DAGAONKAR BABU SANGEETBAAZ!! (BABUMOSHAI BANDOOKBAAZ – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gaurav Dagaonkar, Abhilash-Joel, Debojyoti Mishra & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Ghalib Asad Bhopali & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 17th August 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 25th August 2017

Babumoshai Bandookbaaz Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a Bollywood crime comedy film, starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui and Bidita Bag and directed by Kushan Nandy. The film has been produced by Kiran Shyam Shroff and Ashmith Kunder. The music for this film has been given (five out of six songs) by Gaurav Dagaonkar, a composer we hear in Bollywood quite infrequently. The last time we heard him was in ‘Wah Taj’ when he made a song that nobody heard again. Before that though, he had given some good music for ‘Heartless’ (2014), and ‘Kaafirana’ (Joker; 2012). Hopefully since he’s in charge of the major chunk of the album here, he will do his best. The guest composers are a debutant duo named Abhilash-Joel, who have worked on a scratch composition by Debojyoti Mishra, and built their song around it. Hopefully, they make a great debut! So let’s jump into this bandookbaaz album and hope it is sangeetbaaz!!


1. Barfani (Male) / Barfani (Female)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Orunima Bhattacharya, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

Gaurav Dagaonkar starts off this album with a delightfully haunting (What an oxymoron) classical number, based on raag jog. The composer really pleasantly surprised me with his amazing command over classical notes. The way his notes have come out in such a mellifluous manner, is commendable. The mukhda is an instantly gripping portion, and the hook, ‘jal jaane do‘, is what gives you the goosebumps. The antara, in the ideal way that classical songs usually go, follows a more happy-sounding route, and it contrasts very well with that haunting mukhda. The composition reminds you of many 90s songs, when Bollywood music was so heavily inspired by traditional classical music. The lyrics by Ghalib Asad Bhopali are quite intense, and do justice to the song’s theme quite perfectly. The word ‘barfani‘, is a word I’m hearing for the first time in a Bollywood song in recent years! The song is presented in two versions, male and female — both with the same haunting arrangements, thanks to a wonderful beat given by the jingle bells (ghungroo), and a very beautiful play of the guitars and the Dobro (Shomu Seal) which give a very sitar-ish sound. The male version is sung with impeccable finesse, by Armaan Malik, and I believe this is his first such song, which is so heavily based on classical music. He handles the song beautifully, in the lower octaves, and I believe it is his career’s best performance, solely because he tries something new! Orunima Bhattacharya is in charge of the other version, and she takes up a higher pitch, and aces it, and you can tell she has been classically trained. A beautiful and haunting romantic song to start off the album!

Rating: 4.5/5 for Male Version, 4.5/5 for Female Version

 

2. Aye Saiyan

Singers ~ Orunima Bhattacharya & Vivek Naik, Original Composition & Lyrics Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The second song seems like a song that was a residue from the ‘Anaarkali Of Aarah’ album that released earlier this year. It follows the same folksy vibe, as if there’s a dance going on in the village. Gaurav aces the composition, which is essentially a Bhojpuri folk song, but his music makes it more lively and likeable. The same tune is repeated throughout the song, so it does get a bit tedious towards the end, but I guess that’s how the folk song is. The lyrics are funny, if you understand Bhojpuri. The harmonium (Satyajeet Prabhu) leads the way right from the beginning, giving a very fresh vibe to the song, and the sprightly rhythm and percussions (Satyajeet Jamsandekar) is enjoyable as well! There are amazing dholaks that give the song a rhythm to which you can nod your head! The vocals by Orunima are great here as well, and she showcases her versatility in this song, which is so different from the first one! Vivek Naik has a short interruption, which disturbs more than sounds good. A fun and cute folksy number!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Ghungta

Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Chorus ~ Vivek Naik, Santosh Bote & Rahul Chitnis, Original (Hook) Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, New Composition by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi

Here comes another remake, and this time, it’s incorporated into an item song. But before we apply our judgements to that sentence, let’s listen to the song with an open mind. Because when I did that, I really enjoyed the song, thanks to Gaurav Dagaonkar’s enjoyable music, and Neha Kakkar’s very energetic vocals! The song is the remake of R.D. Burman’s ‘Haye Re Haye Tera Ghungta’ (Dhongi), and what I liked is that the only part taken from the old song is the hook. The only difference is that the girl is singing ‘mera ghungta‘ instead of the boys singing ‘tera ghungta‘. The rest of the composition goes well with that hook, and especially the antara is very catchy, and has a trademark Panchamda touch to it. The arrangements are just as lively, with the signature Maharashtrian dhol-taasha rhythm backing it. But amazing guitars (Arvind Haldipur) welcome the listeners into the antara, and that makes the antara sound even more enticing. The vocals are something that propel the song to heights that might not have been touched, had the singer been different, or if Neha Kakkar had sung even a little bit lifelessly. However, her rendition is lively, and she proves again how much energy her voice has. Ghalib Asad Bhopali’s lyrics are very typical to this genre. One of the better of such songs to release this year.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Chulbuli

Singer ~ Papon, Additional Vocals ~ Vivek Hariharan, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The retro vibe kicks in with the next song, a naughty, mischievous number with a very retro tune. Gaurav Dagaonkar has composed it very well, and right from the opening harmonium bar, you know you are in for a treat. The composer has created a nice vaudevillian-esque tune, resembling the musical style that was prominent in the 50s. The tune of the Mukhda is amazing, and gets you gripped there itself. The lilt of the song is increased by the tempo and the beats. The Antara is irresistible, again having a very retro tune. The arrangements are beautiful; surprisingly, they’re a little less retro-esque. The European touch is high in them, with the accordions, mandolins and chimes being most prominent. However, to balance this old-school vibe, Gaurav throws in a number of wonderful things like electric guitars, drums and brass instruments. The vocals are mellifluous, and what can you expect other than mellifluous when it is the genius Papon behind the mic? His voice is so magnetic, you just can’t pay attention to anything else. Vivek Hariharan joins him in backing vocals. His rendition reminds me of ‘Labon Ka Karobaar’ (Befikre), and so do the arrangements, now that I think of it. Ghalib’s lyrics are great and fun! The best song of the album yet!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Khali Khali

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan, Music by ~ Debojyoti Mishra & Abhilash-Joel

The debutants Abhilash Lakra and Joel Dubba step in for this song, and they are in charge of a melancholic number, that haunts your soul. The composition is very haunting, and has been composed with such notes, that are sure to make you emotional, and frightened at the same time. The pace is very slow, aptly so. The problem arises in the Antara, where the song gets into the Bhatt mode, and as the listener, I started to zone out. And the way it runs after that is very tedious. The duo tries to make up for that with mysterious arrangements, but that too, sounds maudlin. There are amazing strings though, all throughout the song, and even the percussions are great. Mohit Chauhan sounds good, but doesn’t manage to keep our interest in the song. The lyrics are good, again. Not very impressive of a debut.

Rating: 2.5/5


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a pretty surprisingly good album! I was expecting very little from it before the first song came out. After that came out I started hoping for a little more, and the makers just gave more and more after that! Gaurav Dagaonkar finally gives an album that he can be proud of for ages — with Indian classical, folk, European music that proves his versatility. The debutant duo Abhilash-Joel do disappoint relatively, but show promise in their great sense of composition and arrangements. That makes this a quite sangeetbaaz album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4.5 + 2.5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Barfani (Male) = Barfani (Female) = Chulbuli > Aye Saiyan = Ghungta > Khali Khali

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 24 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz) = 26

Which is your favourite song from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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MUBARAKAN! A FLOP ALBUM HAS BEEN BORN! (MUBARAKAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Hassan Jahangir, Amaal Mallik, Rishi Rich, Yash Anand & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Badshah & Hassan Jahangir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th July 2017

Mubarakan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mubarakan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy of errors starring Arjun Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor, Anil Kapoor, Ileana D’Cruz, Athiya Shetty and Ratna Pathak Shah in the lead roles. The film is directed by the only director in Bollywood who still insists on doing comedies with a cast larger than a herd of cows, Anees Bazmee and produced by Ashwin Varde, Murad Khetani and Balwinder Singh Janjua. The film’s plot consists of such never-before-tried aspects like — double roles, a love quadrangle, a huge Punjabi family and Punjabi dance numbers. It is going to redefine Bollywood, I’m sure of it. 😏 If you didn’t get that sarcasm, moving on. The music is by T-Series, and that means multiple composers. Thankfully, one name out of the three composers, is a relief, it being the name of Amaal Mallik, the young composer proving his mettle out there. He gets two, upbeat dance tracks, so I hope those are catchy! The next two composers are Gourov-Roshin, returning after treating us to a small break from their remakes, and sadly they have three songs, and Rishi Rich with Yash Anand, who have composed the title song of the film. Let’s just get this over with, eh?


1. The Goggle Song

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam, Armaan Malik, Neeti Mohan, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A wedding song to start the album, this one is an enjoyable tune from Amaal. Not the best he can do for sure, but it still makes you groove to the beat. The beat itself is infectious, with the composer adding quirky sound effects making it sound better. The ensemble of singers does really well for a wedding song, and for once, Tulsi sounds better than Neeti. The lyrics are mediocre, but hilarious at times. A good wedding track, but not very innovative.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Mubarakan (Title Track)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Juggy D, Sukriti Kakar & Badshah, Music by ~ Rishi Rich & Yash Anand, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Badshah, Yamma Yamma Credits: Music by ~ R.D. Burman

“This is the Rishi Rich beat.” The song starts with this obvious statement, and an unexpected incorporation of some portions ‘Yamma Yamma’ (Shaan). The actual composition falls flat, but it is saved by R.D. Burman’s old song, which plays throughout, and its addition was quite creative. Vocals are horrible. Lyrics are horrible. Rap is horrible. Arrangements are not so horrible. (Mostly, it is the awesome oud from the old song). In short, a horrible song, but for the arrangements and the old song’s portions.
P.S. I wouldn’t call this a Remake as such.
Rating: 2.5/5 (0.5 bonus for using that old song wisely)

 

3. Jatt Jaguar

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Navraj Hans & Apeksha Dandekar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another typical Punjabi song, the Punjabi flavour accentuated even more by a mediocre composition that barely manages to grasp your attention, except at the hook. Even Vishal doesn’t sound as energetic as always, but Navraj does. Lyrics are typical. Arrangements are typical, but there are traces Amaal’s digital quirks. At many places the tune seems like some old song I can’t recall! 😥 Not the best Amaal can do.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Haathon Mein Thhe Haath

Singers ~ Papon, Altamash Faridi, Aditi Singh Sharma & Arpita Mukherjee, Backing Vocals by ~ Rinku Giri, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A typical Pakistani pop-esque song follows, and it immediately strikes me as Papon’s worst song after a long, long time. The composition is staid and clichéd, his vocals do not help at all. Aditi sounds over stylish as usual. Those typical digital beats add to the melancholia. Backing vocalists add to the staleness, especially the Sufi one. Lyrics are something you won’t even notice. A song that clearly doesn’t know where it belongs.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Hawa Hawa

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Prakriti Kakar, Original Composition by ~ Hassan Jahangir, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The hit Pakistani pop song remade, with a typppppical kuthu beat and rhythm! Mika singing increases the headache, and the new composition is just unbearable. The hookline is good, but the other parts fall flat. The female vocals by Prakriti sound good though. Lyrics belong to a Sajid-Wajid soundtrack. Why????
Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

Singers ~ Rinku Giri & Puja Basnet, Original Composition Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another Punjabi folksy song ends the album, this time a mélange of two Punjabi folk songs, ‘Kala Doriya’ and ‘Baari Barsi’. The composition doesn’t hook you at all; in fact it sounds like ‘Jatt Jaguar Part 2’. The new singer Rinku Giri is the typical Punjabi male singer affair, he sounds like Diljit Dosanjh. Arrangements are “louder louder”. Lyrics are typical. A song that relies on folk songs to propel it, but fails.
Rating: 2/5


Mubarakan is yet another feather in Bollywood’s cap of Punjabi albums. All of the songs are very staid, heard-before ones, that don’t really help generate any interest. Amaal does okayish in one song, but showcases his quirk in the other. The others perform subpar, with the exception of Rishi Rich, who has made quite a catchy song. But even with its catchiness I couldn’t rate it higher than 2.5. So, for anyone counting, Mubarakan! Another flop album has been born! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 51.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: The Goggle Song > Mubarakan = Jatt Jaguar = Haathon Mein Thhe Haath = Hawa Hawa > Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 20

 

Which is your favourite song from Mubarakan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

CRYBABYIEE WEDS NRI!! (SWEETIEE WEDS NRI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo & Shah Jahan Ali
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Dr. Devendra Kafir, Late Shyam Bhateja, Palak Muchhal, Shakeel Azmi & Banjara Rafi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Sweetiee Weds NRI Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

{P.S. The song “Shiddat (Reprise)” is sung by Mohd. Irfan on Saavn and YouTube, and Sharad Patel on iTunes. Since the former is there on two sites, I will review that}


Sweetiee Weds NRI is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, with the clichéd theme of a wedding. The film stars Himansh Kohli and Zoya Afroz in the lead roles, and is directed by Hasnain Hyderabadwala, and produced by Cyrus Dastur, Dhaval Patel, Sada Bhuvad, and Tariq Mohammed. I couldn’t care less about the plot of the film, so heading on towards the music front. We have a multicomposer album, as is the norm for T-Series, but it is shocking to not see any of the T-Series protégés working for the film. Except maybe Arko. Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo and newcomer Shah Jahan Ali are the other composers for the film. Jaidev just gave us a better-than-the-original mata-ki-chowki recreation of Badshah’s ‘Kala Chashma’, and he gets one song here. Palash, back after doing nothing in films for three years, gets five songs all of a sudden in this film. Let me break the suspense. It is actually two songs, one of them having four versions. Raaj Aashoo, who has composed quite passable music before, gets a song and its reprise too, while Shah Jahan Ali, newcomer, gets one song too. Let me specify that even Arko has one song only. So with five composers and ten tracks, let’s see whether this grand wedding is just all quantity or has some substance too.


1. O Saathiya

Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Prakriti Kakar, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Thankfully, the first song is composed by the person whose song I was waiting for and at least expecting something from, Arko. And sure enough, the song is a pleasant and enjoyable listen. The composition is a breezy one, and starts off quite pleasantly. The soothing quality of the song continues as it progresses, and the  peak point of the song is the “Humrahi” hook, which is like fresh air. (Don’t watch that part in the video song though! 😂) There is no antara as such, the mukhda is repeated twice in the song, once by the male singer Armaan and the other time, by the female singer, Prakriti. That’s why the song ends up sounding shorter than it is, because the mukhda is repeated twice and that’s it. The arrangements are breezy as Arko’s arrangements usually are. The Acoustic guitars, and shakers and those digital beats in the hookline, giving a ballroom feel, are amazing. The interlude consists of a nice, feel-good, guitar piece, followed by a refreshing flute portion, which is in turn followed by a sweet piano piece. The vocalists carry the song out with ease, Prakriti sounding amazing with the nuanced singing. Armaan sings in that slightly uncomfortable low pitch which he rarely sings in, in the beginning, but gets better in the high pitched hookline. Arko’s lyrics are typical romantic song lyrics, but suit the ambience of the composition. A simple but sweet and effective song.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kudi Gujarat Di

Singers ~ Jasbir Jassi, Sonia Sharma, Akasa Singh & KD, Music by (Original and Recreation) ~ Jaidev Kumar, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Shyam Bhateja, New Lyrics by ~ Dr. Devendra Kafir, Rap Written by ~ KD

Jaidev Kumar steps in here, and with another remake, after his remake of ‘Kala Chashma’ in the recent ‘Behen Hogi Teri’. As we know, this music company’s latest fad is to remake hit Punjabi pop numbers of the 90s, and after they remade ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ by Sukhbir, in ‘Hindi Medium’ last month, they choose ‘Dil Le Gayee’ by Jasbir Jassi to remake this month. And the ingenious naming system of T-Series starts again, naming this one ‘Kudi Gujarat Di’, which are just the words that appear right after ‘Dil le gayee’ in the song’s lyrics. However, I’m quite pleased with this remake. The main reason is that Jaidev Kumar, who had composed the original, which was in fact his debut, has recreated it. So he keeps the flavour of the song intact, and yet manages to add a pleasant club touch. The composition has been kept the same, and lyrics have been changed. Unlike the ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ remix, this one actually is a remake. The arrangements have been changed to good club arrangements that are actually enjoyable. The techno sounds here, make the song more viable for today’s audience, who is only behind club songs. The vocals are great too, with Jasbir showing that he is still sounding as young as ever. The female singers, get very less scope, and I don’t even know which of them has sung what. A rap by someone called KD sounds very spoofish and amateurish. The new lyrics by Dr. Devendra Kafir, who wrote ‘Bolna’ (Kapoor & Sons) before this, are fun but typical. An enjoyable remake. 

Rating: 3.5/5

3. Musafir / Musafir (Reprise) / Musafir (Remix)

Singers ~ Atif Aslam & Palak Muchhal / Arijit Singh / Atif Aslam & Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

The next song witnesses Palash entering film music after a long time; his last release was ‘Amit Sahni Ki List’ in July 2014 if I’m not wrong. And this song, he provides in as many as three different versions. The composition is a very typical, Bhatt-ish composition that at first seems very bland and boring, but sounds better the next time. And when you start liking it, you start listening to it frequently, and after listening to it a lot, you start hating it. So like almost all Bhatt-ish songs, this song has a quite uninteresting life story. Jokes apart, Palash’s composition, though nothing innovative, provides temporary relief like Zandu Balm and sticks in your head for that short while as if it has been stuck with Fevicol. (There, I managed to put ‘Dabangg’ references in my review.) The mukhda is very typical, and so is the hookline, so much so that the first time I tried to listen to the song, I didn’t go past the hook. The antara is nothing great either. But despite all this, the song somehow manages to get in your head. So it’s like a Rohit Shetty film — not perfect, but manages to get you watching ahead. The arrangements must be the reason we are able to go forward. Both actual versions (not counting the remix for now) have different arrangements. While the Atif Aslam version has a clichéd-to-the-core acoustic guitar setting with occasional electronic tabla beats, the Arijit Singh version has better arrangements, starting off with a flute, and progressing with a more unplugged-ish acoustic background, piano and guitars. The flute really impressed throughout the song, and Palash isn’t stingy with the use of the flute. Atif’s diction is very irritating in his version, and when he says “Gira” for “Ghira”,Batakta for “Bhatakta“, and “Dikka” for “Dikha“, you can’t help but cringe. Palak joins him to repeat the mukhda at the end of the song. Arijit goes solo in his version, and he rectifies all of Atif’s diction mistakes. However, Palash makes another mistake here, which is making Arijit sing the repeated mukhda at the end, making the song seem extra long. He could have stopped after the antara, or made Palak sing it for some respite from the overbearing drowsiness. The remix is a miserable attempt to quieten the two ever-at-war fan bases of Atif and Arijit, by cramming both into one song. But why would anyone want them to be together in a remix. And I can’t even say how sappy the vocal programming sounds when Palash uses it on Atif, making him sound like a goat. The beats are typical remix beats that make your ears explode. The lyrics by Palak are suitable for the song, but again, very typical and nothing innovative. I don’t even know whether I like this one or not, so I’ll say it’s somewhere in the middle.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Musafir, 3/5 for Musafir Reprise, 0.5/5 for Musafir Remix

 

4. Wedding

Singers ~ Shahid Mallya & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Palash’s second song is the wedding song of the album, very uncreatively titled “Wedding”. The composition is something that totally belongs to an Indian animated film for children. Come on, even children’s songs are composed more thoughtfully than this. The “Saiyaan Oh Saiyaan” refrain by Palak is very cheesy. Some of it is way too sweet to digest, and the lack of usual Punjabi arrangements, makes it even more bland. Instead, Palash uses weird-sounding techno sounds that make it sound very over-the-top. And of course, the typical brass band, which is also, unfortunately, digital. A weird EDM-ish interlude tries to makes things “cool”. Palash tries to bring in a folksy feel to the song by roping in Shahid Mallya to sing it, but he sounds so uninterested, it comes out through his singing. And the lines he’s made to sing! 😵 Palak sounds too, too, sweet, like the syrup in Gulabjamun if someone adds too much sugar. Her lyrics too, are straight out of a fairy tale; the cringeworthy Hinglish takes a toll on you by the time the song ends. When EDM and an overly sweet melody spoil everything.

Rating: 1.5/5 

 

5. Shiddat / Shiddat (Reprise)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Mohd. Irfan, Additional Vocals by ~ Priyanka Negi, Seepi Jha & Bhuvan Ahuja, Music by ~ Raaj Aashoo, Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

With Raaj Aashoo’s song, things take an even more downhill turn. Totally overloaded by a very overbearing melancholic sound, the song exhausts you by the time it is over. The composition is something even the Bhatts would shy away from nowadays. What’s more, the song spans for over five minutes, something utterly unbearable. And two versions. So it sadly has eleven minutes of unmerited footage in this already long album. The arrangements are typical digital beats that would be a rage if it were 2007 right now. The vocalists in neither version could keep the interest of the listener in place, till the end. Armaan, trying to be K.K., disappoints like never before. On the other hand, Mohd. Irfan in his version sings in a voice that defies the beauty of his real, silky smooth voice. The female backing vocalists are irritating throughout. I would rather not talk about the unstylish lyrics. Welcome to 2007.

Rating: 1/5 for Shiddat, 1/5 for Shiddat Reprise

 

6. Zindagi Bana Loon

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Shah Jahan Ali, Lyrics by ~ Banjara Rafi

Newcomer Shah Jahan Ali comes into Bollywood with this song, and brings yet another old-fashioned, slow-paced song into the album, much to the dislike of the audience. The tune is so complicated, with so many pauses in random places, and no indication as to whether it is a happy romantic or a sad romantic song, that you just forget about it after you hear it once. Shah Jahan Ali must have been feeling like Roop Kumar Rathod felt while composing ‘Agar Tum Mil Jao’ (Zeher), or M.M. Kreem while composing ‘Jaadu Hai Nasha Hai’ (Jism), because the song is like a wannabe version of those. The slow pace doesn’t help either. Neither do the arrangements. The guitars are played so typically, the lack of innovation makes you go crazy. Palak tries to bring nuances like Shreya Ghoshal into her singing, succeeding at none of them. She sings in such an unnaturally high-pitched voice, it even surpasses the cheesiness of ‘Kaabil Hoon’ (Kaabil). The lyrics of the song are cringeworthy again. Another staid composition.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

7. Kinara

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Finally the album comes to an end. But waiting right at the end for us, is another version of ‘Musafir’ by Palash Muchhal. This time it has been disguised under another name, ‘Kinara’ because the word ‘Musafir‘ doesn’t come in the new lyrics. But it is a version of ‘Musafir’. This album has so many versions of ‘Musafir’, which means tourist. As if the album is a tourist destination! The composition and lyrics are much the same, except one line in the hook, where the lyrics have been changed. The arrangements comprise an overtly sentimental combination of violin, piano and jingle bells. Palak tries again to imitate Shreya, when she does her Female Versions, like the one of “Sunn Raha Hai” (Aashiqui 2) and that of “Hasi” (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Even Palash tries to imitate the arrangements of the former, with those jingles and the occasional tabla. Clearly, the makers were under the false impression that the public would love ‘Musafir’ so much that they would hover around long enough to wait for a mediocre female version. 

Rating: 1.5/5 


It looks like the album of Sweetiee Weds NRI was finalized years ago. Dated melodies, arrangements that originated sometime before the dinosaurs, and a tracklist trying to imitate ‘Aashiqui 2’ with vocals that sound bland to say the least and the same vocalists used over and over again, this album isn’t really as good as the makers made it out to be when they were promoting it. Instead of Sweetiee Weds NRI, the name should’ve been Crybabyiee (you can throw a few more e’s in there if you want) Weds NRI!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 3 + 0.5 + 1.5 + 1 + 1 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  O Saathiya > Kudi Gujarat Di > Musafir (Reprise) > Musafir > Wedding = Zindagi Bana Loon = Kinara > Shiddat = Shiddat (Reprise) > Musafir (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 14 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Sweetiee Weds NRI) = 15

 

Which is your favourite song from Sweetiee Weds NRI? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

AMAAL’S ‘NOOR’AANI ALBUM!! (NOOR – Music Review)

Music Album Details

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st April 2017

Noor Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Noor is an upcoming Bollywood drama starring Sonakshi Sinha in the titular role and Purab Kohli, Kanan Gill, Shibani Dandekar in supporting roles. The film, directed by Sunhil Sippy and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Vikram Malhotra, is based on Pakistani author Saba Imtiaz’s novel, ‘Karachi, You’re Killing Me!’ which is the account of a Pakistani journalist and her misadventures in both her profession and her love life. The film takes the setting to Mumbai, of course, or else who knows who would have to incur the wrath of You-Know-Who. Anyway, we are here for the music. So, the music of the film has been given by Amaal Mallik, making it his second ever completely solo album after ‘M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story’. Of course, I expect something fresh and light-hearted in keeping with the movie’s promos and theme. After two good songs in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ earlier this year, it is his second venture this year and hopefully it will get just as amazing a response.


1. Uff Yeh Noor

Singer ~ Armaan Malik, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Aditi Paul, Abin Thomas, Shishir Samant & Akshay Jadhav, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Seedhe seedhe sab chale, par ye tedhi chale,
Afra-tafri ho jahaan, ye bas nahi miley,
Paagalon se zyaada paagal, miley zameen aur maange baadal,
Kahin se jaake zara akal laa,
Uff ye Noor, Wallah!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The first song happens to be an apt title song, a song that enlightens us on what we can expect from the character of Noor in the movie. And it does give us quite a detailed insight on that, as well. Amaal’s composition is not only buttery and light-hearted, forcing you to groove to it, but it is also instantly catchy. A very Amit Trivedi-ish vibe accompanies the composition, and that hookline is one of the cutest stuff I’ve heard in a while. The groove that the song carries with it, is just unmatchable. The composition of the antara is just amazing. What helps the composition big time are the arrangements, trying to lighten the mood even more, what with the amazing brass instruments — the trumpet (Ketan Sodha), the Saxophone (Shyaam) and the trombone (Blasco). These three instruments remind one of another song from the genre, ‘Suno Aisha’ (Aisha) which was by Amit Trivedi. There’s an amazing flute portion (Tejas Vinchurkar) towards the end of the song, that’s very easy to miss, so listen carefully, and there is also another flute/woodwinds portion in one of the interludes, which is amazingly played! Occasional strings and those two dholak beats (Akshay Jadhav) at the beginning of the hookline, are some easily missable additions that Amaal has added into the song. Of course, you can’t talk about this song without talking about the instrument that gives it most of its fresh vibes, which is the guitar (Meghdeep Bose). The vocals by Armaan are amazing, and show his versatility; of course he doesn’t just sing romantic songs! It is probably one of his best performances. He controls our emotions of fun and laughter so well in this song, and also conveys the character of Noor very perfectly, as does lyricist Manoj Muntashir. The lyrics are where the similarities to ‘Suno Aisha’ end officially. In ‘Aisha’, Aisha was placed on a pedestal and how her ego was raised when Amitabh Bhattacharya wrote stuff like “Tum ho kamaal, tum bemisaal, tum lajawaab ho Aisha.” On the other hand, Manoj is doing nothing but hurting Noor’s ego, by saying stuff like “Kahin se jaake nayi shakal laa, and “Aankhon mein gussa bhara hai, chehre pe baarah baja hai“! Jokes apart, Manoj does a great job writing the lyrics! A nice protagonist-oriented song, with innumerable fresh vibes!

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Gulabi 2.0 / Gulabi Redux

Singers ~ Amaal Mallik, Tulsi Kumar & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated & New Composition by ~ Amaal Mallik, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal!!!”

– Kumaar

We are all familiar with probably the most famous Rafi song ever, ‘Gulabi Aankhein’ (The Train), a song that almost everyone, from the kids, to the grandparents in India, know by heart. Why wouldn’t we know it, considering that it has been through so many remakes and recreations and revamps by the likes of Atif Aslam, Raghav Sachar and of course the wonderful performance by Sonu Nigam in London. Well, now, the makers of ‘Noor’ make sure we get yet another version of the song, this time, a club revamp. Well, this song actually un-grew on me. I used to like it (just like) the first time I heard it, but it just slipped away after that; I couldn’t bring myself to love it any more, and whatever I liked also started to seem ordinary. The good thing about this remake is, that it only retains the hook of the old song. However, the tune that works as padding, is a bit weak, except the “haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal” loop. The antara is super-ordinary, something I never expected from Amaal. The numerous interruptions going “gulabi, gulabi“, sound boring after some listens. There is an English female rap though, that is quite entertaining. The arrangements are mostly EDM, which is loud for the most part, but I will still maintain that it is better than all the noisy cacophony we find ourselves tripping to nowadays. Vocals are okay-ish as well, and the two versions differ from each other only in terms of vocals, the first one sung by Amaal, the second by Yash Narvekar. Still, Yash has backing vocals in the first song, and Amaal has backing vocals in the second. 😄😄 The two songs sound pretty much the same. The female singer is Tulsi Kumar, supposedly singing in a newly thick voice she has obtained. I just hope she doesn’t think that voice is good, and I hope she stops using this kind of voice. The additional lyrics by Kumaar are functional considering it is a club song. A cacophonous remake, which I hadn’t expected!

Rating: 3/5 for Gulabi 2.0, 3/5 for Gulabi Redux

 

3. Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai

Singer ~ Sukriti Kakar, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Mohini Gaur, Shishir Samant & Meghdeep Bose, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Yeh sabhi mausam ho rahe apne
Kal talak thhe jo ajnabi
Yeh safar yunhi le chala aage
Piche ab raahein na rahi!
Saari khwahishein,
Dil ki yeh farmaishein,
Tune suni iss tarah,
Koi duaa, jis tarah, sunle Khuda!”

– Kumaar

The next song turns out to be a very light-hearted romantic song, something that we know Amaal is an expert at, especially after ‘Sau Aasmaan’ (Baar Baar Dekho). This song is quite similar to that one in terms of overall feel of the song; a very sprightly and vivacious sound helps you forget your worries for the entire length of the song. The mukhda starts off quite abruptly, but you get used to it. The hookline is the peak of the song, obviously. But it is the antara that really surprised me pleasantly. I’ve never heard an antara starting so calmly and without making any ruckus like “Oh, I’m the antara now, you guys!” In fact, it just merges in so well with the interludes, you feel it is some extra stanza in the interlude, until it is so long that it has to be an antara. The arrangements add to the lightness of the song, the guitar (Ankur Mukherjee) played in this very MJ kind of way, is so oddly placed in such a song, yet so wonderful-sounding. The vocals are nice as well, Sukriti sounds cute in her very energetic rendition. I couldn’t help missing Neeti though, who usually sings such songs. Then I realised it would just sound like ‘Sau Aasmaan’ Part 2, so I started accepting Sukriti’s voice after that. 😂 The way she sings the sargam, in the first interlude is very beautiful. Kudos to Amaal for composing that. The backing vocalists really have a spectacular job, repeating the lines of the hookline after Sukriti. Lyrics are just as happy and boisterous as everything else, and suitable for the theme of the song. An enjoyable romantic song!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Hai Zaroori

Singer ~ Prakriti Kakar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Nasamajh thhe hum, jo yeh bhi na samjhe,
Waqt aane par, sab badalte hain!
Manzilein kya hain, aur raaste kya hain,
Log pal bhar mein, yahaan rabb badalte hain!
Kisi ke vaaste kahaan, kinaare aayi kashtiyaan,
Yeh dooriyan hai bas dooriyan!
Ke chori chori chupke se chupke se rona, hai zaroori,
Ke paani paani ankhiyon ka, ankhiyon ka hona, hai zaroori,
Reh gayi aarzoo ik adhuri,
Ke kabhi kabhi aisa bhi, aisa bhi hona, hai zaroori!”

-Manoj Muntashir

A sombre and pensive melody brings up the rear of the album, and it is a sheer delight to the ears. In spite of the song being pensive and slow-paced, it touches your heart in a way that probably no song has, recently. The song has a very beautiful tune, which makes you feel as if you are flying high in the sky. The composition has a very Western classical touch to it, and the arrangements just support the same feeling. The mukhda itself is so hard-hitting, you can’t help but listen further. And that hookline, that’s what can be charged legally for making people go crazy and making them speechless. The antaras carry forward the serious feel of the song perfectly, and it makes for a great listen overall. That bridge line between the antara and hookline is so heartbreaking! The arrangements as I was saying, are amazing. They ooze out grandeur like a leaking pipe. The live strings are so overwhelming (in a positive way), it transports you to a whole different world. You will feel like you are sitting in an Orchestra Hall in Europe. The slow pace is made up for by the grand arrangements, which make sure nobody has the audacity to dismiss this song by calling it boring. Twinkly sounds, heavenly wind instruments and amazing guitars (Joell Mukherjee) in an interlude, constitute the rest of the arrangements. Amaal’s piano notes are amazing, and he plays them like little treats throughout the larger treat that the song is. Prakriti steals the show, and after ‘Bheegh Loon’ (Khamoshiyan), it is her second song where she gets the opportunity to shine by herself. Her graceful, lilting voice in this song is something that I frankly never expected her to pull off, and she has!! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are a spectacular piece of poetry, and it is after such a long time that I’m hearing a sad song that doesn’t go overboard with its sentimentality. I’m ready to be sad for a day, listening to this song on loop! Amaal surpasses his own ‘Kaun Tujhe’ (M.S. Dhoni) with this one!

Rating: 5/5


Noor is a charming album. With just four tracks, it still has the most variety I’ve seen in recent albums. With not song sounding even close to the next, Amaal provides us with a mixed bag, wherein anything you pick out from it, will be a treat to the ears. Barring one. Of course, everything has some flaws. Here, it is the club song. I’m sure Amaal would’ve been better off producing an original club song than remaking an old song! Anyway, the rest of the songs are a breeze of fresh air, something that has dwindled nowadays, what with music makers following some unnecessary clichés that will make their music hit for a week or so. But this album seems like something that will stay on my playlist for sure. ‘Noor’ means ‘light’, and the songs are so light-hearted, so I call this album Amaal’s Noor-aani album!! Bright and light!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 20

Album Percentage: 80%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hai Zaroori = Uff Yeh Noor > Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai > Gulabi 2.0 = Gulabi Redux

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes in 2017: 09 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Noor) = 10

Which is your favourite song from Noor? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A COMMANDO WITH LESS COMMAND ON TUNE! (COMMANDO 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mannan Shaah, Gourov-Roshin & Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Aatish Kapadia, Raftaar & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 3rd March 2017

Commando 2 Album Cover

Commando 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To but this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Commando 2 is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film starring Vidyut Jammwal, Adah Sharma, Esha Gupta and Freddy Daruwala, directed by Deven Bhojani, and produced by Vipul Amrutlal Shah. It is a sequel to 2013 sleeper-hit, ‘Commando’, which is still famous for its wonderful action scenes. That film had more of a rustic setting, wheras this one is a sleek, urban film. And that might reflect somehow in the music as well. Which is by the composer of the first movie, Mannan Shaah. I don’t know whether he did some other small albums during these four years, but I definitely didn’t hear any. He has composed three songs for the movie, while the guest composers Gourov-Roshin have “composed” another. It is a remake. My expectations are 50-50, considering that the music of the first film was good as per the movie’s theme, and that T-Series has changed over the years. And also, Gourov-Roshin have remade something, which succeeds only sometimes. At least I hope the Mannan Shaah part of the album is good. So let’s see how the album is, though I’m a bit apprehensive!


1. Hare Krishna Hare Ram

Singers ~ Armaan Malik, Ritika & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Sameer Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Hare Ram, hare Ram, Hare Krishna Hare Ram!”

– Sameer Anjaan

T-Series’ habit of rehashing old hits continues with the first song of the album itself. And the song isn’t a hit from the 70s, 80s, or even 90s! It is a (relatively) new song (can’t believe ten years have passed already!!) from 2007! The goat that gets sent to the slaughterhouse this time is ‘Bhool Bhulaiyaa’s title track, by Pritam! And the remake is in the hands of the people I least trust with remakes nowadays, Gourov-Roshin! (With Abhijit Vaghani doing the programming) So yeah, lethal combination. Now, the song’s new composition by Gourov-Roshin cleverly doesn’t stray too far away from the original one, and in doing so, sounds quite similar to the old one in totality. However, it sounds completely incomplete! The song starts off with a rapid rap from Raftaar (if you don’t know, his name means speed 😛 ) which is quite impressive as far as rap is concerned. Then comes the new mukhda, which, as I said, sticks very close to the original. The hookline is the only thing here that deserves to be heard, because of its original catchy and haunting tune by Pritam. The antara too, can’t survive without the old tune serving as a structure. So yeah, I bet the duo did a lot of put-this-note-here-and-that-there, and composed the new parts with the same notes, but jumbled up. The arrangements are quite cool, and there’s a nice tap dance part after the rap at the beginning, which sounds amazing. And that plucked instrument loop from the original has been incorporated in the places you would least expect it to be, sometimes played on some trumpet-like instrument. The beats are groovy. And that synthesiser loop that starts the song is mind blowing. Vocals by Armaan Malik are one of his worst performances ever. The makers have made him song in a different voice, yes, but it doesn’t suit him or the song at all. The female vocalist hardly gets scope to say anything, and that too, is unintelligible. Raftaar, as mentioned before, raps efficiently. The new lyrics by Kumaar are no weirder than the original by Sameer. 😀 Good as a song, but not as a remake as it doesn’t meet the standards of the original, which was way ahead of its time!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Tere Dil Mein / Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Armaan Malik & Shefali Alvares, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Aatish Kapadia

“Abb toh intezaar hai, bas tere jawaab ka,
Milta hai khayal kya, tere mere khwaab ka,
Mera dil toh ho chala, ikk khuli kitaab re…
Tere dil mein kya hai tu bataa re!”

– Aatish Kapadia

Composer Mannan Shaah takes over from here, and his first song is a dulcet romantic ballad, that instantly gets you hooked. The composition is one of the sweetest I’ve heard this year. Each month seems to be having its own ‘Best romantic Song’, and while January’s and February’s songs were ‘Enna Sona’ (Ok Jaanu) and ‘Bawara Mann’ (Jolly LLB 2) respectively, I would vouch for this one as March’s best romantic track till now. Mannan’s composition is heart-rending, especially the hookline, which has an innate Indian touch to it. It is just so emotional-sounding for some reason! And the line going “Tu hi mera sach hai re…” has been composed beautifully! The antara just continues with the beauty of the composition, and I especially loved the part where the antara bridges to the hookline! That’s when the maximum goosebumps showed up. The arrangements are amazing, with acoustic guitar riffs (Warren Mendonsa) forming the base of the arrangements, and a ravishing Strings section by the Chennai Strings Conducted by Sax Raja blows away your mind. Electric guitar, also by Warren Mendonsa, makes a cameo in the interlude, and that’s quite interesting to listen to too. The vocals by Armaan are cute and sweet, but his diction falters at places, like “kaab” for “khwaab“, and he hasn’t seemed to have got time to rehearse those intricate aalaaps in the mukhda and hookline! Sad, because that makes a technical glitch in such a beautiful song! Armaan is usually good, but I cant help but miss Arijit here. The song is like a modern equivalent to ‘Commando’s romantic song ‘Saawan Bairi’, but gets nowhere close to it in terms of compositional intricacy and perfection. Then again, that was a semiclassical composition. There is a “Club Mix” included in the soundtrack, which is basically a remix, with the original track played at a very high tempo, that barely does any justice to it. There’s a female portion in that track, which is sung by Shefali Alvares (I got that even before reading the credits! Yayyyy! :p ). The song makes for a nice club track, but doesn’t at all do justice to the surreal composition. And yes, I am rating that because if the makers want to degrade their album by adding unnecessary remixes, it’s not my fault! Note that it is the first remix in all of 2017, and that means we are changing! The remix has been essentially done to bring forward another antara, which wasn’t in the original, and unused. So if you want to hear that, hear this club mix. Otherwise, I will only suggest that you hear it if you work as a DJ. The lyrics by Aatish Kapadia are simply wonderful, and I really loved them, both in the original and the antara of the song that got used in the remix. A romantic song straight from the heart.

Rating: 4.5/5 for original, 2/5 for Club Mix

 

3. Seedha Saadha / Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Amit Mishra / Jubin Nautiyal, Music By ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Seedha saadha dil, Seedha saadha,
Mera Kam hai tera zyaada!”

– Kumaar

A melancholic rock song is the next song Mannan Shaah has to offer here, and from the way it starts, you can tell that it isn’t headed anywhere. The first version, at least. It has that feel to it right at the beginning, which tells you right away that it is a weird, unlikeable composition. And it definitely does start off that way. The composition is as colourless and dull as it can be, before the hookline. The only part the composition ever becomes likeable is in the hookline. The antara too, is decent, but because of the mukhda and other factors we’ll come to later, the song just doesn’t appeal to you. It is a pity that such a good hookline couldn’t get a better fitting part to it. Now for the other factors. Like Amit Mishra’s vocals. Amit Mishra. The one who stunned or entertained us with his renditions in ‘Manma Emotion Jaage’ (Dilwale), ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ (Dishoom) and the best, ‘Bulleya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), does nothing but disappoint in this song. His faltering voice doesn’t go with the composition, for which even K.K. would’ve worked. Jubin does way better in his version, but then, his version is a subtly arranged one, without as many hard-hitting rock noises as Amit’s version has. And I must say, Mannan’s composition sounds way better as a soft rock song, than a heavy rock song. Jubin’s soft voice had the right voice texture for it to come out right, which is why his version is way better. The arrangements in Amit Mishra’s version are too distracting, and the melody can’t be enjoyed as such. Whereas Jubin’s version has a wonderful, sway-inducing soft rock arrangement, enhanced by a synthesiser loop playing in the interlude. In a nutshell, you should go for the wholesome Reprise, than the incomplete and weird first version. Lyrics by Kumaar are good, but quite typical here. A sad song better felt in Jubin’s voice than Amit’s. It is basically a middling composition relying on voices to uplift it, out of which one clearly could not!

Rating: 2/5 for Original, 3.5/5 for Reprise Version

 

4. Commando (Title Track) / Commando (English Version)

Singer ~ Aditi Singh Sharma, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Commando, commando, commando, commando!” :p

– Kumaar

The last song of the album is the title track of the film. Of course, it isn’t exactly the title track because they don’t say ‘Commando 2’, but then whatever. The composition is yet another middling composition by Mannan, and I don’t get why it flies all over the place and has so many turns and twists, that nobody will be able to decipher or even enjoy it. The mukhda makes it start off like a very run-of-the-mill track, without any shine whatsoever. The hookline is the easiest possible way you could imagine to put a tune to the word ‘Commando’. The interlude sees the song going all fusion-y, and then there’s a tempo increases that gets the song taking off at last. From there, the song at least sounds decent. There’s a nice traditional percussion in that part, and it is followed by a nice electric guitar piece. The antara that follows is also better composed, and has the required attitude that is seen in the action scenes of the movie’s trailer. There’s an English Version, in which just the mukhda’s Hindi parts have been replaced by lines in English, and it was actually unnecessary. They could’ve secretly added it in the movie without giving us another audio track, like some filmmakers do for certain songs that are actually good. Aditi is at her pretentious best, and stylises the words so much that it sounds too false! Mannan’s techno sounds do fare well for the song though. Kumaar’s lyrics are just bland. One of the most boring title tracks of late. *Remembers Raees title song*. Or maybe not.

Rating: 1.5/5 for original , 1.5/5 for English Version


Commando 2 is such a letdown, I can’t explain it in words. Only one song matches any expectations, and that too isn’t as good as the best song of “Commando”. Gourov-Roshin’s remake is good except for the fact that is unnecessarily relies on Pritam’s song to propel it forward. Mannan’s other songs are below the standards he set for himself with the first film’s album. Also, unnecessary reprises bog down the album. This Commando lacks command over tune, and composition! And maybe, choice of singers too.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4.5 + 2 + 2 + 3.5 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 50% (How convenient!) 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Dil Mein > Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version) > Hare Krishna Hare Ram > Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix) > Seedha Saadha > Commando (Title Track) > Commando (English Version)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Commando 2) = 07

 

Which is your favourite song from Commando 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

WAJAH REMAKES HAIN!! (WAJAH TUM HO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Abhijit Vaghani, Kalyanji-Anandji, Meet Bros., R.D. Burman, Gourov-Roshin & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Rajendra Krishan, Kumaar, Anand Bakshi & Dev Kohli
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 5th November 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 16th December 2016

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Wajah Tum Ho Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Wajah Tum Ho is an upcoming Bollywood crime thriller, starring Sana Khan, Gurmeet Choudhary, Rajniesh Duggal and Sharman Joshi in lead roles. The film is directed by Vishal Pandya and produced by Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Those two names are enough to tell us that it’s a T-Series production, and that we may expect some good songs, and some remakes. Sure enough, three out of the four songs on the album are remakes of old songs. Only Mithoon composes an original song, in three versions, while Abhijit Vaghani, Meet Bros, and Gourov-Roshin recreate old songs, Abhijit’s appearing in two versions. Abhijit is debuting as a composer in Bollywood, having been on the programming panel before, and going by his pop single, a remake of ‘Pyaar Manga Hai’ that released earlier this year, the sing might be good enough. The Meet Brothers are back after long as a duo, and I’m expecting a lot from their remake as well. Gourov-Roshin are just done giving me a shock with their atrocious techno music in ‘Force 2’, and they had remade a song there too, so I don’t expect much from this remake of theirs. Without further ado, let’s see how good the remakes, and Mithoon’s original song, is!


1. Wajah Tum Ho / Wajah Tum Ho (Male) / Wajah Tum Ho (Lounge)
Singers ~ Altamash Faridi & Tulsi Kumar / Altamash Faridi / Altamash Faridi, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Bikhre bikhre se thhey hum pehle, abb sawarne lage
Tumhare galiyon se rozana jo hum guzarne lage!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon starts off this ambitious album, that has set out to remake many classics, but he starts off the album on an original note — just in case the remakes, are safely protected deep inside the album by a five-minute long buffer period that consists of Mithoon’s song, which happens to be the title song of the movie. The song is a new, interesting take on this title. The title is actually taken from the song ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ (Hate Story 3) from Vishal Pandya’s last film. While that song, composed by newcomer (and already-goner) Baman, was composed on typical Bhattish lines, this one has a nice old-world-charm mixed with the omnipresent Mithoon touch. The composition is more of a soft and soothing one, in contrast to the sensual and intense one of that song. Of course there’s no reason to compare, so I should just stop. Back to this song, the mukhda brings it to a nice beginning, but it is in the hookline where it receives its shocks and jerks, and starts slowing down. Repetition of the song’s title so many times in a seemingly ultra-slow pace, isn’t your everyday idea of a soothing romantic song. The antara gets better because of more high notes, which kind of lessen the laziness in the composition. The song is included in three versions in the album — One being a duet between Altamash Faridi and Tulsi Kumar, while the other two are solely sung by Altamash. The duet version works because of the male and female voices, and I must admit, Tulsi sounds good in the song, if not great. Just like Amaal Mallik does, Mithoon has used her voice nicely here. Altamash sounds a bit sleepy in places but the high notes in the antaras let us know that he is very much awake. In the male version, though, it gets tedious to hear the song in a complete male voice. The lounge version is a different case altogether. Though it has been sung by Altamash solo, the arrangements in the lounge version are BEAUTIFULLLL! While Mithoon graces the other two versions with the same arrangements consisting of soothing and breezy acoustic guitars (Kalyan Baruah), he has something more mystical and magical in store for you in the lounge version. Of course, a nice lounge touch has been added to the song, and many things happen all of a sudden, which suddenly transforms that lazy composition into one sounding utterly beautiful! The arrangements consist of some beautiful guitar work (Joell Mukherji), while the flutes (Madhu Mukherjee) are brilliant. Nice percussions with the drums make the song sound complete. The sarod (also by Madhu Mukherjee) and tablas are what give the song more of a lounge touch, though! It is this version that finally brings out the beauty of the composition and makes it succeed. Sadly, I don’t think it will be promoted much! 😦 About the lyrics, I would rather say that they are very sappy and icky, instead of praising them by saying they’re nice romantic lyrics. 😛 Manoj Muntashir writes words like “Kahan pe tu ho shuru, kahan main khatam, pata na chale“. I’m like, “Are you a blob of clay? Are you mud? Are you sand? Or are you the European and Asian parts of Russia? Please tell me so I can solve that problem for you so that you don’t have to sing it in songs!” The lyrics are rather a nice get-to-know-yourself course. A middling start to the album, but the lounge version of this track is surely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Dil Ke Paas / Dil Ke Paas (Unplugged)
Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neuman Pinto / Armaan Malik, Tulsi Kumar & Shamita Bhatkar, Composition by ~ Kalyanji-Anandji, Music Recreated by ~ Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by ~ Rajendra Krishan

“(Male) Kal tujhko dekha tha, Maine apne aangan mein
Jaise keh rahi thi tum, Mujhe baandh lo bandhan mein

(Female) Ye kaisa rishta hain, Ye kaise sapne hain
Begaane hokar bhi, Kyon lagte apne hain
Main soch mein rehti hoon, Dar dar ke kehti hoon”

– Rajendra Krishan

Aah! Here are the “awaited” (by T-Series to release and torture us with) remakes, finally! Reading the name of the song, you won’t know that this song is a remake of “Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas” (Blackmail) because T-Series has cunningly named it in such a manner that you’ll never guess it. The music producer/arranger Abhijit Vaghani, who has earlier composed in Bollywood for ‘Chaarfutiya Chhokare’ with his partner Sameer, gets to remake this evergreen Kishore Kumar classic. Well, he hasn’t really composed anything new in the song, and Kalyanji-Anandji’s original composition has been kept intact (What a relief, that at least that has been done!) This song also comes in two versions, one that has the never-too-popular Arijit rendering it, and another tagged as “Unplugged”, which has his close successor, Armaan Malik singing it. They both are accompanied by the T-Series behnaa, Tulsi Kumar. The first version of the song really has everything going against it, in terms of the vocals, what with Arijit sounding like a terrible robot, while Tulsi gets her voice tripled and quadrupled. The original recorded voices will never reach us; we get the adulterated version of their voices, and the result is quite revolting! At least Tulsi sounds better than usual in her tripled voice, but Arijit sounds horrendous with his robotic voice, that is way too thin for it too be actually believed to be his. Neuman Pinto has a rap portion in the middle of this version, and it is just disgusting how such a rap can be shoved into a classic song like this! As if that wasn’t enough, Abhijit tries to make the song sound more sensuous (and fails too) by slowing the pace down by some kilometers per second. 😦 Armaan, in his version, gives us the pleasure of listening to a good, unadulterated rendition of the timeless classic, which we sadly couldn’t hear in Arijit’s voice. Thankfully, Armaan’s version is enough to make up for it, at least in terms of vocals. While in the first version, Arijit and Tulsi took turns singing one line each or something, this song is mostly Armaan’s, and Tulsi only sings the second antara, quite blandly, at that. Shamita Bhatkar’s backing vocals provide a good harmony to accompany Armaan, and it sounds good more so because the overdone harmonizations with the voices in Arijit’s version just failed to make a mark. The arrangements are better in the second version too, but they become quite boring after a while. At least real instruments like the guitar (Nyzel D’Lima) and violin (Manas Kumar) are brilliant here. The first version however, is overdone with techno sounds, and that kills the original old song. Rajendra Krishan’s lyrics from the original song have also been retained, thankfully. Except when Tulsi sings and they have to change the gender of the sentence, which was originally from the male point of view. (Like changing leta to leti). More of a revival, rather than a remake, but all that this so-called “revival” could do, is to make us return to the original classic!

 

3. Dil Mein Chhupa Loonga
Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Tulsi Kumar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Aise na mujhe tum dekho, seene se laga lunga
Tumko main chura lunga tumse, dil mein chupa loonga”

– Anand Bakshi

The Meet Brothers step into the album, hopefully in order to save it.. I mean, I really expect a lot from them after their work after their split with Anjjan. So this song happens to be a remake of R.D. Burman’s immensely popular ‘Aise Na Mujhe Tum Dekho’ (Darling Darling), and just hearing that this song has been remade, made me excited! But I must say, what I got wasn’t exactly what I was expecting. Of course, the hookline is amazing, what with more sensuality infused into its tune by slowing down its pace, but the padding is quite disappointing. The mukhda starts the song off on a faltering note, which gets stabilised only when the hookline arrives. The antara too sounds very generic and seems like an attempt to redo the ‘Aaj Phir’ (Hate Story 2) and ‘Tumhe Apna Banane Ka’ (Hate Story 3), which just seems more accentuated because of that slow-paced guitar-and-tabla arrangement that all three of these songs have. Anyway, the arrangements are good and suitable for the theme of the song. The acoustic guitars (Pawan Rasaily) sound nice and soothing, while those very typical tablas (in these songs) give it a more earthy touch, along with certain Arabic-sounding elements. The digital beats too, sound very typical. On the vocals front, ws have Armaan and Tulsi again, and Armaan sounds awesome as always, again reminding one of his rendition of ‘Tumhe Apna’ (Hate Story 3). The way he sings the hookline, he’s sure to get even more female followers. Tulsi, on the other hand, sounds atrocious trying to sound different. Meet Bros’ experimentation to make her sound more “you-know-what” fail when she starts sounding like Manjulika. Plus, that double-voice-overlapping thing doesn’t work with even Shreya Ghoshal, (remember ‘Mashallah’ from ‘Ek Tha Tiger’?) so how did the composers think it would work Tulsi? Lastly, the lyrics. Kumaar’s new lyrics suit the theme of the song, but aren’t really innovative; all the Bollywood clichés repeat themselves yet again. A revamp that could’ve been great, but ends up being mediocre.

 

4. Maahi Ve
Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Backing Vocals ~ Amit Gupta, Original Composition by ~ Anand Raaj Anand, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Dev Kohli, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Judke bhi tooti rahi ishqe di dor ve,
Kisko sunaaye jaake toote dil ka shor ve”

– Kumaar

The last song on the album is also a remake, but happens to be a remake of a relatively newer song, ‘Maahi Ve’ (Kaante). People are still coping with the craze of the old song, and T-Series decides to remake it even before the old song’s magic wears away. Anyway, that’s none of our business. The song has been recreated by composer duo Gourov-Roshin, the same duo who remade ‘Kaate Nahin Kat Te’ in ‘Force 2’ and Punjabi Folk song ‘Nachna Aaonda Nahin’ in ‘Tum Bin 2’. Both of those songs, they didn’t quite get it right, what with excessive techno sounds and loud noises overpowering he melodies. This time, not only is Anand Raaj Anand’s original tune sounding great in the hookline, but the padding hat the duo provides in the form of the mukhda and antaras, also sounds nice. It has been composed nicely, perfect for the lounge song theme and NOT excessively and unnecessarily sensual-sounding. It actually sounds like a sad song, like the old song did. I myself cannot believe that I liked the remake. Maybe it is because I didn’t really love the old song too much either.. though I did like it. The arrangements by the duo are cool, especially the minimalistic techno sounds in the hookline. There is not much more to hear in terms of arrangements, but the whole sound of the song is lounge-ish. The interludes are good, having some kind of Arabic music playing in both of them. Neha Kakkar, Gourov-Roshin’s regular Singer, renders this one perfectly. Who could be a better replacement for Richa Sharma than Neha Kakkar? (Well maybe Sonu Kakkar could, but “assi ki kariye!?”) Amit Gupta’s robotic voice might sound irritating at first, but you learn to ignore that as the song progresses. Kumaar’s new lyrics, thankfully, are not cheap, but they take forward the a!bience of he song nicely in connection with Dev Kohli’s original words. A surprisingly good remake!! #5StarHotelSong!!


Wajah Tum Ho doesn’t really cater to my likes. An album full of remakes of great classics, out of which two remakes do not live up to the standards of the original. One original song, which fails because of a certain female singer, but excels in one of its three versions. Not a very enticing summary of an album, is it? But will T-Series understand? No. They’ll always be adamant on ruining old songs to add into their films; so be it. The album reeks of stale compositions and/or boring arrangements. One song, by Gourov-Roshin, a duo that has only disappointed up till this song, stands out as a good one, though it will be forgotten in no time. All in all, it is an album depending on the remakes to propel it forward. 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Maahi Ve > Wajah Tum Ho (Lounge Version) > Wajah Tum Ho (Male) > Dil Mein Chhupa Loonga > Dil Ke Paas (Unplugged) > Wajah Tum Ho (Duet) > Dil Ke Paas

 

Which is your favourite song from Wajah Tum Ho? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Dangal, Chef: Pritam Chakraborty 

 

‘Dangal’ will be the last review of 2016!! 😀 I’m so excited! Stay tuned for a fun 2016 end-of-the-year wrap-up! 😉

THE LITTLE FORCE OF TECHNO MUSIC!! (FORCE 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Amaal Mallik
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Javed Akhtar & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 27th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th November 2016

Force 2 Album Cover

Force 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Force 2 is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film, starring John Abraham and Sonakshi Sinha in lead roles, and Tahir Raj Bhasin in a negative role. The film has been directed by ‘Game’ and ‘Delhi Belly’ fame Abhinay Deo, and produced by Vipul Amrutlal Shah, Viacom18 Motion Pictures, and John Abraham himself. The film is a sequel to Nishikant Kamat’s directorial, ‘Force’, which released in 2011. The music of ‘Force’, by South composer Harris Jayaraj, was quite nice, with many romantic songs being the best ones, and ‘Khwaabon Khwaabon’ being the thrilling USP of the album. With only one underwhelming song in that album, ‘Dum Hai Toh Aaja’, it turned out to be one of the most underrated albums of the year. This time, though, composers Gourov-Roshin take hold of the music. Earlier this year, along with Shaan, they had composed a song for ‘Great Grand Masti’, under the name Superbia. For this movie, Gourov Dasgupta and Roshin Balu, without their partner Shaan, have been roped in. The song from ‘Great Grand Masti’, I didn’t like much, so I can’t say much about my expectations from the duo. However, a guest composer in the form of Amaal Mallik also increases the chances of the album being a success. With just four songs, three by the duo and one by guest composer Amaal, I am sure the makers of the movie are more interested in the storyline than the music, but still hoping with crossed fingers that the music lives up to the music of the first film nevertheless! So let’s get ready to measure the force in the music of ‘Force 2’!


1. Rang Laal
Singers ~ Dev Negi & Aditi Singh Sharma, Voiceover by ~ John Abraham, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The first song on the album shouts patriotism right in your ear. The way it gets there though, is quite mediocre and average. Let me explain. The song starts off with a voiceover by John, after which comes a rap by Dev Negi. The actual melody composed by Gourov-Roshin comes after the rap, and it is good till there. I don’t deny it. But then the hookline comes and takes away whatever goodness the son had established. The hookline sounds so outdated and worn-out, and on top of that, it arrives so abruptly. The mukhda and hook don’t really blend in well with each other. There is practically no antara, and if I were to call some part of the song as one, it would be a part that consists of only a rap portion and the same tune that comes before the hookline in the mukhda. It all gets so predictable after a certain time. The song seems to rely mostly on the rap, and the patriotic voiceovers by John Abraham. The arrangements are techno sounds, that have fortunately been kept not so loud. The rock guitar that plays occasionally is impressive though. The vocals are just fine. Dev Negi impresses with the rap, but due to the very short part that he actually has to sing, he can’t shine in those parts. In the hook, he is joined by Aditi Singh Sharma, who can hardly be heard. John Abraham’s voiceovers sound out-of-place in an audio song. They could’ve just added it in the promos if they’d wanted. I really don’t like this method of including dialogues in songs. Kumaar’s lyrics are good, full of patriotism, and might be the only thing on the song meeting the requirements and expectations from this patriotic track. A disappointing start to the album.

 

2. O Janiya
Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Laxmikant-Pyarelal, New Composition and Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Javed Akhtar, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The second song on the album is a remake of ‘Kaate Nahin Kat Te’ (Mr. India). The song gets a club makeover from Gourov-Roshin, and as it starts, you get to know that it isn’t going to work out well, and it isn’t going to do justice to the original. The song starts off with some weird Arabic, (??) French (??) Or Spanish (??) lyrics that seem to be aping the way ‘Lovely’ (Happy New Year) started, with some similar Arabic words. (Or maybe gibberish). It is a horrible starting, with some lady sounding like she’s saying “serret lekhh baybee“, with too much emphasis on the “baby“. After that, it is pure techno music that follows. Thankfully, the duo has only used the hook of the old song, and tried to form a new song around that. Sadly, that seems to have failed. The mukhda is a typical club song composition, which fails to really create any interest. Cleverly, T-Series have named the song after the first line of the mukhda, so that no old song aficionados judge the song by its name and thereby proclaim that they’ve ruined the original. Which they have, anyway. The hookline is the same hookline that so many of us already love, but it doesn’t even sound good in the song, much less, sound good with that mukhda. The antara is a bit better in terms of composition, but you really can’t do anything when half the song engages you and not most of it. Neha Kakkar was practically expected to sing this song. She provides the little relief in the song, singing it with the required spunk. But she spoils the hookline, adding too much of nuances into it, and trying to sound a bit too cool. The last time the hook repeats, her love basically overflows, and she sings “I looovvve you love you love you love you” (at 4:03 in the song), which is enough to spoil the hookline for one last time. The arrangement is mainly techno music, that depends on a loop, to make itself noticeable. That tune plays all throughout the song, and it is quite an annoying tune. The techno music in the hookline spoils the sound of the hook as well. It all seems like such an overdose of techno music. Kumaar’s new lyrics are quite unbelievable. “O janiya, Tu nahin tha, Teri yaadon Se kiya Maine pyaar“. 😂 A song that could very well have been remade into a good romantic song, gets a club makeover and gets spoiled forever.

 

3. Ishaara
Singer ~ Armaan Malik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Rashmi-Virag

Amaal Mallik finally enters the album, after the duo Gourov-Roshin fail to create any magic. I expected Amaal to make up for the missing magic, but I must say, the result is quite underwhelming here too. Don’t get me wrong, I really love Amaal’s music. The composition this time around, too, is very soulful and emotional. Perfect for a romantic song that will grow on you like slow poison. However, I also couldn’t help but feel it was quite similar to many of his previous songs, like ‘Kuch Toh Hai’ (Do Lafzon Ki Kahani) and ‘Kaun Tujhe’ (M.S. Dhoni). The humming, he has used many times, and that particularly, was the setback for me. The mukhda is beautiful, while the hookline is so mellifluous that it just gets stuck in your head. The antara sounds very similar to the mukhda, it is hard to differentiate between the two, but it is well composed. The arrangements are minimal, with the acoustic guitars and strings really doing a great job. In an interlude, a rock guitar with a muffled voice, sounds like a lounge treatment has been given to it, and it sounds great! The star of the song, though, is definitely the mandolin. Every time it plays, it sends a chill down your spine. The entire feel of the song is all in all, quite haunting, and I would’ve enjoyed it more, had it been a bit different-sounding from Amaal’s earlier compositions. Armaan is a star, and he proves again how merely his voice can elevate a composition to another level. He adds little nuances to the composition which really make it stand out in those parts. Rashmi-Virag, as always, write awesome lyrics, and become yet another reason to listen to the song. Their writing is always full of soul and emotion, and that’s proved here too. One of Amaal’s weaker songs, due to the overlap with his previous songs. However, his arrangements, Armaan’s voice and Rashmi-Virag’s inexplicable writing, make this worth hearing at least a couple of times!

 

4. Catch Me If U Can
Singer ~ Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Gourov-Roshin come back into their album, with yet another overdose of techno music. The song is suitable for the thriller genre, and with the pacy techno arrangements, it has its things right. However, it falls flat in the composition. The mukhda starts off very flatly, so much so, that the listener can even get bored right away. It actually sounds like something composed just for the fun of it, and not meant to feature in a major motion picture soundtrack. The duo’s composition is painfully non-creative, and follows the path of many previous failed techno thriller songs. The hookline is just plain bad, I can’t put it any other way. The antaras have just as much in their favour as a child who hasn’t studied for the Maths exam. The duo try to cover their mediocre composition with some techno music, but it only sounds good at the beginning, where it does some nice little disco thing that is impressive and reminiscent of the 80s disco era. All throughout the rest of the song, are stale and boring techno sounds that fail to interest the listener. Some occasional Arabic drums do the trick though, being the only catchy sounds in practically the whole album. Amaal’s vocals haven’t been tuned properly, and firs of all, he shouldn’t have sung this song. Someone with a more strong voice like Suraj Jagan or the like should have been approached. Even Amaal seems uninterested in singing the song, as I can make out from his voice. The duo could’ve done some autotuning there, because other people even use it for singers who don’t even require it. Kumaar’s lyrics are pretty mediocre. SKIP!


Force 2 seems to be one of the worst albums of the year. With not even one track being completely lovable, the album falls short of expectations from every which way. What Harris Jayaraj did in the first installment, and what Gourov-Roshin give in the second, have many miles’ difference between them. Amaal’s guest song does become the best song of the album, but could’ve been better in itself too. But with T-Series relying on what the audience wants and depending on old songs remade to do the trick, I doubt that could’ve been possible. A FORCELESS ALBUM, WITH AN OVERDOSE OF TECHNO MUSIC!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishaara > Rang Laal > O Janiya > Catch Me If U Can

 

Which is your favourite song from Force 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂