikh wrote. 😁 This will be liked only by those who love the typical Bhatt-ish songs. I’m so drained out after hearing this song! 😦 A very disappointing start by the duo.

 

2. Rootha Kyun
Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan & Payal Dev, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Azeem Shirazi

The next song in the album does start off quite promisingly. As I have said before, piano notes are a wonderful way to start off a song. They have the power to grab the attention of the listener from the beginning of the song. This time, Sharib-Toshi do just that. They use the very diplomatic piano to lure listeners into the song. However, once the listeners are lured inside, the trap is quite pleasant. Unlike my expectations after hearing ‘Aaj Ro Len De’, this song fares better. Mohit Chauhan is a safe choice taken by the composers. He sings the heard-before-yet-appealing composition beautifully. Especially the way he sings the hookline, is impressive. Payal gets to sing the second antara along with the hookline. Let me say it takes time to get used to her voice there. She seems to have used an unnecessarily high-pitched voice, trying to ape Sadhana Sargam, but after a listen or two, it starts sounding beautiful, and then it seems nobody could have done better. i don’t know how that happened because until I wrote this, I had only heard the song once and didn’t like her voice, but now suddenly started liking it. Sharib-Toshi get it right with the composition, and play  it safe there too. Though typical, it is pretty catchy, unlike the first one, which only had a catchy hook. But this song has the mukhda and antaras catchy too. The main reason for the catchiness has to be the fast pace of the song, which does make a huge difference. The hookline has been composed really well, and as I said before, sang just as well by Mohit and Payal, later on. Again, arrangements are fabulous. I remember Sharib-Toshi’s fab arrangements in ‘Zid’ as well, and it is great how they always pay attention to their arrangements, though their compositions might not be so strong. Here, they have equally balanced both. The arrangements are a good mixture of a string orchestra, rock elements (guitars and drums), digital sounds and sparkling Indian instruments like the santoor. Azeem’s lyrics are typical too, but still go well with the song and sound good, so that’s is passable. When typicality meets genius, it sounds like this. A safe song from all angles! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tujhko Mein
Singer ~ Shaan, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Azeem Shirazi

Here Sharib-Toshi try to do what I’ve been ranting and rambling on about — something that isn’t the typical horror Bhatt-ish stuff. They rope in Shaan for this, and you will understand why, after you hear the song. Sharib-Toshi have composed a happy-go-lucky, sugary-sweet song, which tries so hard to be romantic without getting melancholic. The result? The duo fails miserably even there. The sweetness is overdone, just like an over-ripe fruit. Too sweet, and you start feeling nauseated. The same is the case with this song. The composition falls into the same category of songs which Shaan is getting nowadays, that sound pretty mild and kiddish. He does well, no doubt, but it has gotten boring hearing him sing the same types of songs, with no variations at all. In the hookline he sings “main aankhon mein” in a very irritating manner. Sharib-Toshi do try hard to  give a good composition, but as I sad, it sounds too goody-goody, and artificial. With the composition and vocals not making a deep impact, we can only expect the duo to add great instrumentation, but sadly, the arrangements here are pretty clichéd and banal. What with the seemingly forced finger snaps, and other weird digital beats. Guitars and the saxophone try to normalise things, but to a limited extent. A synthesiser tries to impress in the first interlude, but even that does not work. There is nothing new in the arrangements, and if the duo wanted to make an outstanding romantic track, there are many things they could have added to the otherwise boring composition. It is high time they realise that things have changed since their debut in ‘Raaz: The Mystery Continues’ in 2009, seven years ago, when all this seemed appealing. Azeem Shirazi’s lyrics are plain and simple, but not backed by a strong composition, they fall flat on their nose, if they have one. 😛 I wanted the duo to do something different. They did. But not very impressively. It is called Typicality in Experimentation.

 

4. Aafreen
Singers ~ K.K. & Antara Mitra, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash, Lyrics by ~ Prashant Ingole

The newcomer duo comes back to finish off the album with their second song, a romantic duet. The song does have a heard-before tune, but it has been crafted so well, that it manages to appeal to the ears, and fits into the category of breezy romantic songs Bollywood used to produce in wholesale, until those melancholic romantic songs started arriving in bulk. So, this song provides a great respite from those melancholic songs of these days. Unlike ‘Tujhko Mein’, this is a great example of how such a song is done. Kaushik-Akash score with the composition. The distinct Pritam-ish touch is omnipresent in the song, and it sounds good. The hookline does remind of Salim-Sulaiman’s method of composing romantic hooklines, and is quite pleasant itself. As with the composition, the duo has made a great choice by roping in K.K. to do the male vocals. This is his territory, and he rules in such songs, as is evident in the song. Antara does seem out of place, and to be extremely honest, Tulsi Kumar would have carried it out beautifully too, as she has sung such songs before. Antara gets more scope to open up in this song than ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’, but still she sounds too artificially sweet. It is all the fault of her having different voices in each song. Her parts have been composed beautifully, though, doing half of her job for her. The arrangements are mostly techno sounds, but electric guitars and a faint string orchestra are audible. The fingersnaps sound good in this song. In the line just before the hookline, a wonderful church-like choir joins in with great harmonious backing vocals. Prashant Ingole’s lyrics, which would seem dull and typical otherwise, are definitely saved by the composition. At last the finale is great, with the duo showing a lot of promise. Great for a debut! Vocals and composition holds all the magic! #5StarHotelSong!!


As much as I was expecting, 1920 London isn’t even half as good! The newcomers from the A&R project fare well, even if I don’t consider that it is their debut. While on one side, with the remake of ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’, they give a quite hellish composition, on the other side they give a breezy, heavenly composition with ‘Aafreen’. Sharib-Toshi, the more seasoned artists of the two, however, disappoint. They stick to their old templates, out of which luckily, one turned out to be exceptional, while the other two are extremely avoidable. In 2014, when the duo had claimed that ‘Zid’ was their career best, I ignored it as it was unbelievably ordinary. But now I think they had said it right. In retrospect, their career best does seem to be ‘Zid’. Horror films are seemingly their forté, seeing their albums, but here they disappoint. And thoughh the newcomers do well, neither of their two songs will have a long life; they aren’t that strong either! So overall, the album is full of song that would not grip you, or shall I say would not ‘possess’ you?? 😀 👻👻

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aafreen > Rootha Kyun > Gumnaam Hai Koi > Tujhko Mein > Aaj Ro Len De

 

Which is your favorite song from 1920 London? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Cabaret, Chefs: Kaustav Narayan Niyogi, Munish Makhija & Tony Kakkar

AZHAR NE KIYA HAI ISHAARA, AMAAL KA HAI KHEL SAARA!! (AZHAR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Pritam Chakraborty, DJ Chetas & Kalyanji-Anandji
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Manoj Yadav, Rashmi-Virag & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th April 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 13th May 2016

Azhar Album Cover

Azhar Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Azhar is an upcoming Bollywood biopic, based on Indian cricket team’s former captain, Mohammad Azharuddin. The movie stars Emraan Hashmi as Azharuddin, Prachi Desai as Naureen, his first wife, and Nargis Fakhri as Sangeeta Bijlani, his second wife. Supporting cast includes Lara Dutta, Gautam Gulati and Kunaal Roy Kapur. The film is directed by Tony D’Souza, and produced by Shobha Kapoor, Ekta Kapoor and Sony Pictures Networks. The movie highlights the famous and well-known events in the cricketer’s life, which resulted in his downfall and debacle. I wasn’t expecting some huge number of songs for this movie, but at 5, the number meets my expectations, being neither too less nor too much. What’s more, though the album was previously supposed to be composed solely by hit-machine Pritam Chakraborty, due to some health issues Pritam had, the task of matching up to his level and completing some unfinished business had to be handed over to none other than Amaal Mallik, who I regard as ‘Junior Pritam’, what with his consistent hits coming even after such a short time of being a composer. So here too, he’s expected to make Pritam (whose assistant he was before) proud. However, Pritam’s one song has been retained in the album. There is a remake of two of Kalyanji-Anandji‘s superhit tracks from the movie ‘Tridev’, done by DJ Chetas, but that’s like a bonus for me, as I wasn’t interested in it from the beginning itself after I read DJ Chetas’ name. With T-Series producing the album, hits are guaranteed, but there is still lots of curiosity and hopes that Amaal performs well on stepping into his master’s shoes. 🙂 So… Gajar ne kiya hai ishaara… It’s time to read my review! 😀


1. Bol Do Na Zara
Singer ~ Armaan Malik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Rashmi Virag

Amaal kickstarts this album, with a soft and mellow romantic song. Piano notes that will blow your mind away open up the song, and continue to fascinate you until Armaan with his soft and innocent voice starts singing in a lovely manner, which is sure to touch your heart. He has taken care of the whole song very responsibly and half of the magic of the song lies in his vocals, and I’m glad he hasn’t imitated Arijit in this one. Amaal is the star behind this greatness in the song. Besides choosing the right singer, he has woven up a beautiful song with notes that are pure and instantly likable when heard together. Instrumentation is subtle and minimal, but fascinating nonetheless. The aforementioned piano is there, guitars do play a role, electric and acoustic both. Strings can also be heard occasionally. Other digital beats complete the song wherever it seems incomplete. Armaan and his aalaaps in the beginning and end of the song are marvellous. The mukhda itself has the power to attract numbers of listeners and hook them all the way through the song. Imagine how good it must be, to be doing that! Rashmi-Virag’s lyrics are perfect for the theme of the song, not too over romantic, but stilll have the right measure of Bollywood romance in them. One thing i liked about Amaal’s composition is that it ranges greatly from low notes to high, and how seamlessly! Kudos to him for that. A wonderful synthesizer interlude will impress you a lot! With this one, Amaal starts off the album on a PERFECT note! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Itni Si Baat Hain
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Antara Mitra, Music by ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

Pritam continues the magic in the album with something I believe he’s the best at. Romantic songs. Guitar plucks start off the song, and Arijit kicks in. For me, this song didn’t start off as well as the first, but instead, the magic lies in the latter part of this song. The tune with which Arijit starts off the song, did remind me a bit of ‘Wafa Ne Bewafai’ (Teraa Surroor), but only for a very very small time, after which it becomes totally different. The magic in the composition lies completely in its simplicity, something Pritam hasn’t done for a while, as he was giving us all those experimental romantic songs. However, this one is out-and-out simple and innocent, not trying really hard to impress and win hearts, but doing so anyways! Arijit carries forth the mukhda and first antara of the song beautifully, both having the same tune and structure. Antara takes over with the second antara, (Pun unintended, so please… 😒😂) continuing ever-so-gracefully. It’s something I never understand how she sounds so different in each song, and it is commendable, but she should carve out a niche for herself in the industry nevertheless. Here, she sounds sugar-sweet, but I can’t help but miss Neeti Mohan for this one. Anyways, Pritam has composed the best part of the song for Antara, and she does justice to it, being all sweet and goody-goody. Arrangements, too, are minimal. The song’s base is a digital rhythm that plays throughout. On top of that, Pritam has added beautiful sarod (Prateek Srivastav) and tablas (Jitu Shankar). Guitars (Pawan Rasaily) are a prominent part of the song. Towards the end of Antara’s part, both Arijit and Antara harmonize together wonderfully, reminding me somehow of Rahman in the 2000s. Manoj Yadav’s lyrics are sweet and simple too, but could’ve been better, too. A song that takes time to grow, but when it grows, nothing could be better! It all lies in its subtlety and simplicity! #5StarHotelSong!! 

 

3. Oye Oye
Singers ~ Aditi Singh Sharma & Armaan Malik, Music by ~ Kalyanji-Anandji, Recreated and Remixed by ~ DJ Chetas, Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi

Next up is the song I was least excited for — a remake/remix of the superhit ‘Gajar Ne Kiya Hai Ishaara’ (Tridev) by none other than the Mashup King of recent times, DJ Chetas. Where Sadhana Sargam, Alka Yagnik and Sapna Mukherjee led the old song, this one is led by a sole female singer, Aditi Singh Sharma, the one who is the best choice for club songs these days. Armaan does join, but later on. The surprise is that the whole song isn’t ‘Gajar Ne Kiya Hai Ishaara’, but Chetas has included the hookline of ‘Gali Gali Mein Phirta Hai’ (Tridev) as well, into the remake. That part is when Armaan gets his only line in the song. When it is a DJ remaking an old classic, all we can do is place our foreheads in our palms out of shame. Apart from Aditi adding unnecessarily stylish nuances to the vocals, DJ Chetas adds nothing but beats, that help in places but lower the song’s quality in other places. Armaan is the best thing that happened to the song, extracting an extremely different voice from what we usually hear him singing with. Lyrics are the exact same as the old song, and so is the composition. Though the song is groovy, due to the beats, Aditi’s singing isn’t really what I would’ve liked in the remake to this song. Also, it adds to the looooooonnnnnnnnngggggggg list of ‘Bollywood Classics Spoiled By Being Remade’. Had Amaal or Pritam remade it, it might’ve been better, and if they could’ve been made to compose an original club disco song with this theme, there would’ve been nothing like it. My favorite part of the song, if I had to choose, would definitely be the ‘Gali Gali Mein Phirta Hai’ lines by Armaan. Perfect song for clubs.

 

4. Tu Hi Na Jaane
Singers ~ Sonu Nigam & Prakriti Kakar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

After that bombardment to the ears, here’s Amaal to the rescue, with a soft, soothing, lovable, calming and any-other-good-adjective-you-can-think-of type of song. Further, it’s Amaal’s first song with Sonu Nigam, the legend! It is a huge leap for him and a milestone in his career. The song starts off so calmly, it is a huge refreshment from the loudness of ‘Oye Oye’. And when Sonu starts off, it is heavenly! A beautiful composition is the strength of the song, and the song is perfect for Sonu Nigam, with the intense heartbroken nature of the lyrics, which he’s best at. Prakriti also, is a great choice for the song. Her Punjabi parts are so melodious and fascinating, that they have made a place for themselves in my mind and heart. Amaal’s arrangements are beautiful, the rock plus classical combination heard many times before, but seldom done as good as this. Electric guitars, drums on one side perfectly complement the tablas, flutes and a wonderful sarangi interlude. The soul of the song lies in the composition and vocals, while the arrangements hold the both together as one. Kumaar’s lyrics are out of this world! Once you hear them, you would fall in love with them yourself, and Sonu and Prakriti do a fantabulous job expressing the pain in the lyrics. Though it is a sad song, it doesn’t go over the top with melodrama nor does it fall short of emotions. It strikes the right emotions in you and might bring you to are as well! Oh, the magic! The antaras have been well divided between Sonu and Prakriti, each getting one. I can even imagine what situation this song would appear in the film, and it is pretty obvious too. Keeping it in mind, the song is perfect! A song that will make you speechless! 😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍 One of the best songs of 2016, and welcome back FOR REAL, Sonu Nigam! Extremely well done Amaal!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Jeetne Ke Liye
Singer ~ K.K., Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The finale to the album brings K.K. and Amaal together once again after an unforgettable ‘Tu Bhoola Jise’ (Airlift). This time, a motivational song has been crafted by Amaal, and K.K. has sung it in his trademark style. The song is also tailor-made for him, being a rock song with an emotional touch. Amaal’s arrangements are very cool, with the electric guitars blaring and drums providing the rhythm to move our heads to. Acoustic guitars appear in the relatively calm antaras until the energetic, almost hard rock hookline comes. Strings too make a short appearance in the song. Amaal has composed the song quite well, and it suits the theme — a person who has lost hopes motivating himself to fight on and on and finally win the fight against bad situations. Kumaar’s lyrics perfectly explain it. Amaal’s composition is something that doesn’t appeal much at first, but when heard again and again, and when lyrics are taken into consideration, it sounds awesome! The impactful hookline is all that is needed to touch one’s heart. The finale to the album is indeed grand! K.K. at his best after a LONG time! #5StarHotelSong!!


Azhar is an album in which I was not expecting three out of five songs to be romantic. Azhar is an album which I was waiting for since last summer, because Pritam was going to compose for it. Azhar is an album in which the once-assistant of Pritam, Amaal Mallik, composes alongside his guru. Azhar is an album in which disciple overtakes the teacher, making the teacher extremely proud. Azhar is an album in which Amaal showed to the world that he can compose such beautiful stuff in such a short notice of two to three weeks! Incredible and fantastic. I would say, barring DJ Chetas’ song, Azhar is an album for a film in which such great music was never expected. Last but not the least, I would say that Amaal is the star of ‘Azhar’!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tu Hi Na Jaane > Bol Do Na Zara > Itni Si Baat Hain > Jeetne Ke Liye > Oye Oye

 

What is your favourite song from Azhar? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Sairat (Marathi Album), Chefs: Ajay-Atul