THE CASE OF THE INCOMPLETE ALBUM… (JAGGA JASOOS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th July 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 14th July 2017

Jagga Jasoos Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Jagga Jasoos is a Bollywood musical adventure film, starring Ranbir Kapoor And Katrina Kaif in lead roles. The film has been directed by Anurag Basu and produced by Siddharth Roy Kapur, Anurag Basu And Ranbir Kapoor. The film is a musical that revolves around the adventures of a teenage detective, Jagga. The musical format of the film makes it one-of-its-kind, and never before tried in Bollywood. After having watched the movie, I can only say that Anurag gets full marks just for trying the format and sucking us into this very innocent and beautiful world. Now, T-Series has bought the rights of only the full-length songs in the film, it seems, and so they’ve released a ‘full album’ comprising six songs. Pritam has done a wonderful job giving rhyme and tune to Jagga’s world. You might have already noticed that I haven’t written a rant about how late the album released — it is because I kind of expected the songs to release late just because they might give away the story of the film. Sadly, the deceitful makers only released six songs. So whatver, let’s just analyze the songs we all have been hearing for the past two months!


1. Ullu Ka Pattha

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Nikhita Gandhi, Ulule Vocals by ~ Vivienne Pocha, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hmm, confuse hai,
Dosti pe isse aitbaar aadha hai,
Rang mein dosti ke jo bhang ghol de,
Ishq ka bhoot sar pe savaar aadha hai!
Nigal sake nahin, ugal sake!
Sangemarmar ka bangla banaata hai,
Dil akbar ka pota hai!
Jaana na ho jahaan vahin jaata hai,
Dil ullu ka pattha hai!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam starts this colossal album with a song that jumps right into diversity, with a Spanish guitar wonderfully setting up a nice European flavour for us. And then Vivienne Pocha’s “ulule” vocals start and we are instantly hooked. Pritam’s composition is catchy, with a mellifluous sound. The rapid-paced portions are just amazing, and the way they drop into the smooth hookline is marvellous too. The “ulule” adds a tinge of craziness and zaniness to the song, giving something that children and adults alike can pick on to, as a kind of signature of the song. The antara has a beautiful composition, and keeps up with the Spanish feel of the song. The arrangements are just bewitching; the Spanish guitar as described earlier, is just a beautiful addition to the song; it transports you elsewhere. There’s a nice conclusion in yhe form of a Spanish guitar musical piece, and that part is something you ought not to miss, thinking that the vocals are over. Other instruments like drums and then digital beats provide a nice and groovy beat to the song. The vocalists do a great job; Arijit as always moulds himself into the required form and renders this quirky romantic song with ease, while Nikhita supports him well. Though I feel Shalmali would have suited better here! Anyway, that huskiness in Nikhita’s voice is what makes it sound amazing. I like the way how Pritam adds a welcoming drum portion before she enters; it sounds like it’s a welcome for her to come in the song! And of course, Vivienne, who gives the song a nice hookline in the form of her “ulule” backing vocals, does a fantastic job. Arijit’s vocals at the end of the song where he just experiments by making non-verbal sounds, sounds amazing. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are super cute, describing the heart as many things nobody could ever think of, like Shah Jahan, A hundred rupees change, and whatnot. A crazy and fun romantic song to start off this album; it has already created waves across the nation!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

2. Galti Se Mistake

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Chal muscle phulaana, thodi body banaana,
Tere chikne gaalon pe stubble ki fasal ugaana,
Arererereee, abey aye,
Chal beta shuru ho jaa guru,
Bagal uthaake thoda deo lagaana,
Kisi bagal waali ko mardaani khushboo sunghaana,
Chal upar ke do button dheele karke bataana,
Baalon wala seena dikhaana, baalon wala seena dikhaana!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam switches modes from European music to Indian music in the next song. Indian music itself is so diverse; here he picks a wonderful style of music to back the next song, and that is Assam’s Bihu Dance music. The fun Assamese percussion and wind instruments start off the song, until it takes a digital turn and the song starts. It is essentially a fun song being sung in the boys’ hostel, and that craziness reflects in the composition. The way the composition makes abrupt stops and starts, and turns unexpectedly, shows the same. I loved how Pritam infused the Bihu Dance theme into this kind of a song, that has no relation whatsoever to Bihu. The wonderful folk instruments they’ve used, against the backdrop of digitally produced sounds and a crazy composition, provides for a fun listen. The composition itself takes time to grow, because the song is so situation-oriented. The hookline is just so cute, you can’t get it out of your head. The antara is amazing, but what makes it more amazing is Amit Mishra’s stupendous rendition of it. He brings a very harsh quality to his voice, probably to be shown as the rowdiness of the boys in the hostel. Arijit joins only in the hookline, and the voice quality gets smoother, so you know he is singing. Amit sings the rest of the song brilliantly though! After the antara, Pritam introduces an almost one-minute-long folk interlude, after which the hookline just plays again. I feel that could’ve been shortened in length as that portion is just a mix of all the instrumental pieces we heard at the beginning of the song. Amitabh’s lyrics are again, hilarious. The antara is superbly funny! A fun song, whose composition takes a little time to grow, but till then, the arrangements and vocals help you love it!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Jhumritalaiyya

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Neelesh Misra

“Duniya yeh thodi thodi hai behtar lagey,
Dil ke naukar-o-chaakar lagey,
Jhuk ke pooche kya hai aarzoo!”

– Neelesh Misra

This soft romantic song is featured on the album next, and it is a song that made me love it right from the moment I first heard it. Pritam brings in an evident Coke Studio treatment for this song, which is tangible in the arrangements and unconventionally sweet composition. The composition is instantly likeable, only because of its amazing cuteness. The hook, ‘duniya yeh..’ has a distinct Coke Studio feel; it goes suddenly high-pitched in the otherwise low-pitched and calm composition. The “Ah-ha-haa” sounds so cute as well! The composition is what makes the song sound fit for a Disney movie. The antara has the same tune as the mukhda, with Arijit providing a bit of pleasant variation. There is a short conclusion line after a long interlude after the antara, which brings in the trademark Pritam touch to the song, and ends it on that very Pritam-ish note. The arrangements are complete with acoustic guitars, rock guitars, and drums, but all of this only increases the calmness of the song, making it a kind of peculiarly soothing alternative rock song. And that’s why I immediately linked it to Coke Studio. The backing chorus provides even more of that oh-so-tangible Pritam touch. The mukhda that is arranged solely on acoustic guitars and the groovy drum beats, sounds amazing and grips the listener right away. There is a nice banjo-like instrument portion in the hookline, which sounds amazing, giving the song a kind of folksy vibe. The second interlude is what showcases the most important part of the song, at least musically. It is here that we are served a wonderful rock guitar and drums combo that works so well, and then when the backing chorus joins in later on, you can’t help but sway with the vocals, as the wonderful drum beats accompany you. Arijit’s vocals are the perfect choice here; he exudes simplicity and charm, and renders the song spot-on. His vocal prowess is showcased in the song, especially in that short portion at the very end where his raw voice without any instruments behind it is exposed. And in the antara, the way he sings “rakh jaaunga“, is spectacular! A slight confusion is that Mohan Kanan could be heard in the song promo of this song on YouTube; but nowhere to be heard in this audio version. 😐😐 Neelesh Misra, who writes so infrequently, hits the bull’s-eye yet again, and some of the lines are funny in a cute way, while the others are very thought-provoking, like the one I’ve showcased up there below the credits of the song. A pleasant, breezy romantic song!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Phir Wahi

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Phir wahi, phir wahi, saundhi yaadein puraani, phir wahi,
Phir wahi, phir wahi, bisri bhooli kahaani, phir wahi,
Phir wahi, phir wahi, jhootha vaada,
Aasmaan ka mere, chanda, aadha,
Dil kyun joda agar dil dukhaana tha?
Aaye kyun thhe agar tumko jaana tha?
Jaate jaate labon pe bahaana tha, phir wahi!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After all those happy-go-lucky songs, it is time for a pathos-filled, heart-rending, sad song. And let me tell you, this one is a masterpiece! The composition takes the route of many former Bhatt-Pritam sad songs, but still has a sound of its own, thanks to Pritam’s wonderful arrangements. If the had arranged it just like his old Bhatt-ish songs, it might not have appealed so much at all. The composition is wonderful. It starts very slowly, and might not hook you at once, but right from the first instance of the phrase “Phir Wahi” in the song, it gets better. The emotion is almost tangible, and Arijit’s singing makes it even more so. I personally loved the tunes of the lines “dil kyun joda agar dil dukhaana tha..” and all other variants of it. The song has nothing more than the mukhda repeated twice, but its essence lies in that. It is emotional without having an overtly complex and twisting composition. The straightforward notes hit your heart instantly. The hookline is really emotional. And the song is actually about a son yearning for his father to come back, making it so much more layered than the usual boy missing girl Bollywood sad song. More on that when we speak about the lyrics. The arrangements are beautiful as well. There is a wonderful guitar played throughout the song. The way they stop-and-resume the guitar strums in the “aansoon pochhe hi kyun…” line of the antara, is just mind blowing!!! But even more spectacular than the guitar, there is also a WONDERFUL piano portion that starts the song. The interlude is a wonderful Coke Studio-esque portion, with amazing soft rock sounds of the drums, which continues for the rest of the song. The piano chords throughout the song are amazing. Backing vocals are beautiful wherever they can be heard. The alternative rock that features in the song after the mukhda is the trademark Pritam sound, which we heard in songs like ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani), ‘Saware’ (Phantom), ‘Daayre’ (Dilwale) and the recent ‘Main Agar’ (Tubelight). Towards the end, a wonderful saxophone enters that steals the show before the song ends. And again, that splendid piano loop that started the song, ends the song too. Amitabh’s lyrics just tug at your heartstrings. The love of the song for his father is beautifully reflected in the lines he’s written, with a bit of frustration on the son’s part for his father leaving him like that, and evident love in that frustration as well. A sad song unlike the Bollywood sad songs of these days.

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Musafir

Singer ~ Tushar Joshi, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Ho kahaani meri, tarjumaa ho tera,
Ho duaayein teri, sar jhuka ho mera,
Raaz mein bhi tere, sach chhupa ho mera,
Main kamaai jodun, karz adaa ho tera,
Yahaan mera tere siva, hai dooja nahin koi re,
Akela mujhe chhodke, na jaana yun nirmohi re!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

Pritam finally brings in another singer to sing the entire song, this time, a debutant! It’s really exciting when Pritam introduces new singers to us, because we know he doesn’t leave them for a long time, and keeps giving them opportunities to shine in his later albums. Tushar Joshi, who did sing a couple of backing vocal portions in Pritam albums prior to this, gets to enter Bollywood as a lead singer, and how! The song he gets is plain out of this world. A composition that is a trademark Pritam composition, yet invokes such pathos and emotion, this song grows on you in no time! The mukhda is wonderful; it repeats twice in this song too; I think that’s the norm nowadays — maybe composers don’t have the time to compose a new tune for antaras! Anyway, the composition is beautiful. After each stanza, a wonderful “Aye-aye-aye-aye” portion really gives you the goosebumps. The high-pitched line in the song, “yahaan mera tere siva...” is just too good! Pritam’s arrangements do not stray from his usual style of arranging such songs; a loud but soothing rock template backs the solid composition, with wonderful instances of piano, acoustic guitar and the necessary drums and electric guitars. Towards the end, a ravishing background chorus sings for about the last one and a half minute or so, coupled with an amazing guitar solo! At the beginning a nice and soothing piano loop plays, and quite like the previous song, ‘Phir Wahi’, it sucks you in completely! Tushar’s voice sounds very similar to Arijit’s in the high notes, but otherwise, it is sort of a cleaned version of Arijit’s voice, without the rough texture. Amitabh’s lyrics are yet another instance of his bravissimo; the man is a complete genius when it comes to such philosophical-slash-romantic songs! A beautiful composition evoking memories of songs like ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani)!

Rating: 5/5

 

6. Khaana Khaake

Singers ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Tushar Joshi, Geet Sagar, June Banerjee, Antara Mitra, Amit Mishra, Ashwin Kulkarni, Aaroh Velankar & Sunny MR, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Life ki simple si philosophy, yeh jaan lo,
Hum yahaan do din ke mehmaan hai, yeh maan lo,
Non-stop ek party hai, jahaan sabko aana hai,
Aur khaana khaake, daaru peeke, chale jaana hai!
Jeena toh unhi ka jeena kehlaaya,
Jo bhi bina chu cha, karke, khaake peeke chale gaye, chale gaye!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The next and final (😏😏) song on the album, is a laugh riot, whether you hear it on-screen or off. If you’ve watched the video, there’s an entertaining video to couple with the random and quirky song. But if you hear just the audio too, it doesn’t take away from the comic appeal of the song. The hook itself is a crazy, zany and wacky line, that by itself, helps us gather more interest to listen on. The composition is very simple, and has nothing much like a proper structure. All I know is that it has the hookline repeated thousands of times. The only thing that can pass as an antara, is Tushar Joshi’s portion in the middle, which has been composed and even sung, beautifully. But it has been written even more beautifully. Bhattacharya sees life as a party, where everyone has to eat, drink, and then leave! What an imagination! So can we say, “All the world’s a party. And all the men and women merely eaters and drinkers”? 😄😄 The song provides a lot of entertainment for the ears, for instance, there’s a nice haunting line in the form of the “khaali ghar mein chaaron aur sannata” line and its variants, and the entertaining lyrics, and to top it all, one of the female vocalists emulates a saxophone and succeeds in adding to the whimsicality of the song. Tushar Joshi in his portion, playback singing for Ranbir’s character, cleverly incorporates a bit of Jagga’s stammer before starting his line! That’s a nice effect! The simple digital metronomish beat that backs the song serves as almost the only instrumentation, besides the weird quirky sounds like a spoon clinking against a glass, and other zany sounds. Of course, this song tilts a little on the “Less Repeat Value” side! Welcome to a madhouse!

Rating: 4/5


Jagga Jasoos is an amazing album, full of variety, innovation and catchy music. Pritam and Anurag Basu recreate the magic of “‘Barfi!”, though in a slightly different and more massy way. The music has worked already and should work even more. My only regret is that, for a film that’s a musical and has such amazing songs in it, and had such hard work gone into it by all persons involved, the small songs haven’t released with the full album! Let’s hope they’ll release and we will get to relive Pritam’s and Basu’s magic of the big screen, on our phones! And let me assure you, these six songs are NOTHING compared to those! Anyway, this six-song album is a good showcase of Pritam’s range and versatility!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 5 + 5 + 5 + 4 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 91% {This is not the final rating; when the OST releases, I will review it average it out}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: From start to finish in the same order.

 

Which is your favourite song from Jagga JasoosPlease vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A BREACH IN THE RAABTA!! (RAABTA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: JAM8, Meet Bros., Sohrabuddin & J-Star
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Kumaar, Jitendra Raghuvanshi, J-Star & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 3rd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Raabta Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raabta is an upcoming Bollywood romantic reincarnation drama, starring Kriti Sanon, Sushant Singh Rajput, Jim Sarbh, Varun Sharma and Rajkummar Rao. The film is the directorial debut of already many times successful producer, Dinesh Vijan. The film is produced by him along with Homi Adajania, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s official gist is this: “When a human being dies, they lose 21 grams from the body. This, they say, is the weight of the soul. The journey of a soul transcends over space and time… beyond the realms of this earth. This film tells the story of two seemingly ordinary individuals, going about their lives until their paths cross and they realize that they belong with one another. Unaware of a connection that was forged several hundred years ago, Shiv and Saira are inexplicably drawn to each other, and it takes them on a hysterical rollercoaster of love, intrigue, entertainment and life (twice over!). When two souls unite, they become one.” 😴 Hopefully, it is executed well. The music of the film is by JAM8, and a guest composition by Meet Bros. also features on the album. I guess we all know the controver(sies) surrounding the music of the film, due to that one guest song, so there is no point reiterating them. We all know who the actual composer of the songs credited to JAM8 is, but he wishes that his name shouldn’t be associated with ‘Raabta’ because of his policy to only compose for solo-composer albums, so there’s no point in naming him. I just hope the music company learns its lessons and reconsiders it’s actions!! On this grave (😄) note, let’s start with the music review of ‘Raabta’. 


1. Ik Vaari Aa / Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hai pyaar toh kayi dafaa kiya,
Tujhse nahi kiya toh kya kiya,
Tera mera yeh vaasta,
Hai iss zindagi ki daastaan,
Ya phir koi hamaara pehle se raabta?
Toh ikk Vaari aa, aa bhi jaa!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The album starts off with a very happy-go-lucky, romantic club number, with a lilting yet groovy sound. The composition has the stamp of Pritam all over it, and the way it flows is in the trademark way that almost all Pritam songs flow. The song’s melody starts off right with the hook, which is a wonderfully composed piece, that efficiently works in pulling you into the song. The antara following it, too, is very happy-sounding and charming, but it is the last stanza, which I call the ‘conclusion’ because it just doesn’t seem like an antara, is what steals the thunder. That part has been composed in a very entrancing manner, and is a major throwback to the corresponding ‘conclusion’ part in Pritam’s ‘Tu Chahiye’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The high-pitched bridge line that leads to the hookline, is just amazing. The arrangements are quite similar to Pritam’s previous club song arrangements, with the upbeat EDM portions, and that wonderful “chipmunk” that we heard in ‘The Breakup Song’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) last year. There is a Sajid-Wajid touch in the arrangements somewhere (‘Mukhtasar’ from ‘Teri Meri Kahaani’ and ‘Raat Bhar’ from ‘Heropanti’). But on a whole, the EDM has a very international touch to it, and it sounds like JAM8 is trying to recreate Pritam’s club arrangements in an international style. But because I always something out-of-this-world in a Pritam club song, and since this song is by his company, this song was quite underwhelming in that department. The pumped-up portions of the arrangements sometimes clash with Arijit’s super-high-pitch, and that sounds quite odd at times. That brings us to Arijit’s vocals. Definitely not the best he’s performed, but he still manages to carry the song in a quite charismatic way, and doesn’t drive you to sleep like he did in ‘Half Girlfriend’. But of course, the parts where he goes super-high-pitch, made me uncomfortable, and that doesn’t happen with every other singer. In the second version of the song which takes a sans EDM route, and is more reliant on guitars to propel it, everything that sounded wrong in the arrangements is set right. A slight rock guitar backdrop makes the song lighter than it was in the original version, and definitely more enjoyable. The company also replaces the fun chipmunk-like EDM with a nice vocal chorus, which gives off ‘Tum Mile’ vibes somehow,and immediatel removes all Sajid-Wajid vibes. As for the vocals, they have improved due to Jubin’s smooth treatment of the composition, taking care not to sound like he is straining his voice too much, and handling the high notes much better than Arijit did. And the small nuance he takes while singing “yaara” and all of its rhyming words, is just magnificent! In the conclusion stanza, Jubin gets to sing an entirely differently-tuned line that fits in perfectly and sounds as good as its counterpart in the original version. Oh, and it is a welcome change, considering that we have been hearing the original for over a month now. So this reprise is really one of the best reprises to have come out, ever! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are great, and suitable for a fun romantic number. I don’t know what I missed in the first version, but something is surely missing. To cover it up though, the Reprise takes a nice romantic twist!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4.5/5 for Jubin’s Version

 

2. Raabta (Title Track)

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Arijit Singh, Original Composition by ~ Pritam, Music Recreated by ~ JAM8, Original Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya, New Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Hadd se zyaada mohabbat hoti hai jo,
Kehte hain ke ibaadat hoti hai woh,
Kusoor hai, ya koi yeh fitoor hai,
Kyun lage sab kuch andhera hai,
Bas yehi noor hai,
Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”

– Irshad Kamil

The recreation craze continues as ‘Raabta’ (Agent Vinod) is recreated in this movie, which takes its name from that song. But how fortunate are we, that the man who made the original song, is the one who is remaking it (through his company, that is). The track, originally a romantic number, and probably the first time Arijit Singh actually came into large notice, though he had sung other songs before that, has now been remade into a dance track for the film. But this dance track is as far from a regular Bollywoodish dance track as you can imagine. It has a very quite and soothing vibe to it, and a very unexpected twist in the form of a nice interruption wherein JAM8 introduces to Bollywood, a new genre of music called ‘Tropical House’, which sounds like some techno Caribbean music. Anyway, the new composition that the group has made for the remake, is great. The mukhda, sung by newbie (in Bollywood) Nikhita Gandhi, is charming and scintillating, with its romantic vibes really reaching you. The way they have joined it to the hookline of the original song too, is quite cool. The time the song goes downhill is when, after the nice and refreshing Tropical interlude, Arijit comes back to reprise his portion, the antara from the original song, a part I felt didn’t quite merge with this song. Yes, I know that if the hookline adapted well into this song, every other part should too, but I just didn’t feel the antara this time. When it went back to the new composition, I started grooving to the beats again. So it was like a sudden disconnection from the song. But then, JAM8 makes up for it in the fantabulous (which is a very small word to describe it!) ‘conclusion’ part of the song, which has a lilting and entrancing tune. Especially the oddly-but-fantastically placed line, “Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”, is a wonderful bridge from the ‘Conclusion’ to the hookline. And the continuous EDM beats, really infuse life into the song. The composers also add wonderful piano notes occasionally, and the guitars that start off the song are so vibrant! So I guess I have already spoken about the arrangements as much as I could. Moving on to the vocals, Nikhita Gandhi, another singer from the Rahman camp of singers, joins Pritam’s camp for this one (quite similar a story to that of the other well known ‘Gandhi’ singer, Jonita — not sisters!) And she totally owns her debut. Yes, Arijit gets the major part in the song, but because she opens it so smashingly, the listeners get hooked and keep waiting for her voice to return. Sadly, it comes back only for the hooklines. Arijit is his usual self, trying to be charming , succeeding and also acing that aforementioned ‘conclusion’ portion. Irshad Kamil writes the new lyrics for this song, wrapping Amitabh Bhattacharya’s already awesome lyrics with an awesomeness of his own. A song that takes itself miles away from its original, neither better nor worse, but just at par, in a different genre. Barring the copy-paste antara, the song is quite good.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Sadda Move

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh, Pardeep Singh Sran & Raftaar, Additional Vocals ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Bhangra ke rhythm mein, tuney Bharatnatyam kyun milaaya?
Mere mehboob, dekho sadda move!”

– Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya

In the next song, JAM8 cuts out the whole international feel that was looming over the album all this time, to replace it with a street hip-hop number in Punjabi style. And I must say, how disappointed I was, hearing this song. The composer takes a very weird route with this song. There isn’t much by way of composition, but whatever is, sounds like very often recycled Punjabi lines used innumerable times. Like the antaras. And the mukhda just starts off so abruptly, it takes time to adjust to it. Actually, a rap starts the song, and it is quite obnoxious. Raftaar. That “Sadda Move Move” line by Raftaar is so irritating. The hookline of the song, too, isn’t too impressive. Arrangements are what lift the song up for me. That flute loop that plays every now and then is just insane — a glimpse of the trademark Pritam-ish insanity that JAM8 has so far, cruelly kept out of this album. The digital beats are quite groovy, but they don’t really provide anything new and innovative, which is what I would like to hear when I listen to a Punjabi street hip-hop number. The tumbi and “burrrhhhaaaa“s are the typical Punjabi people clichés, thrust into the song just to stereotype Punjabi music. But I must say, the dhols are quite engaging. The vocals are above average — Diljit sounds good but not excellent; probably the composition is barring me from liking his rendition too. On the other hand, his co-singer, Pradeep Singh Sran, who made it big in Bollywood with his song ‘Cutiepie’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), brings back his Labh Janjua-ish voice and steals the listeners’ hearts. Raftaar is strictly annoying, and his rap is least enjoyable. Overall the song has a strong Meet Bros-ish vibe. Legends Amitabh Bhattacharya & Irshad Kamil come together to write something that Kumaar or Shabbir Ahmed would’ve written by themselves, if they had been approached. Quite stereotypical, and ‘enjoyable’ would be an exaggeration. A clear dip in the level of the album. 

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Altamash Faridi & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Tere nishaan, yaadon mein hai,
Tu kyun nahin, taqdeer mein?
Naadaan dil, hai dhoondhta,
Qurbat teri tasveer mein.
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Dekhe khudaya, do aashiqaan diyaan tabaahiyaan
Ve badi lambiyaan si judaiyaan!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After three relatively happy-sounding songs, it was necessary, I guess, for the composers to bring in a touch of pathos in the album. So they bring a sad song sung by Arijit, which I feel is loosely modelled on Pritam’s ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), because of the slight Sufi touch to it. The composition, I have to say, is something that disappointed me highly. I just couldn’t find anything great in it. The song is trying so hard to be emotional, but manages to ve not even one bit emotional! And that almost never happens with Pritam songs. The first two stanzas are composed on the same tune, and that is a major drawback, because it is what makes the song sound very, very monotonous. The very first line of the song made me think, “What?” because the music that starts off the song is very promising! After that it becomes a crying fest, something so overdramatic I wouldn’t have expected it to be a song from a big banner films as ‘Raabta’. The hookline is so unidimensional, it hardly managed to touch my heart as an emotional song should. The composition ends with another “conclusion” stanza, and this time, that stanza is clearly trying to emulate the “conclusion” of ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) with its composition, arrangements and Arijit’s singing style. The arrangements of the song are also very heard-before, and stale arrangements. The Dholak rhythm has gotten so old and typical, I wish no composer uses it in sad songs anymore! The music that starts the song though, the violin one, is very good! And that is what made me believe the rest of the song too, would follow suit. Arijit sings this one with utmost lack of expression, almost like a robot. It seems he spent all his energy in ‘Ik Vaari Aa’. The Faridi brothers pitch in for a good but again, clichéd, Sufi interlude, that only makes the song sound more artificial. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are good, but not amazing. A sad song that makes me sad that it had to be in this film.

Rating: 2/5

 

5. Main Tera Boyfriend

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Neha Kakkar & Meet Bros., Original Composition by ~ J-Star & Sohrabuddin, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Na Na Na Na!

– J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi

Guest composers, Meet Bros, step into the album now, for their remake of the popular track of J-Star’s, ‘Na Na Na Na’. Now there’s a huge controversy regarding who stole the song from whom and blah blah blah. But besides all that, I think the whole nation is raving about the song and how catchy it is. The original was definitely one of the catchiest pop songs of that year and even now, and Meet Bros try to keep its catchiness intact. They have built a typical Bollywoodish composition around it, which sounds least like a Meet Bros. composition, and more like a Pritam one. How coincidental because JAM8’s ‘Sadda Movie’s sounded like a Meet Bros song. The Mukhda starts the song off on a very nice tune, and expectations rise right away. It is the antara that could’ve been better, and repeating each Antara twice was not needed; it just made the song that much longer. The hook… Do I need to speak about it! 😀 The arrangements too, are very similar to Pritam’s, complete with the chipmunk noises here too. The club sounds are great as well, and make the song enjoyable at all points. The vocals are energetic, with Arijit replenishing all his drained energy, and giving a very spunky rendition of the song. Is it just me, or does anyone else also think he sounds amazing in upbeat numbers as well!? Neha cannot match up to her co-singer’s level and performs a bit disappointingly this time. Meet Bros. also come and sing an interlude that would have sounded better had it stayed out of the album. 😥 And after that, there’s a lady’s voice that says “I Wanna be your boyfriend.” 😮 Kumaar’s lyrics are the usual type of lyrics that go into such songs. A song that I didn’t expect much from, since it was a remake, turns out to be quite foot-tapping!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Darasal

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Inkaar mein jo chhupa hai woh ikraar ho!”

– Irshad Kamil

Finally, to finish off the album, JAM8 bring an Atif Aslam romantic melody, something that is quite quintessential in recent T-Series albums. As soon as the song started, it reminded me of ‘Jeena Jeena’ (Badlapur) because of the similar pattern of the guitar piece. The composition is actually very sweet, and it is also slow-paced like ‘Jeena Jeena’, and would suit well for a waltzy arrangement too. But JAM8 choose to keep things minimal and grace the song with nothing more than a nice and sweet guitar riff, and occasional amazing strings. The tune, though slow-paced, grows on you instantly. It is instantly likeable, unlike all the other JAM8 songs in the album, which I took some time to get accustomed to (Except the Jubin ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). I loved the way how they repeated the last line of every antara twice, and the last line of the song thrice. The antara itself is very calm and soothing, and gives a very breezy feel to the song. In the Mukhda, the line where he repeats the words twice, is just outstanding! (“Teri Ada, Ada Pe Marta…” etc.) This is actually what is expected from an ideal romantic comedy. Sadly, it comes in at the end of this album! 😪 Atif’s vocals are some of the best I’ve heard from him in quite a while; he sings the song with a totally different charm than he sung his other songs of late. It draws the picture of the typical boy-next-door image in Bollywood rom-coms. Kamil’s lyrics are just beautiful! Some of them are just salute-worthy, like the one I’ve featured up there at the beginning of this song’s review. Finally, a cute romantic song that befits the film’s romantic aspects. 

Rating: 4.5/5


Raabta is an album I wouldn’t have expected (read, I would have expected much more) from a romantic film like this. Most of the songs are prohibited to be the usual fun-and-frolic that we associate with Pritam, for no specific reason. In fact, the dance song from guests Meet Bros is better than the dance song from JAM8 itself. JAM8 sticks to a very conventional route, save the title track, and only manages to deliver well in two songs in that conventional barrier (‘Darasal’ and ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). But I can’t take away from the album that, as an entire album, it is full of variety and sounds good. It is just lacking on the innovative quotient, and likeability quotient, and hence, the repeat value. ‘Raabta’ means ‘connection’, but there is a slight breach in this Raabta!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 + 3 + 2+ 3.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darasal = Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version) > Raabta (Title Track) > Ik Vaari Aa = Main Tera Boyfriend > Sadda Move > Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 = 17

 

Which is your favourite song from Raabta? Please vote for it below! Thanks!