NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1 (ITTEFAQ, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR, RIBBON, RAM RATAN, SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA & JULIE 2 – Mini Music Reviews)

November 2017 Round-Up #1

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1

This round-up covers the following albums of November 2017 releases: ‘Ittefaq’ by Tanishk Bagchi, ‘The House Next Door’ by Girishh G, ‘Ribbon’ by Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai, ‘Ram Ratan’ by Bappi Lahiri, ‘Julie 2’ by Rooh Band, Viju Shah & Javed-Mohsin, and ‘Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Zain-Sam-Raees, Rashid Khan & Anand Raj Anand.

The ones that haven’t been covered in this post will be included in the next round-up for November, or will be written about in a separate post all for themselves.



♦ Intense & Intriguing, Ittefaq Se: ITTEFAQ Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Anjaan, Tanishk Bagchi & Groot
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 23rd October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the song: Saavn
Buy the song: iTunes


The only song from this film is a Atmos-Pop remake of “Raat Baaki” (Namak Halaal), named Ittefaq Se. Tanishk Bagchi is back to his remaking streak, after some nice original music in “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” with partner Vayu. He keeps the original song intact, and that’s good, and he mysterious vibe that accompanies the song goes well with the setting of the film. The beats are nice as well. The only place the song lacks is the vocals, where Jubin sounds like he always does, and is starting to sound monotonous now, and Nikhita eats up her words while producing an over-stylish voice. I would have preferred Neeti Mohan on this one. The change in lyrics from “Pyaar Se” to “Ittefaq Se” actually fits in really well!


A good remake, that called for better voices behind it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Song: 3.5 

Song Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 38 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Ittefaq) = 39


♦ As Always, Romance Predominates: THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR Music Review

♪ Music by: Girishh G
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Vayu Srivastava & Chen-Yu Maglin
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 16th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the album: Saavn
Buy the album: iTunes


Girishh G starts the album off with a dulcet Mithoon-with-Bhatts-like melody, O Mere Sanam, that impresses because of its complexity, like every other Mithoon melody. Benny Dayal sings in his trademark husky tone for romantic songs, and the hookline is something that gives you goosebumps. Girissh’s piano is the highlight of the arrangements, while Shakeel Azmi’s lyrics are beautiful with a delicious assemblage of Urdu words. Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai is aptly disturbing, demonic as it is, and the composition is frankly very bad. It is Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics that make the song disturbing, and not because it is scary! Because it is cringeworthy. Suraj Jagan spoils the vocals, his co-singer Shilpa Natarajan could’ve done just fine without him. Xiao Xiao Ma is a haunting Chinese lullaby-ish number, which is good as long as it lasts, volatilizing shortly afterwards. The last track, The House Next Door, is a short instrumental piece, which again has the problem of not being captivating, despite the wonderful use of strings.


Not the best album for Girishh to debut in Bollywood with!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 1.5 + 3 + 3 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध।< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Mere Sanam > The House Next Door = Xiao Xiao Ma > Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai

 



♦ Cute Little Ribbon: RIBBON Music Review

♪ Music by: Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Sagar & Puneet Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 31st October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Mikey McCleary presents a Sufi rock song, Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai, to start off the album, and also introduces a new singer Aniket Mangrulkar, a singer who is a much better tuned rock singer than the much-in-demand Amit Mishra. The composition by McCleary is irresistible, especially in the hook parts. The rhythms are spot on, and the lyrics too, are meaningful. Sagar Desai, the second composer, comes with a dulcet number, Har Mod Par Umeed Hai, which couldn’t have been better sung by anyone other than Jasleen Royal with her sweet voice. The composition is slow and jazzy, and so it takes some time to love, but it is at par with the first song on the lyrics front.


This seems to be the season for short and sweet (and most importantly, script-driven) soundtracks.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai > Har Mod Par Umeed Hai



♦ Bappi’s Music Ratan Has Lost Its Shine!: RAM RATAN Music Review

♪ Music by: Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Deepak Sneh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


So, I only heard this album because the music composer was Bappi Lahiri, and I should’ve realised he is so irrelevant these days as far as composing goes. Nevertheless, here’s the “review” — a highly uninterested one, at that. Nand Lala starts off thinking it is ‘Bairi Piya’ (Devdas), but then goes off into a ‘Maiyya Yashoda’ (Hum Saath Saath Hain), and then becomes cheesier than any Krishna song ever. Palak’s cheap vocals do not help. The composition is bad, as expected, and Bappi doesn’t give anything great in the arrangements either. Instead he adds a cringeworthy English “rap” in the interlude! 😣 Nagada Nagada is the most dated 2000s Gujarati dhol mix, and Raja Hasan and Bhoomi Trivedi are made to sing like pop artists making a Garba album to be sold outside temples. Yeh Hai Dance Bar is as cheesy as its name — and Bappi is singing it himself. He tries to make it full of techno sounds but it flops. Jal Jal Jal Rahi Hain Raatein, starts off as if it could be the best of the album, with the irresistible sensuous tabla beats that R.D. Burman used in ‘Jaane Do Na’ (Saagar), but as soon as Sadhana starts with her outdated voice, it goes downhill. Mohammed Irfan too, sings like Bappi Lahiri! It turns out to be the most cringeworthy song on the album.


Bappi Lahiri clearly has lost his Music Ratan!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 1.5 + 0.5 + 2 = 6.5

Album Percentage: 32.5% 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Why don’t you just skip it? I might be the only one in the world to have had the honour of listening to it!



♦ Reprise Versions Zaroor Sunna: SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA Music Review

♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Raees-Zain-Saim, Rashid Khan & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kunaal Vermaa, Shakeel Azmi, Kumaar & Gaurav Krishna Bansal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of the three versions that Jogi appears in, any layman would pick Shafqat’s version as the best – owing to his seasoned voice and classical prowess, and amazing nuances, not to mention Arko’s clever usage of wedding sounds at the beginning. The duet version is spoiled by Yasser trying to ape Shafqat’s singing style, and Arko’s typical duff rhythms with harmonica. The female version by Aakanksha Sharma is good too, where Aakanksha sounds like a better version of Palak Muchhal. The overall composition, though, is typical of Arko now, and he needs to move on from this. It is the sister of ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ and ‘Nazm Nazm’. Kaushik-Akash-Guddu compose Main Hoon Saath Tere for JAM8, another song that relies on the company’s previous success, ‘Zaalima’. The digital tune is tweaked, and Harshdeep gets kicked out, and some notes undergo permutations and combinations, and voila! We get this song. The hookline reminds me of some song, but I cannot remember at all which one! Arijit’s singing is very dull and he seems asleep, but Shivani Bhayana’s female version is pretty good, with different arrangements. The song falls flat in the antara though. It is Pallo Latke by newcomers Raees-Zain-Saim, which surprisingly becomes the song of the album, as an individual song (not including the various versions). As a remake of a Rajasthani folk song, it is surprisingly good, and will do until we get to hear some real Rajasthani folk music in “Padmavati”. Jyotica Tangri sounds amazing here, sweeter than she does in her Neha Kakkar avatar. Yasser spoils the song again, along with Fazilpuria’s annoyingly interrupting rap. The Dr. Zeus-esque tumbi seems out of place in a Rajasthani song though. Rashid Khan returns after a loooooooooong time, to give another typical romantic song Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki, again in three versions, out of which once again, Shafqat’s steals the thunder. The composition is nothing special, it is Rashid’s usual sweet as sugar tune which is oh-so-predictable. Asees sounds sweet in her version, while newcomer Asit Tripathy also does well. Asit’s version scores high because of the beautiful Rajasthani arrangements — the ravanhatta being most prominent. The lyrics resemble those of ‘Main Rang Sharbaton Ka’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and are good enough until they become very cringeworthy with the Hinglish portion. Last on the album is veteran Anand Raaj Anand’s angsty rock song (in two versions) Mera Intkaam Dekhegi about a boy warning his girlfriend (ex-girlfriend??) that if she rejects him, she will have to see his revenge. Oh, the melodrama. She should just say, “Oh alright, let me get my camera too so the world can see it too.” Krishna hurts the ears with his painful rendition, and Anand’s was skip-worthy right from the beginning.


An ensemble of composers bring five pleasant, but heard-before songs, and are forced to make innumerable versions of them, to make sure we never forget them. No wonder the newcomers steal the cake. 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 1 = 37

Album Percentage: 67.27%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jogi (Shafqat Version) > Pallo Latke = Jogi (Duet) = Jogi (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Asit) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Shafqat) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Female) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Male) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Krishna) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Anand)

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 39 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana) = 40

 



♦ Raunchy Diaries: JULIE 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Viju Shah, Rooh Band, Atif Ali & Javed-Mohsin
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan & Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 18th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Rooh Band & Atif Ali’s debut in Bollywood starts off with quite a corny title song Oh Julie, which is good enough as far as the arrangements and rhythm go, but the vocals and lyrics pull it down; stuff we have heard time and again. Their second song Koi Hausla Toh Hoh, also sung by their leading vocalist Anupam Nair, is the everyday Pakistani pop, something even the Bhatts would resist from including in their albums now, with staid lyrics like “Saanson Ka Chalte Rehna Hi Toh zindagi nahin”. Veteran composer Viju Shah’s stint of three songs for this album is devoid of much electronic disturbance. The romantic song Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai, is a typical 90s melody, in which the singer Mistu Bardhan sounds like Sadhana Sargam does in her live concerts. The voice is harsh to the ears. The reprise version Aise Kya Baat Hai, in Palak Muchhal’s voice, is better only because the voice is more ear-friendly. Otherwise, the song is just as flat and dated. His third song happens to be a raunchy item number, Kharama Kharama, sung by Pawni Pandey, and which surprisingly fares much better, thanks to the irresistible South Indian rhythm. Again, it is bogged down by a typically 90s composition, and the lyrics obviously. Javed-Mohsin, nephews of Sajid-Wajid, present the last song, Mala Seenha, sung by Mamta Sharma, a tedious rehash of their uncles’ item songs with the singer. Again, the rhythms are the only worthy parts of the song.


An album that you will automatically avoid.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 + 3 = 15

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kharama Kharama = Mala Seenha > Aise Kya Baat Hai = Oh Julie > Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai = Koi Hausla Toh Hoh



 

Hope you enjoyed this Round-up! Second one coming soon!!

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RATHER ‘DEAD’Y!! (DADDY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Olefonken & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Danish Sabri, Prashant Ingole & Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 8th September 2017

Daddy Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Daddy is an upcoming biographical crime film, starring Arjun Rampal, Aishwarya Rajesh, Anand Ingle and Nishikant Kamat. The film is directed by Ashim Ahluwalia, and produced by Arjun Rampal and Rutvij Patel. The film documents the life of gangster-turned-politician Arun Gawli. The film has music by Sajid-Wajid and a Norwegian DJ named Olenfonken, and I would expect something good from a movie about a gangster’s life. Let’s see how close to my expectations the composers deliver!


1. Eid Mubarak

Singers ~ Shabab Sabri & Tanvir Hussain, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

Sajid-Wajid are usually great at Qawwali, and here they present a Qawaali as the first song. Well, the composition is the traditional Qawwali, and so it isn’t hooking right away, but if you’re the Qawwali lover, you would love it. As always, for a Sajid-Wajid song, they give it booming arrangements, making it worth listening to as a Qawwali. Harmonium, tablas, dholaks make the arrangements very rich and beautiful. As for the vocals, Shabab and Sa Re Ga Ma Pa 2016 contestant Tanvir Hussain (who’s exceptional with those aalaaps), handle them well. Lyrics are suitable too. A trademark Sajid-Wajid Qawwali.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Zindagi Meri Dance Dance

Singers ~ Alisha Chinai & Vijay Benedict, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Olefonken, Lyrics by ~ Anjaan

Now I know I’m breaking my own rules, but this song is so bad it calls for a long review. 😅 Get ready. So the song starts with a nice, retro beat (the beat from Bappi Lahiri’s old song “Zindagi Meri Dance Dance” from “Dance Dance”, the song which this song is a “remake” of). After that an emcee announces that we, the audience are now going to be taken to the moon, and asks us to look at a rocket, in which the whole audience will apparently fit, without any food supply, water supply or anything. Then he erases all our doubts and tells us that a particular Mehbooba and her Mehboob are going to climb out of this rocket, and dance, in the “pyaar ki masti“, on the moon. Then we get to hear the Mehbooba, who says “Hi Darling, I want to daaaaance with you. Daaaaance. Daaaance of love. Daaaaance on the moon.” It’s so cringeworthy you feel like stopping the song then and there, but you continue for the sake of it. Later we learn that the boy’s life is “Dense” (“Zindagi Meri Dense Dense“). Well of course bro, life is a dense jungle, you need to bear with it. Luckily for us, the girl pronounces “Dance” well enough. All throughout the song, a good composition is spoiled by various stupid interjections by the characters, and it is so irritating. Midway, the Mehboob decides he has the money and brains enough to take his Mehbooba to Venus. Now if I were him I would die before going to Venus, because I would anyway die on Venus. Someone please tell him he’s gonna die on Venus. His Mehbooba, stupid as she is, complies, and gets all happy about going to Venus, and even counts down! And then the stupid backing chorus sings “Venus! We Are Venus!” I don’t know if they know they’re speaking incorrect English or whether they think they are Venus. The Mehboob and Mehbooba further go on to romance on Venus! She says “Dekhe Jo Tu Aise Mujhe, Mere Kadam Dagmagayein!” Well, I bet that’s because of the poisonous gases, lady. But she doesn’t get the point, and keeps romancing him. Later she gets bored of Venus (Or maybe an alien is after them) so the lady very casually points out, “Darling, Chalo Kisi Aur Duniya Mein Chalo” (Let’s go to another world.) And the smart Mehboob immediately says “Mars.” Ugh, idiot!! Thankfully they don’t romance on Mars, and the makers stop the song there, instead of going till Pluto. Still, the song ends at a staggering six and a half minutes! 😛 Olefonken has basically remixed the old song, but nobody will like it anyway. The only thing this is good for, is a hearty laugh.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

3. Aala Re Aala Ganesha

Singers ~ Wajid & Ganesh Chandanshive, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Prashant Ingole

Where the first song was a Qawwali, the last song is a Ganesha song. And very badly composed too. Such a dark composition doesn’t suit a Ganpati song at all. It’s a typical Sajid-Wajid bad composition with no appeal at all. Those percussions are the same percussions they use everywhere, the dhol taashas, but that’s actually the best part of the song. The vocals are terrible, Wajid doing it himself. He is accompanied by Ganesh Chandanshive (‘Deewani Mastani’ fame) who disappoints as well. Lyrics are just so cringeworthy, like “Shambhu Cha Baal Kon?” (Who is Shankar’s son?). And then the chorus answers ‘Ganesha’. Another bad Ganesha song to release in the season, after the one from ‘Sniff’.

Rating: 1.5/5


Daddy is such a bad album, it is unbelievable. Two composers who used to be on the A-list of Bollywood composers once upon a time, now making this kind of music, is really sad. The guest “song” by Norwegian DJ Olefonken too, is dumb. Rather than “Daddy”, it should be called “Dead-y”!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 6

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Eid Mubarak > Zindagi Meri Dance Dance= Aala Re Aala Ganesha

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 29 (from previous albums) + 01 = 30

 

Which is your favourite song from Daddy? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

ANU NOT ZORDAAR! (INDU SARKAR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Anu Malik & Aziz Nazan
♪ Lyrics by: Puneet Sharma, Sanjay Chhel & Aziz Nazan
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: Not Yet Released as an album!
♪ Movie Released On: 21st July 2017

Indu Sarkar

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Indu Sarkar is a Bollywood historical / political thriller film, starring Kirti Kulhari, Neil Nitin Mukesh, Tota Roy Chowdhury and Anupam Kher. The film is directed by Madhur Bhandarkar and produced by Bharat Shah. It is set in the Emergency period in India, from 1975 to 1977. The film has opened to mixed reviews, and while some are praising the hard-hitting nature of the storyline, others are putting it down for its melodrama. Anyway, I, being a music reviewer, am spared from giving any views on the movie which I haven’t even watched, and don’t intend to either. I am focusing on the music. The most influential composer of the 90s, Mr. Anu Malik, has scored the soundtrack for the film. He did well in earlier this year’s ‘Begum Jaan’ so I’m expecting the same here as well! Saregama, the music company, after releasing four songs as singles, hasn’t released all songs in a single album, so I’m assuming this is the album, with four songs. Let’s see how Mr. Malik has composed for this!


1. Chadhta Sooraj Dheere Dheere

Singer ~ Mujtaba Aziz Naza, Composition & Lyrics by ~ Aziz Nazan, Music Recreated by ~ Anu Malik

Aziz Nazan’s famous Qawwali gets remade by Anu Malik, and sounds quite bleak and dull. The composition is good (no new composition by Malik) but the nine-minutes length makes it sound tedious. The vocals (by Aziz Nazan’s son) are good, and so are the lyrics. Anu remakes it with apt arrangements for a Qawwali, and also rock elements. Duration bogs this one down!
Rating: 2/5

 

2. Yeh Awaaz Hai

Singer ~ Monali Thakur, Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

A sweet and sugary composition, evoking memories of ‘Lag Jaa Gale’ and ‘Salaam’ (from Anu Malik’s own ‘Umrao Jaan’ album), again too high in duration — eight minutes. Monali’s voice makes things sound bright, and the lyrics are beautiful and meaningful. The arrangements also resemble ‘Aazadiyan’ (Begum Jaan). A song resembling many other songs, but good in its place.
Rating: 3/5

 

3. Dilli Ki Raat

Singers ~ Bappi Lahiri & Anmol Malik, Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

At first, I thought this was composed by Bappi, but the Panchamda vibe made me check again, and it was by Anu himself. The composition is terrible, and so are the vocals (especially Anmol’s), but the R.D. Burman vibe in the arrangements makes it bearable (only for a one time listen). The lyrics disappoint. SKIP!
Rating: 1/5

 

4. Yeh Pal

Singer ~ Amruta Fadnavis, Lyrics by ~ Sanjay Chhel

This song is slightly better in its composition; a soothing romantic waltzy song. The vocalist should’ve been Alka Yagnik or Asha Bhosle, but Amruta Fadnavis tries hard to do well. The arrangements are soothing, with the guitars and strings making it all the more soothing. The mandolin and accordion are outstanding too. The whistle makes it sound a lot like Anu’s trademark 90s songs. Sanjay’s lyrics portray love as a trap. A good song; but the vocals could have been better!
Rating: 3.5/5


Indu Sarkar is an album that Anu Malik seems to have scored very half-heartedly. Earlier this year, his fabulous score for “Begum Jaan” stunned me, and then this dull soundtrack after that, is very odd. The best song too, suffers of bad vocals. Anu Not zordaar!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2 + 3 + 1 + 3.5 = 9.5

Album Percentage: 47.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Yeh Pal > Yeh Awaaz Hai > Chadhta Sooraj Dheere Dheere > Dilli Ki Raat

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 21 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Indu Sarkar) = 22

 

Which is your favourite song from Indu Sarkar? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SHREYA + SUNIDHI = SHABANA!! (NAAM SHABANA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Meet Bros. & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 9th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 31st March 2017

Naam Shabana Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


P.S. The song ‘Dil Hua Besharam’ can be heard on Saavn, while its reprise ‘Baby Besharam’ can be heard on the YouTube audio jukebox. The Saavn link doesn’t have the latter whereas the YouTube jukebox doesn’t have the former. Thought it necessary to inform in case you get confused! 😀


Naam Shabana is a Bollywood thriller, starring Taapsee Pannu in the titular role, and Manoj Bajpayee, Prithviraj Sukumaran, Elli Avram and Taher Shabbir in supporting roles. The film has been directed by Shivam Nair, whose ‘Bhaag Johnny’ flopped in 2015. The film has been produced by Neeraj Pandey and Shital Bhatia. It is a spin-off to the 2015 super-hit film ‘Baby’, and shows the journey of Taapsee Pannu’s character Shabana from ‘Baby’, before she was roped in to be a part of the mission. The movie is definitely awaited, because of it being the first of its kind; Bollywood has been free of any spin-offs as such, and it is just wonderful that the first Bollywood spin-off is that of such a wonderful thriller. Anyway, let’s go over to the music, because we have a little more time to wait for the movie. We all remember that ‘Baby’ had been touted to be a songless film. Nevertheless, three songs had been included in its album — technically two, because one of the songs had a male and female version. Meet Bros. Anjjan had composed one promotional track, while M.M. Kreem, had composed the two-version track in question. The soundtrack was like an accessory to the film, and not something to cherish in your playlist for a long, long time. This movie seems to be different, in that it has four original tracks, with one having two versions, thus making it five songs. Rochak Kohli, who of late, just composed single additional songs that released after the albums of ‘M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story’ and ‘Wazir’ released, comes back with a substantial chunk of an album after a long time. He last composed three songs out of the five-track ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’ (which were quite ignorable) and before that, three out of ten in ‘Hawaizaada’ (which I still listen to!) So I am not quite sure what he can give in this album, where he has three out of five songs. The other two songs are two versions of the same song, composed by Meet Bros, without Anjjan. Hopefully, they don’t give something too-hard-to-grasp like ‘Baby’s ‘Beparwah’. So let’s see what kind of music this album to a much-awaited thriller, holds in hand!


1. Rozana

Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Inn aankhon se yeh bataa, kitna main dekhun tujhe,
Reh jaati hai kuchh kami, jitna bhi dekhun tujhe,
Rozana main, sochun yahi,
Ki jee loongi main besaans bhi,
Aise hi tu mujhe, milta rahe agar, rozana, rozana!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rochak decided to start the album off with a mellow, soothing song that would be enough to transport us to dreamland. The first song in the album is a romantic song that has a very beautiful composition; Rochak gets everything right in that he composes this one with the perfect Bollywood ideals of ‘romance’. Each and every note hits your heart and hits hard. The mukhda gives a nice headstart to the song, and the hookline is one which doesn’t care much about imposing itself on you but grows on you like slow poison just as I like it. The antaras hold all the magic of the song; the very powerfully lilting tune of the antaras just leaves you spellbound. The arrangements are quite minimal, but Rochak gives an impressive strings backdrop for most of the song, especially the strings in the interlude are very impressive. Guitars and piano soothe your senses like nothing else can. And also, Rochak has employed a kind of Marching rhythm to the antara. I don’t know why that’s there, but it doesn’t hamper the song in any way. The arrangements provide for a nice nighttime lullabyish listen. And the vocals are by none other than the melody queen, Shreya Ghoshal. She handles each word with utmost care, and the whispery way in which she sings the song proves yet again how wonderful she is as a singer. Unnecessary bouts of loudness can never be found when she is behind the mic. The lyrics by Manoj Muntashir are mind blowing, especially the paragraph I’ve showcased above! A MINDBLOWING start to the album, and it will definitely consolidate Rochak’s career in Bollywood.

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Zinda

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Ziddi raaston se paanv yeh, aaj bhi, jhagadna toh bhoole nahin,
Haare hain kayi dafa toh kya, aaj bhi, hum ladna toh bhoole nahin,
Aaj bhi dil baaghi hai, bas yehi kaafi hai,
Zinda hoon abhi, baaki hoon abhi,
Meri har saans mein thodi si zindagi hai abhi!”

– Manoj Muntashir

After the lulling romantic song, Rochak throws in a motivational kind of song next. This time, the composition is a bit weak. It sounds great in the first listen, but later on I found that it is quite typical and offers nothing new. The mukhda starts off the song on a slow pace, which only speeds up when the hookline arrives: the only portion of the song that remains with you after the song ends. Wonderfully composed on pensive sounding high notes, that part will definitely hook you on to the song and assure that you don’t leave it halfway. The antara that follows is also quite sombre, and doesn’t leave an impact on you, unless you hear it many times. On a whole, the song’s tune has nothing much to lap up. The arrangements also fail to offer anything different or innovative. The tune is already so laidback, but the arrangements refuse to make it more interesting, staying very minimal until, again, the hookline comes. Strings and guitars can be heard, but nothing stands out very boldly. Sunidhi Chauhan provides to the song, everything that the tune and arrangements could not. Her energy, though diffused in the song, manages to make the song repeat-listenable, even if only once or twice. Lately, she seems to have gotten stereotyped to these kind of songs. The lyrics by Muntashir, too, are good in their purpose of being motivational. A motivational song that fails to motivate a lot, but is functional to an extent. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Zubi Zubi

Singers ~ Sukriti Kakar & Rochak Kohli, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Rochak Kohli, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Mere dil, gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi,
Masti mein gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi!”

– Anjaan

Next up we have Rochak’s final song for the album, and it happens to be an upbeat club number. This one is a remake, of Bappi Lahiri-composed ‘Zooby Zooby’ (Dance Dance), and it is quite a decent remake too, at that. The composition, though faltering at the beginning, turns out to be quite catchy. The mukhda is what I have a problem with — it seems forced and a bit childish. But right from the first time the hookline is sung, till the end of the song, it is an enjoyable track! The great thing is that, like it used to happen before, only the hookline of the original song has been taken, while the rest has been composed afresh. The antara is a nice continuation of the sensuous dance song, but then that line from the mukhda, “humko hai jaan se bhi pyaari aashiqmizajiyaan“, comes back to irritate. The arrangements are fantastic discoesque arrangements, recreating the Bappi Lahiri era in today’s style. Rochak has added groovy beats, and that amazing programming effect he has added to his own voice when he sings the hookline, keeps me waiting for his parts to come! It makes him sound like an awesome robot. 😀 Sukriti also, has sung well, except the mukhda. (Again!) She sounded a lot like a fake Shefali Alvares there, and I found it quite irritating, as I would have if Shefali herself had sung it. The rest of the song, she shines. Kumaar reworks around Anjaan’s original hookline, and pens down aptly enjoyable lyrics. A good remake, spoiled by a mediocre first stanza.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Baby Besharam / Dil Hua Besharam

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas & Meet Bros / Aditi Singh Sharma & Meet Bros, Music by ~ Meet Bros, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

(Nothing to showcase, thanks to Kumaar’s lyrical masterpieces which you’ll read of later on in the passage)

The next song is yet another club song, this one by Meet Bros. The composition sticks quite close to Bollywood’s conventions of composing a ‘catchy’ club song. Right from the beginning Meet Bros “try” to get us caught on to the composition, which, unfortunately, is very staid. The mukhda is bad, and the hookline follows suit. The antara doesn’t provide much respite in this respect either. The arrangements are typical club beats, and it sounds like it should’ve released a year or two ago. Meet Bros have added this weird synthesiser tune, which sounds like the song is part of a comedy movie, an adult comedy to be precise. I wonder if this song was actually composed for some other movie before, and then moved over to ‘Naam Shabana’ Because it couldn’t find a place anywhere else. The vocals are what differentiate one version of the song from the other. It actually had released first in Jasmine’s voice, and that one is outright banal, sounding like it is trying to imitate ‘Yaar Na Miley’ (Kick). Aditi Singh Sharma, though not eligible to win a Best Singer prize or anything for her rendition, provides respite MERELY IN COMPARISON TO Jasmine Sandlas. At least her voice is more club-environment-friendly. Yes, she does spoil some lines with her unnecessarily stylish accent. Oh yeah, and she knows how to pronounce the “Baby” as “Bebe” (which you need to practise if you ever want to make it big in Bollywood as a club singer!), as opposed to Jasmine singing “Baby” as “Bebi”. The way they sing “beyyyyyysharam” is quite torturous. I guess it was first going to be included in ‘Besharam’ as the title track (that would explain the comedic arrangements), until Ishq Bector & Shree D saved us by stepping in. Kumaar’s lyrics feature lyrical masterpieces like “Rafaa dafaa sufi bandon ko karke nasha vasha karlo“, and “Thoda sa bigadne mein bolo na kya harz hai?“. *Slow claps*

Rating: 1/5 for Baby Besharam, 1.5/5 for Dil Hua Besharam


Naam Shabana is a decent album, but not great. Its predecessor had two songs, so it was okay that only one worked. This has four songs, out of which only one works perfectly, the others are decent, and one is bad. For a thriller, the album is apt, with a romantic song, a motivational song, and two situational club songs. However, it will have less of a connect with the audiences. Rochak has done a commendable job though! The only good thing I might remember about this album years later is that it has both Shreya and Sunidhi, modern stalwarts of the Bollywood music industry, lending their voices to the songs.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 1 + 1.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 58%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rozana > Zubi Zubi = Zinda > Dil Hua Besharam > Baby Besharam

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Naam Shabana) = 09

 

Which is your favourite song from Naam Shabana? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SURRENDER YOUR EARS TO THIS ALBUM!! (BADRINATH KI DULHANIA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Akhil Sachdeva & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Kumaar, Akhil Sachdeva, Indeevar, Ikka & Badshah
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 10th March 2017

Badrinath Ki Dulhania Album Cover

Badrinath Ki Dulhania Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Badrinath Ki Dulhania is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com starring Alia Bhatt and Varun Dhawan. The film is directed by Shashank Khaitan and produced by Karan Johar, Hiroo Yash Johar and Apoorva Mehta. So we had a film in 2014 named ‘Humpty Sharma ki Dulhania’, which was a bit of a sleeper hit, and the cast and crew behind it happens to be the same that is behind this one. But according to the makers, it has no connection to the film except that the director, the producers and even the actors, are exactly the same. This film continues the ‘Dulhania’ franchise (If we can call it a franchise with just two films) in U.P., contrary to the setting in Punjab in the first film. Anyway, over to the musical department. Karan Johar has always delivered back-to-back hit soundtracks, and this should be no exception. I still feel guilty that I misjudged the ‘Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania’ album terribly when it released. After a month or so, it started growing amazingly. And now I love it. So I’ll be careful this time around not to make that mistake again. Here, we get a trio of composers, starting with Bollywood’s newest hit-machine, Amaal Mallik, who has composed two songs. Next up is a newcomer named Akhil Sachdeva, with one song, which hopefully is strong enough to bag him a debutant award this year, and lastly is young talent Tanishk Bagchi, who has been composing for so many multicomposer albums here and there that I’ve lost track. Both Amaal and Tanishk have delivered good songs in the past, and with Karan Johar both have a hit record, so I can’t expect anything more than catchiness (sticking to the rowdy look of the movie’s posters and all) in their tunes. As for Akhil, I hope he has something great in hand! So let’s jump right into this soundtrack!


1. Aashiq Surrender Hua

Singers ~ Amaal Mallik & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Arey bhagyawaan, maan bhi jaa, ladna befizool hai,
Pyaar dikhe na kya, aankhon mein padi dhool hai?
Pyaar dikhe na kya, aankhon mein padi dhool hai!!
Taj Mahal banvaana Shah Jahan ki bhool hai,
Uske paas paisa, apne haathon mein toh phool hai!
Tune gusse mein phone mera kaata toh aashiq surrender hua!”

– Shabbir Ahmed

The rowdiness starts from the very first song. And who better to get the catchiness in that rowdiness right than Amaal Mallik, who I believe is following Pritam’s footsteps in this regard? The song is an enjoyable chhed-chhad number, the type of which Bollywood’s music records of the past abound in. But very few fit the bill and actually get everything in the right place. And though this one isn’t PERFECT, it definitely gets you grooving. Amaal’s composition doesn’t rely on complicated turns and meanders for it to get famous. Instead, it takes a very heard-before but enjoyable tune, and carries it forward to make a song that impresses with its simplicity and innocence! The tune is of a type we Indians love to dance to; play it in any wedding and people will dance like crazy even if they don’t know it! And the song will propagate just like that! People will play it somewhere, it will catch on to someone else, and then to someone else, and someone else and someone else. Like a viral fever, but a good one. :p The antaras have been composed very playfully and one cannot miss that overlying South Indian flavour that the beats infuse into the song. That brings us to the arrangements. The aforementioned beats are full of heavy percussion (Dipesh Verma and team) following a kuthu rhythm, which has been laid down by Dipesh Verma, Keyur Barve and Omkar Salunkhe. As of that was not enough, the composer decides to let his assistant Krish Trivedi go all-out with the whistles. The noises with which the song starts off are just so instantly gripping! The occasional brass instruments really bring an Indian-wedding touch to the song. Other digital beats really decorate the song, which would otherwise sound like a recording from a wedding at a village. The song aptly ends with that quintessential ‘play-the-hookline-on-brass-instruments’ trick. Vocals are perfectly enjoyable and help the song to get through to the listener. The composer himself takes the mic and sings the song very efficaciously and mischievously. But of course, nobody sings such songs as well as Shreya Ghoshal, who was a great decision for it, considering that she isn’t getting too many songs like this these days! In her short one-stanza cameo, she does very well, while Amaal carries the rest of the song on his shoulders! Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics are a clever kind of rowdy, and at least they’re decipherable and their meaning comes out clearly! Rowdy but classy!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Roke Na Ruke Naina

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Haathon ki lakeerein do, milti jahaan hain,
Jisko pata hai bata de, jagah woh kahaan hai..
Ishq mein jaane kaisi yeh bebasi hai,
Dhadkanon se milkar bhi dil tanha hai,
Doori main mitaaoon kaise, jaane na manaaoon kaise, tu bataa?
Roke Na ruke naina, teri ore hai inhe rehna..”

– Kumaar

Next up is a pathos-filled romantic song composed by Amaal. And Amaal has composed this one in one of my favourite styles of composition for sad songs — rustic and earthy. Quite recently we heard ‘Naina’ from Pritam’s ‘Dangal’. Quite similar to that in that the song is a sad song with a traditional tune and traditional instruments. The song starts with a heart-rending sarangi piece, and gets to your heart right away. The composition by Amaal has to be one of his maturest compositions in this genre. The mukhda does a nice job in making the ambience damp and melancholic. The soothing piece is followed by an ethereal hookline, something that isn’t blurted out by the singer and forced onto the listener, but proceeds quite calmly. The antaras have yet some more beautiful notes strung together to make a heard-before but engaging stanza. Amaal treads over both high and low octaves with the antaras, and that one odd line in the antara which is made of high notes, just finds its way directly to your heart. The arrangements do half of Amaal’s work in making listeners teary-eyed. Of course the aforementioned sarangi brings in the Indian part of the pathos, as do the wonderful tablas and the oh-so-majestic flute. But Amaal cleverly tops it with acoustic guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) and drums (Debashish Banerjee), in a kind of soft rock template. When the drums interrupt out of nowhere in the till-then very traditional arrangements, I just couldn’t help but remember ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani). And then Amaal also puts to use nice oriental instruments like the mandolin (Tapas Roy) which sends chills down your spine when they play. The vocals are top-notch; Arijit infuses the rustic touch to them. He splendidly covers both low and high notes impeccably, as always. Kumaar has penned one of his finest lyrics for this song. A beautiful sad song, which excels in the instrumentation department!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Humsafar

Singers ~ Akhil Sachdeva & Mansheel Gujral, Music by ~ Akhil Sachdeva, Lyrics by ~ Akhil Sachdeva

“Jitni haseen ye mulakatein hain, unse bhi pyari teri baatein hain
Baaton mein teri jo kho jaate hain, aaun na hosh mein main kabhi
Baahon mein hai teri zindagi, haaye
Sun mere humsafar, kya tujhe itni si bhi khabar?”

– Akhil Sachdeva

The new composer Akhil Sachdeva enters the album next, with his sole song, a romantic ballad, the type of which we haven’t not heard before in Bollywood. The composition follows the familiar template of Pakistani romantic songs, but nevertheless manages to tug at your heartstrings. The song starts with a nice Punjabi couplet rendered by Mansheel Gujral in her strong voice. The mukhda itself gets you swaying to the song, and it actually makes you feel happy. The hookline here too, is quite subtle, but you still get that forced feel. The antara is soothing, with its low notes, again, making you fall in love with them. But overall, there is nothing innovative in the composition. It kills with its simplicity. The arrangements are basically acoustic guitar (Veljon) riffs and digital beats that don’t really leave any scope for anything else. However, the newcomer adds a wonderful harmonica that magically uplifts the mood whenever it plays. The vocals by the composer are fine, not excellent. At places he sounds a lot like Atif Aslam, but doesn’t get the prolonged notes as right as Atif does. Also, his pronunciation needs a lot of improvement. He needs to work on his ‘jh’ sounds, which come across as ‘zzzzh’. I say this not in a demeaning manner though. On a whole, his rendition is soulful. Mansheel has more of a backing vocalist role here, but stuns in her parts. Akhil himself has written the lyrics here, and he uses all the possible Bollywood romance clichés in one song — ‘sunn mere humsafar’, ‘baahon mein teri kho jaate hain’, ‘tujhe maan loonga khuda‘ and whatnot. Nevertheless, the song makes for a good listen.

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Badri Ki Dulhania (Title Track)

Singers ~ Dev Negi, Neha Kakkar, Monali Thakur & Ikka, Additional Vocals ~ Rajnigandha Shekhawat, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, Rap By ~ Ikka

“Khelan kyun na jaaye, tu hori re rasiya,
Khelan kyun na jaaye, tu hori re rasiya,
Poochhe hain tohe saari guiyaan kahaan hai Badri Ki Dulhania?”

– Shabbir Ahmed

And Tanishk makes a grand entry with the next song, which happens to be the title song of the movie. The song is an enjoyable one with a folksy rhythm and whose upbeat tempo makes you dance and sing along. The song starts with a wonderful folksy line, composed playfully. After that and a rap, Tanishk’s mukhda to the song begins, and it has all the required spunk for a successful Bollywood dance track. And then when we come to the hookline, he cleverly incorporates the tune of the folk number ‘Chalat Musafir’ to Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics. (Or maybe Shabbir wrote it after he composed. Any which way, both of them went about it very cleverly!) The antara is a short stanza that efficiently carries forward the naughtiness and catchiness in the composition. Tanishk has to be commended for this composition, because I’ve never heard such a good song of this genre from him after ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns) and that was what he composed with his friend Vayu. So hats off to him. The arrangements are amazing. The percussion (Dipesh Verma) is topnotch with a strong U.P. flavour to it, and the harmonium (Pradip Pandit) is another star of the song. The song is a holi song, and so the quintessential dhols (Deepak Bhatt) do the needful. The vocals are the strong point of the song. If someone doesn’t like the composition, they’ll fall in love with the song anyway, because of the vocals. Dev Negi, at his exuberant best, renders the male portions spot-on, while the three female vocalists all impress with their respective portions. Neha Kakkar, who takes the major chunk of the female portions, sounds cute, naughty and funny. The way she sings ‘muniya re muniya‘ is enough to melt your heart. Monali, whose ‘Cham Cham’ (Baaghi) is still on the majority of Indians’ playlists, and whose ‘Dhanak’ (Dhanak) is still on mine, renders the antara with ease, but doesn’t sound quite the innocent girl she always sounds, here! It is surprising that Neha sounds more innocent in this song! 😀 And when Neha takes over from Monali in the antara, I couldn’t even recognize Neha the first time I heard the song, and that’s saying something! The third lady vocalist is classical singer Rajnigandha Shekhawat, who sings the introductory folksy lines so beautifully, I’m in love with them. Ikka raps here, and his rap isn’t as irritating as it could have been. Maybe he toned it down a bit. He suits the rustic environment of the song, and doesn’t really rap anything odd. Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics here are functional, if not good. An apt title song!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Tamma Tamma Again

Singers ~ Bappi Lahiri & Anuradha Paudwal, Chorus ~ Dattatray Mestry, Archana Gore, Arun Ingle, Aparna Ullal, Mandar Apte, Mayuri Patwardhan, Nitin Karandikar, Deepti Rege, Voice-over ~ Ameen Sayani, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Indeevar, Rap by ~ Badshah

“Been bajaati hui…. NAAGIN!”

– Ameen Sayani

And Tanishk, with his second song, also closes the album, with another remake. If the previous song was a remake, then this one is definitely a remix. The makers have decided to rehash ‘Tamma Tamma’ (Thanedaar) for the movie. And thankfully, they retain the original track and just construct other additional around the sample. The composition by Bappi Lahiri (which was also ‘inspired’ by Mory Kante’s ‘Tama Tama’) was a rage in India when it released and the portion sampled in this song is the mukhda, hookline (obviously!) and one antara. Tanishk has rehashed this so well, I almost disliked it at first. He has used the song-break technique by stopping the song multiple times before actually getting to the hookline, something else which we hardly get to hear completely twice or thrice (or maybe more. I didn’t count!) But then, I realised that I had started liking the song. It happened spontaneously. One moment I was all about ‘Remakes are bad!’ and the next moment I was a freak dancing to a remake. Because it has been done very diligently, not to mention cleverly. Club beats have been added that really enhance the disco touch of the song, and the original voices have been muffled in such a way that actually does make the old song sound ‘old’! Tanishk has added very efficient beats to the hookline, like the electronic tabla. And the interlude, besides containing another interruption by Badshah, also contains a wonderful mandolin solo by Tapas Roy. The only tampering Tanishk has done with the original track is, he has added a new chorus to sing the hook, and it sounds pretty good too. Badshah’s rap does sound agitating at first, but Tanishk has enhanced that too with his nice electronic tabla beats. Ameen Sayani, the RJ of Binaca Geetmala, has done a voiceover, and the “been bajati hui naagin” part is particularly INSANE!!! Tapas Roy’s mandolin returns to play the hookline at the end of the song, and it sounds awesome then! An efficient remake!

Rating: 4/5


Badrinath Ki Dulhania is yet another feather in the cap of so many people. First of all, the composers, two relative youngsters doing so well in the competitive industry, Amaal and Tanishk, who have made two stellar songs each, and one newcomer, Akhil, who plays it safe in his debut. Next, the singers, who have really outdone themselves with their singing in this album! Dev Negi and Amaal Mallik for instance. After that, Karan Johar, because his productions always have enjoyable music, and he gets yet another successful album. Here is an album I would happily surrender my ears to. It is a kind of antidepressant album!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 86%

Final rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Roke na Ruke Naina > and then any order you like

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes: 04 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Badrinath Ki Dulhania) = 06

 

Which is your favourite song from Badrinath Ki Dulhania? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

RUNNING AHEAD OF STEREOTYPES!! (RUNNING SHAADI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Abhishek-Akshay, Keegan Pinto, Anupam Roy, Sandeep Madhavan & Anjana Ankur Singh
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Yadav, Shellee, Keegan Pinto, Sonal Sehgal, Tanveer Ghazi & Anas Ali Khan
♪ Music Label: Times Music / Junglee Music
♪ Music Released On: 27th January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 17th February 2017

Running Shaadi Album Cover

Running Shaadi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Running Shaadi is a Bollywood rom-com starring Taapsee Pannu, Amit Sadh and Arsh Bajwa in lead roles. The film is directed by Amit Roy, and produced by Shoojit Sircar. The film is about a young couple who establish a website that helps couples in love elope and get married. The concept sounds interesting, and though the movie has been delayed for like 3 years, it is finally seeing the light of day, probably due to Taapsee’s successful stint in ‘Pink’. Anyway, what we are concerned with is the music! So, the music is composed by four entities — two duos and two individuals. The composers leading the album, with three tracks out of the total of seven, are Abhishek-Akshay, who had composed for a Shoojit Sircar film previously, and it was ‘Vicky Donor’s, also their debut. After that, they scored one “song” for ‘Tere Bin Laden: Dead Or Alive’ (notice the double-quote marks around the word “song”). Clearly I wasnt impressed by both of their previous outings, except for the fact that I appreciate that their song ‘Rum Whisky’ became so popular (I found it overrated.) Hopefully, they’ve done something great in this album, because they’ve bagged the most number of songs anyone in the album has! Next comes Keegan Pinto, a debutant, who has composed two songs for the movie. Keegan is (was: he joined FCB Ulka on February 15th, when I’m writing this) the Creative Head of MTV channel and it is a pleasure to see him foray into Bollywood music composing. Hopefully he has something creative to offer! Anupam Roy comes next, whose Bollywood résumé already boasts of two films that are Shoojit Sircar productions, ‘Piku’, and ‘Pink’, and now a third one, so Happy Hattrick to him. Anyway, he imoressed in both those albums, so hoping for the same here, though he has just one song. Last up is yet another debutant, but this time it is a duo debuting together. Sandeep Madhavan & Anjana Ankur Singh have bagged one song in the album. Hoping that it is one of those multicomposer albums that makes you think again about whether the multicomposer trend really is bad or not, I am diving into this album wih a very open mind, ready for anything! Expecting quirky music, though, because of the theme of the film and its poster!


1. Pyaar Ka Test

Singers ~ Bappi Lahiri & Kalpana Patowary, Music by ~ Abhishek-Akshay, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

“Akhiyan ka, jo jalaye tu torch, dil mein lighting ho jaaye,
Jo tu aaye, nikat mere, bhar-pet loving ho jaaye,
Zulf ka shower khol de toh romance ki barkha barse,
Tere figure ke tukde ko mere jigar ka tukda tarse!”

– Manoj Yadav

The album starts off with a quirky song, as expected. Duo Abhishek-Akshay are helming this song and I must say, the result is something that will be horribly underrated, and dismissed as a bad song, when it isn’t so. Yes, even I had almost dismissed this song as a bad one, but when I got myself thinking, I realised that it can’t be bad if it sticks to the script and it is how it is, deliberately! Let me explain. The song is an entertaining listen, and when you hear it for the first time, you might not notice all its qualities right away. The composition is quite basic, like some weird Bhojpuri wedding song, in the mukhda, to the point that you almost switch the track, but that’s when the impressive part i.e, the antara arrives! The composition of this part has a wonderful 80s disco touch to it, and making Bappi Lahiri sing it increases the feel altogether! The hookline is basic in its structure too, and the song follows the duet template quite seriously, with alternate lines sung by the male and female singers respectively. That brings us to the vocals. As I mentioned before, the choice of Bappi Lahiri was an apt one, seeing as to how impressive he goes in the antara, and even otherwise, he sounds quite funny and quirky enough to make this song a funny one. Kalpana Patowary too, brings her husky voice to good use here, making a nice couple with Bappi da. Arrangements by the duo consist of harmonium-led synthetic sounds, emulating a typical Indian wedding which is never complete without that mandatory speaker that gives out a lot of muffled sound. I must say, the duo has done that bit of programming too well, with the voices recorded a bit unclear deliberately. And how can you make a wedding song and forget the brass band? In my favourite part of the song, the antara, Bappi Lahiri’s signature synth sounds like those claps and quirky sounds find their way into Abhishek-Akshay’s arrangements, and I’m impressed! But the first thing any layman will notice about the song, are its lyrics! Manoj Yadav has written them in such a childish and immature way, that you end up laughing! And hen you realise it is a deliberate degradation of lyrics quality. And that just brings up the image of the song in your eyes so much! 😀 Weird comparisons between lovers and other coupled things from everyday life have been drawn out so efficiently, and it’s just so hilarious! In ‘Housefull 3’s ‘Pyaar Ki Maa Ki’, we heard “Tu meri bread, main tera jam”, but here it goes a million steps ahead, what with “Tum hamari chidiyan hai, hum tumhare hain nest”, “Tum humare ludo ho, hum tumhare hain chess!” And though it sometimes sounds so, so, oh-so-cheesy, it never fails to make you laugh! That’s what a good humorous song should be like! Subtle humour, disguised in a very typical tune. Impressive arrangements and some nice disco touches make this one impressive, not to mention the hilarious lyrics!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Mannerless Majnu

Singer ~ Sukanya Purkayastha, Music by ~ Abhishek-Akshay, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

“Baatein meaningless magar din raat bakaiti jhaade,
Laaj sharam-less itna ke openly dakaiti maare!
Ho, mere mummy daddy ke hi, saamne humko taade,
Love ke naam pe saara bill yeh only humpe phaade,
Dil Toh shaitaan hai iska, naam ka bhola hai,
Pakka namoona hai piya, kaisa namoona hai piya,
Milgaya mannerless Majnu!!”

– Manoj Yadav

Abhishek-Akshay’s next song on the album is an upbeat and peppy number, which sounds like a kind of Mujra musically. The composition is so cute, I cannot explain in words! Right from the mukhda, to the very catchy hookline, to the amazing antara, the song is a very entertaining listen. The duo has done a great, great job on the composition, and all the notes have been strung into such a tune, that would definitely get anyone up on their toes. The line “pakka namoona hai piyaaaa.. haan, kaisa namoona hai piyaaaa” is so charming, it brings a smile on your face whenever it plays. The duo’s arrangements are just as entertaining, with the dholaks and tablas impressing big-time. The mandolin has been played in such a sweet tune, a loop that surpasses so many redundant instrumental loops we hear in today’s songs. Guitar chords sound awesome whenever they can be heard. Digital beats accompany the traditional instruments in such a wonderful way, that it is fun to hear their mélange. It makes the song very breezy, and makes for a very fun listen. Sukanya Purkayastha, who sang the female version of ‘Pani Da Rang’ from ‘Vicky Donor’ (not composed by Abhishek-Akshay, but by Ayushmann Khurrana), finally gets a strong song for her to showcase her versatility. She has sung the song so beautifully, her performance falls into the league of great singers like Rekha Bhardwaj, Sona Mohapatra and Nandini Srikar. I personally found her voice resembling the last name a lot! Nevertheless, her efficacious rendition should definitely win her awards, if the award shows are “careless” enough to notice such gems by mistake. 😦 Again, Manoj Yadav writes words that fascinate with their humour! New words like “Sharam-less” for “Shameless” and “Public-city” for “publicity” make the lyrics even more fun to listen to. Fun-filled to the core, this song should be noticed by people. Hats off to Abhishek-Akshay!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Dimpi De Naal Bhaage Bunty

Singer ~ Late Labh Janjua, Music by ~ Abhishek-Akshay, Lyrics by ~ Shellee

“Jaddo Dimpi de Naal Bhaage Bunty, Soni Minty nu leke bhaage Shunty!”

– Shellee

Abhishek-Akshay’s last song in the album turns out to be a Punjabi wedding song, for the making of which, it seems, they required very little extra preparation, as they already had the ready-made template “Rum Whisky” (Vicky Donor) to cheat from. The song follows the exact same template as that song did, but I still found this one listenable. The composition is thankfully a very happy-go-lucky one, though it is just a hair’s breadth away from the “Rum Whisky” tune. The hookline is really catchy, as it should be. (I must say, this duo is amazing at making catchy hooklines!) What’s a Punjabi song without a fast paced tune? This one is aptly fast paced, and it increases the likeability manifold. The mukhda is good, but after some time, it gets monotonous. The arrangements are he everyday Punjabi song arrangements, with tumbi galore. I’m surprised the duo has used very less dhols, so the song sounds very softly arranged in pieces other than the hookline, where the duo suddenly remembered that they had dhols at their disposal. Beats in the other parts are given by the strong bass that he duo has used in the song. Late Labh Janjua’s voice suits the song perfectly, and it is clear he was typecast very badly during his days. So many such songs he has recorded have released posthumously. His booming voice helps increase the repeat value of the song though. Shellee’s lyrics are quite nice, especially the hookline which sums up the job of the main characters well. And Shunty is such a sweet sweeeeeeeeet name! A templated but likeable song!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Bhaag Milky Bhaag

Singers ~ Sanam Puri & Sonu Kakkar, Music by ~ Keegan Pinto, Lyrics by ~ Keegan Pinto & Sonal Sehgal

“Daddy se yun hi na darr, daddy ko hai bas apni fikar,
Tu bhi toh Insaan hai, nahin hai tu Kisi ki medal,
Duniya ko bhool ja, duniya toh hai kal ki!
Bhaag Milky!! Bhaag Milky!!”

– Keegan Pinto & Sonal Sehgal

Keegan Pinto, enters into the album next with his first song, a feel-good song wih a country music vibe to it. The composition is one that instantly makes you happy, and the guitars really make you feel good. The mukhda starts off the song on a great note, and after the three songs by Abhishek-Akshay that had various Indian flavours to them, a Western song is much welcome. The hookline is very subtle, yet hard-hitting. (Note: Though they’ve named the song ‘Bhaag Milky Bhaag’, probably to resemble the movie ‘Bhaag Milkha Bhaag’, the song actually goes, “Bhaag Milky” only.) The first antara continues the Western country music feel, but it is the second antara that impresses much more, when Sonu Kakkar enters just to break into a very charismatic traditional Punjabi folk piece. Keegan’s arrangements are beautiful, guitars in particular. Drums accompany them as always, and very well. The Punjabi portion has a wonderful mehfil feel to it, with the tumbi and dholaks complementing each other fantastically! Overall, it is a great fusion of Western and traditional sounds. Both the vocalists render the composition very impressively, Sanam Puri sounding charming as ever, and Sonu Kakkar as raw and earthy as ever. Towards the end, both break out into a nice harmony, both singing with their respective styles — Sanam in a very Western, rockstar-like way, and Sonu in an earthy way. Keegan & Sonal’s lyrics are humorous in a subtle way. The composition seems so mature, that it will take some time to realize that the lyrics are actually quite whimsical. Though whimsical, they do carry a strong message. 🙂 Sweet and charming!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Faraar

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Keegan Pinto, Lyrics by ~ Keegan Pinto

“Paabandiyaan nahin ho jahaan, uss paar jayenge, faraar ho jayenge.. faraar ho jayenge!
Ikhtiyaariyan, nahin ho jahaan, uss paar jayenge, faraar ho jayenge, faraar ho jayenge!”

– Keegan Pinto

Keegan’s next song falls flat in front of his previous one, but is still pleasant nevertheless. The composition is quite predictable and there really is nothing new or innovative in it, which one would expect after so many good songs in the album! The mukhda starts relatively entertainingly, but the composition in the hookline is just so commonplace, it is difficult to get hooked and start humming. The antara too sounds very bland, and very commonplace. You can literally guess what is coming next. What’s worse, the song is six minutes long! The vocals by Jubin, Bollywood’s new Arijit, in that he’s getting atleast one song in every other film nowadays, are quite mellowed-down and miss the spunk he usually has. And his voice has been programmed as if he’s singing in a closed room and his voice is echoing from the walls. The arrangements are good, but again, very ordinary. The soft rock template usually does bore me, but not when it is done innovatively. Here, there is literally nothing other than that. Keegan’s lyrics are also functional, and carry the ‘Running Shaadi’ theme forward. One of the less entertaining songs of the album!

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Main Faraar Sa

Singers ~ Anupam Roy & Hamsika Iyer, Music by ~ Anupam Roy, Lyrics by ~ Tanveer Ghazi

“Jismon ki aanch mein bhi, khushboo sa laag hai,
Bheege hain Baal mere, boondon mein aag hai,
Sadiyan bitaa de yun hi re….!
Tu hai toh har kami, kaafur ho gayi,
Mutthi mein dhool thi, sindoor ho gayi!”

– Tanveer Ghazi

Next comes Anupam Roy with a romantic song, and I must say that’s quite late to put a romantic song on an album. Anyway, the song is a beautiful semi-classical composition, fusing magical modern notes with beautiful classical ones. The mukhda starts off with the hookline itself, and it is just mesmerising. However, the real magic comes in the antaras, when a beautiful classical tune takes over. Anupam has composed that part with a magic touch. Even though the song is so slow, it manages to take you over completely. As a whole, the composition is bound to get you listening to it over and over again. The arrangements are amazing as well. Starting with digital beats accompanied by acoustic guitar strums, the song then marvellously transports over to beautiful Indian plucked instruments. (Maybe ektara). The flute is really impressive! The vocals are just as spell-binding. Anupam’s voice has this magnetic aura around it that just makes you drown in it. On the other hand, Hamsika renders the classical touches splendidly, in a high-pitched voice that hits your heart directly. Lyrics here, aren’t by Anupam himself, but by Tanveer Ghazi, who gave us the brilliantly penned ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Pink) last year. Here too, his writing takes the form of a wonderful romantic song, getting sensuous too at places. Charming!

Rating: 5/5

 

7. Kuch To Hai

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Sandeep Madhavan & Anjana Ankur Singh, Lyrics by ~ Anas Ali Khan

“Kuch to hai, hawaaon ne Rukh jo badla hai,
Kuch to hai, bechainiyan si, darmiyaan bhi hai!”

– Anas Ali Khan

The final song on the album takes the form of another romantic song, composed by Sandeep-Anjana. The duo has made a quite ordinary composition, but it still manages to reach out and you enjoy it. The mukhda is beautiful, while the “ruk jaa yahiiii” hookline is marvellously composed. It is the antaras, though, that charm with their slow pace and grow on you like slow poison. It is commendable for the duo to have made that antara, as it is so detached from the breezy feel of the rest of the song, but still so impressive. Also, the duo stays clever and keeps the song’s duration just perfect. The arrangements are great as well. This time the rock has been executed slightly better, with drums pitching in, the guitars performing variations, and a BRILLIANT saxophone playing occasionally like a surprise. Vocals by Jubin are much more lively than his other song. Again, he sings the antara brilliantly. The lyrics by Anas Ali Khan, are soothing and relaxing, as is the music. A relaxing end to the album!

Rating: 4/5


Running Shaadi came as a pleasant surprise to me! I was thinking that the movie would have quite massy music that wouldn’t really be innovative, but actually, the music is just opposite! It is fresh and enjoyable. Abhishek-Akshay prove themselves with their three songs, while Keegan makes a smashing debut (okay, half of his debut wasn’t so smashing, but he other half definitely was!) Sandeep and Anjana too, impress with their song, and Anupam as always made a song that soothes your senses. An album made wih love amidst the race of  other albums releasing with it, which are trying to be as typical as they can!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 3.5 + 4.5 + 3 + 5 + 4 = 29

Album Percentage: 82.86%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Main Faraar Sa = Mannerless Majnu > Bhaag Milky Bhaag > Kuch To Hai > Pyaar Ka Test > Dimpi De Naal Bhaage Bunty > Faraar

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes = 04 (from previous albums) + 00 = 04

 

Which is your favourite song from Running Shaadi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THIS HUNTER KILLS WITH MELODY!! (HUNTERRR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Khamosh Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Vijay Maurya, Swanand Kirkire, Khamosh Shah & Azazul Haque
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th February 2015
♪ Movie Releases On: 20th March 2015

Hunterrr Album Cover

Hunterrr Album Cover

To hear the full songs of this album on Hungama CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Hunterrr is an upcoming coming-of-age / comedy Bollywood film, directed by Harshavardhan Kulkarni (the writer of “Hasee Toh Phasee”) and produced by Kirti Nakhwa, Rohit Chugani, Ketan Maru, Vikas Bahl, Vikramaditya Motwane Anurag Kashyap. The film stars Gulshan Devaiah, Radhika Apte and Sai Tamhankar in lead roles. The music of the film, naturally, comes with a lot of expectations, as always from a Phantom production. This time the music has been composed by a newcomer Khamosh Shah, so let’s find out what he has treated us to, here! 🙂


1. Hunterrr 303
Singer ~ Bappi Lahiri, Lyrics by ~ Vijay Maurya

Khamosh Shah kicks off his debut Bollywood soundtrack, with a visit to the 80s era of Bollywood, the era when the disco fever had taken Bollywood music by storm. And who better than Bappi da himself to get the privilege of singing a song of the genre which he is most known for?? You can call it somewhat of the title track of the film, or a nice, enjoyable disco dance number, but whatever you call it, it is guaranteed that you’ll be grooving to the beats of the song! The signature trumpets of the 80s have been put to very good use, and provide a catchy intro to the song. The female backing vocalists, annoying at places, could have been avoided, but I guess the song wouldn’t have resembled the 80s so much, had they not been there. The techno beats, which were a must to make the beats stand out, are brilliant. The composition is also pretty catchy, and I said, you won’t be able to stop yourself from dancing to it! The hookline has some female vocalists who sound a lot like Usha Uthup, and one wonders where she has gone, and also that she would have sounded awesome as a co-singer with Bappi da, who himself can be heard singing in a very care-free, casual attitude, as if he has been relieved of all his tensions. Though he does sound too (I mean TOO) old for this song at parts. 😂 Successful attempt by the debutant, to recreate the disco era of the 80s!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Chori Chori
Singers ~ Sona Mohapatra & Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Khamosh Shah

The old-fashioned sound effect of the tape recorder, makes for an interesting open into this sweet, retro-styled love song. Khamosh’s composition follows a very simple yet endearing path, attracting us more and more as it progresses. Arijit sings in a voice, that we rarely get to hear him in, what with him singing mostly intense romantic songs. (I think the last song of his where he sung in this manner was ‘Manwa Laage’ from ‘Happy New Year’.) Sona, with her easily identifiable voice which has that sharpness that instantly grabs your attention, impresses in yet another scintillating performance. In this song she gets a lesser chance to show nuances and complex aalaaps which she does in all other songs, but still excels, and in my opinion, overshadows Arijit, but only so much. Khamosh Shah, yet again brings back the past of Bollywood, with his wonderful arrangements. The numerous rhythmic ways he has played the instruments just stole my heart, especially the maracas (shakers). The backing vocals before the second antara do not fail to impress either! Khamosh also writes the lyrics in a cute, simple and sweet way, making you fall in love with the song even more. The fact that the song doesn’t sound like a mature love song, but more like a love song between two youngsters, says it all. Usually, a four minute love song is enough for me, but in this case, I have to say, that I wouldn’t have minded one more minute or so! 😊 Sona and Arijit come together for the first time, to make a sweet retro-styled number come to life! A simple but cute love duet! #5StarHotelSong!

 

3. Thaali Hai Khaali (Na Heer Na Hoor)
Singer ~ Nakash Aziz, Lyrics by ~ Azazul Haque

The next on the soundtrack is a fun, peppy number, sung very flamboyantly by the tapori singer of Bollywood (no offense, I just mean that he sings mostly tapori songs…But yes, he sounds awesome in his calm tracks too!) Nakash Aziz! The composition is quite fun, but at parts, it gets boring, making the listener lose interest. The great and quirky arrangements do make up for that, though. The weird interruptions by various instruments here and there throughout the song, really ensure that the listener is paying attention to them, and only them. They make themselves stand out as if demanding more attention from us. For example the techno sounds throughout the song, then the backing vocals that go “Tyaau tyaau tyau” If you closely listen to the lyrics (that is, if the arrangements fail to attract you) you can gather that it is all about food. 😂 This does make it a bit interesting and funny to hear. Coming to the best part of the song, it has to be without any doubt, Nakash’s rocking and energetic rendition of it. I felt that he has sung with all the expression he has inside him, and his voice makes yet another reason to hear this song, even though the composition may not succeed at times. The arrangements and vocals are the highlight of this song! Way to go, Nakash!

 

4. Naina
Singer ~ Khamosh Shah, Lyrics by ~ Azazul Haque

Khamosh himself comes behind the mic for the next song, a beautiful, breezy romantic number with just as beautiful lyrics. It starts off softly, slowly picking up pace as it moves forward. The composition is one that you’ll instantly develop a liking towards, and it calls out to you. Khamosh has equipped some great arrangements yet again, mostly having acoustic guitars leading, joined by drums and occasional strings. The harmonica interlude is wonderful, but the part of the song you must not miss at any costs, is the interlude before the second antara, where a beautiful sarangi piece will steal your breath. This track sounds odd in this soundtrack, after those three songs which weren’t really reflective of this era musically, but this song does bring the modern style of music in the album. Khamosh not only composes well, but sings just as well too! His voice suits his composition perfectly! This song would also be lapped up by youngsters, but more so than the Arijit track, because it has more of a contemporary feel to it. But again, it is all depending on the likes of the listener. Lyrics, as I said before, are great. Another great romantic track on the album! The debutant shows off his singing skills too, after displaying his composing and writing skills! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Bachpan
Singer ~ Amit Trivedi, Lyrics by ~ Swanand Kirkire

Amit Trivedi sings for Khamosh here, and the song he’s been given is a beautiful ode to childhood. Khamosh’s slow-paced tune haunts and at the same time, makes you emotional. His arranegements also help in increasing the emotional factor. Though not many, but whatever they are, they provide the required effect. Amit’s husky voice leads us through the composition, which starts off as nostalgic in the calm, pleasant way, but as it progresses, the way Amit’s voice expressions change, and the way the composition takes various turns, it starts becoming nostalgic in the sad and intense way. Again, the arrangements are mainly led by guitars, in the simplest way possible, but such that it will be the most effective. In the antara, the song reaches its peak, and at that point, you are sure to have goosebumps all over your skin. The orchestral strings supporting the guitars help to make the emotional factor stronger, somehow. Right after the antara, something weird happens. Usually in a song, the mukhda would be repeated, but here, after the antara, the song suddenly switches back to the calm-nostalgic mode, thanks to some soft piano notes. This aspect, I found pretty interesting! Though the song is more than five minutes long, one doesn’t experience any boring moments. Thanks to Swanand Kirkire, who is definitely, undoubtedly the star of this song, everyone is able to relive their cherished childhood, in just the five minutes for which this song plays. Each line brings back some memories. A song which is enough to make you nostalgic, and helps you relive those cherished moments of your childhood! Excellent lyrics by Swanand take the song to a whole new level! #5StarHotelSong!

 

6. Ye Naa Gade
Singers ~ Anand Shinde & Vaishali Made, Lyrics by ~ Vijay Maurya

A phone conversation between between two people in Marathi opens up this song, on a not-so-interesting level. You’ll have to hear that to get what I’m talking about. But when the actual song starts, it turns out to be an energetic, Marathi folk-ish number, which actually is pretty catchy. Anand Shinde, the father of Marathi singer Adarsh Shinde, renders the song with the correct amount of energy and zest. Vaishali Made, winner of Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Challenge 2009, supports him just as vivaciously, but in a voice that sounded a bit too high-pitched. Since the lyrics are purely in Marathi, it is not difficult to say that this song might just become huge in Maharashtra. In other states, it might not have the same response, and might be dismissed as a Marathi film song too! However, the best thing in the song has to be the dynamic arrangements and catchy composition by Khamosh. He has presented the Marathi flavour perfectly. Just as it is Marathi films, he has infused the same amount of tapori-ness in the song, and also used the proper instruments, beats and everything. If not the vocals or the tune, at least the beats might prove as a reason to hear the song for non-Maharashtrians. The hookline is (as it is supposed to be) the catchiest part of the song. The song ends the way it started, with the phone conversation. I would say, it is worth a try, if you want to get acquainted to the Marathi style of music!

 

7. Dil Lagaana
Singer ~ Altaf Raja, Lyrics by ~ Khamosh Shah

The last song on the soundtrack probably is the one which has the least to offer, in terms of innovativity. Altaf Raja has been roped in to do the honours with the vocals, and the song has also been composed in a very filmi Qawwali way, but one that sounds like an overdose of the 90s. Everything about the 80s-90s has been brought forward, but in a very dull and stale way. Even the hookline doesn’t have the ability to grasp the listener, which should be a must for a superhit song (and more so if it’s supposed to resemble the 90s!!) Altaf sings in his regular way, but even he fails to save the composition. Khamosh’s lyrics are full of shers and they are quite simple, too. Arrangements are good, and they also bring back the 90s successfully. The small interruptions by Altaf in English just sound cheap, as does his Americanized version of the hookline at the end. Not something to be very proud of. Pretty dull ending to the soundtrack!


Hunterrr sees a very promising debutant do wonders in his first soundtrack itself. The producers have selected great songs as per the movie, with only one song performing below average. Though it is not a type of soundtrack which will find a place on the whole nation’s playlists because of its uniqueness, each song does bring forward a different aspect, and this brings variety into the album. The result I got turned out to be way better than what I was expecting!! All in all, a very successful debut by Khamosh Shah! Surprisingly an enjoyable album!

 

Final Rating For This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Chori Chori > Bachpan > Naina > Hunterrr 303 > Thaali Hai Khaali > Ye Naa Gade > Dil Lagaana

 

Which is your favourite song from Hunterrr? Please vote for it below! 🙂