WILL YOUR HEART SKIP A DHADAK? (DHADAK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ajay-Atul
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 11th July 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 20th July 2018dhadak-hindi-2018-20180711-500x500

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana


Firstly, what a beautiful album art. It could have been more beautiful had the music label credited the music composers and lyricist on it. This is a big problem when it comes to Zee Music.

Dhadak is an upcoming romantic drama, an adaptation of Marathi blockbuster ‘Sairat’ (2016), starring Ishaan Khatter and Janhvi Kapoor, directed by the ‘Dulhania’ franchise director Shashank Khaitan, and produced by Karan Johar, Apoorva Mehta, Hiroo Yash Johar and Zee Studios. The Marathi film had an amazing and short music album by Ajay-Atul; the songs still ring in your ears whenever you think about the film and ‘Zingaat’ became popular worldwide. Well, director Khaitan (who has usually had multicomposer albums for his films, scored by people like Sharib-Toshi, Sachin-Jigar, Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi and Akhil Sachdeva) almost by default has to rope in the same duo for the remake. Of course, they get to cash in on the success of the Marathi film in the bargain. The question always plagues me whether Ajay-Atul really wanted to do the film or not, just like I thought last year when A.R. Rahman agreed to compose for ‘OK Jaanu’. But the songs of ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’ were his babies so he kind of had to say yes. Same here with Ajay-Atul, I believe. But that aside, I’m sure Ajay-Atul have given it their all and not compromised on the quality of the songs. Let’s see how fast their songs makes our heart dhadak this time!


‘Sairat’ became known for its wonderful symphony, which was recorded live by composers Ajay-Atul at Los Angeles. Obviously, they had to create something to equal that, and so, Dhadak Title Track opens the album with a ravishing section of strings in the beginning. Now, I don’t know or care whether they have been recorded here in India or over at Los Angeles, but they sound beautiful, abd the duo has composed that portion very well, complete with the female backing vocalists humming it to perfection, and the flute accompanying them to make it a complete package even before the song starts. Ajay Gogavale and Shreya Ghoshal, the lead vocalists of ‘Saathiya’ (Singham), make the song beautiful with their voices, and yes, Ajay’s voice is a kind of folksy voice that suits wonderfully in Marathi songs, but Hindi music listeners are getting irked by it. I for one, am used to it, and couldn’t ask for anyone else to have sung this song. He sings the high portion at the end beautifully. Ajay-Atul really outdo themselves when they present that adorable, sweet and charming portion sung by Shreya in the antara; I wish the song was one antara longer! The brilliant use of piano and aforementioned strings makes it an auditory masterpiece, but what makes me listen to the entire song each time is the flute at the end, where Ajay-Atul tweak the tune for one note, and give the hook an entirely new feel! Mandolin has also been used to wonderful effect in Shreya’s stanza, and also a matka-like instrument. Of course, the backing chorus provides a wonderful choir setting when Ajay and Shreya sing the hook together towards the end. Amitabh Bhattacharya writes good lyrics, and they do highlight he young romance between the protagonists well.

The second original song, Vaara Re, also witnesses Ajay-Atul doing a great job with sound; a Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy-esque (harking back to the beginning of ‘Uff Teri Ada’ from ‘Karthik Calling Karthik’) electronic riff meets a wonderful sitar portion and again,you get hooked right away. The composition for this one takes time to reach its peak; the initial couple of lines leave you indifferent, but once it reaches the cross line (Mudke dekhna hi kyon..) and travels to the hookline with a flourish of strings and flutes, you are completely hooked to the song. Again, the interlude comprises a great flute and piano portion, with the female backing chorus humming, and their harmony in the second verse is great. The song is basically just two mukhdas separated by the interlude — a rare occurrence in Ajay-Atul songs. Then again, having one antara as in the title track is also rare for Ajay-Atul. The lyrics for this one are more along the inspirational/motivational/life skills route, obviously still romantic though, and Ajay once again provides a bold rendition, but I can’t help but miss Sonu Nigam in this song; it would’ve given it a softer quality and calmer tone.

Of the two songs retained from ‘Sairat’, Zingaat which retains its name as well, works better for me; the essence of the original is kept intact and the meaningless and flirtatious fun of the song too, remains untouched. Yes, Ajay-Atul’s arrangements and the word ‘Jhingaat’ (misspelled and hence mispronounced badly as ‘Zingaat’) is in essence Maharashtrian sounding, but the lyrics by Amitabh Bhattacharya really make it sound more suitable for Hindi. He writes such organic-sounding lyrics, I find myself singing that more than the Marathi one, because the Marathi in the Marathi song is actually not the Marathi I speak. Naturally, I am inclined towards the Hindi one. Which does not mean that one is better than the other. Oh, and Atul sohunds so wonderful singing in Hindi! His voice is so clear and unlike the folksy texture of his brother’s voice. I almost thought Amitabh Bhattacharya has sung it; they have a similar voice. So that was more of a lyrics and accessibility review than a music review, but yeah, the song is great.

‘Yad Lagla’ becomes Pehli Baar in what I found, is the poorest track of the album. The new lyrics by Bhattacharya do not convey the innocence and expression that Ajay-Atul’s original Marathi lyrics did, wherein it actually sounded like a teenage boy was lovestruck and dreamily singing a love song for his crush. Here, the Hindi lyrics ruin it. Yes, they fit well with the music, but the expression is missing. It should have either been in some Rajasthani dialect, to retain the organic-ness of it. But obviously, Ajay-Atul’s music is spot-on. ‘Yad Lagla’ was a gem and hence, by the theorem of similarity, this song will win over your heart with the wonderful percussion, the brass instruments and the soaring symphony portions. Interlude number 2 especially, is heaven. I’m happy I’ve been listening to this music for two more years than some others! 😊


A lot was expected from Dhadak just because of the original album of the film it is an adaptation of. The retention of Ajay-Atul promised us that the album would be of the same standards, but actually, my heart didn’t dhadak much too differently, or skip a dhadak after listening to the songs, except the title track!

Obviously the album is much better than what Bollywood is offering these days so it has secured quite a high score on the rating scale though.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 9 + 8 + 8.5 + 8 =  33.5

Album Percentage: 83.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dhadak Title Track > Zingaat > Vaara Re = Pehli Baar

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 25 (from previous albums) + 02 = 27

Which is your favourite song from Dhadak? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂