THE MUSICAL SUPERHERO RESURFACES!! (BHAVESH JOSHI SUPERHERO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya, Anurag Kashyap, Babu Haabi & Naezy
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 1st June 2018

Bhavesh Joshi Superhero Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Bhavesh Joshi Superhero is a Bollywood action film starring Harshvardhan Kapoor, Priyanshu Painyuli and Nishikant Kamat, directed by Vikramaditya Motwane and produced by Reliance Entertainment, Eros International, Anurag Kashyap, Madhu Mantena and Vikas Bahl. The film is about a group of friends who set out to expose the water scams and other wrong activities in the city. When one of the friends dies, Sikandar (played by Harshvardhan Kapoor) sets out to become a vigilante and avenge his friend’s death and stop the corruption in the city. The film is quite different from what Motwane has made in the past, and it shows he is a versatile filmmaker, never repeating his formula. Of course, for music, he ropes in Amit Trivedi, after that one movie, ‘Trapped’, where he didn’t compose the music. Let’s see, what with all the soundtracks of his releasing this year, can Trivedi do a great job for a director whose films he is known to have done great music for?


The soundtrack starts off with a song called Hum Hain Insaaf that actually summarises the entire theme of the movie in three minutes — in a groovy rap track set to catchy beats and music by Trivedi, and rendered just as addictively by Babu Haabi and Naezy. Babu Haabi sounds much more amazing than he did two years ago in the songs of ‘Udta Punjab’, while Naezy sounds great as usual. Trivedi’s digital beats are catchy, especially the opening bars, which immediately attract your attention. The rap in this song actually doesn’t get boring at any point; it is fun also to listen to the lyrics, which are meaningful (written by Anurag Kashyap, Babu Haabi and Naezy together). The hookline has an anthemic ring to it, perfect for such a movie.

The other song that carries the change-the-world theme in its lyrics is Qasam Kha Li, because Bollywood superheroes can’t go without a dramatic oath ceremony. Just kidding, Phantom ‘Ph’ans. 🙂 Anyway, the song seems to have been quite easy for Trivedi, having composed ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’ (Raid) just recently. Maybe he called Papon over and said, “Let’s record two songs, both having the same blood running through them, and let’s see which one ends up in which movie.” That being said, this song is just as soulful and beautiful as the other, and clearly this fits into the ‘Bhavesh Joshi Superhero’ soundtrack more than the other song, and again, I was just joking about the “Let’s see which movie blah blah.” The strings and drums used by Trivedi are captivating throughout the song, and Papon’s sombre rendition is perfect for this retrospective number. Towards the end, Trivedi sets right what went wrong in Blackmail’s ‘Nindaraan Diyaan’ — he uses the rock template in a much better way than he did there (where he spoiled the entire climax of the song by overdoing the rock)! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are beautiful, and just perfect for what I’d imagine an Indian common man superhero to sing. 🙂

It is Chavanprash which has probably polarised audiences about this soundtrack; it is a super-cheesy and typical Trivedi qawwali-ish number with just as cheesy lyrics by Bhattacharya, but hey, I did enjoy it! Trivedi, first of all, is an expert at making such songs catchy, and he brings back his ‘Ghanchakkar’ self to make a kind of amalgamation of three songs from that soundtrack — ‘Ghanchakkar Babu’, ‘Allah Meherbaan’ and ‘Jholu Ram’. Divya Kumar’s effusive vocals make it known that you’re supposed to have fun listening to and crooning this song. And Amitabh’s lyrics, even the cringeworthy hookline, are fun! Trivedi adda those qawwali elements like the bulbultarang, and rock elements, and his signature quirky female chorus (Arohi Mhatre and Pragati Joshi) are ever loyal and give yet another enjoyable performance. The ‘satak’, ‘jhatak‘ effect in the antaras are so fun. Anyway, I love this song and you can judge me for it.

The best of the soundtrack comes with Tafreeh, where Trivedi starts the proceedings with a heady digital rhythm coupled with a nice guitar loop, and the Vikramaditya Motwane side of Amit Trivedi surfaces for the first time in this Vikramaditya Motwane soundtrack; the song instantly sends you back to the ‘Udaan’ soundtrack, more so because of Trivedi’s dreamy melody, than the arrangements. Also, he sings the ‘Chal Zaraa…” portion so amazingly, it’s hard not to get addicted! That beat he keeps up for the entire song in the background never gets repetitive. He even uses marching rhythms later on! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics have a certain message we all need to understand; the ‘carpe diem‘ philosophy resounding very vehemently throughout the song. Again, Trivedi does the rock parts well, and ends the song on a very entrancing high.


I won’t have many supporters for this statement, but I’m going to go ahead and call this Trivedi’s best soundtrack after a long time! Motwane really brings out the musical superhero that Trivedi really is! 😊

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 = 33

Album Percentage: 82.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tafreeh > Chavanprash > Qasam Kha Li > Hum Hain Insaaf

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhavesh Joshi Superhero? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

ADORABLE BUT FORGETTABLE! (MERI NIMMO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Krsna Solo & Mangesh Dhakde
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 25th April 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 27th April 2018

Meri Nimmo Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Meri Nimmo is a Bollywood film starring Anjali Patil and Karan Dave, directed by Rahul Shanklya and produced by Aanand L. Rai. The film was released directly on Eros’ streaming service Eros Now. The film’s music has been composed by two composers, one of which we get to hear once every year (at least), and one who we are only hearing for the second time since he debuted in bollywood! The former being Krsna Solo, and the latter being Mangesh Dhakde (who debuted with four amazing songs in ‘Hawaizaada’ in 2015). Expecting some good music, especially because it is an Anand Rai production!


Krsna’s part of the album opens with a sweet retro sounding song Bulbula, which resembles Vishal-Shekhar’s ‘Dil Kaagzi’ (Gippi) in every aspect. The arrangements are similar waltzy arrangements, with the mandolin and flutes. The composition is of the same lilting type, and Paroma Das Gupta even tries to sound like Neeti Mohan (and succeeds). The only place this song falls flat, is the composition. The mukhda is so painfully repetitive, the saccharine nature of the rest of the song too, can’t make up for it. It was nice to hear something from Krsna though, since he only appears once or twice a year!
His second song, Yeh Bhi Beet Jaayega, fares much better. A simple piano starts the song, and this song too is in the retro zone. This time though, the composition is more eventful, and Sukriti Kakar’s vocals are beautiful. Raj Shekhar’s lyrics are sweet, as was required for this movie. The strings interlude creates a grand feel, and the antara continues the sweetness of the song. The thing is, I don’t think I’ll be listening to these songs again in the future — they just aren’t that memorable.
Mangesh Dhakde, returning three and a half years after his debut in ‘Hawaizaada’, presents Tumse Hi by Javed Ali, a good composition, but just that. I loved the sarangi and mandolin; they create a soothing effect. It seems like Mangesh has stretched the composition at places instead of getting to the hookline early. The hookline itself has a nice old Bollywood touch, with that amazing nuance by Javed Ali. Javed Ali too, doesn’t sound at his best, with an awkward coarseness in his otherwise silky voice. Raj Shekhar’s lyrics though, are incredible.


Overall, a passable album. Expected much, much more from these two composers. Still, give this album a listen. Chances are, you will find one song that you’ll enjoy, but only for the duration it plays.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 7.5 + 7 = 21

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Yeh Bhi Beet Jaayega > Tumse Hi > Bulbula

Which is your favourite song from Meri Nimmo? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A MUSICAL MUKKA FROM YOUNG TALENTS! (MUKKABAAZ – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rachita Arora, Nucleya & Vineet Kumar Singh
♪ Lyrics by: Hussain Haidry, Dr. Sunil Jog & Vineet Kumar Singh
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 20th December 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th January 2018

Mukkabaaz Album Cover

 

Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes


Mukkabaaz is an upcoming sports-cum-politics drama directed by Anurag Kashyap, starring Vineet Kumar Singh and Zoya Hussain in lead roles, and Ravi Kishen and Jimmy Shergill in supporting roles. The film’s music has been composed by last year’s debutante Rachita Arora, the composer of ‘Newton’, and features two guest compositions by Nucleya and lead actor Vineet Kumar Singh. I do expect something in the zone of Sneha Khanwalkar in Rachita’s music, because I don’t see why Kashyap would sign her if she didn’t! After musical successes like ‘Gangs Of Wasseypur’ and ‘Bombay Velvet’, let’s see what director Anurag Kashyap has in store for us, with this music album!


The album starts off with a very energising track, Paintra from the DJ Nucleya. Unlike his previous stint in Bollywood, ‘Let’s Nacho’ (Kapoor & Sons), this one actually has some use in the film’s narrative, and it does its job of promoting the film very well. The makers have added another version of it called Paintra (Extended Version), but it only has some hard-hitting dialogues by Jimmy Shergill, who plays the antagonist. The song itself is the typical Nucleya mishmash of interesting digital sounds, with a queer but catchy South Indian vibe to it. The Rap by DIVINE is the highlight of the song, and after a long time we get a meaningful rap in Bollywood, thanks to lyricist and lead actor Vineet Kumar Singh. Vineet himself has composed a song in the album, Adhura Main, a song trying to ape ‘Humni Ke Chhodi Ke’ (Gangs Of Wasseypur) so much so that it has the same singer, grown up now, and the same simplistic harmonium arrangement. Sadly, it doesn’t work — Vineet’s lyrics are the only good thing. The voice is harsh to the ears, and the high notes make you cringe.
The major chunk of the album, which is five songs, belongs to Rachita Arora, the talented young lady who scored for ‘Newton’ last year. Her first song, and my favourite of the album, is Mushkil Hai Apna Meil Priye, a folksy number enriched by Brijesh Shandilya’s vibrant vocals, and Dr. Sunil Jog’s amazing lyrics on class differences between lovers. Rachita arranges it fabulously too, with folksy vibes in the initial parts, that break out into an enjoyable up tempo brass band towards the end. In a similar zone is Bahut Hua Samman, a protest song against politicians, of course. The percussions here are spot-on, and though the composition slackens in between, the amazing vocals by Swaroop Khan keep you hooked. I particularly enjoyed the parts where the sound of the vocalist is muffled; it gives a fun effect. Bohot Dukha Mann is the last of the songs we can hear in any other non-Anurag Kashyap album. It is a classical-based song, quite in the Rahman zone, because of Raag Puriya-Dhanashree, Rahman’s favourite in the 90s. The song itself doesn’t hold together for long, and disintegrates completely after a second antara starts. Rachita Arora and Dev Arijit behind the mic too, fail to pique interest.
The remaining two songs fall into a typical ‘can’t-understand-what’s-happening’ Anurag Kashyap zone. Not that they aren’t enjoyable. Chhipkali is a laugh fest; the first time I heard it, I laughed out loud, and there haven’t been many songs that have made me do that before! The laughing is definitely because of Vijay’s interactive singing, Rachita’s amazing pseudo-retro arrangements and slow tempo, and Hussain Haidry’s lyrics that anyone living in a house infested with lizards would relate to. The ‘Gandhi ke photo ke peechhe‘ gag is hilarious. Saade Teen Baje, on the other hand, is a Bhojpuri-style ladies sangeet number that makes you want to understand why they’re having such a jolly time, if only the lyrics were audible amidst the giggling and the lead vocalist’s accent. Rachita’s typical wedding arrangements are great though.


Not the very best music to come out of an Anurag Kashyap film, but the single by Nucleya is sure to hit the radio. A sizeable punch, given that the composers are new talents!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 9 + 7.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 6.5 = 58

Album Percentage: 72.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mushkil Hai Apna Meil Priye > Bahut Hua Samman = Paintra = Paintra (Extended) = Chhipkali > Bohot Dukha Mann > Saade Teen Baje > Adhura Main

 

What is your favourite song from Mukkabaaz? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NEW Composer Rachita Impresses A TON!! (NEWTON – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rachita Arora
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 22nd September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 22nd September 2017

Newton Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Newton is a Bollywood black comedy film, starring Rajkummar Rao, Pankaj Tripathi, Raghubir Yadav and Anjali Patil, directed by Amit V. Masurkar, and produced by Manish Mundhra of Drishyam Films. The movie, as we all know, has garnered great response from cinema-lovers and *most* critics, and we also know it is India’s official entry for “Best Foreign Language Film” in the 90th Academy Awards. Best of luck to us for that! Anyway, back to the point. The film revolves around a government clerk, Newton (played by Rao) who is sent for election duty in a naxal-controlled town in the jungles of Chhattisgarh. His struggle to ensure a fair election and educating the locals about election is what constitutes the base of the film. Of course, the film, as many of these films are, doesn’t have music, save for a promotional song by Rachita Arora. It comes in two versions in the album, so let’s check it out! Hopefully, Rachita makes a smashing debut with this film!


1. Chal Tu Apna Kaam Kar

Singer ~ Amit Trivedi, Backing Vocals ~ Satish Badoliya

Rachita starts off the song with a promising whistle, intriguing listeners right away. As Amit Trivedi starts with the song’s first note, an immediate whiff of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy’s music hits your ears, and the song has you hooked from there onwards. The new composer has made sure her composition is intriguing, because usually, satirical songs fall flat due to their compositions not begin up to the mark. Thankfully, here, Rachita’s composition is really quirky and very catchy and fun to listen to — with the beautifully mellifluous hookline doing the trick for her nicely. It is her arrangements that outdo the composition though. A groovy beat supports the song throughout, only to be joined by catchy finger snaps, quirky technological sounds, nice bass, cool guitars (Meghdeep Bose), drums, beautiful strings, and even an unexpected flute (Tejas Vinchurkar)! The dumroo and the harmonium, coupled by a wacky folksy backing vocal (Satish Badoliya) in the second antara, help the song sound more massy. What really surprised me was the oud/rabaab in the first interlude, giving the song a nice and folksy touch! Rachita’s digital programming too, is amazing — she proves her mettle in programming with her first ever Bollywood song! Amit Trivedi was the perfect choice for the vocals, and he always carries such songs with a lot of confidence and spunk. His heavy voice really makes for an interesting listen. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics work on the protagonist’s catchphrase “Chal Tu Apna Kaam Kar”, and spin it into a nice satirical piece! Things look sunny for this talented new composer. Welcome to Bollywood, Rachita Arora!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Chal Tu Apna Kaam Kar (Raghubir Yadav Version)

Singer ~ Raghubir Yadav, Backing Vocals ~ Atam Prakash Mishra and Ashish Kumar Mishra

The second version of the song is nothing like the first version; it is a more folksy rendition invoking memories of the ‘Gangs Of Wasseypur’ songs that Sneha Khanwalkar had recorded from local artists. Here, Rachita does quite the same thing, but instead of looking for some new singers, she decides to let Raghubir Yadav, acting in the film, sing it. And he does immense justice to the folksy nature of this version. First of all, Rachita has changed the composition to make it more suited for a folk song, and though the composition this time isn’t extraordinary, it is good. It is also more soulful. Raghubir Yadav aces the vocals, while Rachita’s arrangements are cool — the harmonium and folksy percussion (Dipesh Verma), along with the folksy backing vocals, provides a nice ambience to the song. The plucked instruments (probably iktara) and chimtas too provide a nice folk touch. As mentioned before, the lyrics are awesome! A folksy reprise of the previous song, with slightly less repeat value, but who cares about repeat value?

Rating: 3.5/5


So, Newton is a short album, with two tracks, both the same song at least lyrically. Rachita makes a smashing debut and it seems she will soon establish her as a composer who does not really care about the mass appeal and popularity of her songs, since both her songs here are true to the film, and not made to attract people. (The same category as people like Mikey McCleary, Sneha Khanwalkar etc). Also, the fact that Eros Music released the music late here (which is fine, since this isn’t a film like “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” which relied heavily on music) shows that they didn’t really want to reveal the songs early. Newton gives us an amazing new composer!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Version 1 > Version 2

 

 

TANISHK-VAYU KI SHAANDAAR DAAVAT!! (SHUBH MANGAL SAAVDHAN – Music Review)

How clever, how innovative and how unconventional! In keeping with the unconventional theme of this movie, the music company Eros Music (who before this, have never disappointed me in releasing music on time!) have thought of a very innovative music release strategy i.e, to not release the album as a “full album” even after the movie has released! Wow!! How nice! One of the composers of the album, Vayu Srivastava, (@purevayu on Twitter) though was kind enough to assure me that this was the last song; so going ahead with the review!

UPDATE (5th September 2017): Eros Now has now released the full OST, and it does indeed, only have five songs.


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 5th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st September 2017

Shubh Mangal Saavdhan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on ErosNow CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Shubh Mangal Saavdhan is a Bollywood film, starring Ayushmann Khurrana and Bhumi Pednekar in the lead roles, directed by debutant R.S. Prasanna and produced by Aanand L. Rai and Krishika Lulla. The film revolves around the film’s leading man, who suffers from ‘erectile dysfunction’, what he calls a ‘Gent’s Problem’. The madness and mayhem that follows in the already engaged to be married couple’s life is the premise of the story. (Because the adults have found out as well!) So the theme is quirky and the film has been getting RAVE reviews, but there was no sign of the music album, even after the film had released! Eros Music seems to be following a certain promotional strategy, and I must say, it’s the worst promotional strategy ever, where the promotion carries on even after film release! At least Sony Music releases the album 11-12 hours before the film, leaving the music lovers satisfied! This irresponsible type of music release where the music released after the movie, is just plain weird. Anyway, the music album happens to be fast-coming-to-the-top composer duo Tanishk-Vayu’s first solo album, in which they’ve composed all songs, and even written all the songs! And whatever I’ve heard of Tanishk-Vayu’s music, it is always quirky and zany, and a brilliant mix of Indian and Western sounds, so I’m sure that they would provide amazing music for this film, about the wedding of two people from small middle-class families in Delhi! Let’s dive in and see how sumptuous their wedding feast turns out to be!


1. Rocket Saiyyan

Singers ~ Ritu Pathak, Brijesh Shandilya & Tanishk Bagchi

“Duniya palat doonga, tu na lena tension,
Tere hi liye hai meri sagli attention,
Dekho na baby dil ki wire ke length ko,
Chhukar dekho pyaar waale current ko!
Baatein kare phenke gulaab, hamare saiyyan,
Aisi velocity janaab, phawware saiyyan,
Rocket hamare saiyyan!!”

Tanishk-Vayu start their first solo album, with a quirky romantic song, with the peppiness quotient very high. The song is a quirky take on the quintessential Indian Wedding songs, and the duo’s small experiments all throughout the song make it so appealing. The composition, for one, is so crazy and zany, it appeals instantly, to people who are open to loving weird stuff, and I’m one of them! Right from the beginning, the duo uses quirky sounds to catch the attention of the listener, and it works in a weird way. The actual composition is very simple, and in some places I could tell they’re just trying to be overtly crazy and weird, but it just works so well, you don’t have time to think about it. The song has a mukhda and an antara, the mukhda by the female singer, while the antara is by the male. Both have the same, crazy kind of tune, and the hookline is very catchy, as it should be. However, it might just be reduced to a “Comedy” song. There is a certain quality in the arrangements as well — the quirk creeps into the music too, and alongside the usual wedding percussion, we get funny sounds like babies crying, and other computerised noises, that just act as nice attractions throughout the short song. The use of the shehnaai (Seems digital) in the interlude produces quite a humorous effect. The vocals are good for the type of song it is — Ritu Pathak, returning to sing after a long, long time, manages it very well, and a bit off tune too, producing a good, imperfect effect that suits the song very well. Brijesh Shandilya, the composers’ favourite, also does an amazing job, but has a very little portion. The lyrics by the duo too, are funny and cute. A song that might irritate a lot of people, but the quirk is what you have to look out for!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kanha / Kanha (Unplugged)

Singers ~ Shashaa Tirupati / Ayushmann Khurrana

“Roke mohe, toke mohe, kaate re dagar o re Yamuna ke tatt ki,
Laaj nahi, kaaj nahi, maare jo kankariya, toh phoote mori matki,
Vaak chatur bharmaave, prem jaar arjhaave,
Jo bhi kare, kare sab quick, quick, quick, quick!
Kahun main piya ji thoda karlo sabar par na, maane na,
Kanha, maane na!”

This next song happens to be Tanishk-Vayu’s most straightforward song of their career, conforming the most to conventional standards than any of their other songs that have all been quirky! Of course, that was called for here, since they had to compose a thumri, and you can’t really mess with thumris. They have a particular fixed structure, and a way of making them. That being said, the duo does a wonderful job in making their first semi-classical song, and they win half the battle with the strong composition itself! The composition is so free-flowing, like so many of the Radha-Krishna songs of Bollywood. I can just predict that this will make its place in the list of Great Bollywood Krishna songs. The hookline is just so sweet, and instantly likeable, and the composition of the entire thumri has a very tangible Rahman touch to it; it is impossible to dislike that. It freshens your mind up instantly, as good Indian classical music always does. The song is presented to us in two versions — one by a professional, and a female version, as conventional thumris usually are. That version is sung by the awesome Shashaa Tirupati, who uses her sweet voice to melt your heart singing the thumri. She’s getting really good classical based numbers in the Rahman camp as well this year, and now she gets to sing this one, which almost sounds as if it’s a spawn of the Rahman songs. The duo give the female version a beautiful, traditional arrangement, with amazing tablas, sarod, and awe-inspiring flute solos. It is a delight to the ears, and the richness of the music just can’t be forgotten for a long time. It starts so richly too, with the background vocalists singing a nice vocal rhythm, alongside the playful combo of the santoor and flute! But even with all the conventional-ness of the arrangements, the duo tries something unconventional, and adds drumbeats every time before the hookline, and that’s what makes the song even more interesting! The second version is by the leading man of the film, Ayushmann Khurrana, who seems to be singing at least one song in every film of his nowadays. Of course, since he can sing so well, he aces the song, but I never knew he could sing classical this well. Of course, it doesn’t sound professional, but it is good enough! The duo decorate this one with a beautiful guitar riff (Tapas Roy) and a nice loop on the ukulele that’s so captivating! So while one version is completely semiclassical, the other one follows a more “Unplugged” (as it is named) route, with the guitar playing the lead role. Last but definitely not the least, the lyrics of both versions are beautiful. I commend the duo for using traditional words like “sakhi“, “laaj“, “panghat“, “badra“, and making it sound more rooted. And on the other hand, the duo uses English words, creating a fun contrast. The Radha-Krishna story has been kept intact, and the romance of the protagonists uses that as a backdrop, and it is so beautiful to listen to! Kudos to Tanishk-Vayu for a wholesome semiclassical number, in two delightful versions!!

Rating: 5/5 for Shashaa’s Version, 4.5/5 for Ayushmann’s Version

 

3. Laddoo

Singer ~ Mika Singh

“Boli aisi ke, tamatar bhi mangayein toh lage jaise mushaayaron mein
Baitha sunn raha hoon usko!
Aankhein aisi ke, milaayein jab nigaahein, ye nigaahein dagmagayein,
Kuch samajh mein bhi na aaye dil ko!
Ho, jab se mohabbat uthi, seene mein ghus gayi Gupti,
Iss dil ke laddoo bant gaye!”

The duo bring back the quirkiness and unconventional quality of the album with this song, a romantic song sung by Mika! Now, before we start complaining about how Mika isn’t suitable for romantic songs, I would like to remind you about “440 Volt” (Sultan) last year, which was a romantic song that wouldn’t have sounded half as good if Mika hadn’t sung it. This time, Tanishk-Vayu compose a very quirky number and rope Mika in to sing it. The composition is again, a very desi composition, that will appeal to your sense if you love traditional tunes with an innate quirk. The mukhda is amazing, the antaras make sure you don’t make your attention wander elsewhere, but the hookline is the best part — it is so short and simple, as if they’re stating an obvious fact, “Iss Dil Ke Laddoo Bant Gaye!” and it’s over as soon as it starts. That’s the best part of this hookline; it doesn’t hover around for long and waste your time. The arrangements are very beautiful — a very traditional beat of manjeeras and dholaks among rich guitar riffs sounds very interesting, and never before heard. The shehnaai-like sounds are also very fun to listen to. The manjeeras give the song a very unconventional and traditional rhythm, and that is what made me listen very closely to the arrangements in the first place! Towards the end we get a fun shehnaai portion, and it seems to be a sweet conclusion to the fun-filled romantic song. The vocals by Mika are surprisingly amazing; the duo seem to have done a good job in giving him the right brief, and so he doesn’t eat up many of his words here! The way he sings the hook is a way nobody else could’ve done it! Tanishk-Vayu’s lyrics are fun as well, and the comedy element is intact even in this song. The quirkiest romantic song I’ve heard in a while!!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Kankad

Singers ~ Raja Hasan, Shashaa Tirupati, Rajnigandha Shekhawat & Arman Hasan

“Mere liye tu Ram na Ranjha, utna bahut hai, jitna sanjha,
Chhote bade sab tere, sapne hain mere abb,
Mere wale sapne toh, sach mein hain mere abb,
Tu jo rahega toh, saath dega toh, Rab se kya mangungi main,
Sab kuch toh paa lungi main,
Dil yeh kahin ladkhadaye agar toh thaam le na please!
Kankad bhi kabhi koi aa nahi sakta tere mere beech!!”

The duo wind up the album with a wedding song, but again, it is a very traditional wedding song, and full of emotion! The composition is very heavy on emotion as well; and it focuses on the emotion much more than it does on the enjoyment factor! At the end it basically just freshens your mind and makes you feel good. The makers had kept this song hidden until even after the movie was released, but I don’t understand why, because it was such a beautiful number!! The composition showcases Tanishk-Vayu’s versatility, and they prove that they can compose emotional numbers just as well as those upbeat comic numbers. The hookline especially is steeped with emotion — you can just feel the emotion through the earphones as it plays. The arrangements too, represent some of the duo’s most rich arrangements in terms of folk instruments and traditional sounds. The quintessential wedding chorus starts the song off, with a tumbi sound, and your interest is peaked right there. The dholaks, dafli, strings and a surprise element of the shehnaai in the interlude all provide an amazingly rich arrangement, at the same time keeping things very enjoyable and danceable on! The whole composition and arrangements have a very distinct Rahmanish touch to them! The vocals are beautiful, with Raja Hasan (after a long time, yo!) taking care of the male portions well, keeping the emotion intact. However, he could have been better in certain places.  The female singer, Shashaa Tirupati, has a very small part, but still manages to steal the lightning, as that part has been composed so thoughtfully by the composers, and it is full of tangible emotion. The various backing vocalists like the small child singing at the end, provide a nice “grand Indian wedding” feel to the song. But still, the lyrics which are so full of emotion, do not make you feel as if it is a conventional Bollywood wedding song; it is just too sweet for that! The lyrics are what make you realise the true meaning of the song, and I salute the makers for making this emotional song against the backdrop of the wedding. Last month we saw an emotional song against the backdrop of the Holi festival, ‘Gori Tu Latth Maar’ (Toilet: Ek Prem Katha), and this time, Tanishk-Vayu follow the same template, to make another beautiful wedding song full of love and emotion! A commendable job, to create an emotional wedding song! Not your everyday Bollywood Wedding song!! This ends the album on a very high note!!

Rating: 5/5


Shubh Mangal Saavdhan really proved how talented Tanishk-Vayu are. Usually, they appear in multicomposer albums where they hardly get enough scope to show their talent in composing for an entire movie, with a particular theme running throughout the movie. Here, when they get the chance finally, they make great use of the opportunity and provide us with an enjoyable album full of quirky music, and also some emotional music. Their method of fusing quirky sounds with traditional desi beats and tunes, really is the hallmark of their music, and it is what makes their music light, fluffy and a delectable treat to listen to! Thank you, Tanishk and Vayu, for treating us to such a delicious wedding feast of an album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 92%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kanha = Kankad > Laddoo = Kanha (Unplugged) > Rocket Saiyyan

 

Which is your favourite song from Shubh Mangal Saavdhan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DO NOT SNIFF!! (SNIFF!!! – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mujtaba Aziz Naza
♪ Lyrics by: Amole Gupte
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 16th August 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 25th August 2017

Sniff Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Sniff is a Bollywood mystery film, starring Khushmeet Gill as the child detective in the film. The film has been directed by Amole Gupte and produced by Jyoti Deshpande, Amole Gupte and Ajit Thakur. The film is about a young detective, who, with his keen sense of smell, solves a case of car thefts in his society. Now, Amole Gupte’s films’ emotional aspect gives them the scope of having very touching music albums. ‘Stanley Ka Dabba’ and ‘Hawaa Hawaai’ by Hitesh Modak prove that. This time, Gupte goes for a newcomer, though. For us, we have heard him sing in ‘Indu Sarkar’ just last month. He’s Mujtaba Aziz Naza. The newcomer gives five songs for the album; let’s see if they’re worth a listen sniff!


1. Bugs Ki Naak / Amole Ki Naak

Singers ~ Bugs Bhargava Krishna / Amole Gupte

They think it’s funny, but it’s plain irritating. There’s no composition at all, just the singer shouting, thinking he’s singing jazz. Mujtaba does better with arrangements, which are jazzy, but the way the composition goes haywire in outbursts, is just too bad. At least Bugs’ version has jazz, but Amole’s has a-cappella. The lyrics are stupid. What have you got to do with why his nose is so big? And he repeats ‘Hathkadi’ 1000 times! We got it the first time! Good try to sound retro, but ends up sounding irrit-etro!

Rating: 1/5 for Bugs ki Naak (for better arrangements and vocals), 0/5 for Amole Ki Naak

 

2. Aur Kitni Door

Singer ~ Vishal Bhardwaj

This one starts like a Vishal Bhardwaj song with its intro music, and also gives a ‘Taare Zameen Par’ feel. But the composition is so weird, and so hard to grasp! Mujtaba tries to make it like VB’s style, but just getting him to sing won’t do that. That being said, it is quite an average song. Arrangements are mellow; the use of strings is beautiful. The song gets heavy after the mukhda and you zone out. Better, but not good.

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Jai Jai Ganaraj

Singer ~ Shankar Mahadevan

To rope in Shankar Mahadevan to sing a Ganpati song is fine. But to compose it so badly is not fine. It has none of the energy and uplifting quality that accompanies a Ganesha song. It just has an overbearing tedium. The Maharashtrian instruments have been used unwisely. The composition belongs somewhere in the 90s. Shankar still tries to do justice to it but fails. The least energetic Ganesha song I’ve heard! 

Rating: 1.5/5

 

4. Dekhti Kya Hain Aankhein

Singer ~ Kareena Shomakhova

This song seems to have been made according to the mystery aspect of the film. As such, it fares quite well, woth a sinister tone to open it. A jazzy horror tune starts it off. The composition isn’t great here either, too, with sudden high notes. The new singer Kareena Shomakhova is off tune so frequently. The sound effects try to scare you, to no avail. A song that ran away from a C-Grade horror film.

Rating: 1.5/5


Sniff is the worst Amole Gupte album ever. I remember loving ‘Hawaa Hawaai’s music so much more than the rest of the world. Same goes with ‘Stanley Ka Dabba’. Both were by Hitesh Sonik. And for the film where Gupte was the Creative Director, ‘Taare Zameen Par’, we all know how popular that album is. This one, though, just loses out on all the emotion, motivation and inspiration that used to find its way into Amole Gupte movies, and hence albums. It sounds so much like it’s some cartoon kind of album. Is it because of the change in music director? Well I can only warn you not to sniff this album!

 

 

Total Points Scored By This Album: 1 + 0 + 2 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 6

Album Percentage: 24%

Final Rating for this Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Listen at your own risk.

 

I’m not asking for your  favourite song! Thanks! 😄

MULTICOMPOSERS GIVE A HUGE, BUT NANHA-MUNNA ALBUM!! (MUNNA MICHAEL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Danish Sabri, Sabbir Khan & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st July 2017

Munna Michael Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Munna Michael is an upcoming Bollywood dance/action film starring Tiger Shroff, Nidhhi Agerwal and Nawazuddin Siddiqui in central roles. The film is directed by Sabbir Khan, and produced by Viki Rajani and Eros International. The film revolves around a dance competition, in which a vagabond played by Shroff decides to participate, until he is entangled into teaching the local villain how to dance, and they both fall in love with the same girl. So, the typical *yaaaaaawwwwwwwnnn* Bollywood plot. The music is by multiple composers, featuring songs by Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu. I’m not excited about anybody’s song particularly, except maybe Tanishk’s solo song and Tanishk’s song with his ex-co-composer Vayu, who he partnered up with again for this song after 2015’s smashing debut for them, ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), so let’s just see what the album is about and we might just get surprised!


1. Main Hoon

Singer ~ Siddharth Mahadevan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is a tribute to Michael Jackson, since the film is a dance film and the main character is probably an MJ fan, if we can deduce anything from his name. Tanishk’s composition is bland. Hookline is oddly-placed, but the Antara has a bearable tune. Arrangement and mixing are chaotic, as if Tanishk was adamant on using all techno sounds there are. The impactful vocals dont help either. Lyrics worth avoiding. When an oddly placed hook spoils almost the entire song!

Rating: 2/5

 

2. Ding Dang

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Antara Mitra, Rap by ~ Parry G, Shivi & Danish Sabri, Music by ~ Javed-Mohsin, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri & Sabbir Khan

A tribute to Jackie Shroff (atleast lyrically). The generic composition leaves you unflinched. Typical tapori arrangements with random backing vocals of “Aah-aah”. Both vocalists fail to make the song better, and the rappers fail miserably. Lyrics are cheap, trying-to-be-funny but failing miserably again. The hook lyrics make you go, “Sorry, what???” Ding dung?

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Pyar Ho

Singers ~ Vishal Mishra & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A very soothing romantic composition but quite heard-before, and the arrangements too remind of some songs heard in the past. The strings, guitars and digital arrangement still win your heart, though. The composer himself has sung as if he wanted Arijit to have sung it and Arijit would have been apt. Sunidhi is her usual perfect self while Neeti Mohan seems to have done backing vocals, but hasn’t been credited! Lyrics are very staid and nothing new. Best of the album but nothing creative.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Swag

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya & Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

A very situational song for a performance of Nawazuddin’s character. And they have tried to make it sound so-called “cool”, but it doesn’t work much. That instrumental loop that keeps repeating throughout the song is catchy, and the digital beats are cool, but sound very similar to an English song that I can’t recall. Brijesh’s vocals are the fun part of the song, but Pranay’s interruptions could have been avoided. Lyrics are bad, again. Except for Brijesh and that instrumental loop, a forgettable song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Beparwah

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Nandini Deb, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is one of Gourov-Roshin’s rare songs that are not recreations, and surprisingly, it starts off quite promisingly, in a retro-sounding prelude. The composition is still good, but a duration of six minutes is way too far-fetched, because the song is also very repetitive, and after one antara the song gets too boring. Arrangements are the same techno sounds that featured in the other songs, and many times in the past too. A rock interlude somewhere in the middle makes your ears bleed. Siddharth Basrur does a good job, but his cosinger, Nandini Deb, doesn’t impress. Again, lyrics are unimpressive. It is a song Hrithik Roshan should have got in 1999. 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Shake Karaan

Singers ~ Kanika Kapoor & Meet Bros., Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

I see the credits for this song.. and I prepare myself for another ‘Baby Doll’. And sure enough, those pop sounds and ladies shrieking feature in this song. I admit that the composition is catchy but not as much as previous Meet Bros-Kanika songs. The sound is a welcome change from the overpowering disco theme of the rest of the songs. Kanika’s voice is enjoyable as always. Lyrics continue to be the sloppiest they can be! A welcome change from the overbearing techno sounds of the album, but not innovative at all! 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

7. Feel The Rhythm

Singer ~ Rahul Pandey, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Pranay M. Rijia & Sabbir Khan

Pranay’s next song is actually quite impressive. The composition is a perfect example of a catchy MJ-ish tune, complete with glitzy arrangements that Pranay aces. The techno sounds here and the techno sounds in the other songs differ so much in the freshness quotient. This one is on the lines of ‘Iss Tarah’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) and that’s how it impressed me. Rahul Pandey sings a bit like Yash Narvekar and Benny Dayal, and sings impressively too. Again, the lyrics are the usual. A nice and fresh-sounding dance song!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

8. Beat It Bijuriya

Singers ~ Asees Kaur & Renesa Baadchi, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

Tanishk-Vayu return after two years (‘Banno’; ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’) with another folksy song, this time with a techno twist, obviously. The song has a very superficial tune, and hard to grip. Also it sounds inspired from Tanishk’s own ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ Title track. The arrangements match those of their first song; folksy harmonium, dhols and other techno sounds make for an entertaining listen. There’s an amazing fiddle interlude. Asees sings like never before, with a grunge in her voice in the hookline. The lyrics are a kind of funny Hinglish that I couldn’t grasp at once. Entertaining but limitedly.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

9. Pyar Ho (Redux)

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Sunidhi sings this Redux of ‘Pyar Ho’ solo. It has a melancholic arrangement, with those slow and mellow piano notes, that gets quite boring to hear after some time. The strings are good enough though. Sunidhi’s solo rendition though, is a treat to the ears. The composition is the same, and the lyrics have been tweaked to make it sound sad. Not something I’d like to listen to often.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

10. Swag (Rebirth)

Singer ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

‘Swag’ had apparently died while the rest of the songs were playing, so its ‘Rebirth’ appears now. Now, whatever little elements ‘Swag’ had going for it, are all removed in this Rebirth. It has even been stripped of all melody (whatever little it had) and now sounds like a funky instrumental that makes you cringe because of the way Pranay chants those lines creepily. The arrangements are fresh here, but there’s nothing like a good tune or good vocals to accompany it. So that’s a wasted opportunity. I prefer the song in its last life.

Rating: 1.5/5


Munna Michael sounds like a very badly done ‘ABCD’ album. Then again, if ‘ABCD’ would’ve had such music, we wouldn’t have had a sequel. The overdose of (badly done) techno music really sounds useless. One song gets it right, but no others impress. When you can groove to only one song in a dance film’s album, the album’s got problems. Also, when a director or producer asks for “Give me one Kanika song, one tribute to Jackie Shroff, one to Michael Jackson, one funky Hinglish song, many wannabe retro songs”, the results are bound to be bad. ‘Munna’ is a name usually used for small kids. So may I say that these Munna Multicomposers failed miserably? 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 1.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pyar Ho = Feel The Rhythm > Swag = Beparwah = Shake Karaan = Beat It Bijuriya = Pyar Ho (Redux) > Main Hoon = Ding Dang > Swag (Rebirth)

 

Which is your favourite song from Munna Michael? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂