THODI DER AUR THEHER JAAUN??? (HALF GIRLFRIEND – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Tanishk Bagchi, Rishi Rich, Farhan Saeed, Rahul Mishra & Ami Mishra
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Arafat Mehmood, Tanishk Bagchi, R. Rekhi, Veronica Mehta, Yash Anand, Yash Narvekar, Ishita Moitra Udhwani, Kumaar, Anushka Shahaney, Laado Suwalka & Kunaal Vermaa
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 27th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Half Girlfriend Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Half Girlfriend is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama film, starring Shraddha Kapoor and Arjun Kapoor. The film is directed by Mohit Suri, and produced by Shobha Kapoor, Ekta Kapoor, Mohit Suri and Chetan Bhagat. The film is an adaptation of Chetan Bhagat’s 2014 super-hit novel {In that everyone started hitting it after reading it, so it became super hit} of the same name. I have read that book and didn’t think much of it. And I’m not going to waste time on the plot. So let’s see who is behind the music this time. Now Mohit Suri is always up for new musical talent, and he brought Arijit Singh, Ankit Tiwari and Ami Mishra into the limelight with his previous film albums. I must say, ‘Ek Villain’ and ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ were better off than ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was full of clichés. And now this movie seems like it will be a complete detour from the usual type of music we hear in his other films. Maybe, just maybe, the songs with the lead characters staring at each other for infinite amounts of time, and shots of Shraddha Kapoor crying her eyes out, will not be removed and maybe we will be spared the melodrama that exists in all other Suri movies. But then again, maybe not. Maybe Mohit Suri will make Chetan’s rom-com into a romantic drama just like his other films. And of course, maybe the music will follow suit. That is confirmed as soon as I read the name of the first music director, Mithoon. He has collaborated with Mohit Suri in almost all of his movies, and the only collaboration I didn’t like of theirs, was ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (‘Aashiqui 2), after which I loved the sings from the next two movies. He gets three tracks here, but all are based on the same song. Tanishk Bagchi, the latest composer going tons of places this year, gets a single song here, and hopefully he opens his account with Mohit Suri fabulously so that we get to hear him in more Mohit Suri albums. Rishi Rich, after a long hiatus after the ‘Hum Tum’ song, returns {he has two more albums upcoming this year!} and he gets two tracks. Next up is Ami Mishra, who debuted with ‘Hasi’ from ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ in 2015, and vanished after that. He gets one song too. Then we have the debutants. Rahul Mishra with one song (I have never heard of him so can’t say what I’m expecting), and Farhan Saeed, who is debuting only as a composer; he has sung a couple of songs previously, and in this album, he gets to compose two tracks, out if which one is a version of the other. So with an astounding ten tracks to review, I must start right away.


1. Baarish

Singers ~ Ash King & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk Bagchi & Arafat Mehmood

Tanishk gets to open the album with his only song in the film. The song is a romantic song, with a tune that will have any Bollywood music lover hooked right away — because it adheres to all Bollywood sensibilities so obediently. The composition is like a trademark Bollywood romantic composition, and sweet too, at that. The mukhda makes the song start in a very sweet way, but that bridge from the mukhda to the hookline, which goes “Aankhon Ke Darmiyaan…” comes so abruptly, you are baffled for a moment. But afterwards, it is nothing but an uphill journey for the composition. The antara is how antaras in romantic songs traditionally are — calm and soothing. Again, an abrupt pause has been added at the end of the antara, which could’ve been avoided since the two lines fit together perfectly even without a pause! The tune for the mandolin loop that plays throughout the song is just so lovely! The hookline itself is yet again, something that will appease all Bollywood lovers, especially 90s music lovers. The arrangements which Tanishk has used in the song work in favour of the song, and as I said, that mandolin loop is sooooo catchy and hummable. The santoor starts off the song wonderfully, and it suits the ‘rainy’ theme of the song. The flute and strings too, add to the beauty of the song. As for the vocals, Ash King does well, but we have heard more outstanding renditions from him, in front of which this seems so ordinary. Shashaa just has to hum a line in an interlude. Tanishk & Arafat Mehmood wield the pen and produce utterly nonsensical words, defying all the laws of grammar. And however serious they might be trying to sound, it just sounds ridiculous. A song that sticks to those criteria that would make it a hit in Bollywood, but doesn’t dare to go experimental.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Thodi Der

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Farhan Saeed, Music by Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The next song in the album is another romantic song; the only difference is that this time, both of them love each other — in the first song it was like one-sided. Like tape. This song marks Farhan Saeed’s Bollywood debut as a composer, and it is actually a re-work of his own pop single of the same name. Thank goodness, he brings in a female singer to sing this one with him, and it is none other than Shreya Ghoshal. She handles the nuances very well, and her saccharine voice suits the composition very well. Farhan too, sings his parts well, but it doesn’t have the same impact. The composition itself, sounds very nice to the ears, but clearly has something missing and like the last song, only caters to people who like traditional, typical, same-old-kind of music. The hookline has a great tune though. The arrangements are better off here, with a wonderful sarangi taking care of the people who want variation in the song, and that sarangi solo in the interlude is not to be missed. The guitars are evidence of the fact that the song would’ve sounded so bland without the sarangi — they’ve been played that boringly. It would’ve been quite nice to hear a Sufi treatment given to the song, like tablas/dholaks and the like. A harmonium can be heard, but in very miserly quantities. Occasionally the sarangi reminds you of ‘Roke Na Ruke Naina’ (Badrinath Ki Dulhania), and I even started humming its antara, after the mukhda of this was over. Kumaar’s lyrics are not great, and there are places where they’re about the day not being able to live, and the night not breathing when the two characters aren’t together. Good for a couple of listens, but not something to repeat over and over again.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Tu Hi Hai

Singer ~ Rahul Mishra, Music by Rahul Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Laado Suwalka

The piano notes of the next song start and instantly you think ‘Bhatt’. Even though they aren’t in any way associated with this film, the piano notes just scream ‘Bhatt’ at you — “BHATT! BHATT! BHATT!” And when you continue listening to the song, you realize that the piano notes were right and you should have listened to their warning cries. Rahul Mishra, a debutant helms this track, and tries to make it as bland and dead as ever. The composition is a trademark Bhatt-ish one, and even though those songs sometimes do impress me, this one falls into category of them which I utterly despise right from the first time I hear them. The hookline is something decent, and that’s pretty much it, because it has been composed so drearily. Dreadfully slow, the song seems to get nowhere and leaves no impression on you after it ends. And the duration doesn’t help, because five and a half minutes is pretty long, for a staid composition. The only part of the song that seems impressive (only to an extent, because it is nothing new) is when the chorus singers try to make the song a Sufi song, and they succeed, but then Rahul starts with the Pakistani pop stuff again. Rahul Mishra’s vocals are quite good; he should carry forth his singing in the industry. The arrangements sound like a terribly-slowed-down version of the arrangements of the ‘Sanam Re’ title track. That tablas and electric guitars arrangement got old after just one song — ‘Sanam Re’. The lyrics by Laado Suwalka are even more typical than the composition. Not a very impressive debut, but hopefully somebody likes it and gives Rahul Mishra another chance.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

4. Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga / Pal Bhar (Chaahunga Reprise)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shashaa Tirupati / Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon steps in with the next track, and that’s something I was looking forward to, because he has been giving somewhat impressive songs in Mohit Suri’s film albums. However, when I played the song, the result was so anticlimactic I can’t express it in words. Mithoon’s composition sounds like a very desperate attempt to recreate the magic of ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (Aashiqui 2), a magic which I was immune to anyway, so this song too, didn’t affect me with its supposed magical composition. Of course, the song will become a rage nevertheless. Come on! It is Arijit and Mithoon after all! The song fares well for the mukhda, after which it seems to disassemble itself and both antaras sound like a different song altogether. Especially the female antara, seems like Mithoon strung together some completely unrelated notes to construct it. The first antara is slightly better, and it is a relief they’ve repeated it like thrice in the Reprise Version. But the drawback of the Reprise is that there’s no mukhda there. Also, the words and tune don’t match, creating that “Dubbed Music” effect, when you understand the song is dubbed because the words don’t fit well into the composition. Arijit gets into his dull mode here, and in some places you really feel that he drifted off to sleep. Shashaa in her antara does well, but not excellent. The arrangements are also boring. In the first version, they are fine, until those ‘Tum Hi Ho’ beats take over and you go like “Oh Goddddd! Not again!”. I loved the piano notes in the beginning though, and the santoor interlude. There’s a place before Shashaa’s antara where a wonderful flute mesmerizes you. But after that, there’s a staccato piano piece that sounds so random, haphazard and horrible. The Reprise gets the arrangements better. It starts with some weird harp-like sound, and a sound like water dripping from a leaking pipe, and Arijit’s voice is programmed such that you’ll actually believe he’s in some dingy underground basement where a pipe is leaking. But the better part of the arrangements is later, when strings are added in. Otherwise, everything is almost the same as the first version. So both versions have their own plus points. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are definitely the highlight of both the tracks. They surpass Mithoon’s arrangements, his dull composition and Arijit’s dreary rendition. One read through them and you’ll be stunned. Mithoon in his uncreative form.

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 2.5/5 for the Reprise

 

5. Lost Without You

Singers ~ Ami Mishra & Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Ami Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kunaal Vermaa & Anushka Shahaney

A bit of freshness seems to enter the album with the next song, Ami Mishra’s contribution to the album. It is a song with half-English, half-Hindi lyrics, and with a rock backdrop. The composition of the Hindi parts again, sticks to the normal Bhatt music criteria. The only way the song sounds fresher is due to the English parts, which are interspersed with the Hindi portions quite gratuitously. There’s a catch to that too, though. The “singer” behind those English parts, Anushka Shahaney, seems to be putting on a very artificial accent, something that will barely impress you once you hear it, and it sounds like nonsense because you can’t make out her English. Meanwhile, Ami continues droning on his Hindi portion, which isn’t quite different from his other song ‘Hasi’ (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Especially the “aaaaa aaaaa” sounds very similar to ‘Hasi’. The arrangements consist of very typical rock elements, the guitars and drums playing throughout the song. There is an interlude where Ami has added some oriental sounding guitar-like sound. The Hindi lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, are again, nothing innovative, and you barely pay attention to them as the song continues to play. Anushka Shahaney, who has written whatever she rambles herself, should’ve sung in such a way that we could’ve understood what she had written. Ami Mishra disappoints this time, but at least something is fresh here — the addition of English parts, even though they’re unintelligible. The album is just going more and more downhill.

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Stay A Little Longer

Singer ~ Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Anushka Shahaney, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Farhan Saeed returns, this time with Anushka Shahaney. And they spoil ‘Thodi Der’ for us. This song is basically an English version of that song, as is evident from its name.. a direct translation from Hindi to English. The composition, I already liked before, but here, even the little nuances that featured in the Hindi version have been gotten rid of, because it’s English right? And English songs can’t have nuances in them right? The song just sounds mediocre, even more so because of the way Anushka sings them in that accent. Her lyrics this time can at least be made out — but they sound very ridiculous. And of course, they don’t fit into the tune, so she has to sing “come” as “cu-uhm”, “love” and “lu-uhv”, “new” as “nyu-oo”, and she has to add “Oh”s and “Ah”s anywhere randomly. Ishita Moitra Udhwani helps her with “additional lyrics”, a term which I don’t understand because can’t two people write a song together? Or did she just replace one word by another so she deserves less credit? 😏 The only thing better here, is the arrangement, which has not only sarangi, but a very opulent symphonic orchestra towards the end, something that wouldn’t have suited in the Hindi song, but something which this English version didn’t deserve, frankly. Supposed to be soothing, but the singer makes sure it is anything but that. At least the arrangements respect us.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Mere Dil Mein / Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta / Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Yash Anand & Yash Narvekar, English Lyrics ~ R. Rekhi & Veronica Mehta, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Rishi Rich comes into the album very, very late, with a song you can call the title song of the film. And it is the only so-called upbeat number in the entire album. As such, we are bound to love it, especially people like me who were bored to death by the previous songs. The song is essentially a hip-hop number, with a groovy beat, and Rishi Rich informs us right at the beginning, “This is the Rishi Rich beat”. The song starts with some dialogue by someone sounding like Kangana Ranaut… Don’t miss it! The hookline is insanely catchy, and that “I gotta let you know…” line too, is very catchy. The composition is very repetitive though, and these two things are repeated over and over again so many times, you get annoyed after some time. There are not many more things constituting the arrangements, except that trippy beats and various weird sound effects. Veronica Mehta, who also featured in Rishi Rich’s “Hum Tum” song, at least sings in a more believable accent, but again, many of the words are not decipherable. Yash Narvekar, on the other hand, sings the male portions well, and I think Bollywood has a new Benny Dayal now. In charge of the lyrics are two people each for English and Hindi lyrics. 😂😂 And again, that additional lyricist, Ishita Udhwani, helps them, but they seem to not want to place her in the main lyricist’s list. Poor girl. There’s another version called the Dialogue Version, which has some of the most cringe-inducing dialogues from the film. That ‘Sentiyaa Gaye Hum Toh‘ dialogue is so cheesy! The dialogues come across as very annoying, and it is so evident that Arjun Kapoor wasn’t the right choice for playing this village boy. 😑 At least this song breaks the seemingly neverending spree of depressing songs!

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 1.5/5 for the Dialogue Version

 

8. Half Girlfriend (Love Theme)

(Instrumental, Music by Mithoon)

An instrumental track by Mithoon arrives to finish the album off. Mithoon provides us with a love theme, similar to the love theme he gave in ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was, I admit, a soul-stirring track. Here, he gives us an instrumental with selected lines from “Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga” played on the piano. Since I loved the piano notes in the song, I loved the first part of this track, where everything is just on plain piano. Later on, the orchestra pitches in, and brings a haunting and grand feel to the track. A choir can be heard as well, trying to make it sound even more haunting. After that comes a flute part which is beautiful. The orchestra returns to support the flute, and the song ends on a very grand note, like every instrumental should. Though I didn’t like the actual song which this track is based on, I thoroughly enjoyed the instrumental, and four and a half minutes just flew by.

Rating: 3.5/5


Half Girlfriend is a half-baked album. You know, when you fry something and it remains raw inside? That’s what this album is like. The makers have gone into such trouble making ten tracks for this movie, and sadly, not even one is memorable. All of them stick to typical clichéd song-making styles, and even a simple would be memorable, only if the composition were better. Tanishk and Farhan’s songs stand out by far, the rest seem to lag behind. I’ve heard a lot of good things going around about this album, and I waited. I heard it thrice like I do for any album before writing its review. And then I heard it while reviewing and that’s when I really understood how good (read bad) it is. Now I can’t wait any longer for my brain to like this album, can I? Thodi Der Aur Theher Jaaun? No way!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 1.5 + 3.5 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 53%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thodi Der > Baarish = Half Girlfriend (Love Theme) > Lost Without You > Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga = Pal Bhar = Mere Dil Mein > Stay A Little Longer > Tu Hi Hai = Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

 

Which is your favourite song from Half Girlfriend? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A TRIED-AND-TESTED MACHINE! (MACHINE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Dr. Zeus & Viju Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Arafat Mehmood, Niket Pandey, Ikka, Mohammed Irfan, Jasmine Sandlas, Shabbir Ahmed & Late Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 17th March 2017

Machine Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Machine is an upcoming Bollywood romantic thriller starring Kiara Advani and Mustafa Burmawalla, who is the son of Abbas Burmawalla. The directors of the film are Abbas-Mustan themselves, and the movie has been produced by Jayantilal Gada, Haresh Patel, Pranay Chokshi, Abbas-Mustan Films productions, and Dhaval Jayantilal Gada. The film revolves around two racing enthusiasts who fall in love. Abbas-Mustan’a films are known as very massy thrillers, and this seems to be no exception. Music seems to play a very important part in their films, and they make it a point to promote their films’ albums heavily before the movie’s release. And they’ve worked quite well with whatever compoosed they’ve worked with in the past. With the exception of their latest movie before this, ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ which had quite a dull album (and it wasn’t a thriller), many of their albums have been hits. They’ve collaborated with Jatin-Lalit (‘Khiladi’), Anu Malik (‘Baazigar’, ‘Baadshaah’, ‘Soldier’, ‘Ajnabee’), Himesh Reshammiya (‘Humraaz’, ‘Taarzan: The Wonder Car’, ‘Aitraaz’, ’36 China Town’) and Pritam (‘Naqaab’, ‘Race’, ‘Players’, ‘Race 2’). All of these albums were quite popular. However, the album to ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ was below even that. And it was a multicomposer album! This time around, the duo try to change that by roping in a single composer for five songs of the album, and a guest composer for one song. The man behind most of the album here is Tanishk Bagchi, who is currently riding on the success of his two enjoyable songs from ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. He has worked with the duo in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’, for one song (the best song of that album). The guest composer is Dr. Zeus, who also had a song in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’. I’m expecting quite a lot from Tanishk though, so let’s jump right in!


1.Itna Tumhe

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Can’t find any lyrics worth this space)

The soundtrack opens wih a romantic song filled with the Bhatts’ templated sound, but also paying “homage” to another old song, which, since it hasn’t been credited, has to be a “coincidence”. The song’s first line itself makes you instantly think of “Aakhir Tumhe Aana Hai” (Yalgaar), but all the coincidences flee at the end of that line, as composer Tanishk Bagchi sets the song to its very own composition that is quite catchy in itself. Now, Tanishk has never really given such a templated song before, at least not in the romance genre of songs, so it takes a little time to get accustomed to the fact that Tanishk has composed it. Till then, though, the song grows on you. The similarities in the first line of the mukhda notwithstanding, the rest of the song fares quite well as a romantic Bollywood song. Some places sound very heavily heard-before, but that doesn’t lessen the likeability in any way. The antara with its high notes sounds a bit uncomfortable to the ears at first, but sets in after a couple of listens. As a whole, it sounds like a song that the Bhatts had reserved but then never got a film to add it into. The English interlude by Shashaa Tirupati sounds very generic, but again, good enough. The arrangements are what makes the song even more likeable — the strings at the beginning are nice, and the digital beats are charming. Not to mention the cool twinkling sounds that Tanishk had added, which adds considerably to the ‘mechanical’ sound of the song, given that the name of the movie is “Machine”. Yasser Desai (who had dented last year with a couple of songs in ‘Beiimaan Love’ which I had no time to review) doesn’t quite fit in with the song, and his voice is kind of hard to digest; it sounds too robotic. Autotuned heavily, it is quite weird to listen to at first, but as everything else does, his voice also sets in later. Shashaa does her English interlude beautifully, but other than that, doesn’t have any other lines. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics are quite laidback, not to mention that the conscious effort to add the “..aana hai” and other rhyming stuff at the end of every hookline sounds a bit too forced! An above average start to the soundtrack, but gets the “Machine” theme right, because of the great arrangements and accidentally mechanical vocals.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Chatur Naar

Singers ~ Nakash Aziz & Shashaa Tirupati & Ikka, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Niket Pandey, Rap by ~ Ikka

(Utterly banal lyrics!)

Next up we get a party song, which is mandatory in every Abbas-Mustan film, so that they can show the actor driving up in a cool Lamborghini, and then the branded sunglasses of the actress. This time, without Pritam, they have to resort themselves to a quite low-standard party song (I believe that Pritam has given them the best party songs in the past) which tries to be a remake of the classic ‘Ek Chatur Naar’ (Padosan) but fails, because it sounds nothing like it except in bits and parts. And since they haven’t credited the old song’s musicians, I’m taking it to be a ‘spin-off’ like I did for ‘Mere Miyan Gaye England’ (Rangoon). The composition is upbeat and might (notice that I say MIGHT) get Gen Y dancing to its beats, which I still think are too loud for today’s music sensibilities. Though the composition is something I wouldn’t care to listen to again, the arrangements are quite youthful and lively. The beats really do make the song enjoyable, and Tanishk’s offbeat additions make the arrangements all the more weirdly likeable. Weird vocal tweaks added in the weirdest places are quite funny to hear. Otherwise, the composition is quite generic. The vocals are enjoyable as well. Nakash Aziz is enjoying himself in this party track, and his variations make the song worth listening. Shashaa Tirupati sings her lines like a typical club song singer, and she gets her voice programmed heavily as is the tradition in such songs. Ikka’s rap is very short thankfully, and it is not that great either. The other lyrics by Niket Pandey are another set of words more bent towards rhyming instead of making sense. Heard as a club song, it might work. But if you hear it thinking it is a remake, it will spoil the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Brake’An Fail

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rajveer Singh & Ikka, Music by ~ Dr. Zeus, Lyrics by ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rap by ~ Ikka

“Teri Meri Kahaani, duniya yaad karegi soch le,
Brake’An ne mereya fail te sajjna, rok saki te rok le!”

– Jasmine Sandlas

Dr. Zeus enters the soundtrack with his guest composition, another club/party song. Abbas-Mustan seriously can’t go without adding at least two of these in their albums! The song surprisingly, shows no resemblance to previous Dr. Zeus songs, and I was really surprised when I couldn’t find any of those screeching ladies and that trademark Dr. Zeus shattering glass in the song! The composition is quite a melancholic one, considering that it is for a club song. I mean, if he removed the club beats, it could just as well go as an undercover agent and place itself in a Sanjay Leela Bhansali soundtrack as the melancholic track. (Okay, just kidding!) The hookline “teri meri kahaani…” is quite catchy, and the rest of the song too, isn’t bad at all. The composition is actually catchy for once. It is one of those Dr. Zeus songs (probably the only one?) that doesn’t irritate. The arrangements are suitable for the song, and this time, Dr. Zeus aptly replaces those screaming ladies (from ‘Happy New Year’s ‘Lovely’ and ‘Ek Paheli Leela’s ‘Desi Look’) with car brake sounds, according to the theme of the movie, car racing. Jasmine’s vocals suit the song well, and the song wouldn’t have had the same impact with somebody else singing it. Rajveer Singh has quite little to contribute but Ikka has an extra long rap in the middle somewhere, which we just have to wait for it to end. Jasmine herself writes the lyrics for this one, and they are completely in Punjabi, and they seem quite meaningless, considering that it is a Club song. A good song from Dr. Zeus after all those screaming ladies and all that shattering glass.

Rating: 3/5

 

4.Tu Hi Toh Mera

Singer ~ Yasser Desai, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Very staid lyrics!)

Tanishk re-enters wih the fourth track of the album and one can’t help but think of Disney Princesses when this track starts. The arrangements really increase the Disney feel of the song. The composition is quite likeable until that jarring Pakistani pop styled line comes up and the hookline that follows too, follows the same template. The parts where the tempo is slow and everything actually sounds like a ballroom dance, are the best parts of the song, while everything else sounds below average, straight out of a Bhatt movie. The arrangements too, excel in the ballroom portions of the song. The sparkling sounds, coupled with the extravagant strings, set very fantastic arrangements to the song, and especially the beginning of the song, which is very waltzy, sounds amazing. But again, the parts before and during the hookline, sound very laidback and clichéd. There is a nice Spanish interlude which is enjoyable as well. Again, Yasser tries to be Arijit desperately, and one can’t help but sit and point out parts where he sounds a LOT like Arijit, which is almost the entire song. It would’ve been better for the makers to have just called in Arijit. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics here too, are very very heard-before and offer nothing new. A Bhatt-Disney fusion doesn’t work so well.

Rating: 2/5

 

5.Tera Junoon

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

“Jeena muhaal hai abb, tera sawaal hai abb,
De bataa, tu zara, kya naam loon main tere pyaar ka!”

– Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

Finally, here comes what I was expecting from Tanishk after he showed us his versatility in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. The composer takes his much-used desert-nomadic styled arrangements (he used it before in ‘Rabba’ from ‘Sarbjit’) and weaves a wonderful melody through it. The composition is just so melodious, it hooks you right away. It is one of those songs that you end up loving even though they are so ordinary, simple and heard-before. However, what made me love this one in spite of all these factors, was the simplicity of the composition, the fact that the déjà vu in the composition didn’t matter to the makers, and they just presented this song with a very simple coating. The arrangements are fascinating, with the mandolin rising high above everything else, even the strings. The claps give wonderful beats that are the highlight of the song. The overlying Arabic flavour works wonderfully in favour of the song. And the vocals are beautiful! Jubin sings in a way I’ve never heard him sing before, so much so that I hardly recognized him the first time I heard the song, until I read the credits! Well, it just goes to show his versatility. Arafat Mehmood is joined by Mohammed Irfan the singer to write this one, and I must say, the composition saved the lyrics, which resort to weird-sounding words to make it work. A great song hidden in an album of songs that are concentrated more in the “average” zone!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Cheez Badi

Singers ~ Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Viju Shah, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Tu Cheez Badi hai mast mast, tu cheez badi hai mast!”

– Late Anand Bakshi

The last song of the album was a later addition in that it released much later than the other five tracks did. And since I’m always so late in writing reviews, I get the advantage of adding such latecomer songs in my reviews. 😉 Anyway, about the song. As you might already have gauged by reading the name, the song is a remake (this time an official one) of the 1994 super-duper hit track by Viju Shah (who was one of the most innovative young composers of the time) ‘Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast Mast’ (Mohra). And the man who has been churning out one remake after another, Tanishk Bagchi, is in charge of this one. It was a relief to see him remaking it, instead of T-Series’ other go-to’s for remakes these days, Gourov-Roshin. So after two great 90s songs remade, Tanishk remakes this one with the club theme in mind. It starts off like an ordinary club song, but then that trademark “Pa ni saaaa…” from the old song comes in to indicate that it is a remake of that song. The composition contains almost nothing new except for a short line that Udit Narayan sings (he has redubbed everything for this song; his voice clipping hasn’t been retained from the old song). And yes, that line sounds quite odd in the song. It doesn’t gel in well with the rest of the song. The previous two remakes by Tanishk of course, had the old song’s tune retained, so this one is an odd one out that way. I liked the way he brought the old song’s antara’s tune to become the mukhda and then the antara too, of this version. The arrangements disappoint, with very everyday club beats. The mandolin playing the hookline’s tune provides respite, and so do the electronic tabla beats, but otherwise, the EDM is quite heavy, and too loud as well. The interludes both consist of very heavy EDM that is tough to digest with one of your favourite old songs. I enjoyed the small portion where Tanishk incorporated the old song though, in the second interlude. Vocals by Udit Narayan are awesome; he always manages to sound young! Neha Kakkar too, sings her parts well, without adding unnecessary nuances anywhere. Shabbir Ahmed’s additions to Anand Bakshi’s original lyrics are not any more crazy than the original, and the part which goes “zabardast dast” really calls for a cringe. Not one of Tanishk’s best remakes, but I would say it isn’t his “dosh dosh” as new lyrics have been added, unlike his other remakes (with the exception of the “Badrinath” title song).

Rating: 3/5


Machine seems to be an album miserably bowing down to supposed public demands. There’s a remake, three club songs, three Bhatt-ish romantic songs (of which one excels). Tanishk’s songs range from one sode of the spectrum to the other. If some are utterly boring, some are just as beautiful. Dr. Zeus gets it right with his sole song, but it won’t be something on my playlist for long. A tried-and-tested machine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 3.5 + 2 + 4.5 + 3 = 18

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Junoon > Brake’An Fail > Itna Tumhe = Cheez Badi > Tu Hi Toh Mera = Chatur Naar

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 07 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Machine) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Machine? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DEMOLITION OF THE MUSICAL HOUSE THAT WAS ONCE FULL!!! (HOUSEFULL 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sohail Sen, Mika Singh, Milind Gaba, Sharib-Toshi & Tanishk Bagchi
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Sen, Farhad-Sajid, Earl Edgar, Sanjeev Chaturvedi, Mamta Sharma, Arafat Mehmood, Rani Malik, Manoj Yadav & Danish Sabri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 9th May 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 3rd June 2016

Housefull 3 Album Cover

Housefull 3 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Housefull 3 is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film, starring Akshay Kumar, Riteish Deshmukh, Abhishek Bachchan, Jacqueline Fernandez, Lisa Haydon and Nargis Fakhri in lead roles, with Boman Irani and Jackie Shroff in supporting roles. The film is directed by Farhad-Sajid, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. The movie is the third part in the ‘Housefull’ franchise, and we can see where the franchise is heading. The quality of the second part was nohere near that of the first; I doubt that the third one will even match the second, going by the trailer. As for the music, the first part had an awesome and enjoyable album by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The second had quite a decent album by Sajid-Wajid, which didn’t match up to the first, but was good anyway. The third part however, has a multicomposer album, and I’ve seen where multi-composer albums go with comedy films (Ahem, ‘Welcome Back’, we’re hinting at you…!) The list of composers isn’t so impressive, either, and each team gets only one song, so, yeah…! Sharib-Toshi, fresh from the success (*cough cough*) of their three songs from the ‘1920 London’ album, are the first music directors in the album. Not expecting something great from them, but I will be happy if they manage to give something good, because here they can’t give typical Bhatt-ish stuff, can they? 😂 The next is Sohail Sen. I wonder from where he ended up doing this album, but nevertheless, expectations are high from him as he seems to be the composer I like the most in this album! After ‘Gunday’, a great song is expected. The third composers on the list are Mika Singh and his all-time partner Millind Gaba. (I think it’s the other way around.. Mika is the partner of Millind… I guess…?) I am not expecting anything from them, going by their ridiculous title song in ‘Welcome Back’. And the last composer is Tanishk Bagchi. Now, he has been impressing right from ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’ to ‘Kapoor & Sons’ to the recent ‘Sarbjit’. He had got a rom-com action film ‘Direct Ishq’ in between, where he didn’t impress much, so let’s see how he does in this rom-com! Read on to find out how the songs of the much awaited ‘Housefull 3’ are!


1. Pyar Ki
Singers ~ Nakash Aziz, Anmol Malik, Divya Kumar & Sharib-Toshi, Rap by ~ Earl Edgar, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav, Farhad-Sajid & Danish Sabri

Sharib-Toshi, back after their middling songs in ‘1920 London’ (I thought they wouldn’t dare to make music after that!) get the very first song in the album. Sharib-Toshi have had a decent track record with upbeat songs, the best being ‘Emotional Fool’ (Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania) for me. Here, they give an upbeat track with literally no meaning, except a trying-to-be-catchy composition, which works to some extent. The makers play it safe by employing four lyricists on this track, so we can’t catch the culprit who is feeding nonsense to our ears! Well, good escape!! Sharib-Toshi’s composition does appeal on and off, but when it does, something has to spoil it — either the lyrics or the vocals. Frankly, the composition is catchy. A hookline that is perfect for Bollywood and specifically, such movies in Bollywood, does grab your attention, while the other parts of the song have been composed pretty good too. Divya’s Qawwali portion is a good addition. In spite of the decent composition, the lyrics are atrocious. Manoj, Farhad, Sajid and Danish team up to give lyrics that try to be smart with a very stupid double meaning hookline, that doesn’t even shock you in the least. In the rap portion, I’m guessing written by Danish, as I can even hear him singing (though not credited!), it is suggested that the relationship of two lovers is just like that of bread and JAM! 😛 In the song, the moon gains weight (“Chaand ko chadh gayi hai charbi”) and the Sun starts talking in Arabic! (“Sooraj bhi laga bakkne Arabi”) These idiotic lines make the song appeal even more, and cater to your laughter. And the rap (I’m mentioning it again..) is a must-hear! 😂😂 On the vocals front, two singers try to save the song, with Nakash using his totally lovable voice, and Divya singing a wonderful Qawwali bit. Anmol, however, is back with her over-stylish vocals singing ‘baby’ like ‘baibaa’ and interfering by inserting random “yeaaahh”s everywhere. Earl’s rap is stupid. Sharib-Toshi’s arrangements are catchy, too. Mostly techno sounds, but they do surprise by adding good Spanish guitars and harmonium in between. A ridiculously funny start to the album! This time Sharib-Toshi do commendably well, but others spoil their work! Oh, yeah.. And salute to the lyricists! They’re surely gonna win awards worldwide for that!

 

2. Taang Uthake
Singers ~ Mika Singh, Mamta Sharma, Neeti Mohan & Sohail Sen, Backing Vocals by ~ Hrishikesh Chury & Madan Shukla, Music by ~ Sohail Sen, Lyrics by ~ Sameer Sen, Farhad-Sajid, Mamta Sharma & Sanjeev Chaturvedi

Here comes another song with a Topsy-Turvy name. Sohail Sen holds the baton for this one, and fails to do much wonder with it. The composition is the typical Bollywood-Dappankuthu combo, with the typical kuthu rhythm supporting the Bappi Lahiri-styled composition. Sohail tries hard to create another ‘Tune Maari Entriyaan’, but fails miserably. All he manages to create is a decent dance track, which isn’t a sureshot earworm. The composition being very stale and heard-before types, it does not appeal as much as ‘Tune Maari Entriyaan’ either. Sohail has roped in Mika as the lead male singer, singing for three actors, while Mamta and Neeti get their voices superimposed on each other, and thank God Neeti’s voice is clearly audible, while you have to strain your ears to hear Mamta’s, which I’m sure nobody will do. Their parts, trough, have been composed very good, and are actually catchy, especially the second antara. Mika, as always, eats up most of his words, and in a line says something like “Kiltapille pultapille”. He puts in that unusual dog sound while singing, and it seems more dog-like ever since he sang that wonderfully catchy song ‘Tu Mere Agal Bagal Hai’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero)! But sadly, the same magic hasn’t been repeated here. Sohail’s arrangements remind you of ‘Tune Maari Entriyaan’, and I guess he has copy-pasted the same rhythm into this song. The dhols, rock guitars, are all the same. He seems to have added the brass band and Shehnaai. And now, coming to the lyricists! Here, there are not two, not three and not even four, but a total of FIVE lyricists! (Plus, Mamta is one of them!) And what can they offer? A song about lifting up your legs and dancing the whole night! What an amazing concept!! I was really awestruck on hearing the lyrics! Too good! If you think I would say all that, you’re so much mistaken. Judge for yourself. Here are some lines — “Jhoomega body ka har part taang uthake”… So are you telling me that our legs have legs, toes have legs, fingers have legs, our eyes have legs, our ears have legs, our stomach has legs, our pancreas has legs, our appendix has legs, our lungs have legs and everything else has legs? Thanks for the wonderful lesson on anatomy! I never knew all this! 😀 Here’s another one — “Main wine Ki bottle, jismein nasha total, all the guys just want a piece of me”… No comments… So, you get the idea! All the lines are just a mishmash of supposedly “fun” words, but none appeal. It’s just a compilation of lines from various dance songs which have come and gone across the years. A catchy composition, but everything else, boring! Lyrics again, deserve a standing ovation, for giving such an unknown fact about human anatomy!

 

3. Malamaal
Singers ~ Mika Singh, Akira, Miss Pooja & Kuwar Virk, Music by ~ Mika Singh & Millind Gaba, Lyrics by ~ Rani Malik & Farhad-Sajid

Mika has already driven us crazy in ‘Taang Uthake’, and now he’s here to compose a song with Millind Gaba, someone whose songs I’ve never liked. This is a Punjabi wedding song, which has a pretty enjoyable composition, but gets boring after a minute, because if the atrocious vocals and lyrics, again! The starting has a dholak portion that sounds like the start of ‘Balam Pichkari’, but just for a second. After that, a very poorly recorded female sangeet portion, only to be disturbed by Bhangra elements like that phurr phurr sound. Mika sings in an utterly intolerable high pitch, which is sure to puncture your eardrums if you hear it for too long. The female singers don’t help. Miss Pooja’s voice isn’t as harsh as usual, but is more irritating than ever. Akira, who had a song in the recent ‘Santa Banta Pvt. Ltd.’, has only one single line in the song, which I suspect is a line that had to be replaced, because it’s smack in the middle of Miss Pooja’s stanza. And her voice is atrocious! Hear it in ‘Ishq Karle Anytime’ (Santa Banta Pvt. Ltd.) for a more detailed hearing experience. Millind and Mika have horribly and terribly recorded the “song”, if I can call it one. It sounds as if we are hearing it on a radio in some garage. Heck, garages pick up a better signal, than this song’s recording makes it sound like! Irritating Bhangra sounds make up most of the arrangements, with harmonium, techno sounds, and the quintessential tumbi pitching in occasionally. The lyrics are by Rani Malik, a pretty renowned lyricist of the 90s, and she writes lyrics that will put all the lyricists of the album to shame. They’ll wonder how they couldn’t come up with such bad lyrics and they’ll curse themselves for not torturing the listeners as much as she has. Here’s an example — “Mauka hai dastoor bhi hai, Par why you standing far. Take me in your arms raja, Like a true sardar”. It is an insult of Hinglish!! Farhad-Sajid too force their names in the lyricists list; I guess they must’ve made up one or two lines in each song, and hence, they feature as lyricists on every song. ATROCIOUS!!!! RIDICULOUS!!! YUCK!! Stepping on cow dung in the village with bare feet is better than hearing this, because at least we can wash our feet, whereas this song won’t even get washed out of your brain!

 

4. Fake Ishq
Singers ~ Kailash Kher, Nakash Aziz & Altamash Faridi, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood & Farhad-Sajid

Tanishk is back after a mediocre and a mindblowing song in ‘Sarbjit’. I had praised him for not making his rock Qawwali ‘Allah Hu Allah’ in ‘Sarbjit’, filmy at all. And lo and behold! Here he comes with a filmy rock Qawwali, just against my wishes. Just as I expected, he overdoes the filminess, and ends up spoiling everything. The singers lineup will not make you think so, by trust me, the singing is horrendous! I’ve never seen Kailash Kher singing so badly, in such an unnecessarily high voice, and whenever I have, it sounded pleasant! Nakash’s talent has been purely wasted by making him wail random “Abbaaaa”‘s all throughout the song, which is a real pest to the ears. Altamash is the most modest, only showing up in the hookline — that too, overshadowed by Kailash’s booming voice. Nakash gets to do an atrociously worded AdLib before the Qawwali actually starts, but he sings it decently. Tanishk’s core composition is pretty boring, too, desperately trying to ape Sohail Sen’s ‘Isq Risk’ (Mere Brother Ki Dulhan) which was leagues ahead, and of a totally different level. The composition is ridiculously high-pitched, and a troublesome one too, at that. It is tooooooo dull and toooooo trying-to-be-emotional. Arrangements too, sound odd. I’ve never heard a shehnaai in a Qawwali before, and it doesn’t sound good, I’ve learned today! The rock element hasn’t been overdone, though, and thankfully, most of the arrangements are the usual tabla and harmonium. The lyrics, yet again, do not impress at all!!! “Bada fake tha pehle, yeh ishq ishq, yeh ishq ishq. Abb nek lagey hai, yeh ishq ishq”.  Wow, you must have got a very weak heart, man. “Emotion Ke jo taar hil gaye, kele Ke chhilke jaise chhil Gaye, love mein hum kill Gaye”. This line is trying so hard to be funny.. Hahahaha! Here, I laughed.. Happy? And lines like “Aeroplane Se rail ho Gaye” and “Topper se hum fail ho Gaye”, “Heaven Se hum hell ho Gaye” (pronounced by Kailash as ‘Hail’, so that makes sense, because hail comes from heaven, right?) just degrade the song even more. An insult to the Qawwali genre, a miserable copy of ‘Isq Risk’, an insult to a legend like Kailash, and a waste of his talent. Was expecting better from Tanishk!


You saw how “good” Housefull 3 was. Yes, it was funny. Yes, it is a comedy movie. But comedy movies can have better soundtracks. I think a single composer would’ve done way better on the album! And if they really wanted multiple composers, just to keep on with the trend, I guess, more experienced composers would have done better. In my opinion, Sohail should have done the Qawwali. 😀 Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Sajid-Wajid’s albums guaranteed a house full opening for the first two films… Not sure about this one, though!! 😂

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pyar Ki > Taang Uthake > Fake Ishq = Malamaal

 

Which is your favourite song from Housefull 3? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Note: ‘Housefull 3’ being a June release, it will be counted in the June Music Mastani Monthly awards… Just reviewed it because ‘Waiting’ and ‘Veerappan’ albums are still awaited! 😣

INNOVATIVE! EMOTIONAL! ENJOYABLE! EXPERIMENTAL! BEAUTIFUL! (SARBJIT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Jeet Gannguli, Shashi-Shivamm, Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: Rashmi-Virag, Sandeep Singh, A.M. Turaz, Jaani, Late Haider Najmi & Arafat Mehmood
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 29th April 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 20th May 2016

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Sarbjit Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Sarbjit is an upcoming Bollywood biographic drama film, starting Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Randeep Hooda, Richa Chadda and Darshan Kumar. The film is directed by ‘Mary Kom’ fame Omung Kumar, and produced by Vashu Bhagnani, Bhushan Kumar, Sandeep Singh, Omung Kumar, Deepshikha Deshmukh, Krishan Kumar, Jackky Bhagnani and Rajesh Singh. The film portrays the struggle of Sarabjit Singh (Randeep Hooda), an Indian national who was convicted of terrorism and spying by a Pakistani court, through the eyes of his sister, Dalbir Kaur (Aishwarya Rai Bachchan). Sarabjit’s wife, Sukhpreet is played by Richa Chadda. Sarbjit’s sister Dalbir fought with the Pakistani Government for nearly 23 years before Sarbjit being declared as innocent. Sarbjit’s case is fought by Awais Sheikh (Darshan Kumar). The film narrates the heart-wrenching story of Sarabjit and his sister and wife. In ‘Mary Kom’, I remember how I was expecting barely four songs, and I got the surprise of seven songs, and a stellar album (scoring a सां on the blog). Here, I expected many songs, because it’s natural looking at the long list of music directors. I expected a maximum of seven songs, and lo and behold! I get ten! 😀 I don’t know where so many songs will go in a biopic, but I can assume one thing for sure, that the songs will be mind blowing just like ‘Mary Kom’, which made me believe that Omung Kumar has a very great music sense. There are five entities, and seven people behind the music this time, and all have had successful stints in the past. The first is Amaal Mallik (with one song); I don’t have to introduce him, do I? And I don’t need to tell you about his past hits, because you already know! So I expect a lot from his as usual. The next is Jeet Gannguli, also with one song, who didn’t quite impress this year with ‘Sanam Re’, but impressed with his single in ‘One Night Stand’, so expecting a good one here too! The next composers are duo Shail-Pritesh, with their Bollywood debut. Shall Hada and Pritesh Mehta have been assistants of Sanjay Leela Bhansali, so again, expecting good music, if not great! Also, their maiden Marathi album ‘Carry On Maratha’ last year was spectacular! And they have five songs… So that explains it. 😀 Tanishk Bagchi, who scored this year with ‘Bolna’ (Kapoor & Sons), and had one of the greatest hits of last year ‘Banno’ (Tamu Weds Many Returns), has two songs in this album. Expectations are a lot from this youngster too! Last but definitely not the least, both the composers from ‘Mary Kom’, Shashi Suman and Shivamm Pathak, come together for a song, having worked separately in ‘Mary Kom’. Why would I expect great things from them, either? 😀 So, with this huge album’s huge introduction, I know you are already exhausted, but there’s lots more… Sorry!! 😀 Read on to see how emotionally right the album of ‘Sarbjit’ is!! 🙂


1. Salamat
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Tulsi Kumar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Rashmi-Virag

Amaal gets to open the album, and wow! He takes full advantage of the fact that he has only one song in such a huge album, by giving something spectacularly good. To start with, electric guitars give a single blare, quickly followed by wonderful sarangi, harmonium and beautiful sparkling sounds. This is just the beginning of the soulful arrangements. The splendid arrangements continue throughout the whole song, and never fail to catch your attention. It is Amaal’s composition, though, which plays the lead role in the song, and that’s how it should always be! Have a strong composition, and the rest falls in place all by itself (of course, there are some exceptions!). A soulful song, with every note touching your heart deeply, is probably the best thing that you could ever find in an album. What’s more, Amaal composed it owhen he was just 17 years old! What a remarkable feat, because the composition is his most mature composition EVER, and it deserves nothing but many rounds of applause, which would also seem less. The antara, though, is the same tune as the ‘Hero’ theme song. 😀 Loved how Amaal incorporated that here! Going the Himesh way, who put ‘Desi Beat’ (Bodyguard) into ‘Son Of Sardaar’ title song, and ‘Main Jahaan Rahoon’ (Namastey London) into ‘Lonely’ (Khiladi 786). 😀 Amaal goes the traditional way for arrangements, of course, adding some modern twists, to create a pan-generational appeal. What I have to endlessly praise, is that, even though he has added some modern elements, like electric guitars and all, he has made sure not to go overboard, and that is what I appreciate about him —  he knows how much is right, and the songs are perfectly done. Traditional instruments include the tablas, woodwinds (they sound oh so beautiful!!!), dafli, harmonium and so many more instruments just making small cameos. The first interlude has a traditional string instrument which has been amplified and made to sound like an electric guitar, while the second interlude has been decorated wisely with the flutes. The flutes have to get a special mention for being used so beautifully all throughout the song, especially the last time the hookline is sung. Speaking about vocals, Arijit sounds as majestic as ever, possibly even more, and his low-pitched voice which I never like, suddenly appealed to me a lot! Tulsi, too, sings exceptionally well! She must sing like this more often!! Both of them score great together again, after ‘Soch Na Sake’ (Airlift). Rashmi and Virag write some soulful romantic lyrics, typical Bollywood style, but still appealing, especially the different words in the hookline each time. What a brilliant start to the album by Amaal! Amaal’s most mature composition hands-down! And the flutes!! 😘 #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Dard
Singer ~ Sonu Nigam, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Rashmi-Virag & Jaani

The next song starts similarly, with the sarangi notes touching each corner of the heart and making our eyes watery. (Okay, that’s exaggeration.. 😝) Anyway, the instrument always sounds very majestic, and so, it is an appreciated start to the song. Jeet composes this one, with Sonu behind the mic, ready to stun the audiences again. Jeet’s composition is totally emotional and it will make you emotional, especially when you try to sing along. The line ‘Jo tujhe lagta baarish hai, woh main hoon jo ro-oon’, has been crafted soooooo beautifully! I loved that line so much, it can’t be explained in words. The whole song, in fact, seems to be composed really carefully, unlike today’s timepass songs that are composed in seconds by adding techno beats and a repetitive rhythm, and become super-duper hits. Jeet has given such a composition last year too, with ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ title song. He knows how to make songs emotional and heart-touching even if they sound overdramatic sometimes. Yes, this song does sound a bit too dramatic, but Jeet has somehow managed to make it very lovable! Both the mukhda and antara share this property. There is a paragraph that comes once in the song, and it is the peak point of the song, like the climax of a movie. The instrumentation suddenly intensifies there and the vocals go high-pitched and also, the composition is more intense there. This paragraph is “Pankh agar hote…” Marvelous! Jeet’s arrangements in the song are spectacular. Acoustic guitars, sarangi, cello, dafli and violins make up the main arrangements. Digital beats support the whole song. Sonu’s voice never disappoints me, and it appeals here too. He has one of those magical voices that nobody can ever match. He renders Jeet’s heart-wrenching composition with so much ease, that it is unbelievable, but believable only because it’s him! By the way, I can totally imagine Rahat Fateh Ali Khan singing this one; if only there was a reprise! Rashmi-Virag and Jaani team up to write brilliantly heart touching lyrics, and since they’re so good, I don’t care that it took three people to write them! It makes perfect sense, in fact. 🙂 A wonderful song from Jeet; I consider it as one of his best! And with it, the album gets yet another #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tung Lak
Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Sunidhi Chauhan, Shail Hada & Kalpana Gandharv, Backing Vocals ~ Deepti Rege, Mayuri Patwardhan, Roshni, Hargun, Music by ~ Shail-Pritesh, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Singh

Shail-Pritesh step in for the next song, which will be their Bollywood debut song. The duo get an upbeat Punjabi bhangra number, which is pretty heavy for a celebratory song. I’ll explain. The song starts off with a high-pitched couplet sung by Shail, which is highly impressive. Then the song starts off, complete with the typical bhangra noises made from the mouth, which is impossible to explain. 😄 The hookline is catchy, but doesn’t have a universal appeal. The composition is, as I said, heavy on the ears. And a celebratory song should be light! The makers have tried to recreate the magic of ‘Gallan Goodiyaan’ (Dil Dhadakne Do), but that had a prominent modern sound to it, and hence appealed even though it was kind of heavy. I have to applaud the efforts, though! The duo has included many twists and turns in the composition, and it is quite difficult to understand what’s going on. Arrangements are awesome, with typical Punjabi dhols, dhadd, nagada, tumbi and the vocal sounds. There is a weird dubstep treatment in one paragraph, which leaves you wondering, “Is this 1990 (the time period of the movie, or rather, the starting period of the movie) or 2015?” The singers are spot-on with their rendition, though. Sukhwinder Singh never disappoints in such songs, and singing such a fast-paced composition with so much energy, is not an easy feat! Kudos to him! Sunidhi Chauhan sounds like what she sounded in the 2000s, maybe because the song sounds like that. The song also has a 90s feel (it’s supposed to, but I don’t think that’s deliberate! :P) Shail is good in additional vocals, while Kalpana (The Haryanvi ‘Old School Girl’ from ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’ singer) has a rap portion which she handles well, but again, it seems out of place. The lyrics are celebratory, and suit the occasion, but not so amusing as they were meant to be. The song has left me in a fix. I don’t seem to understand it. It seems a mishmash of tunes of various Punjabi songs, and it’s WAY TOO COMPLEX for a celebratory song!

 

4. Rabba
Singer ~ Shafqat Amanat Ali, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

Young composer Tanishk steps in with his first song of the album, and brings in Shafqat Amanat Ali, a voice we’ve not heard for quite some time now. The song is a melancholic song composed on a Middle-Eastern template, of which the beats are groovy. The composition itself, I found a bit overdramatic at places. It has quite a dated feel to it, but Shafqat takes it higher with his deep and silky vocals. Tanishk tries to do justice to the theme of the movie, but the composition is not something that you would call catchy. Arrangements are good, with flutes, santoor and some electric guitars too. However, again, they are heard-before and turn out to make the composition pretty dull and make it sound more monotonous. The antara gets really boring at a particular moment, and at that time, it seems like a task to continue with the song. The lyrics too, are not very impressive. Backing vocals seem to be trying hard to impress, but don’t. An exhausting composition, whose saving grace is Shafqat’s vocals and the Middle-Eastern template (a bit).

 

5. Meherbaan
Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Shail Hada & Munnawar Masoom, Music by ~ Shail-Pritesh, Lyrics by ~ A.M. Turaz

Take a look at the singers and you get no prizes for guessing that the song is a Qawwali. Shail-Pritesh have done a wonderful job at composing a Qawwali that follows the traditional template, and also hooks you. Sukhwinder, again using his magical voice, starts off the song, to be joined by Munnawar in the AdLib. And after that, the real fun part of every Qawwali starts, when the tablas start all of a sudden, and everything falls into perfect rhythm. A wonderful sitar-tabla jugalbandi has been showcased by the duo, and that is what invokes the “waaah”, at the sheer beauty of it all. The duo has used such beautiful arrangements all throughout the Qawwali! Following the regular Qawwali template, they still manage to give something innovative, by using no, or very little, harmonium! I mean, I thought a Qawwali is nothing without a harmonium! This Qawwali, however, relies on the sitar mostly to do its job. And boy, does it work! The rapid way in which the sitar is played, it would take sheer concentration and talent to do that! And the duo is full of that, it seems! The composition, like all Qawwalis, will not appeal to all, but to me, it sounded realllly catchy. The hookline sounds better because of the arrangements, otherwise, such a simple hookline wouldn’t sound so good in a Qawwali. However, the other parts have been composed very well! Especially the line before the hookline, “Toh phir karde khatam yeh jo sarhad hai hamaare darmiyaan”. Wow!! What a stupendous tune! And it provides a seamless transition from the mukhda to the hookline. On the vocals front, Sukhwinder fortunately handles the most part of the song. Munnawar & Shail too have a good number of parts, yet it feels like Sukhwinder is that main singer, the one who sits in front of all the rest in a baithak. 😂😂 Towards the end, all three do a great jugalbandi, withh Munnawar and Sukhwinder handling aalaaps, Shail handling the hookline. And towards the end, this Qawwali breaks into full bhangra mode for some reason, with dhols and the nagada. Turaz’s lyrics are apt for a Qawwali, and like all Qawwalis, they are situational words, and suits a devotional Qawwali. A great harmonium-less Qawwali, with a great trio of singers, and a beautiful composition from the duo! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Barsan Laagi
Singer ~ Shail Hada, Music by ~ Shail-Pritesh, Lyrics by ~ A.M. Turaz

A wonderful, feel-good sitar solo starts off the song, with Shail’s aalaaps accompanying it. Once he starts singing the real composition, you can’t help but go “Wooooowww!!!” Atleast, that’s what I felt! The song is a breath of fresh air after the heavy songs of the album up till now. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is sooooo beautiful, I really felt like it was one of Rahman’s 2000s compositions, and I also felt like it was one of those beautiful Lata Mangeshkar songs from the 1950s! There is a lot of magic in the composition, and when songs make you feel rejuvenated and refreshed, you have got to notice that there is a certain spark of magic in them. This song is one of those. The duo has put before us an exquisite, radiant, semi-classical composition, which is really hard to dislike. The hookline, which has nothing to do with the title of the song, “Aaj malang nu savran de, Khushiyon da pani barsan de”, is just simply charming. The antaras are sweet, but definitely not simple, nevertheless they shine like gems in the song. About the arrangements, what can I say?? They are just too captivating and enchanting for me to say anything. The aforementioned sitar has a prominent part, in both a low pitch and high pitch, and acoustic guitars have been used well in the hookline, along with ravishing strings. The matka sounds exceptionally sweet, too! There are shehnais at places too, waiting to astonish you with their wonderful sound. Shail’s vocals are beautiful too! No wonder he was Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s favourite! His voice has the right texture — a mix of rustic and smoothness. Turaz yet again, writes marvelous lyrics! A feel-good song, which will really lift up your mood! Shail-Pritesh excel in the composition, arrangements and Shail sing is it out beautifully! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. Allah Hu Allah
Singers ~ Altamash Faridi, Shashaa Tirupati & Rabbani Mustafa, Additional Vocals by ~ Arsh Mohammed & Supriya Pathak, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Late Haider Najmi (Traditional), Additional Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

Tanishk’s next song is a fusion Qawwali, with a striking rock template. After a mediocre song, ‘Rabba’, he impresses highly with this second song of his. First of all, the composition is really complicated, yet it has the appeal to all kinds of people, especially music lovers! Many twists and turns in the composition ensure it to appeal even more. The chorus “Apna kar lijo mohe, daras de dijo mohe, karam kar dijo mope” has been composed so beautifully, it is impossible not to like it. And the whole song is just as likable and soulful. Each line holds something new in store, and the fact that it has been composed on the roopak taal, with seven beats, increases its attractiveness manifold for me. To me, that rhythm sounds very classy and I love any song composed on it! The offbeat treatment done in the antara, where the words don’t necessarily fit right into the rhythm, has turned out really beautiful. Arrangements are beautiful too. Qawwali instruments like tablas, harmonium, and then simple clapping blended gracefully with modern styles of music like rock with the rock guitars, drums, make for a very interesting listen. It sounds very enticing as long as it plays. The bulbultarang too, sounds great in the beginning. However, the tablas are what won my heart over. 😍 They have been beautifully done, and the rock guitars complement them BEAUTIFULLYYY! A wonderful flute interlude is not to be missed, either. Vocals are spot-on, and the two male singers can’t really be differentiated, while Shashaa sings only in the chorus with them; most of the song is a chorus song, though. Haider Najmi’s traditional lyrics have been really well-used, and thank God they have been used so wonderfully, while Arafat writes apt new lyrics too. So Tanishk makes up for his mediocre song with this highly awe-inspiring song! IMPRESSIVE is all I can say!! The Rock-Qawwali has never been done so well, without sounding too filmy! A winner in all departments! I can hear this one on loop! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

8. Mera Junoon
Singer ~ Shail Hada, Music by ~ Shail-Pritesh, Lyrics by ~ A.M. Turaz

The Sikh devotional song ‘Jo Mange Thakur’ starts off this song, along with some flutes plauign around the vocals. Shail-Pritesh’s fourth song, this one is a melancholic song but motivating nevertheless. The composition is painfully soulful, and touches the heart, quite unusually. Usually, such songs seem overdramatic, but here, the emotions have been well woven into the song, so as to make it seem justified. And it sounds a lot like a Sanjay Leela Bhansali composition. This composition too, has many twists and turns, so making it pretty difficult to follow it, yet striking some chord somewhere with the listeners. Especially the hookline, is something stellar. Shail’s heart-touching rendition makes the song all the more believable, and the spectacular lyrics by Turaz describe the determination and passion of a sister, still looking for her brother, even after so many failures. And Shail has brought the lyrics to life with his lively rendition. Arrangements done by the duo are fabulous as well. The percussion rhythm playing all throughout the song is the base of the song, while flutes and woodwinds join occasionally, only to add more magic into the already magical ambience. The guitars too, have been played well. As I said earlier, A.M. Turaz has written motivating lyrics that describe the feelings of a very strong-willed person. Another complete package! This is how melancholia should ideally be portrayed! Perfect! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

9. Nindiya
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Shashi-Shivamm, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Singh

Shashi Suman and Shivamm Pathak, the two masterminds behind the ‘Mary Kom’ album, come together for a single song, after having worked separately in that album. In ‘Mary Kom’, Shashi had composed a simple, sweet lullaby, ‘Chaoro’, which had been beautifully sung by Priyanka Chopra. This time, Shashi, along with Shivamm, goes a step further and cranks it up a notch higher. The composition this time is really complex and layered, unlike the one-dimensional lullaby that ‘Chaoro’ was. This one has many dimensions. On one note it sounds sweet and simple, while on the next, it suddenly sounds haunting. I really get the goosebumps WHENEVER I hear this song, no matter how many times I’ve heard it before. It has this magical feel to it, and this time, the magical feel surpasses the magical feel of all the other songs of the album — it actually sounds realistic! I really can’t explain it all, but you will have to hear it yourself! It is just a spectacular song from the two! Arijit’s vocals are a brilliant choice; when he sings in the soft and husky voice, his voice sounds really soothing, so here’s anothter thing in favour of the duo. Arrangements are splendid too. Strings make up most of the arrangements, be it violins or folk instruments. Other sound effects like chimes have been used properly to make the song sound like a lullaby, with the harp pitching in at places! The flute too, helps in making the song something to hear again and again. Sandeep Singh’s lyrics are calming too, and with the composition, it sounds even better! At under three minutes, this is the song that stands tall above them all! That’s all I can tell you!! For further information, hear the song!!! BRILLIANCE AT ITS PEAK! 👌👌 #5StarHotelSong!!

 

10. Sarbjit (Theme)
Vocals ~ Shail Hada, Music by ~ Shail-Pritesh

With all those extraordinary songs, there should be an instrumental theme to top it off, right? I mean, albums sound complete with an instrumental! 😀 So, the makers of ‘Sarbjit’ decide to give an instrumental theme to finish off the album. Shail-Pritesh manage to make a haunting piece of music, with the strings playing the major role in it. The sarangi in a very low pitch handle almost everything in the track. The percussion beats in the background are catchy too. Shail pitches in with some ravishing vocals and it sounds even better. Towards the end, the song starts going uphill until it reaches a climactic part where brass, strings and percussion all meet each other at their respective majestic bests. A three minute instrumental that will transport you to the BGM of any Sanjay Leela Bhansali movie, and also, a ravishing finish to the album by Shail-Pritesh, the stars of the album! #5StarHotelSong!!


Albums like Sarbjit are very rare nowadays. The makers of ‘Sarbjit’ have really been very brave by having such an album. By “such”, I mean an album which isn’t afraid of not being noticed, an album which clearly doesn’t rely on commercial stuff, and treads its own path, ignorant of the hullabaloo around it. Not all of the songs would appeal to the masses, except maybe ‘Salamat’ and ‘Dard’. The others are strictly instrumental in carrying the story forward. And that’s what I appreciated about the album. Innovative! Emotional! Enjoyable! Experimental! Beautiful!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order {Ohhh this is gonna be tough!!}Nindiya > Allah Hu Allah > Salamat = Dard > Barsan Laagi > Meherbaan > Mera Junoon > Sarbjit (Theme) > Tung Lak > Rabba

 

Which is your favourite song from Sarbjit? Please vote for it below!! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next: A Surprise! 😀

DOESN’T DESERVE TO BE WELCOMED!! (WELCOME BACK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Meet Bros. Anjjan, Anu Malik, Mika Singh, Music MG (Milind Gaba), Siddhant Madhav, Yo Yo Honey Singh & Abhishek Ray
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Manoj Muntashir, Shabbir Ahmed, Music MG (Milind Gaba), Arafat Mehmood, Nitin Raikwar, Deane Sequeira, Manvendra & Abhishek Ray
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th August 2015
♪ Movie Released On: 4th September 2015

Welcome Back Album Cover

Welcome Back Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Welcome Back is a Bollywood action comedy film, that stars an ensemble cast consisting of John Abraham, Shruti Haasan, Anil Kapoor, Nana Patekar, Paresh Rawal, Naseeruddin Shah, Dimple Kapadia, Shiney Ahuja and Ankita Shrivastava. The film is directed by Anees Bazmee, and produced by Firoz Nadiadwala. As even the newest born baby in the country must be knowing by now, owing to the delay my review has made in arriving, the film is a sequel to the 2007 superhit ‘Welcome’. The absence of Akshay Kumar was already a cause of negative buzz surrounding the film even before its release, and after release, it’s as if the film has been forgotten by most people. Anyways, the music has been given by a horde of music directors, which you can read up in the “Album Details” section, because I’m really too lazy to even copy-paste all that (mostly because of the GENIUS music composers that the list contains). It seems to be an album where T-Series has very little say in what songs to include and what to not, because it has turned out very BAD, frankly. So my review for it will be written with the same amount of interest that the composers have seemed to put into the making of the songs; be ready! 😀 Also look out for many lines where you can point out how irritated I was with the composers as I went through this unnecessarily loooooonnnnnggggg album!


1. Tutti Bole Wedding Di
Singers ~ Meet Bros. Anjjan & Shipra Goyal, Backing Vocals by ~ Ambresh, Ved, Ashish, Ruchir & Bipin, Music by ~ Meet Bros. Anjjan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

To open up this grand album, we have a wedding song that tries to be grander than it should. Larger-than-life arrangements coupled with a staid band-baaja tune is something that is doomed to fail. The Bollywood audience has already had enough of the wedding themes in the 90s and early 2000s itself, and another song along the same lines, without any hint of innovation or evolution is definitely not going to all of a sudden change the mind of the public. Meet Bros. Anjjan, releasing one of their pre-split songs, must’ve been too over-excited after getting a song in such a big-budget movie, that they lost their senses halfway through the process of making it. The stale pe-pe-pein template, a must in Bollywood wedding songs, makes an appearance in this song as well, and it couldn’t have got any more clichéd than this. I have to admit, the good recording and arrangements do give some reason to hear the song despite the boring composition. Meet Bros, making a smart move by not hiring Mika for the song, have also avoided another chance of making the song sound even more stereotypical. Their voices sound way better than Mika would have sounded! Shipra also sounds good in her parts, but again, could’ve added a bit more energy to hear voice. On the arrangements front, dholaks, tumbi, flutes, trumpets and all the other wedding instruments don’t shy away from making appearances at least once in the song. A guitar interlude before the second antara, is worth paying attention to, though! Kumaar’s Hinglish lyrics are neither catchy, nor do they generate any interest in the listener, which is normally the case with Hinglish lyrics. Towards the end, a tempo increase makes things livelier but not at all interesting, and it ends up sounding like a mess! Not an impressive start to the album by Meet Bros. Anjjan!! Arrangements are what makes it tolerable, or else you better just go hear some 90s wedding song — it would be more enjoyable!

 

2. 20-20
Singers ~ Anu Malik, Mamta Sharma & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ Anu Malik, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir & Shabbir Ahmed 

Anu Malik enters the soundtrack with the second track itself, as if trying to say, “Fear not, I’m here!” But then, does it even apply here? Earlier this year, he gave us a great soundtrack in ‘Dum Laga Ke Haisha’, composing songs that both catered to the audience as well as suited the theme of the movie. He had to compose in 90s style there, as the film was set in the 90s. But does that mean he should eternally compose as if it is always the 90s? Because apparently, he seems to be under the impression that what worked 20 years ago, will work even now, even though not required in the film. So, he churns out a song that seems to have been rotting in his music bank ever since he debuted! Right from the beginning, you instantly feel that you are in that era when stupid lyrics and a “catchy” tune would work no matter what. The arrangements make sure you feel that way. And what should I say about the composition? I’ve already said it sounds like a stale 90s item song, and that is it! Nothing more, nothing less. Add Mamta Dharma’s annoying vocals to it, and crude interruptions from Anu himself, and you can increase the cheapness value by infinity! :/ The only one who seems to shine as far as vocals go, is Shadab Faridi (that too, backing vocals!) And his is the only part I liked! About the lyrics, I would say that I never expected Manoj Muntashir to participate in such a song; Shabbir is at least imaginable! Watching a 20-20 cricket match a thousand times would be a more productive work than listening to this thing which has been unfortunately called a “song”! SKIPPPPP!

 

3. Welcome Back (Title Track)
Singers ~ Mika Singh, Geeta Jhala & Music MG (Milind Gaba), Music by ~ Mika Singh & Music MG (Milind Gaba), Lyrics by ~ Music MG (Milind Gaba)

Of course, the title track of ‘Welcome’ was one of the main attractions in the soundtrack and so, as is Bollywood’s regular convention for a sequel, a remake of the title track is mandatory, isn’t it? So here, Sajid-Wajid’s catchy title track is bestowed into the hands of Mika and Milind Gaba, to try and make it more attractive for today’s audience. If you ask me, well, the two have done their job well, and have to be given credit for it! And by ‘it’, I mean turning the song into a complete club song with club beats and the stereotypical club sound and spoiling it. And also ordering everybody to jump while listening to it, even though what they’ve done isn’t even enough to make anybody react in any way whatsoever. It’s pretty much how you sit in history class, expressionless. Mika’s part that goes “Lachke…” is so irritating, that you keep waiting for it to get over, and when it is over, Music MG kicks in with a super-annoying rap, which will not surprise you even though he says it very fast. Geeta Jhala’s voice is one of those thousands of female voices these days that are programmed to suit the club atmosphere, and we never get to know what they really sound like! The beats are totally techno beats and might offer some respite from the obnoxious lyrics and tune, but just some. Sajid-Wajid should hear this, and laugh at Bazmee. Only good for clubs and functions, where half the people don’t even care or know what song plays!

 

4. Meet Me Daily Baby
Singers ~ Siddhant Madhav & Pawni A Pandey, Backing Vocals ~ Hyasinth D’Souza, Music by ~ Siddhant Madhav, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

Till now, we have heard three songs of the album, all three by established and well-known people of the industry, Meet Bros Anjjan, Anu Malik and Mika Singh. None of them really impressed me as such. So when the next song happens to be by a newcomer, naturally my reaction would be something like “Woah! Wait a minute! You mean to say that you’re gonna make me hear a song by a newcomer, after three atrocious songs by non-debutants? How do you expect me to trust you there?!” So I start listening without many expectations. Imagine how surprised I must have been when the song started in a funky, groovy and catchy way! Trumpets and other brass instruments welcome us into the song, and in a really catchy and addictive way. Pawni, whose voice has matured to the fullest by now, starts singing some English lines which don’t really matter as far as what they mean is concerned. The actual song starts when Siddhant Madhav, the composer comes behind the mic and sings his lines in a voice resembling that of Neeraj Shridhar a lot. The composition has been done with care and time, and that’s why I guess it has at least some power to grasp you. Everything is fine until the hookline comes which sounds really cheap and amateur, what with the bad blend of English and Hindi. The lyrics just keep getting worse in the antaras, with phrases like “you know na tere bin main kitni adhoori”, “Within a second tooney Ki Dil Ki chori” and other mixes of Hindi and English we would never even think of using in day-to-day life. Arafat Mehmood seems like another Shabbir Ahmed in making. Siddhant’s arrangements are really engaging, with a slight Latino touch to them, thanks to the wonderful brass instruments, guitars and other techno elements working in favour of the same. As far as the singers are concerned, Siddhant sounds a bit old at places, but that’s the requirement of the film (watch the video — he’s singing for Anil Kapoor and Nana Patekar, so…. You get it!) Pawni sounds as cheap as cheap can get in some places, kind of overdoing the accent when she has to sing some English words. Both the singers put unnecessary extra stress on the word “Baby” everytime they sing it, and they say it so many times in the song, it sounds like an overdose of babies. And the way they say it, it sounds like “Bayybaa”. 😒 Overall, one of the better songs of the album, but sometimes overflowing with cheapness. Anyways, since it’s one if the better songs, I would say, don’t underestimate the power of a newcomer!

 

5. Time Lagaye Kaiko
Singers ~ John Abraham & Anmol Malik, Music by ~ Anu Malik, Lyrics by ~ Nitin Raikwar

Those guitars start the song, and I immediately think of Salman Khan’s ‘O O Jaane Jaana’ for some reason. I guess the guitars have been played in a similar way in that song too. 😂 Anyways, this song is the second song by Anu Malik on the soundtrack, and is another one of the decent ones on it. The guitars have a pretty soothing effect, and the composition is tolerable too. But only until the singers don’t kick in. Because when they do, you might get confused and ask, “These are singers?” Well, I’ll tell you. The male voice isn’t that of a singer. It’s an actor. John Abraham singing his first song. Hello John, just because Salman, Alia, Shraddha et al are singing songs in their movies, it doesn’t mean that it’s compulsory for you! He has sung the song, and just had his voice programmed to try to make it sound good, but it doesn’t even sound good. And Anmol, who’s supposed to be a singer, sounds utterly atrocious, trying to torture us with that deliberate nasal twang in her voice. Shruti Haasan should’ve sung it, for all there was, because she’s featuring in the video. At least she would’ve sounded better. Anu Malik has rescued the song from doom by adding interesting guitar arrangements, though, so as long as you hear it by your own will, it’s all fine. The beats aren’t really captivating, by they’re not bad either. One con about the song is its duration, which is well over five minutes, and that is pretty much unbearable for such a song. Nitin has penned lyrics as if an actual tapori is singing. He has added that Mumbaiya language to the words and messed up English, to put in that effect. Nothing great, but just perfect to suit the visuals and situation, I guess. The composition is good at places, but the listener would lose interest in the antaras. But for the extremely stretched length, and the atrociously bad vocals, this one is pretty good!

 

6. Nas Nas Mein
Singers ~ Shabab Sabri, Rani Hazarika & Meet Bros. Anjjan, Rap by ~ Deane Sequiera, Music by ~ Meet Bros. Anjjan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Meet Bros. Anjjan return for their second song, and it takes the form of a gangster party track. Who knew gangsters partied with sinister music and I-wanna-kill-you type music? :p The song starts with a tune played on a really high-pitched horn or something like that. Deane says her rap portions, which really sound like a witch is singing them, thanks to their sinister feel. Techno sounds accompany her, which might make you groove for some time initially, but gradually the whole setup gets awfully boring and it starts sounding too monotonous. Shabab tries his luck at the club genre, and gets it right here, too. He sounds really great in this type of song. The antara sounds better, because it is slightly slower and calmer, plus Shabab shows some of his classical finesse in the notes of the antara. Rani Hazarika gets her one line only in the antara, one line in each of the two antaras, and when she says it, it sounds so much like a man at first, that you can’t make out the difference between her voice and Shabab’s. Deane’s second rap portion in the second interlude is much better than the one she got in the prelude, and keeps listeemers listening at least till the second antara. Meet Bros. Anjjan’s composition is a tad bit too grim and dark, and it sounds really over-the-top at places, and it gets the listener thinking, “Hasn’t Bollywood gotten over the days when gangsters used to party in clubs like this?” Because such songs were pretty common once upon a time. It just sounds outdated in today’s era. Lyrics are good, and suit the composition, with just as much grimness as the tune. The evil feel could have been slightly milder! Wonderful vocals by Shabab are the only attraction here!

 

7. Damaa Dam Mast Kalandar
Singers ~ Mika Singh & Yo Yo Honey Singh, Music by ~ Mika Singh & Yo Yo Honey Singh, Lyrics ~ Traditional, Additional Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This song really has the capacity to keep you moving and grooving to the music for as long as it plays, for four minutes. Yes, it has the names of two of the people whose songs I rarely like, Mika and Yo Yo Honey Singh, but this time, I’ve got to admit, they’ve co-composed something really funky yet divine! And that’s another rendition of the classic traditional song, ‘Damaa Dam Mast Kalandar’. I know the composition can’t be credited to them wholly, but the arrangements they’ve done are spectacular! Funky club beats grace the entire composition, and the awesome bass effect enhance the sound even more. Mika always sounds really sweet and awesome when he sings this song, be it under Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s direction in D-Day, or this one that he designed with Yo Yo Honey Singh. If you remember, they had released this as a single two years ago, and it had become a rage, playing on TV and radio numerous times. But in this time, it seems to have been forcefully thrust in, just because of lack of a superhit song in the album! Yo Yo’s parts are really low-pitched, and one of my favourite parts in the whole song! It sounds so divine, the way he kind of raps-cum-chants the words he has to sing. The lyrics are mostly the same from the original song, with additional verses written by Kumaar, like what Yo Yo has to sing. Something that I find tough to digest — the best song in the album is a remake, and that too, by Mika and Yo Yo, and the only #5StarHotelSong!!!

 

8. Welcome Back (Theme)
Singer ~ Abhishek Ray, Rap by ~ Abhishek Ray, Music by ~ Abhishek Ray, Lyrics by ~ Manvendra

The last song on the soundtrack (finalllyyy! — that seemed like eons!) is an utterly atrocious trying-to-be-too-cool kind of track, which calls the Welcome Back Theme. It consists of Abhishek Ray singing.. Or belching out words that don’t make an ounce of sense together, and they just seem to have been placed in the song to make it sound cool. The arrangements are bad except for when the tablas play occasionally. Female vocals keep saying “Woahh-ho-hoaa” throughout the song. Manvendra (who’s DAT?) didn’t have much to write here, just the most idiotic lines that could ever cross his thoughts. What an UNINTERESTING ending to this almost neverending album!


Welcome Back is an album that is a disgrace to Bollywood music. Neither does it contain anything original and good (because the best thing in it is remade), nor does it contain anything someone would want to come back and here multiple times. All the song have pathetic lyrics, most have bad vocals, and some even have bad arrangements. Only one song is perfect in all departments, that too is a remake. The album to its prequel also still sounds fresher than this album itself! :\ That says a lot! It  is an album that doesn’t deserve any special welcome at all! It really needs a farewell, however, from our playlists!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Damaa Dam Mast Kalandar > Time Lagaye Kaiko > Tutti Bole Wedding Di > Meet Me Daily Baby > Nas Nas Mein > Welcome Back (Title Track) > 20-20 > Welcome Back (Theme)

 

Which is your favourite song from Welcome Back? Please vote for it below! 🙂