CRAZY LABEL VS DECENT COMPOSER DUO! (ARJUN PATIALA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa & Akash D
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Priya Saraiya, Benny Dayal & Akash D
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 26th July 2019

 

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Arjun Patiala is a Bollywood spoof comedy film starring Diljit Dosanjh, Kriti Sanon and Varun Sharma in lead roles. The film is direccted by Rohit Jugraj and produced by Dinesh Vijan, Sandeep Leyzell, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s first poster credited Sachin-Jigar for its music, but that culminated in the album jukebox crediting Guru Randhawa and Akash D alongside the duo. How they ended up there and for what, let’s see!


It’s not as much surprising as it is sneaky of the music label to add Guru Randhawa as a co-composer, along with the already capable Sachin-Jigar, in two songs out of their four. Starting with that note, we get a very dull sad song, Dil Todeya, the name of which is quite representative of my feelings after learning that there’s another person along with Sachin-Jigar composing some songs of the film. The song is the standard-issue Punjabi pop song, and surprisingly the only song sung by leading man Diljit Dosanjh, though the rest of the soundtrack does leave plenty scope for him to have sung! Nothing in the composition or arrangements shows that the song involves Sachin-Jigar in any way, but ironically the arrangements are solely by Sachin-Jigar, so maybe they are deliberately this typical, given that the movie is a spoof after all. The only interesting element in the song perhaps is the Qamancha/Kamancheh, an Armenian bowed string instrument related to the violin, performed here by Rasalila, and it sounds wonderful. The lyrics by Randhawa again are standard Punjabi pop sad song lyrics. Diljit renders the song with the required sorrow, but it’s nothing compared to his previous songs in ‘Udta Punjab’, ‘Phillauri’, ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’ and ‘Soorma’. Coincidentally, Sachin-Jigar were the first Bollywood composers to use his voice, back when he didn’t act in Bollywood, in ‘Pee Pa Pee Pa Ho Gaya’ (Tere Naal Love Ho Gaya) way back in 2012! Ah well, something has to be sacrificed at the altar of including Guru Randhawa as co-composer. Another coincidence (?) was that Guru’s debut or big break in Bollywood was in an album for which Sachin-Jigar did the original songs — ‘Hindi Medium’, which leads to the third coincidence — this film too was a Maddock+T-Series joint production! Want another coincidence? Sachin-Jigar were the first composers to use Randhawa in a film song, as a singer for a song he didn’t compose, ‘Lagdi Hai Thaai’ (Simran)! Phew!
The second song that the duo composes along with Randhawa though, fares much better, and this time, I contradictorily feel like the song sounds nothing like Guru Randhawa in terms of composition or arrangements! Also, when T-Series released the song, titled Main Deewana Tera as the opening promotional song for the film, they didn’t mention Guru as a composer. Some shady business going on in the crediting of this album. Anyway, Sachin-Jigar (and Guru Randhawa, apparently) create a funky party song (marketed as ‘Ek aur Remix gaana’ with the word ‘remix’ slashed out and replaced with the word ‘Original’) which throws you back to the duo’s own ‘Yeh Jawaani Teri’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), what with the whole R.D. Burman sound (the second soundtrack in a row which harks back to Burman’s music, without remixing it!) It also sounds like Pritam’s ‘Badtameez Dil’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani) owing largely to the wonderful trumpet solos (Kishore Sodha). Guru Randhawa sounds thankfully well in this one, and along with Sachin-Jigar, he manages to concoct a catchy composition, writes functional but stale lyrics and to top it all, Nikhita Gandhi ends the song with her stray line.
Sachin-Jigar’s third song is one that sounds entirely like something Guru would compose, but to my surprise (or no surprise at this point, since we’ve seen two songs composed by both of them together, both of which sound nothing like a collaboration between the two) Guru Randhawa isn’t a composer for this one! Crazy Habibi Vs Decent Munda ends up being catchy in parts only, Sachin-Jigar totally imitating Guru’s musical style in the beats, with a very heavy bass line in the hookline, which, by the way, has been composed very catchily. The other great attraction in this song is Benny Dayal’s Arabic interlude (which he has also written, apparently!) The song loses its appeal towards the second verse, though, but Guru’s rendition of Sachin-Jigar’s tune is not annoying, and thankfully keeps him out of his comfort zone, the high pitch, which unfortunately for his comfort, makes us uncomfortable as listeners.
Sachin-Jigar finally get one song without any apparent interference from the music label (except maybe choice of singer). Sachiya Mohabbatan turns out to be a song that seems like a mélange of two super-hit songs from Maddock Films’ last venture ‘Luka Chuppi’ — ‘Photo’ and ‘Duniyaa’. The tune resembles ‘Duniyaa’, while the arrangements resemble ‘Photo’. Again, the fact that the film is a spoof provides some background as to why the music too must have been made like this. Sachet Tandon, getting songs for other composers as a result of his ‘Bekhayali’ (Kabir Singh) gaining more popularity than its Arijit Singh variant, delivers the melody with finesse, his notes and the occasional grunge on point. The flute (Shirish Malhotra) and guitars (Kalyan Baruah) complement the melody well, and the trademark Punjabi pop beats make the song perfect as a spoofy one. The flute is actually what makes it sound like ‘Photo’ in the first place. Priya Saraiya, appearing in a Bollywood soundtrack after quite some time, pens a nice and sweet Punjabi piece, but nothing we haven’t heard before.
To end the album, we have the mandatory daaru from every film that contains a Punjabi lead character, and another mandate that dictates this song is that it is a T-Series Punjabi pop single by Akash D, who therefore becomes guest composer with the song Sip Sip, used as is in the album. Aditya Dev programs and arranges this one, in the most typical way imaginable, and Guru Bhullar along with the composer himself, renders the cheesy lyrics (also by the composer). The opening synth music especially is really banal, making you reluctant to continue at all. If you do manage to continue, however, you’ll quit soon anyway.


An album devoid of the usual quirks of a Sachin-Jigar album, maybe thanks to the dictatorship of the music label involved, this album does witness them give some temporarily enjoyable party tracks and one melodious romantic song, but nothing compared to their previous works with Maddock Films (Go Goa Gone, Happy Ending, Badlapur, Stree)!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 8 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 34

Album Percentage: 68%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Main Deewana Tera > Sachiya Mohabbatan > Crazy Habibi Vs Decent Munda > Dil Todeya > Sip Sip

 

Which is your favourite song from Arjun Patiala? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

KRIPAYA DHYAAN DE, YEH ALBUM SUNN LE! (LOVE PER SQUARE FOOT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sohail Sen
♪ Lyrics by: Gopal Datt, Anand Tiwari, Abhishek Dhusia, Sahir Nawab, Sumeet Suvarna, Abhiruchi Chand & Jamil Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 14th February 2018

Love Per Square Foot Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Love Per Square Foot is a Bollywood rom-com that premiered on Netflix this Valentine’s Day. The film stars Vicky Kaushal, Angira Dhar and Alankrita Sahai in lead roles, and is directed by Anand Tiwari, and produced by Ronnie Screwvala. The film’s music has been composed by Sohail Sen, back after a long time; his last was ‘Happy Bhag Jayegi’ in 2016. Let’s hope his musical style is intact and he delivers yet another enjoyable album!


Sohail Sen’s return to music composition after one and a half years doesn’t hold as much magic as his previous outings used to. That being said, this album takes some time to warm up to, and in the first listen, doesn’t create much of an impact.
Proceedings are kicked off by the entertaining Mumbaiya rap song Yatri Kripaya Dhyaan De, a tribute to all things Mumbai. The residents of the metropolis would feel a certain pride once they listen to this song, as will the train station announcers. The rap by Mumbai’s Finest (Abhishek Dhusia, Sahir Nawab & Sumeet Suvarna) is entertaining, a bit in the style of DIVINE, and thankfully fits snugly into the song. Lively beatboxing starts off the song, but the song kind of loses its connect in the initial one minute or so, until it settles into its place. After that, it is really enjoyable. I love the way Sohail introduces a nice Maharashtrian-flavoured bhajan segment towards the end, and a nice Ganpati dhol taasha rhythm in the interlude. The vocalists seem to be newcomers, but do a great job in conveying the youthfulness of the city.
Udit Narayan, the evergreen singer, the only singer who hasn’t seemed to age, returns after quite some time, with Ishq Mein Bajti Hai Ghanti, an upbeat wedding song led by the quintessential brass band. Sohail also composes it in a typical 90s tune, to help Udit get more comfortable, probably. It still works thanks to the catchy rhythms and composition and of course, the vocals! Nothing particularly new here, though. The lyrics are funny though, comparing love and marriage.
Benny Dayal and Shivangi Bhayana get the weakest song of the album, Chicken Dance, a song whose composition falls all over the place, though the initial adlib is entertaining. The electric guitars do not work at all, and it ends up being a clumsy party number with no recall value. Benny thankfully has the magnetism in his voice to help listeners keep listening, but Shivangi doesn’t have that quality yet!
Aashiyana is a beautiful romantic song, the only song of the album whose lyrics (by Abhiruchi Chand) make a huge impact on the song. Altamash Faridi and Tarannum Malik, regulars on Sohail Sen albums, know how to do justice to his music, and so the results in the vocal department are amazing. I commend the composer for not going for Arijit though there was a huge scope, because Altamash’s voice brings a freshness to the song, though slightly over-nasal. Tarannum sings her part beautifully too! The antaras are the best parts of the song, composed in a tune that is easily hummable. The reason the lyrics stand out so much, is the conversational way they have been written, seeming like a tribute to Gulzar, who is also mentioned in the song!
Maqbool Hai, the other song by Altamash, is a nice mellow number, starting off with an operatic piece, and seguing into a very Bhatt-ish but very hauntingly catchy melody that wins your heart over. Again, Altamash sings his heart out, creating beautiful effects. The Rahman touch is audible in the song as well, and somehow it sounds like a song that resembles songs from 2008-2009. It still sounds fresh though.
Rekha Bhardwaj ends the album with two versions of a classically-based melody Raaz Apne Dil Ke, a song that fares better and seems more lovable in its Indian Version, with arrangements that complement the composition — tablas, played in a soothing rhythm, and a wonderful tanpura setting the mood for a wonderful classical listen. The Western Version sounds like the composition is uncomfortable with the clumsy “doo doo doo da” with which the song starts, not to mention the digital beats in the background. Not the very best examples of fusion, but there is still a hint of classical music (sarangi) here too, which makes it bearable, at least.


Sohail Sen has done better than this previously, but overall, the album is enjoyable, with a mixed variety of songs, and none being utterly bad!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 7 + 5.5 + 8.5 + 8 + 8 + 6.5 =

Album Percentage: 72.86%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aashiyana > Maqbool Hai = Raaz Apne Dil Ke (Indian) > Yatri Kripaya Dhyaan De > Ishq Mein Bajti Hai Ghanti > Raaz Apne Dil Ke (Western) > Chicken Dance

 

Which is your favourite song from Love Per Square Foot? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

JASLEEN’S HICHKI SUCCESSFULLY OVERCOME! (HICHKI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Jasleen Royal
♪ Lyrics by: Jaideep Sahni, Raj Shekhar, Neeraj Rajawat, Aditya Sharma & David Klyton
♪ Music Label: YRF Music
♪ Music Released On: 20th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd March 2018

Hichki Album Cover

 

Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes


Hichki is a Bollywood film starring Rani Mukerji, Sachin Pilgaonkar, Shiv Subramanian, Supriya Pilgaonkar, and directed by Siddharth P. Malhotra, produced by Maneesh Sharma. The film is about Naina Mathur, a teacher who has Tourette Syndrome, a neurological condition that results in uncontrolled motor tics. Well, Rani Mukerji can pull off almost any character she is given, so there’s no doubt that her performance will be great. The music of the film is by Jasleen Royal, which is great because a) this is her first solo album, b) it could be the turning point of her career if she makes good use of this opportunity, and why won’t she?? This is another one of those cases where YRF has roped in a relatively new composer for a film that doesn’t need massy music, but the music ends up being really memorable. So let’s hope Jasleen gets over her own ‘hichki’ of recycling her songs, and present something innovative and new!!


Jasleen Royal’s first solo album is mainly full of songs sung by one singer, and all the songs have a kind of spirit in them that is perfectly suitable for a small and sweet Yash Raj movie trying to create social awareness. What starts he album off, is Harshdeep Kaur’s Oye Hichki, a song that can be regarded as the title song, and whose hook actually sounds like the motor tics Rani Mukerji’s character has to deal with in the film. The song is a charmingly upbeat number, and Jasleen’s clever use of strong percussions helps give it an Indian touch, not to mention the Punjabi wedding-ish antara, something close to what Jasleen has composed before, but not quite the same, because of the grounded sound. Jaideep Sahni’s lyrics are good, but not the usual quirky stuff that is characteristic of him. In the Soul Of Hichki, Jasleen indeed takes a more soulful turn, but surprisingly enough, this change is brought about by the replacement of the upbeat percussions by electronic sounds. The antara is amazing here, more soulful, and the sarangi brings a wonderful touch. Harshdeep carries the vocals beautifully in both versions, both of which seem way too short; we wish they were longer.
The only non-solo song on the album arrives next, a groovy Tamil-Hindi rap song, Madamji Go Easy, with the funky vocals of Benny Dayal, and supported by a Tamil rapper David Klyton. The backing chorus of rappers do well, too — the “Vasco Da Gama...” portion is very entertaining. The Tamil rap sounds so refreshing! On a whole, the song is a great theme song to be picturized upon a bunch of teenage miscreants. Jasleen’s arrangements too, are entertaining; she uses all the right techno sounds to make this song enough commercial, although never losing the distinct classy nature of the song. Raj Shekhar writes with a quirky style we never got to see him use in his previous ventures.
A string of motivational/inspirational numbers follow, as is always the case in such movies! But we aren’t complaining; Royal delivers her career’s best songs in this portion of the album.
First up, Khol De Par by Arijit Singh is a charming song, that starts with an old-school composition, the likes of which never fail to impress. Jasleen herself does the “Doom Tak Doom” in the beginning, and you get hooked to the song right away. The hookline soars, with a nice rhythmic thump that helps your head nod throughout the song. The antara is wonderful too, especially the part starting from “Sabko Manaane Ki…” It just steals your heart. Arijit as usual, is charming with the vocals, but Jasleen’s acoustic arrangements are wonderful too, making the song as charming as it turns out to be. Raj Shekhar’s lyrics are fantastic, especially in the antara.
Shilpa Rao’s Phir Kya Hai Gham reminds me of a Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy song; I can’t remember which, though! Here too, Jasleen nails it with the rhythmic backing vocals and the cross line “Haule Haule Sab Hoga..”, each stanza ending with a high-spirited “Phir Kya Hai Gham!?”, followed by a nice humming. The song might be the weakest of the album, but you cannot deny the fact that it still is insanely catchy! The motivational intent of it works really well!
My personal favourite of the album, Teri Dastaan, is a melancholic number, probably the one that plays when the protagonist doesn’t know what to do next. Jasleen herself sings this one, and her distinct voice works wonders in this song. Her composition is so mature, and the piano in the background sets the ambience for this pensive melody. Here too, an interlude with a sarangi is a must-hear. The lyrics by Neeraj Rajawat are the highlight here, and probably the best lyrics of the album too.
The song features in a shorter instrumental version too, called Naina’s Theme, and boy, will the theatre-goers get goosebumps whenever this theme plays. Again, Jasleen sets the pensive mood immaculately, with the piano, and also with her humming, that sounds amazing. It ends the album on a memorable note!


Jasleen Royal overcomes the “Hichki” in her (till now) repetitive compositions by presenting a platter of varied songs from diverse genres, and she succeeds and how!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 8.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 7.5 + 9 + 8 =

Album Percentage: 82.14%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Dastaan > Soul Of Hichki = Khol De Par > Oye Hichki = Madamji Go Easy = Naina’s Theme > Phir Kya Hai Gham

 

Which is your favourite song from Hichki? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1 (ITTEFAQ, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR, RIBBON, RAM RATAN, SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA & JULIE 2 – Mini Music Reviews)

November 2017 Round-Up #1

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1

This round-up covers the following albums of November 2017 releases: ‘Ittefaq’ by Tanishk Bagchi, ‘The House Next Door’ by Girishh G, ‘Ribbon’ by Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai, ‘Ram Ratan’ by Bappi Lahiri, ‘Julie 2’ by Rooh Band, Viju Shah & Javed-Mohsin, and ‘Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Zain-Sam-Raees, Rashid Khan & Anand Raj Anand.

The ones that haven’t been covered in this post will be included in the next round-up for November, or will be written about in a separate post all for themselves.



♦ Intense & Intriguing, Ittefaq Se: ITTEFAQ Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Anjaan, Tanishk Bagchi & Groot
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 23rd October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the song: Saavn
Buy the song: iTunes


The only song from this film is a Atmos-Pop remake of “Raat Baaki” (Namak Halaal), named Ittefaq Se. Tanishk Bagchi is back to his remaking streak, after some nice original music in “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” with partner Vayu. He keeps the original song intact, and that’s good, and he mysterious vibe that accompanies the song goes well with the setting of the film. The beats are nice as well. The only place the song lacks is the vocals, where Jubin sounds like he always does, and is starting to sound monotonous now, and Nikhita eats up her words while producing an over-stylish voice. I would have preferred Neeti Mohan on this one. The change in lyrics from “Pyaar Se” to “Ittefaq Se” actually fits in really well!


A good remake, that called for better voices behind it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Song: 3.5 

Song Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 38 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Ittefaq) = 39


♦ As Always, Romance Predominates: THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR Music Review

♪ Music by: Girishh G
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Vayu Srivastava & Chen-Yu Maglin
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 16th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the album: Saavn
Buy the album: iTunes


Girishh G starts the album off with a dulcet Mithoon-with-Bhatts-like melody, O Mere Sanam, that impresses because of its complexity, like every other Mithoon melody. Benny Dayal sings in his trademark husky tone for romantic songs, and the hookline is something that gives you goosebumps. Girissh’s piano is the highlight of the arrangements, while Shakeel Azmi’s lyrics are beautiful with a delicious assemblage of Urdu words. Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai is aptly disturbing, demonic as it is, and the composition is frankly very bad. It is Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics that make the song disturbing, and not because it is scary! Because it is cringeworthy. Suraj Jagan spoils the vocals, his co-singer Shilpa Natarajan could’ve done just fine without him. Xiao Xiao Ma is a haunting Chinese lullaby-ish number, which is good as long as it lasts, volatilizing shortly afterwards. The last track, The House Next Door, is a short instrumental piece, which again has the problem of not being captivating, despite the wonderful use of strings.


Not the best album for Girishh to debut in Bollywood with!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 1.5 + 3 + 3 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध।< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Mere Sanam > The House Next Door = Xiao Xiao Ma > Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai

 



♦ Cute Little Ribbon: RIBBON Music Review

♪ Music by: Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Sagar & Puneet Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 31st October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Mikey McCleary presents a Sufi rock song, Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai, to start off the album, and also introduces a new singer Aniket Mangrulkar, a singer who is a much better tuned rock singer than the much-in-demand Amit Mishra. The composition by McCleary is irresistible, especially in the hook parts. The rhythms are spot on, and the lyrics too, are meaningful. Sagar Desai, the second composer, comes with a dulcet number, Har Mod Par Umeed Hai, which couldn’t have been better sung by anyone other than Jasleen Royal with her sweet voice. The composition is slow and jazzy, and so it takes some time to love, but it is at par with the first song on the lyrics front.


This seems to be the season for short and sweet (and most importantly, script-driven) soundtracks.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai > Har Mod Par Umeed Hai



♦ Bappi’s Music Ratan Has Lost Its Shine!: RAM RATAN Music Review

♪ Music by: Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Deepak Sneh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


So, I only heard this album because the music composer was Bappi Lahiri, and I should’ve realised he is so irrelevant these days as far as composing goes. Nevertheless, here’s the “review” — a highly uninterested one, at that. Nand Lala starts off thinking it is ‘Bairi Piya’ (Devdas), but then goes off into a ‘Maiyya Yashoda’ (Hum Saath Saath Hain), and then becomes cheesier than any Krishna song ever. Palak’s cheap vocals do not help. The composition is bad, as expected, and Bappi doesn’t give anything great in the arrangements either. Instead he adds a cringeworthy English “rap” in the interlude! 😣 Nagada Nagada is the most dated 2000s Gujarati dhol mix, and Raja Hasan and Bhoomi Trivedi are made to sing like pop artists making a Garba album to be sold outside temples. Yeh Hai Dance Bar is as cheesy as its name — and Bappi is singing it himself. He tries to make it full of techno sounds but it flops. Jal Jal Jal Rahi Hain Raatein, starts off as if it could be the best of the album, with the irresistible sensuous tabla beats that R.D. Burman used in ‘Jaane Do Na’ (Saagar), but as soon as Sadhana starts with her outdated voice, it goes downhill. Mohammed Irfan too, sings like Bappi Lahiri! It turns out to be the most cringeworthy song on the album.


Bappi Lahiri clearly has lost his Music Ratan!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 1.5 + 0.5 + 2 = 6.5

Album Percentage: 32.5% 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Why don’t you just skip it? I might be the only one in the world to have had the honour of listening to it!



♦ Reprise Versions Zaroor Sunna: SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA Music Review

♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Raees-Zain-Saim, Rashid Khan & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kunaal Vermaa, Shakeel Azmi, Kumaar & Gaurav Krishna Bansal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of the three versions that Jogi appears in, any layman would pick Shafqat’s version as the best – owing to his seasoned voice and classical prowess, and amazing nuances, not to mention Arko’s clever usage of wedding sounds at the beginning. The duet version is spoiled by Yasser trying to ape Shafqat’s singing style, and Arko’s typical duff rhythms with harmonica. The female version by Aakanksha Sharma is good too, where Aakanksha sounds like a better version of Palak Muchhal. The overall composition, though, is typical of Arko now, and he needs to move on from this. It is the sister of ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ and ‘Nazm Nazm’. Kaushik-Akash-Guddu compose Main Hoon Saath Tere for JAM8, another song that relies on the company’s previous success, ‘Zaalima’. The digital tune is tweaked, and Harshdeep gets kicked out, and some notes undergo permutations and combinations, and voila! We get this song. The hookline reminds me of some song, but I cannot remember at all which one! Arijit’s singing is very dull and he seems asleep, but Shivani Bhayana’s female version is pretty good, with different arrangements. The song falls flat in the antara though. It is Pallo Latke by newcomers Raees-Zain-Saim, which surprisingly becomes the song of the album, as an individual song (not including the various versions). As a remake of a Rajasthani folk song, it is surprisingly good, and will do until we get to hear some real Rajasthani folk music in “Padmavati”. Jyotica Tangri sounds amazing here, sweeter than she does in her Neha Kakkar avatar. Yasser spoils the song again, along with Fazilpuria’s annoyingly interrupting rap. The Dr. Zeus-esque tumbi seems out of place in a Rajasthani song though. Rashid Khan returns after a loooooooooong time, to give another typical romantic song Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki, again in three versions, out of which once again, Shafqat’s steals the thunder. The composition is nothing special, it is Rashid’s usual sweet as sugar tune which is oh-so-predictable. Asees sounds sweet in her version, while newcomer Asit Tripathy also does well. Asit’s version scores high because of the beautiful Rajasthani arrangements — the ravanhatta being most prominent. The lyrics resemble those of ‘Main Rang Sharbaton Ka’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and are good enough until they become very cringeworthy with the Hinglish portion. Last on the album is veteran Anand Raaj Anand’s angsty rock song (in two versions) Mera Intkaam Dekhegi about a boy warning his girlfriend (ex-girlfriend??) that if she rejects him, she will have to see his revenge. Oh, the melodrama. She should just say, “Oh alright, let me get my camera too so the world can see it too.” Krishna hurts the ears with his painful rendition, and Anand’s was skip-worthy right from the beginning.


An ensemble of composers bring five pleasant, but heard-before songs, and are forced to make innumerable versions of them, to make sure we never forget them. No wonder the newcomers steal the cake. 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 1 = 37

Album Percentage: 67.27%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jogi (Shafqat Version) > Pallo Latke = Jogi (Duet) = Jogi (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Asit) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Shafqat) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Female) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Male) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Krishna) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Anand)

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 39 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana) = 40

 



♦ Raunchy Diaries: JULIE 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Viju Shah, Rooh Band, Atif Ali & Javed-Mohsin
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan & Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 18th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Rooh Band & Atif Ali’s debut in Bollywood starts off with quite a corny title song Oh Julie, which is good enough as far as the arrangements and rhythm go, but the vocals and lyrics pull it down; stuff we have heard time and again. Their second song Koi Hausla Toh Hoh, also sung by their leading vocalist Anupam Nair, is the everyday Pakistani pop, something even the Bhatts would resist from including in their albums now, with staid lyrics like “Saanson Ka Chalte Rehna Hi Toh zindagi nahin”. Veteran composer Viju Shah’s stint of three songs for this album is devoid of much electronic disturbance. The romantic song Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai, is a typical 90s melody, in which the singer Mistu Bardhan sounds like Sadhana Sargam does in her live concerts. The voice is harsh to the ears. The reprise version Aise Kya Baat Hai, in Palak Muchhal’s voice, is better only because the voice is more ear-friendly. Otherwise, the song is just as flat and dated. His third song happens to be a raunchy item number, Kharama Kharama, sung by Pawni Pandey, and which surprisingly fares much better, thanks to the irresistible South Indian rhythm. Again, it is bogged down by a typically 90s composition, and the lyrics obviously. Javed-Mohsin, nephews of Sajid-Wajid, present the last song, Mala Seenha, sung by Mamta Sharma, a tedious rehash of their uncles’ item songs with the singer. Again, the rhythms are the only worthy parts of the song.


An album that you will automatically avoid.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 + 3 = 15

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kharama Kharama = Mala Seenha > Aise Kya Baat Hai = Oh Julie > Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai = Koi Hausla Toh Hoh



 

Hope you enjoyed this Round-up! Second one coming soon!!

SACHIN-JIGAR STAY GROUNDED!! (BHOOMI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Anvita Dutt, Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 28th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd September 2017

Bhoomi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bhoomi is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller starring Sanjay Dutt, Aditi Rao Hydari and Sidhant Gupta in lead roles. The film has been directed by ‘Mary Kom’ and ‘Sarbjit’ fame Omung Kumar, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Sandeep Singh. The film is a revenge saga revolving around a father trying to avenge his daughter, who is a rape victim. Now, this filmmaker Omung Kumar, has been known for making loud and sobby dramatic films, but also, both of his previous films have had amazing music albums as well, featuring in the Music Mastani’s Top 20 Albums of the respective years they released in. While ‘Mary Kom’ featured music by newcomers Shashi-Shivamm, and ‘Sarbjit’ featured a nice mix of T-Series-affiliated artists (Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Jeet Gannguli), and newcomers Shail-Pritesh, this time Omung raises the bar by roping in highly busy composers Sachin-Jigar. Now this is probably the first time I remember seeing the duo compose for a drama like this, so it’ll be something new for them and for us. But expectations are still sky high because of Omung! So let’s see how far above the bhoomi (ground) Sachin-Jigar’s music flies!


1. Trippy Trippy

Singers ~ Neha Kakkar, Benny Dayal, Brijesh Shandilya & Badshah, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar’s fifth album of the year starts off with a song I can’t believe they have made!! The song is a club song with a composition that I would expect from someone like Badshah or Yo Yo Honey Singh, and not Sachin-Jigar! The composition is very weird, and not in the good way. It is basically just a typical item song composition, and coming from Sachin-Jigar, that is quite shocking. The male portions especially, are very disappointing. Those are actually the parts that could’ve been the best. Also, the antara is quite similar to their own “Teri Mahima Aprampaar” (Entertainment). The hookline is just Badshah belching out the words in an expressionless tone. Here, it is evident the composers were trying to experiment, just to make the song sound a bit better, but sadly, they couldn’t make those experiments work. For example, the flute and dhols arrangement was clearly done to increase the quirkiness of the song, but it backfires, sadly. The beats too, aren’t addictive or anything — it is just a straightforward song to listen to and forget. The vocals by Neha Kakkar are very disappointing after that amazing rendition of hers in ‘Ghungta’ (Babumoshai Bandookbaaz)! Here she doesn’t even sound half as energetic as she did there! Benny Dayal and Brijesh Shandilya (and of course Badshah) are used very less, and their portions are just repeated over and over. Good, because those parts are very irritating. Also, the ‘Hicky hicky’ sung by Neha is kind of irritating too! The lyrics by Priya Saraiya are the usual fare we get to hear in such songs, and nothing really makes sense. A song that must be a mistake!!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Lag Ja Gale

Singer ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Next up, the composers present a romantic song, very saccharine-sweet, and following a Sufi template to the tee. Again, it is shocking that Sachin-Jigar’s music gets so predictable, but let’s not complain just yet. The composition here is very beautiful, and doesn’t take time to like. The mukhda and antara are especially very beautiful. It is the hook line “tere mere pyaar nu“, that is very predictable and sounds out of place, in an otherwise beautiful song. I can’t remember which, but it sounds an awful lot like a very famous 90s song too. The presence of Rahat almost impeded me from liking the song a lot. His voice has been making songs heavy and inaccessible these days (Like it did for ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ from ‘Baadshaho’), but thankfully, Sachin-Jigar have employed his voice prudently, and not overdone the high pitch or the aalaaps, and it comes out very beautiful. The “Rab Varga” loop gives the song a very unconventionally abrupt start, and it’s one of the best effects of the song. The arrangements by the duo are the trademark Sufi dholaks and tablas, but because of the composition, you bear with it. Also, a wonderful sarangi keeps you engaged throughout the song! The major part of the song also has acoustic guitars, making it a kind of fusion between Sufi and acoustic guitars. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are very cute, and very simple-sweet. A rare song by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan that will be known for simplicity! I wish there was some innovation though, as it has turned out very predictable!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Will You Marry Me

Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt

After two slightly disappointing songs, Sachin-Jigar get to make a wedding song for the film. Now, this song seems to be one of those disappointing songs which grow with time, because that’s what happened with me. I found it a bit weird at first, but in the successive listens, I started to like it bit by bit. Now this is purely subjective, but I still think Sachin-Jigar didn’t try to make this song (or any song from this film) complicated and layered, and that’s why this is happening. The songs are straightforward, something we hardly get from Sachin-Jigar, and that’s why we might be disappointed at first. Anyway, the composition is a peppy wedding number, complete with Punjabi phrases and effective Indian wedding arrangements. The hookline seems very cheesy at first, but becomes catchy later on. The beginning is quite entertaining, with those dialogues, and after that, Jonita’s weird programmed voice singing something gibberish, I believe. That is one of the best parts of the song. The female chorus too, is very entertaining, and the word “ponga pandit” specifically caught my interest. Lyricist Anvita Dutt has utilised it so nicely. As the hookline gets closer though, the song increases its heard-before-ness, and it becomes an ordinary wedding song by the time the hookline arrives, though it is catchy. The antara is no better. Vocals are entertaining, especially Jonita’s, and the female backing vocalists. Divya gets the same part to sing twice, and he sounds good too, but it is the composition of his parts that sounds too flat. Arrangements consist of digital beats accompanied by Indian wedding instruments like the shehnaai (wonderful interlude on that!), dhols etc. Anvita Dutt’s lyrics are very innovative at parts and very ordinary at parts. A confusing song! You don’t know whether you like it or not!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Kho Diya

Singer ~ Sachin Sanghvi, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Now comes what I’ve been expecting from Sachin-Jigar ever since ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ released and I loved all the songs. After that, frankly, I didn’t love any Sachin-Jigar song as much as I loved the song ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’, in any of their albums that released. But now, in ‘Bhoomi’, they come up with a deserving opponent for ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ with this song, another ghazal, and in my opinion, even better than ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ itself. I’ll explain why. The composition is genuinely ghazal-like, as in an actual, authentic ghazal! Though that song was also a ghazal, it did have minor Bollywood-ish touches. But in this song, Sachin-Jigar do not bow down to peer pressure in order to make a Bollywood-friendly song. The song still does carry many nuances of Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s style of composition though. I sincerely hope SLB catches this song and ropes Sachin-Jigar in for his next project! The antara is one of the most beautiful compositions I’ve heard in a while. The arrangements too, are amazing, with soothing tablas, divine manjeeras, beautiful Guitars, and scintillating strings that provide an atmosphere of love and divinity. The water drop sounds, so characteristic of SLB, sound beautiful. Sachin Sanghvi says this is his first solo song in Bollywood (He also sang a duet with Shreya Ghoshal in ‘Jayantabhai Ki Luv Story’ before this), and he does his solo debut in a smashing manner! His voice has that amazing metallic touch, which people might mistake for programming, but it is his raw voice! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are yet again, one of the most brilliant she’s written this year. A lovely number that is surely going to stay with me for a long time!!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Daag

Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

The pathos enters now, as it always does. Of course, because this is an Omung Kumar film after all. There has to be an overtly dramatic sad song. And that happens to be this song. Now, the composition is really good, if I have to judge as per it’s genre. But as an individual song, this doesn’t take me anywhere. After the magic that the former song had me possessed with, this song falls flat! The duo try to lift it up with an intriguing and mysterious arrangement (this guitar riffs do the trick), but how much can a song be able to be saved by good arrangements if the composition isn’t appealing? Sukhwinder adds to the tedium, with his heavy voice, and it sounds very uncomfortable. Even though the composition is so poignant, it all sounds fake due to the overcooked nature of the music and vocals. The hookline itself too, is very tedious. It sounds like something that should have released around 2008. Sadly, this one isn’t memorable at all!

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Jai Mata Di

Singers ~ Ajay Gogavale & Sanjay Dutt, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani

To wrap up the album, Sachin-Jigar present a devotional song. Now Ganeshotsav has ended, and Navratri is about to start, and with the film opening just one day after Navratri starts, it seems an apt decision to include a song entitled ‘Jai Mata Di’ in the album. Now, the song is primarily a very dramatic devotional song again, to make it fit with Omung Kumar standards of drama. However, it fares a bit better than that one, thanks to the divine touch. The composition is amazing, and Sachin-Jigar mould themselves into a very trademark Ajay-Atul mode to compose this one. Actually, if Ajay-Atul had composed for the ‘Sarkar’ series, and the chants would’ve been ‘Jai Mata Di’ instead of ‘Govinda’, then this would have been the perfect background score for the ‘Sarkar’ franchise. To add to the Ajay-Atul feel, Sachin-Jigar even rope in Ajay as the lead vocalist. As always, he aces the song. Sanjay Dutt starts the song with a mantra, bt his interventions throughout the actual song when he sings “Jai Maa Jai Maa’, sound better. The arrangements are good, and Especially the strings are amazing. Other sounds like the tabla, and the pathos-filled composition make it sound like yet another SLB song, a la ‘Gajanana’ (Bajirao Mastani), and ‘Dola Re Dola’ (Devdas). This song isn’t something to enjoy with your earphones, but something to experience in theatres!

Rating: 3.5/5


Bhoomi is a great example of an album composed by talented composers, but which suffers due to their inexperience in the genre of drama. Sachin-Jigar have composed for drama films very less; they usually go for rom-coms or musicals, but in this one, their discomfort is visible while composing for such a film. They still do try to add their own elements into the album, like the quirkiness of ‘Will You Marry Me’, which diffuses into thin air later on in the song. The best song in definitely ‘Kho Diya’, which I’m sure you will agree with, and so might they themselves. Anyway, it is one of those rare occasions where Sachin-Jigar disappoint, and it will surely pass!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 5 + 3 + 3.5 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kho Diya > Lag Ja Gale > Will You Marry Me = Jai Mata Di > Daag > Trippy Trippy

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhoomi? Please vote for it below! Thanks!! 🙂

TWO GENTLEMEN WHO HARDLY EVER DISAPPOINT!! (A GENTLEMAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu, Priya Saraiya & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th August 2017

A Gentleman Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


A Gentleman is an upcoming Bollywood action comedy, starring Sidharth Malhotra, Jacqueline Fernandez, Suniel Shetty and Darshan Kumar in lead roles. The film is directed by Raj Nidimoru & Krishna DK and produced by Fox Star Studios. The film features Sidharth Malhotra in a double role, one being Sundar Susheel, and the other ‘Risky’. Hence the tagline of the film, ‘Sundar Susheel Risky’. The music of the film is given by the go-to music composers for Raj & DK, Sachin-Jigar. Going by the music of ‘Shor In The City’, ‘Go Goa Gone’, and ‘Happy Ending’, I’m sure this one’s also going to be a treat for people who love quirky music, and the genre of action comedy would give amazing song situations as well! Sachin-Jigar’s discography this year boasts of as many as seven film albums (with ‘Hindi Medium’ being a multicomposer one), and this one is the third to release. ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ remained my favourite album of the year until Pritam’s gigantic ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’ released. I can just hope that this one follows suit and becomes another favourite of mine this year!


1. Disco Disco

Singers ~ Benny Dayal & Shirley Setia, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Aaja ve hila denge hum aaj angana,
tere naal karke beat drop nachna,
Dil disco disco bole saari raat SAJNA!!” 

– Vayu

Sachin-Jigar’s third album of the year starts off with a very filmy disco song. Is filmy bad or good? Let’s find out. The composition is very catchy, especially the cross line that goes “Aaja Ve Hila Denge Hum Aaj Anganaa“. That part sounds so much like a retro number. The hookline is a typical Bollywood fare, but still manages to hook the listeners. I, for one, found this song more instantly appealing than any of the others on the album (because they took time to grow). The mukhda and antara follow suit, and don’t let the interest of the listener waiver. The major reason you are hooked to the song till the end, must be the short duration. Sachin-Jigar keep the song at a crisp 2:47, neither too long nor too short. The arrangements are great: the disco-esque feel comes out through the nice bass,drums and guitars, and a totally unexpected tumbi (Tapas Roy). The tumbi is what actually makes the song sound very experimental. It gets a nice solo portion in the interlude and towards the end. The vocals are entertaining; Can Benny Dayal ever disappoint in a club number? I love how he pronounces “sajna” as “sajjena“! Sachin-Jigar help Shirley Setia get her first Bollywood song, and despite everything against her on social media, she really handles the song well, and Sachin-Jigar with their genius thoughts, know how to use her voice to the best effect — in a club song! However, she does mumble a bit in the antara, but I guess the song called for that. Vayu’s lyrics are the usual Hinglish lyrics of Bollywood, but work quite well in the filmy song. A totally filmy disco song!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Baat Ban Jaaye

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Priya Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Hum dono aur yeh saari raat, sharaabi ho jaaye toh,
Band ho kamre mein hum do, aur chaabi kahin kho jaaye toh!
Toh baat ban jaaye!!” 

– Priya Saraiya

Here onwards in the album, things get a bit more Sachin-Jigar-ish, in that you take more time to get accustomed to the song and like it. The time may be two listens, three listens or even more, but the song is actually are wonderful once you listen to them, with close attention to the music. This one here, is a beach party number, and again, it has a bit of a retro touch. It starts off with a very contemporary vibe, the composition flowing like a romantic song. However, it takes an unexpected turn in the cross line (“hum dono aur yeh saari raat“) where, if you pay close attention to the music, a retro vibe kicks in. The composition for the hookline is a trademark Sachin-Jigar one, and makes you groove instantly, especially the hoots after the words “baat ban jaaye” have been sung. The antara is where the song loses pace and we lose interest; that composition is quite heard-before. Luckily enough, this song is short too, which makes the cross line come back soon enough. The arrangements are fantastic here, and suit as a beach party number. Acoustic guitars start the song off, giving the freshness to the song, as a beach number should be. The retro vibe I talked about consists of amazing guitars played in a retro manner. The digital beats are more heavy in this song, and quirky sounds decorate the song. The vocals are good, Siddharth Basrur leading the way in getting the listeners hooked. However, Priya Saraiya seems a bit too much autotuned here, and it loses the charm of her actual voice. Her lyrics too, are an ordinary fare, but suit the situation well, especially the hookline. A party song that seems ordinary, but will grow!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Chandralekha

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani & Jonita Gandhi, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Maari tuney aisi entry, hil gayi poori country,
Mere dil pe dent permanent pad gayi, nazrein jo mili,
Hadd se bhi zyaada cute tu, mere karmon ka fruit tu,
Koi hai gagan mein toh heaven jahaan se aakar tu giri!”

– Vayu

The next song throws us back into the years, with a characteristic rock and roll/hard rock vibe to it. It slightly resembles what Sachin-Jigar had done in ‘Yeh Jawaani Teri’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), but in a more Westernized manner. The composition again, takes time to grow, and till then all you can really focus on is the music. The guitars and drums are groovy as expected in a rock and roll song, but of course, Sachin-Jigar add a surprise element every time, and here, it is that sensuous saxophone, which sounds amazing every time it plays. The composition is good too, and like I said, it just takes time for you to catch on. The hookline is the mukhda, making it very short yet again. Two antaras follow, and also an interlude by Jonita. I loved the effect Sachin-Jigar have given to the last line of each antara — “Mud Mud Ke Na Dekha“, and “mujhe ek bhi paise ka”. There’s another amazing saxophone solo in the interlude before Jonita’s portions, and that’s even more impressive. The characteristic piano played in that retro manner, is mind blowing too. The vocals are amazing. I mean, how can Vishal Dadlani fail to crank up the energy? His husky voice is all you need to make this song entertaining. Jonita gets a very small part to sing, which is more like an interlude, but she nails it, in the traditional ‘Bollywood girl’ ‘I’m-Not-Interested’ manner. Vayu’s lyrics are fun as well, and kudos to him for using a name like Chandralekha for the girl, and also to Sachin-Jigar for fitting it into the tune so perfectly! A retro rock song that is really stress-busting!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Laagi Na Choote

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shreya Ghoshal, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Iss tarah chaahun tujhe,
Chaahun bhi toh tujhse main,
Ik pal ko bhi door na reh sakun..
Chaahe judaa,tere mere, raaste hain magar,
Aa main manzilein jod doon!
Rishta sa hai yeh, judne lagaa jo,
Chahoon kabhi na yeh toote!
Laagi na choote… Laagi na choote!”

– Priya Saraiya

After three upbeat numbers, and after much thought about whether the album does indeed have a soft and mellow number or not, here pops up a romantic song. Actually, this song was the last to release, so the makers successfully kept the romantic song a secret till the very end. The song falls into the category of ‘Slow Poison’ romantic songs — as you can tell, the song does take time to grow again! However, this time, the amount of time it takes is relatively less, thanks to the amazing composition! It has shades of Sachin-Jigar’s own ‘Thoda Thoda’ (Jayantabhai Ki Luv Story), but is way more intense. The mukhda is very trademark Sachin-Jigar, and the way the female portions are composed in the lower octave, is also, very characteristic of Sachin-Jigar’s previous works. It increases the magic manifold. The hook is something you just can’t forget soon! It has been made to stun us, and stun it does! The flow of the song is just so powerful, you are attentive till the end. Again, a short duration helps that to happen; your attention doesn’t wander somewhere in the middle. The arrangements are minimal and digital beats make up most of the background of the song. But the piano at the beginning and throughout is just so captivating, that you can’t dislike it. The guitar in the interlude also sounds unconventional. As for the vocals, Arijit and Shreya always make a good pair, and this time, Arijit takes the high portions while Shreya quite expertly handles the low portions, a role we see her taking up quite rarely. Well, Sachin-Jigar even made Rekha Bhardwaj (who is know for her beautifully high-pitched voice) to take up an amazing low-pitched voice in ‘Mileya Mileya’ (Happy Ending) and ‘Judaai’ (Badlapur), so I guess it’s just an innate trick that they use! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are good too, and she keeps them simple and sweet, avoiding heavy philosophical ideas. A beautiful romantic song, with nothing new, but really has you hooked!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Bandook Meri Laila

Singers ~ Ash King & Jigar Saraiya, Rap Performed by ~ Sidharth Malhotra & Raftaar, Lyrics by ~ Vayu, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

“Aaye haaye haaye, yeh goli daayein baayein jaaye,
Har disha mein yeh visphot kardi ae,
Jaaye jaaye jaaye, jiya na jaaye jaaye jaaye,
Meri jaan pe yun chot kardi ae,
Seene mein tuney, bullet utaari toh,
Udey jugnu haan, udey jugnu,
Le gayi dil ko, kudi tu shikari,
Bana Majnu main, bana Majnu!
Bandook meri Laila!”

– Vayu

Now this was the song everybody was waiting for ever since the motion poster of the film had released. It is described by the makers as an action song, and an action song it is! The song is probably some of the most addictive stuff to have released in the recent years. The hook has had everyone grooving to it for a long time. I don’t know why, maybe because of high expectations, the song seemed very flat the first time I heard it. However, with every subsequent listen, it grew more and more. The composition is addictive; the mukhda is awesome, and the hookline is world-famous now. The rest of the song is mostly rap. Now, about the rap. The rap by Sidharth Malhotra seems very odd, and it seems like a publicity stunt. Earlier this year, Sachin-Jigar made Parineeti sing a ghazal ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), and she aced it. However, here Sidharth seems a bit dull, and when Raftaar performs his rap, you can tell the huge difference between both of them. Of course, Raftaar is a professional rapper and that’s the reason, and I feel he should’ve gotten to sing the entire rap. The ‘Ban meri Laila‘ hooks are very addictive, and the way they sing ‘Laila!!‘ after that line is amazing! The arrangements are international sounding, and very impressive. It falls into the Tropical house genre which Pritam introduced earlier this year with the ‘Raabta’ title track. The EDM is highly impressive. It starts like a Chainsmokers track, and gets better than any Chainsmokers track as it progresses! The action theme is brought out amazingly through the arrangements. Ash King as the leading vocalist, does a fabulous job; it’s been a long time since we’ve heard him in such a groovy song! And Jigar Saraiya sounds great on the hookline. Vayu’s lyrics are fun and interesting as well. The song has a proper international touch to it, but it could’ve been better without Sidharth’s rap! 

Rating: 4/5


A Gentleman is yet another Sachin-Jigar album that doesn’t disappoint. It’s so tough to have an album in which all the songs have repeat value, and especially for an action film. Thankfully enough, Sachin-Jigar and Raj & DK always make a good team, and all of their albums together have been quirky and cool, not to mention catchy. And such albums are the ones that become chartbusters right away. After ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’, Sachin-Jigar provide another wholesome album with ‘A Gentleman’! Sachin-Jigar are two gentlemen who hardly ever disappoint!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 4 + 5 + 4 = 21

Album Percentage: 84%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Just listen to the album! 🙂

 

 

Which is your favourite song from A Gentleman? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOT A VERY IMPORTANT ALBUM!! (VIP 2: LALKAR – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sean Roldan
♪ Lyrics by: Raqueeb Alam
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 26th June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th August 2017

VIP 2: Lalkar Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


VIP 2 (Lalkar) is an upcoming Tamil film that has been dubbed into Hindi, starring Dhanush and Kajol, directed by Soundarya Rajinikanth and produced by Dhanush and Kalaipuli S. Thanu. It is an action comedy, and a sequel to 2014’s ‘Vellailla Pattadhaari’. Knowing nothing about the first film or its music, except for the fact that it had been composed by talented young composer Anirudh, I’m diving into this album. It has been composed by Sean Roldan, another relatively new composer in the South, who I’ve heard has composed really good music for ‘Power Paandi’ earlier this year. Let’s hope he does the same for his first technically Hindi album!


1. Life Of Raghuvaran – Chal Re Raja

Singers ~ Rahul Nambiar & Yogi B, Backing Vocals ~ Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan

Sean Roldan starts the album with a rock song that doesn’t quite impress. The composition is all over the place, very hard to grasp, and understand. The hookline too, is literally very odd and weird. It reminds me of a same kind of song from ‘Kabali’, which was mediocre as well. The pulsating arrangements at least provide some entertainment in the song. Sean Roldan manages to create an enticing and hard-hitting rock rhythm, and the electric guitars (Josh Mark Raj) and drums (Ramkumar Kanakarajan) especially have been played amazingly to ensure that followers of heavy metal would love this song. Sean fuses this with folk instruments like the thavil (Hariprasad). The vocals are not quite welcoming in the song either; they are very crude, and supposed-to-be full of attitude, but it comes across as fake. The English rap sounds like an unwanted interruption in the proceedings of the song. The antara is better; its tune has a kind of Carnatic touch to it, or so I felt. (“Phir Se…”) The lyrics, or at least those that were intelligible, seem to be an inspirational and motivational song slash title song. Not a very enticing rock song, but the arrangements are splendid!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Angel Of Raghuvaran – Tu Mili Hai

Singers ~ Abhay Jodhpurkar & M.M. Manasi, Backing Vocals ~ Vasanth, Sean Roldan, Sudha & Ravi G. 

As soon as this song starts, it reminds me so heavily of ‘Jadoo Rawan Rawan’ from ‘Kabali’. The composition is based on the same raag, I guess. The composition itself is that kind, which haunts you too, but doesn’t leave a lasting impact on your ears. As long as it plays, it sucks you in and you find it impressive, only to forget it right away after it is over. It still is a very good composition; it’s just that it sounds so heard-before, and way too heavy to hear again. I see that Roldan has tried to infuse a kind of Tango-like rhythm, to fuse it with the Carnatic composition, but it fails. The arrangements are heavenly; the strings (Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra) are ravishing, while the twinkly sounds are just marvellous. The flute (Vishnu Vijay) and the strings are what upholds the arrangement though. Drums (Ramkumar Kanakarajan) and trumpets (Jaigopi & Ben) increase the multidimensionality of the arrangements. The vocals are functional; Abhay Jodhpurkar does well as the male singer, but M.M. Manasi sounds kind of out of place here, with her thick voice. The lyrics are the same old romantic lyrics that we find in these songs. A good composition, but too many times heard-before!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Torture of Raghuvaran – Main Ga Raha

Singer ~ K.G. Ranjith, Backing Vocals ~ Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan

This song sounds interesting right from the beginning, where it starts off in a kind of humorous way, and right enough, it opens up into a hilarious song about men singing about not wanting to get married! The Carnatic backdrop of the song makes it all the more funny to listen to, and the composition too, seems to be Carnatic-based. The hookline is instantly likeable, and cute. The backing vocalists (Shenbagaraj, Aravind, Deepak, Jithin Raj & Narayanan) do well, and increase the comic value of the song. They complement the lead singer, K.G. Ranjith, who sounds a lot like Ayushmann Khurana, very well. The arrangements are fabulous. The traditional wedding brass band (Ben & Jaigopi) has been played against the backdrop of wonderfully rustic Carnatic folk music, complete with nadaswaram (D. Balasubramaniam), and the wonderful kuthu-style percussion (Two Man Army), which actually suits this song. I pity how Bollywood misuses and overuses that rhythm. The lyrics are extremely funny too. An enjoyable song!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Raghuvaran Vs. Vasundhara – Doori Zara Banake

Singers ~ Benny Dayal & Shaktishree Gopalan, Backing Vocals ~ Maria Roe Vincent & Sudha

This song sounds like a face-off between men and women kind of like ‘Thug Le’ (Ladies Vs. Ricky Bahl). The composition starts off quite abruptly, and doesn’t actually suck you in until Benny’s lines come in. The arrangements are beautiful! It starts off like a retro funk song with trumpets/brass instruments, and nice digital sounds. It later escalates to a nice and beautiful violin-oriented song in the interlude, where the Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra shows its wonderful skills yet again. The Guitars by Sean Roldan are very impressive too. The composition after the interlude is still below par, and doesn’t really hook you still. The two vocalists do well, especially Benny Dayal, who is incidentally the only Bollywood singer on this soundtrack. The lyrics make the song sound like it is a kind of face off between the two lead characters. Good with its arrangements, but falls flat with the tune!

Rating: 3/5

 

5. Vasundhara – The Empress Arrives

(Instrumental)

This instrumental is quite a grand one, for the entry of Kajol’s character. The feel that strikes you right when the song starts with those trumpets is that she’s a villain from a 1970s Bollywood film, whose music is composed by R.D. Burman. But then those EDM beats arrive and make the song even more interesting. A mysterious ‘Pink Panther’-esque portion follows, which is hinged on just the trumpets (Jaigopi). There is nothing much to hear here, except the mysterious yet whimsical sound of it all.

Rating: 2.5/5


VIP 2 (Lalkar) is yet another dubbed album that we will hear and forget. Forget the dubbed aspect of it; I’m sure it won’t be a memorable album even down south in its original language! Sean Roldan, I’ve heard great things about, but sadly, my first encounter with his music was not all that great! Not a very important album! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 2.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 62%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Torture of Raghuvaran (Main Ga Raha) > Angel of Raghuvaran (Tu Mili Hai) > Raghuvaran Vs Vasundhara (Doori Zara Banake) > Life of Raghuvaran (Chal Re Raja) = Vasundhara (The Empress Arrives)

 

What is your favourite song from VIP 2 (Lalkar)? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂