A WEDDING TO DREAD!! (VEEREY KI WEDDING – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Farzan Faaiz, Jaidev Kumar, Ashok Punjabi & Meet Bros.
♪ Lyrics by: Chandan Bakshi, Deepak Noor, Devendra Kafir, Ramkesh Jiwanpurwala, Kumaar & Faaiz Anwar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 27th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 2nd March 2018

Veerey Ki Wedding Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Veerey Ki Wedding is a Bollywood comedy film starring Pulkit Samrat, Kriti Kharbanda and Jimmy Shergill. The film is directed by Asshu Trikha and produced by Rajat Bakshi and Parmod Gomber. The film’s music album contains music by Farzan Faaiz, Jaidev Kumar, Meet Bros and Ashok Punjabi. Let’s dive right in, I have no expectations as such from this album..!


So the album doesn’t start out as bad as expected; Mind Blowing, though suffering from an extreme case of Mika-ate-the-words-again syndrome, has an enjoyable South-flavoured rhythm by (newcomer?) Farzan Faaiz, with the ‘Chinta Ta Chita’ (Rowdy Rathore) rhythm being used for propelling the song further into the masses’ hearts. The backing chorus sounds so bad, it’s actually good. The typical horns are there too, so everything you need in a generic kuthu song is there — I just wish the lyrics (by two people.. quite talented, it seems, writing lines like “Maana Milky Milky Badi Hai Teri Kalaai“.) and singer were different!
Farzan’s other song Na Kasoor is a staid melody that isn’t bad, but isn’t good either. It’s more like an “Oh, it’s over already? When did it start?” song. While he borrowed the rhythm from “‘Chinta Ta Chita” for his first song, Farzan tries to make this one sound like “Jashn-E-Bahaara” (Jodhaa Akbar), and to that effect even ropes in Javed Ali for the vocals, and jingles bells in the background. Sadly, it turns out to be a disaster because he insists on including sounds like breaking of glass and other “modern” sounds. It’s just a mishmash of sounds that don’t go together. It’s like eating fish with tomato ketchup. (No offence if you do.)
Jaidev Kumar’s Hatt Ja Tau, a convenient remake of the Haryanvi folk song of the same name, is much more enjoyable, mostly due to Sunidhi’s powerhouse vocals. The musical arrangements sound fresh here, but Devendra Kafir writes lyrics that would make you blush. The composition too, being so happy-go-lucky, helps to make you ignore the lyrics, and Jaidev’s cheerful arrangements are fun too.
Another bad song on the album is given by Meet Bros. Talli Tonight, from the name itself you can tell that the song is doomed. Somebody called Deep Money (forgive me if he’s some sensation) sings the song very uniterestedly, while Neha Kakkar sings in a manner I’ve never heard her sing in — utterly bored and sleepy! The wannabe beats do not make you want to get up and groove, rather they would make you skip the song. Meet Bros’ rap is just cringeworthy. Or was that Deep Money?
The best song of the album, only because the others are so cringeworthy, is Ashok Punjabi’s Veerey Ki Wedding, which is essentially a 90s wedding song, that was destined to release in 2018. Navraj Hans provides the necessary spunk to the song, and the arrangements (dholaks, harmonium, tumbi) help make it fun and enjoyable. The ladies’ chorus led by Saloni Thakkar is also enjoyable. The backing vocalists though, sing so high pitched, as if they’re in some 90s song.


Some composers picked up from the middle of nowhere make this a wedding you should be dreading!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 5.5 + 7 + 5 + 7 = 30.5

Album Percentage: 61%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Veerey Ki Wedding = Hatt Ja Tau > Mind Blowing > Na Kasoor > Talli Tonight

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 13 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Veerey Ki wedding) = 14
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NOT TOO JUNGLEE, BUT JUST RIGHT!! (DIL JUUNGLEE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Anand-Milind, Sharib-Toshi & Abhishek Arora
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arafat Mahmood, Guru Randhawa, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Vayu Shrivastav, Devendra Kafir & Abhiruchi Chand
♪ Music Label: T-Series / Pooja Music / Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: The music hasn’t released as a full album
♪ Movie Released On: 9th March 2018

Dil Juunglee

Listen to the T-Series songs: Gaana

Listen to the Pooja Music songs: Gaana


Dil Juunglee is a Bollywood rom-com starring Saqib Saleem and Taapsee Pannu in lead roles. The film is directed by Aleya Sen and produced by Jackky Bhagnani and Vashu Bhagnani. The film’s music is by multiple composers — Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Sharib-Toshi and Abhishek Arora. All of these composers have given something listen worthy in the past, and their style of music suits the romcom genre very well, so it’s probably going to be a fun music album.. let’s see!


Now, this album is somehow split between two music labels — T-Series, and the newly-conceived Pooja Music (belonging to Vashu Bhagnani’s Pooja Entertainment) whose digital marketing is being done by Sony Music. The makers probably wanted a remake of ‘Gazab ka Hai Din’ to feature in the album, but since its rights were with T-Series, that song had to be on T-Series as well, right? Because, obviously! And so I guess the Guru Randhawa song was a bonus add-on, like a ‘Buy one get one free’ kind of deal. So yeah, that’s how I guess this album ended up being on two different music labels. Anyway, since that has nothing to do with the music, let’s move on!
The first song on the T-Series part of the album happens to be composed by Guru Randhawa, along with co-composer Rajat Nagpal, the composers of ‘Ban Ja Rani’ (Tumhari Sulu) and ‘Suit Suit’ (Hindi Medium). While his previous songs in Bollywood have been rehashes of his pop singles, Nachle Na is an entirely original song, and no prizes to guess that it is his best and least contrived-sounding song in Bollywood.. (At the moment of writing this review, ‘Kaun Nachdi’ from “Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety” hadn’t released, which I now believe to be his best yet.) The beats are groovy, and the electronic loop, though harking back to ‘Aa Toh Sahi’ (Judwaa 2), is quite fresh-sounding. Vocals are good, and I’m surprised Neeti Mohan, of all singers was chosen for this song; she does a brilliant job, and surprises me at the same time. It is the lyrics that fall flat.
Now of course, since Guru Randhawa didn’t remake his own song, the music company had to call in someone who could remake some other song. So we have the more-than-part-time remake artist Tanishk Bagchi presenting Gazab Ka Hai Din, a remake of the song with the same name from ‘Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak’. I must say, he has done a good job providing the padding around the old hook; the mukhda is especially beautiful, but the antara is forgettable. But the addition of the old hook sounds so contrived, the beauty of the song ends there. For me, the mukhda of this song is the only memorable part! I wish he had been allowed to build a new song after this mukhda and not borrow from an old one! Jubin and Prakriti sound functional as always; nothing great in either of their renditions. The strings during the hookline are beautiful, they keep your interest intact through the boring parts of the composition. I also noticed that Tanishk has written the lyrics as close as possible to the old song, thereby keeping a small touch of it alive even in the new composition.
However, Tanishk’s other song Beat Juunglee, which features in the Pooja Music part of the album, is an amazing and instantly catchy one, and though he uses the iconic “Yaahooo!” from Shammi Kapoor’s ‘Chahe Koi Mujhe Junglee Kahe’ (Junglee), I’m happy that he hasn’t been made to recreate that number, because his original composition in this song is so insanely catchy!! Armaan Malik was the best choice for this, and the results show brilliantly. Prakriti Kakar gets not much to do, but does well in her one or two lines. Most insane though, is the programming by Tanishk, which has been getting better day by day. The electronic loop which starts the song is crazy and so are the percussions and horns throughout the song. Vayu’s lyrics are always entertaining and they are just that here as well. It just goes to show you how well Tanishk can actually compose when given the freedom. (As if last year’s ‘Shubh Mangal Saavdhan’ wasn’t proof enough!)
Sorry for rambling about that song, but the next song, by Sharib-Toshi, Bandeya, deserves just as much praise. Now this composer duo hasn’t been in the picture for a long time. And by in the picture I mean the way Tanishk is constantly in the picture, every month. The last song they composed was in the recently released “Fukrey Returns”, and now they return with another Punjabi song, this time a sad song sung by Arijit Singh. The composition is soulful, the arrangements heart-warming and the lyrics by Devendra Kafir amazing. The composition has the feel of Anu Malik’s ‘Mere Humsafar’ (Refugee) but the similarity is only in the first line of the hook. Arijit himself is quite at ease with this kind of a song, and is his usual soulful best.
The second best song of the album, after ‘Beat Juunglee’, has to be Abhishek Arora’s Dil Jaane Na, an amazing fusion track that starts off as a soft romantic number, but segues into a pumped-up electronic number with a groovy beat to it. Seasoned voices like Mohit Chauhan and Neeti Mohan are the perfect choice for the song, and they deliver well. I love the way composer Abhishek Arora makes the seamless transition from the soft portions of the song to the upbeat ones, and not just once but numerous times throughout the song. All in all, this song is a treat for people who like light and fluffy music!


The album was “Juunglee” after all, but I loved the Pooja Music part of it much, much, much more than the two songs on the T-Series label. Some things are just meant to be less “Juunglee” and hence less likeable than others!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 7 + 9 + 8 + 8.5 = 39

Album Percentage: 78%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Beat Juunglee > Dil Jaane Na > Bandeya > Gazab Ka Hai Din > Nachle Na

Which is your favourite song from Dil Juunglee? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 10 (from previous albums) + 01 = 11

DECEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP (FUKREY RETURNS, FIRANGI, TERA INTEZAAR & MONSOON SHOOTOUT – Mini Music Reviews)

It is time for my Round-Up for December 2017, which is slightly delayed due to me being so busy, but better late than never, right?

December 2017 Round-Up

This Round-Up includes the following music reviews:

1) Fukrey Returns – Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, Gulraj Singh, IshQ Bector, Shree D & Laxmikant-Pyarelal

2) Firangi – Jatinder Shah

3) Tera Intezaar – Raaj Aashoo

4) Monsoon Shootout – Rochak Kohli, Viveick-Mayur, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry

The music review for “Tiger Zinda Hai” will be posted separately.


♦ Fukrey Returns, But Ram Sampath Doesn’t! – FUKREY RETURNS Music Review

♪ Music by: Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, IshQ Bector, Shree D, Gulraj Singh & Laxmikant-Pyarelal
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Late Anand Bakshi, Aditya Sharma, Satya Khare, Raftaar, Rohit Sharma, Arsalaan Akhoon, Shree D, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba & Vipul Vig
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 16th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 8th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


So Fukrey has returned. Sadly, the man behind “Fukrey”s enjoyable music, Ram Sampath has not returned, and after his underwhelming stint in ‘Raees’, he doesn’t get a chance to bounce back with a franchise that was initially his. Anywho, let’s judge on what we have been given.
Prem-Hardeep, the original composers of ‘Kala Chashma’ before Badshah remade it in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’, get a chance now, to ruin somebody else’s song. Laxmikant-Pyarelal’s ‘O Meri Mehbooba’ (Dharam Veer) gets ‘remade’ into Mehbooba, a banal club song which starts and ends with the Fukras being rejected by a random girl in the club, who happens to be singing in Neha Kakkar’s voice. Yasser Desai gets one line that repeats over and over again, and it is frankly the best line of the song. Raftaar’s rap is too stereotypical. Jasleen Kaur Royal’s Peh Gaya Khalara, though fitting into her now-overused Punjabi dance number template, is quite enjoyable, with the sweet vocals by herself and Divya Kumar, Akasa Singh & Akanksha Bhandari accompanying them. The arrangements are what make the track more enjoyable, and also the quirky lyrics.
Familiar territory is entered in Ishq Bector & Shree D’s semiclassical Raina, which, though quite soothing, gets tedious due to its length (it is the only song on the album over three minutes long, and goes up to over four minutes long!) The arrangements help propel it forward though, and also Shree’s vocals. Shaarib-Toshi enter the Bollywood scene after a long time with a delightful Punjabi melody, Ishq De Fanniyar. The male version by Shaarib is great, but the Female Version has all the feels, hence scores higher. The beautiful melody seems like a wonderful sequel to the first movie’s ‘Ambarsariya’. The lyrics are sweet as well, not to mention amazing accordions in the arrangements.
The techno sounds come along with the last three songs, bunched up together, out of which two are by Sumeet Bellary (composed for ‘Fuddu’ last year), and one is by (another person who re-enters Bollywood as a composer after a loooooong time, longer than Shaarib-Toshi), Gulraj Singh.
Sumeet’s two songs rely on weird techno gimmicks, which fail to propel the songs forward. Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai is a quirky friendship anthem, but is pulled down by lack of catchiness in both music and composition. Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai is like a title song, but gets all over the place in no time. The arrangements are slightly better here. Both songs are sung by Gandharv Sachdev, wit Shahid Mallya joining him in the latter song, and aren’t all that well sung.
Gulraj does well in his title song, Fukrey Returns, with a nice catchy musical loop, and heavy use of brass and techno sounds which makes his song sound even better. Siddharth Mahadevan on the vocals is a bonus.


Not as great as the first movie’s album, but still a commendable album considering the amount of new talent on there. But nevertheless, I wish Ram Sampath had returned!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 68.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishq De Fanniyar = Ishq De Fanniyar (Female) > Peh Gaya Khalara = Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai = Raina = Fukrey Returns > Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai > Mehbooba

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 43 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Fukrey Returns) = 44


♦ Quite A Desi Album! : FIRANGI Music Review

♪ Music by: Jatinder Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Devendra Kafir, Ashraf Ali & Krishna Bhardwaj
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


The song with almost the least amount of Punjabi words (second only to ‘Gulbadan’, which comes later on in the album) in its lyrics, Oye Firangi, starts the album off, and Jatinder Shah steals your heart right away. The charming melody immediately gets you grooving — thanks to a little EDM twist in the hookline — and though it is very simple, it is amazing thanks to the programming, and Sunidhi’s marvellous voice. There comes a British-era ballroom style orchestral portion at the end, but I wish the composer had extended that into another antara instead of ending the song with it! Another charming but heard-before melody, Sahiba Russ Gayiya, starts from where ‘Channa Mereya’ ended, with a similar structure and arrangement. Rahat’s voice is a boon to the song, and it’s the first song of his in a long time that doesn’t get on my nerves.(Ahem, ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’!) I love the way he pronounces the hookline. The Unplugged Version sung by Shafqat Amanat Ali, is funnily named ‘Sahiba (Male)’, as if Rahat’s version wasn’t by a male singer. The song itself is an improvement on the original, in that we get to hear Shafqat’s impeccable aalaaps, and though the choice of Shafqat doesn’t make it sound less like a Pritam song in general [Shafqat is just as much of a Pritam camp singer as Rahat is!] it surely does sound less like ‘Channa Mereya’, because the electric guitars have been toned down. Acoustic guitars play the larger role here. However some factors make both versions balance out at the end.
If ‘Sahiba’ had ‘Channa Mereya’ written all over it, Tu Jit Jawna has ‘Bhaag Milkha Bhaag’s title song all, and I mean ALL over it! Daler Mehndi, who I wish had sung the BMB number too, sings this one, and so it is quite bearable, but otherwise, it falls flat and sounds hollow in its emotion. It is also lyrically a counterpart to ‘Oye Firangi’, except Daler paaji doesn’t call him a ‘Firangi’ (foreigner), while Sunidhi did.
Gulbadan is a Qawwali-esque number, sung by Mamta Sharma. Good to hear her sing a different kind of song, though I’m sure the video will be the same kind of Bollywood ‘item number’. The hookline is greatly composed, with amazing arrangements by Shah, but again, falling into the too much tried-and-tested category of arrangements. I guess the best that comes out of this song is hearing Mamta Sharma’s gentle voice, because she thankfully hasn’t been made to sing in the annoying loud voice of hers.
But the album’s best is the wonderful folksy number, Sajna Sohne Jiha, which transports you back to the Punjab of the olden days. Wadali Bros’ Qawwali ‘Ve Sone Diya Kangna’ has been given a nice reinterpretation by Shah, and it works so well. The rhythms at the beginning really bring out the song’s folksiness, and Jyoti Nooran’s strong voice helps propel it to the finish line, where it emerges the winner compared to the other songs of the album!


A very desi album to the film ‘Firangi!’

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sajna Sohne Jiha > Sahiba Russ Gayiya (Shafqat) > Oye Firangi = Tu Jit Jawna = Gulbadan = Sahiba Russ Gayiya



♦ No Intezaar for This Album! : TERA INTEZAAR Music Review

♪ Music By: Raaj Aashoo
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 11th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


After a long time (or is it the first time?), one single composer gets a chance to compose an album for a film starring Sunny Leone. Somehow, she debuted smack in the middle of the multicomposer craze and so, got mainly multiple composers to compose for all her films! Raaj Aashoo handles the album.
The title track, titled Intezaar Title, instead of a more apt ‘Tera Intezaar’ (Obviously, because that’s the film’s name), is a dreary 2000s melody, sung by Shreya Ghoshal too, as if she is still in her debut year. Adding to the ennui, is the Qawwali-ish chorus. Raaj’s composition is good, but dated. The arrangement is the best thing about the song, especially the flute. Another very typically 90s melody, Khali Khali Dil, sees Payal Dev and Armaan Malik at their clichéd best. The digital sounds do not help make it more ‘modern’ or anything, and even the harmonica fails to create any impact. Quite a similar sound follows in the dreary Mehfooz, another song straight out of Nadeem-Shravan’s music-bank. The guitar work makes it sound like a version of Mithoon’s ‘Sanam Re’ title track, sans the tablas. Yasser gets a version, and, sounding like Arijit as always, manages to make it sound genuinely interesting. The arrangements here too make this song much more interesting than ‘Khali Khali Dil’. The song appears in two more versions, one by Palak Muchhal and the other by a new singer named Hrishikesh Chury. Palak’s 2½ minute long version fares better than Hrishikesh’s normal length one, because of the pleasant arrangements. Also, Hrishikesh tries to sound like Kumar Sanu.
The best song on the album, Abhagi Piya Ki, becomes the best only because the others don’t deserve it. It appears in two versions, a banal one sung jarringly by Kanika Kapoor and Raja Hasan, and a slightly better version sung much better by Payal Dev and Javed Ali. The tablas that went missing from ‘Mehfooz’ seem to have come to this song, and they play in surplus. The semiclassical touch to the song is good, but the 90s melancholia seems to have followed the composer like a thundercloud whenever he sat to compose for this film.
The only song that does not sound anything like a 90s song is Sexy Baby Girl, and it doesn’t work because it tries to sound uber-cool with its lead singer Swati Sharrma, like always, trying to add unnecessary style to her words, resulting in a disaster. Also, the lyrics are cringeworthy.


This is not an album anyone would have waited for. 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 53.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Abhagi Piya Ki (Javed/Payal) > Abhagi Piya Ki = Intezaar Title = Sexy Baby Girl > Mehfooz = Mehfooz (Palak) > Mehfooz (Hrishikesh) = Khali Khali Dil



♦ Surprising Monsoon in Winter!!: MONSOON SHOOTOUT Music Review

♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Viveick Rajagopalan, Mayur Narvekar, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry
♪ Lyrics by: Sumant Vadhera, Kartik Krishnan, Deepak Ramona, Chinmay Harshe, Rohit Bhasy, Neeraj Sharma, Vinit Gulati, Nidhi Gulati
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th December 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 15th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


Rochak gets two songs, and reminds us why he’s one composer that keeps popping up in numerous albums scattered over the year’s span. It is because of his strong melodies. Pal is a cherishable melody which, though predictable, does give you goosebumps, and makes you want it to rain. Arijit’s heart-touching rendition is enough to make anyone fall for the song. On the other hand Miliyo Re is a very Sachin-Jigar-ish romantic song, with Monali and Rochak behind the mic, with vocals that aren’t amazing, but are functional. The composition is good but very commonplace; not as distinct as Rochak’s other songs this year.
Viveick-Mayur present their only song Andheri Raat next, a haunting song with weird Marathi rap, and awesome Punjabi-flavoured male vocals. Neha Bhasin kills it behind the mic, as does her co-singer, Rajiv Sundaresan, doing the aforementioned Punjabi-flavoured portions. The Marathi rap by Aklesh Sutar is funny, and quite weird too.
The other three songs are quite situational, all by newcomers, with neither one exactly standing above the others. Chinmay Harshe’s Miss You Balma, by Akriti Kakar, is experimental but has you questioning “Why??” because the jazzy composition and the rock arrangements don’t really gel well with each other. Akriti aces the vocals though, singing in an unusually (for her) low pitch. The other duo, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry, present two songs, one being a folksy item song Maachis Ki Teeli, in which the very unconventional choice of singer, Bhavya Pandit, whi hasn’t ever sung such a song, proves to be great, as she adjusts to the song’s folksiness very well. Her co-vocalists provide good company as the loafers interjecting occasionally. The last song Faislay has a quite dated tune, and a very mismatching digital loop that starts it off, but Mandar Deshpande’s singing brings it up.


An album that is good, but still will be a wipeout.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pal = Miliyo Re > Andheri Raat = Maachis Ki Teeli > Miss You Balma = Faislay



Hope you liked this section of reviews! The review for ‘Tiger Zinda Hai’ will be out soon!

CRYBABYIEE WEDS NRI!! (SWEETIEE WEDS NRI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo & Shah Jahan Ali
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Dr. Devendra Kafir, Late Shyam Bhateja, Palak Muchhal, Shakeel Azmi & Banjara Rafi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Sweetiee Weds NRI Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

{P.S. The song “Shiddat (Reprise)” is sung by Mohd. Irfan on Saavn and YouTube, and Sharad Patel on iTunes. Since the former is there on two sites, I will review that}


Sweetiee Weds NRI is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, with the clichéd theme of a wedding. The film stars Himansh Kohli and Zoya Afroz in the lead roles, and is directed by Hasnain Hyderabadwala, and produced by Cyrus Dastur, Dhaval Patel, Sada Bhuvad, and Tariq Mohammed. I couldn’t care less about the plot of the film, so heading on towards the music front. We have a multicomposer album, as is the norm for T-Series, but it is shocking to not see any of the T-Series protégés working for the film. Except maybe Arko. Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo and newcomer Shah Jahan Ali are the other composers for the film. Jaidev just gave us a better-than-the-original mata-ki-chowki recreation of Badshah’s ‘Kala Chashma’, and he gets one song here. Palash, back after doing nothing in films for three years, gets five songs all of a sudden in this film. Let me break the suspense. It is actually two songs, one of them having four versions. Raaj Aashoo, who has composed quite passable music before, gets a song and its reprise too, while Shah Jahan Ali, newcomer, gets one song too. Let me specify that even Arko has one song only. So with five composers and ten tracks, let’s see whether this grand wedding is just all quantity or has some substance too.


1. O Saathiya

Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Prakriti Kakar, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Thankfully, the first song is composed by the person whose song I was waiting for and at least expecting something from, Arko. And sure enough, the song is a pleasant and enjoyable listen. The composition is a breezy one, and starts off quite pleasantly. The soothing quality of the song continues as it progresses, and the  peak point of the song is the “Humrahi” hook, which is like fresh air. (Don’t watch that part in the video song though! 😂) There is no antara as such, the mukhda is repeated twice in the song, once by the male singer Armaan and the other time, by the female singer, Prakriti. That’s why the song ends up sounding shorter than it is, because the mukhda is repeated twice and that’s it. The arrangements are breezy as Arko’s arrangements usually are. The Acoustic guitars, and shakers and those digital beats in the hookline, giving a ballroom feel, are amazing. The interlude consists of a nice, feel-good, guitar piece, followed by a refreshing flute portion, which is in turn followed by a sweet piano piece. The vocalists carry the song out with ease, Prakriti sounding amazing with the nuanced singing. Armaan sings in that slightly uncomfortable low pitch which he rarely sings in, in the beginning, but gets better in the high pitched hookline. Arko’s lyrics are typical romantic song lyrics, but suit the ambience of the composition. A simple but sweet and effective song.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kudi Gujarat Di

Singers ~ Jasbir Jassi, Sonia Sharma, Akasa Singh & KD, Music by (Original and Recreation) ~ Jaidev Kumar, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Shyam Bhateja, New Lyrics by ~ Dr. Devendra Kafir, Rap Written by ~ KD

Jaidev Kumar steps in here, and with another remake, after his remake of ‘Kala Chashma’ in the recent ‘Behen Hogi Teri’. As we know, this music company’s latest fad is to remake hit Punjabi pop numbers of the 90s, and after they remade ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ by Sukhbir, in ‘Hindi Medium’ last month, they choose ‘Dil Le Gayee’ by Jasbir Jassi to remake this month. And the ingenious naming system of T-Series starts again, naming this one ‘Kudi Gujarat Di’, which are just the words that appear right after ‘Dil le gayee’ in the song’s lyrics. However, I’m quite pleased with this remake. The main reason is that Jaidev Kumar, who had composed the original, which was in fact his debut, has recreated it. So he keeps the flavour of the song intact, and yet manages to add a pleasant club touch. The composition has been kept the same, and lyrics have been changed. Unlike the ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ remix, this one actually is a remake. The arrangements have been changed to good club arrangements that are actually enjoyable. The techno sounds here, make the song more viable for today’s audience, who is only behind club songs. The vocals are great too, with Jasbir showing that he is still sounding as young as ever. The female singers, get very less scope, and I don’t even know which of them has sung what. A rap by someone called KD sounds very spoofish and amateurish. The new lyrics by Dr. Devendra Kafir, who wrote ‘Bolna’ (Kapoor & Sons) before this, are fun but typical. An enjoyable remake. 

Rating: 3.5/5

3. Musafir / Musafir (Reprise) / Musafir (Remix)

Singers ~ Atif Aslam & Palak Muchhal / Arijit Singh / Atif Aslam & Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

The next song witnesses Palash entering film music after a long time; his last release was ‘Amit Sahni Ki List’ in July 2014 if I’m not wrong. And this song, he provides in as many as three different versions. The composition is a very typical, Bhatt-ish composition that at first seems very bland and boring, but sounds better the next time. And when you start liking it, you start listening to it frequently, and after listening to it a lot, you start hating it. So like almost all Bhatt-ish songs, this song has a quite uninteresting life story. Jokes apart, Palash’s composition, though nothing innovative, provides temporary relief like Zandu Balm and sticks in your head for that short while as if it has been stuck with Fevicol. (There, I managed to put ‘Dabangg’ references in my review.) The mukhda is very typical, and so is the hookline, so much so that the first time I tried to listen to the song, I didn’t go past the hook. The antara is nothing great either. But despite all this, the song somehow manages to get in your head. So it’s like a Rohit Shetty film — not perfect, but manages to get you watching ahead. The arrangements must be the reason we are able to go forward. Both actual versions (not counting the remix for now) have different arrangements. While the Atif Aslam version has a clichéd-to-the-core acoustic guitar setting with occasional electronic tabla beats, the Arijit Singh version has better arrangements, starting off with a flute, and progressing with a more unplugged-ish acoustic background, piano and guitars. The flute really impressed throughout the song, and Palash isn’t stingy with the use of the flute. Atif’s diction is very irritating in his version, and when he says “Gira” for “Ghira”,Batakta for “Bhatakta“, and “Dikka” for “Dikha“, you can’t help but cringe. Palak joins him to repeat the mukhda at the end of the song. Arijit goes solo in his version, and he rectifies all of Atif’s diction mistakes. However, Palash makes another mistake here, which is making Arijit sing the repeated mukhda at the end, making the song seem extra long. He could have stopped after the antara, or made Palak sing it for some respite from the overbearing drowsiness. The remix is a miserable attempt to quieten the two ever-at-war fan bases of Atif and Arijit, by cramming both into one song. But why would anyone want them to be together in a remix. And I can’t even say how sappy the vocal programming sounds when Palash uses it on Atif, making him sound like a goat. The beats are typical remix beats that make your ears explode. The lyrics by Palak are suitable for the song, but again, very typical and nothing innovative. I don’t even know whether I like this one or not, so I’ll say it’s somewhere in the middle.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Musafir, 3/5 for Musafir Reprise, 0.5/5 for Musafir Remix

 

4. Wedding

Singers ~ Shahid Mallya & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Palash’s second song is the wedding song of the album, very uncreatively titled “Wedding”. The composition is something that totally belongs to an Indian animated film for children. Come on, even children’s songs are composed more thoughtfully than this. The “Saiyaan Oh Saiyaan” refrain by Palak is very cheesy. Some of it is way too sweet to digest, and the lack of usual Punjabi arrangements, makes it even more bland. Instead, Palash uses weird-sounding techno sounds that make it sound very over-the-top. And of course, the typical brass band, which is also, unfortunately, digital. A weird EDM-ish interlude tries to makes things “cool”. Palash tries to bring in a folksy feel to the song by roping in Shahid Mallya to sing it, but he sounds so uninterested, it comes out through his singing. And the lines he’s made to sing! 😵 Palak sounds too, too, sweet, like the syrup in Gulabjamun if someone adds too much sugar. Her lyrics too, are straight out of a fairy tale; the cringeworthy Hinglish takes a toll on you by the time the song ends. When EDM and an overly sweet melody spoil everything.

Rating: 1.5/5 

 

5. Shiddat / Shiddat (Reprise)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Mohd. Irfan, Additional Vocals by ~ Priyanka Negi, Seepi Jha & Bhuvan Ahuja, Music by ~ Raaj Aashoo, Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

With Raaj Aashoo’s song, things take an even more downhill turn. Totally overloaded by a very overbearing melancholic sound, the song exhausts you by the time it is over. The composition is something even the Bhatts would shy away from nowadays. What’s more, the song spans for over five minutes, something utterly unbearable. And two versions. So it sadly has eleven minutes of unmerited footage in this already long album. The arrangements are typical digital beats that would be a rage if it were 2007 right now. The vocalists in neither version could keep the interest of the listener in place, till the end. Armaan, trying to be K.K., disappoints like never before. On the other hand, Mohd. Irfan in his version sings in a voice that defies the beauty of his real, silky smooth voice. The female backing vocalists are irritating throughout. I would rather not talk about the unstylish lyrics. Welcome to 2007.

Rating: 1/5 for Shiddat, 1/5 for Shiddat Reprise

 

6. Zindagi Bana Loon

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Shah Jahan Ali, Lyrics by ~ Banjara Rafi

Newcomer Shah Jahan Ali comes into Bollywood with this song, and brings yet another old-fashioned, slow-paced song into the album, much to the dislike of the audience. The tune is so complicated, with so many pauses in random places, and no indication as to whether it is a happy romantic or a sad romantic song, that you just forget about it after you hear it once. Shah Jahan Ali must have been feeling like Roop Kumar Rathod felt while composing ‘Agar Tum Mil Jao’ (Zeher), or M.M. Kreem while composing ‘Jaadu Hai Nasha Hai’ (Jism), because the song is like a wannabe version of those. The slow pace doesn’t help either. Neither do the arrangements. The guitars are played so typically, the lack of innovation makes you go crazy. Palak tries to bring nuances like Shreya Ghoshal into her singing, succeeding at none of them. She sings in such an unnaturally high-pitched voice, it even surpasses the cheesiness of ‘Kaabil Hoon’ (Kaabil). The lyrics of the song are cringeworthy again. Another staid composition.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

7. Kinara

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Finally the album comes to an end. But waiting right at the end for us, is another version of ‘Musafir’ by Palash Muchhal. This time it has been disguised under another name, ‘Kinara’ because the word ‘Musafir‘ doesn’t come in the new lyrics. But it is a version of ‘Musafir’. This album has so many versions of ‘Musafir’, which means tourist. As if the album is a tourist destination! The composition and lyrics are much the same, except one line in the hook, where the lyrics have been changed. The arrangements comprise an overtly sentimental combination of violin, piano and jingle bells. Palak tries again to imitate Shreya, when she does her Female Versions, like the one of “Sunn Raha Hai” (Aashiqui 2) and that of “Hasi” (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Even Palash tries to imitate the arrangements of the former, with those jingles and the occasional tabla. Clearly, the makers were under the false impression that the public would love ‘Musafir’ so much that they would hover around long enough to wait for a mediocre female version. 

Rating: 1.5/5 


It looks like the album of Sweetiee Weds NRI was finalized years ago. Dated melodies, arrangements that originated sometime before the dinosaurs, and a tracklist trying to imitate ‘Aashiqui 2’ with vocals that sound bland to say the least and the same vocalists used over and over again, this album isn’t really as good as the makers made it out to be when they were promoting it. Instead of Sweetiee Weds NRI, the name should’ve been Crybabyiee (you can throw a few more e’s in there if you want) Weds NRI!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 3 + 0.5 + 1.5 + 1 + 1 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  O Saathiya > Kudi Gujarat Di > Musafir (Reprise) > Musafir > Wedding = Zindagi Bana Loon = Kinara > Shiddat = Shiddat (Reprise) > Musafir (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 14 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Sweetiee Weds NRI) = 15

 

Which is your favourite song from Sweetiee Weds NRI? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂