CRAZY LABEL VS DECENT COMPOSER DUO! (ARJUN PATIALA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa & Akash D
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Priya Saraiya, Benny Dayal & Akash D
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 26th July 2019

 

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Arjun Patiala is a Bollywood spoof comedy film starring Diljit Dosanjh, Kriti Sanon and Varun Sharma in lead roles. The film is direccted by Rohit Jugraj and produced by Dinesh Vijan, Sandeep Leyzell, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s first poster credited Sachin-Jigar for its music, but that culminated in the album jukebox crediting Guru Randhawa and Akash D alongside the duo. How they ended up there and for what, let’s see!


It’s not as much surprising as it is sneaky of the music label to add Guru Randhawa as a co-composer, along with the already capable Sachin-Jigar, in two songs out of their four. Starting with that note, we get a very dull sad song, Dil Todeya, the name of which is quite representative of my feelings after learning that there’s another person along with Sachin-Jigar composing some songs of the film. The song is the standard-issue Punjabi pop song, and surprisingly the only song sung by leading man Diljit Dosanjh, though the rest of the soundtrack does leave plenty scope for him to have sung! Nothing in the composition or arrangements shows that the song involves Sachin-Jigar in any way, but ironically the arrangements are solely by Sachin-Jigar, so maybe they are deliberately this typical, given that the movie is a spoof after all. The only interesting element in the song perhaps is the Qamancha/Kamancheh, an Armenian bowed string instrument related to the violin, performed here by Rasalila, and it sounds wonderful. The lyrics by Randhawa again are standard Punjabi pop sad song lyrics. Diljit renders the song with the required sorrow, but it’s nothing compared to his previous songs in ‘Udta Punjab’, ‘Phillauri’, ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’ and ‘Soorma’. Coincidentally, Sachin-Jigar were the first Bollywood composers to use his voice, back when he didn’t act in Bollywood, in ‘Pee Pa Pee Pa Ho Gaya’ (Tere Naal Love Ho Gaya) way back in 2012! Ah well, something has to be sacrificed at the altar of including Guru Randhawa as co-composer. Another coincidence (?) was that Guru’s debut or big break in Bollywood was in an album for which Sachin-Jigar did the original songs — ‘Hindi Medium’, which leads to the third coincidence — this film too was a Maddock+T-Series joint production! Want another coincidence? Sachin-Jigar were the first composers to use Randhawa in a film song, as a singer for a song he didn’t compose, ‘Lagdi Hai Thaai’ (Simran)! Phew!
The second song that the duo composes along with Randhawa though, fares much better, and this time, I contradictorily feel like the song sounds nothing like Guru Randhawa in terms of composition or arrangements! Also, when T-Series released the song, titled Main Deewana Tera as the opening promotional song for the film, they didn’t mention Guru as a composer. Some shady business going on in the crediting of this album. Anyway, Sachin-Jigar (and Guru Randhawa, apparently) create a funky party song (marketed as ‘Ek aur Remix gaana’ with the word ‘remix’ slashed out and replaced with the word ‘Original’) which throws you back to the duo’s own ‘Yeh Jawaani Teri’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), what with the whole R.D. Burman sound (the second soundtrack in a row which harks back to Burman’s music, without remixing it!) It also sounds like Pritam’s ‘Badtameez Dil’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani) owing largely to the wonderful trumpet solos (Kishore Sodha). Guru Randhawa sounds thankfully well in this one, and along with Sachin-Jigar, he manages to concoct a catchy composition, writes functional but stale lyrics and to top it all, Nikhita Gandhi ends the song with her stray line.
Sachin-Jigar’s third song is one that sounds entirely like something Guru would compose, but to my surprise (or no surprise at this point, since we’ve seen two songs composed by both of them together, both of which sound nothing like a collaboration between the two) Guru Randhawa isn’t a composer for this one! Crazy Habibi Vs Decent Munda ends up being catchy in parts only, Sachin-Jigar totally imitating Guru’s musical style in the beats, with a very heavy bass line in the hookline, which, by the way, has been composed very catchily. The other great attraction in this song is Benny Dayal’s Arabic interlude (which he has also written, apparently!) The song loses its appeal towards the second verse, though, but Guru’s rendition of Sachin-Jigar’s tune is not annoying, and thankfully keeps him out of his comfort zone, the high pitch, which unfortunately for his comfort, makes us uncomfortable as listeners.
Sachin-Jigar finally get one song without any apparent interference from the music label (except maybe choice of singer). Sachiya Mohabbatan turns out to be a song that seems like a mélange of two super-hit songs from Maddock Films’ last venture ‘Luka Chuppi’ — ‘Photo’ and ‘Duniyaa’. The tune resembles ‘Duniyaa’, while the arrangements resemble ‘Photo’. Again, the fact that the film is a spoof provides some background as to why the music too must have been made like this. Sachet Tandon, getting songs for other composers as a result of his ‘Bekhayali’ (Kabir Singh) gaining more popularity than its Arijit Singh variant, delivers the melody with finesse, his notes and the occasional grunge on point. The flute (Shirish Malhotra) and guitars (Kalyan Baruah) complement the melody well, and the trademark Punjabi pop beats make the song perfect as a spoofy one. The flute is actually what makes it sound like ‘Photo’ in the first place. Priya Saraiya, appearing in a Bollywood soundtrack after quite some time, pens a nice and sweet Punjabi piece, but nothing we haven’t heard before.
To end the album, we have the mandatory daaru from every film that contains a Punjabi lead character, and another mandate that dictates this song is that it is a T-Series Punjabi pop single by Akash D, who therefore becomes guest composer with the song Sip Sip, used as is in the album. Aditya Dev programs and arranges this one, in the most typical way imaginable, and Guru Bhullar along with the composer himself, renders the cheesy lyrics (also by the composer). The opening synth music especially is really banal, making you reluctant to continue at all. If you do manage to continue, however, you’ll quit soon anyway.


An album devoid of the usual quirks of a Sachin-Jigar album, maybe thanks to the dictatorship of the music label involved, this album does witness them give some temporarily enjoyable party tracks and one melodious romantic song, but nothing compared to their previous works with Maddock Films (Go Goa Gone, Happy Ending, Badlapur, Stree)!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 8 + 7 + 7.5 + 5 = 34

Album Percentage: 68%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Main Deewana Tera > Sachiya Mohabbatan > Crazy Habibi Vs Decent Munda > Dil Todeya > Sip Sip

 

Which is your favourite song from Arjun Patiala? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NAWABS THAT PARTY AND DANCE IN CLUBS..? (NAWABZAADE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gurinder Seagal, Guru Randhawa & Badshah
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Kunaal Vermaa, Ikka, Kumaar, Sandeep Nath & Badshah
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th July 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th July 20181400x1400bb2

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Nawabzaade is an upcoming comedy film starring Raghav Juyal, Dharmesh Yelande, Punit J. Pathak and Isha Rikhi. The film is directed by Jayesh Pradhan and produced by Lizelle D’Souza and Mayur K Barot. The music for the film is composed by Guru Randhawa, Gurinder Seagal and Badshah. I don’t really expect much from the album, looking at the composer names, and I’ll be honest: I’m reviewing it so I don’t have to have only two big albums, Dhadak and Soorma competing in the monthly awards. 😅 So let’s see what entails…


Guru Randhawa continues his spree of rehashing his pop sinhles under T-Series, into Bollywood club tracks; he also continues making the Bollywood variants sound fresher and less raw than the pop songs — giving them a more polished sound. High Rated Gabru is propelled by the two special appearances by Varun Dhawan and Shraddha Kapoor, though. The song is your typical Guru Randhawa EDM number that attracts you at first, but wears off with further listens. As for me, it hasn’t worn off yet though, so I guess this is one of the stronger ones. I like the drum beats Guru has put in occasionally, and the club sound still sounds fresh, so I guess he still has the audience grooving. The Female Version is even more unnecessary than having ice cream in December. Aditi Singh Sharma’s over-stylised vocals seem to say “Remember me? I haven’t got a song in Bollywood for a long time, but I still can’t sing in a normal voice.” The Punjabi reprise of the lyrics just sounds odd. The programming in this version isn’t as fresh and bubbly as in the male version, so it’s bound to get less takers.

Badshah too, is made to rehash his tried-and-tested formula, with a steady beat running throughout the song, Tere Naal Nachna is adorned with noises like an Indian auntyji going “Hainn?” The bass line though, is really addictive, and the hookline by newcomer (?) Sunanda Sharma is irresistible. Badshah has the most catchy female singer portions in his songs! Looks like after Aastha Gill, he is now introducing another quirky singer. The lyrics are the usual Badshah rap stuff, while vodka makes a cameo in the hookline, as always.

Lead composer Gurinder Seagal gets three songs to his credit: he doesn’t make much of the opportunity, though. Amma Dekh is a pacy dubstep number that should have been released two or three years ago. Sukriti Kakar awkwardly tries to sing like Neeti Mohan, while Ikka provides a banal rap portion. Gurinder does give it a cool sound though, with a variety of sound effects used throughout the song. Kumaar’s lyrics are nothing except for Sameer’s hookline from the song ‘Amma Dekh’ (Stuntsman).

If that was cringeworthy though, what awaits you in Mummy Kasam will have you wincing in terror. The staid-by-now Bollywood kuthu rhythm has been given a tedious presentation here, with cringeworthy lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, and weird vocals by Gurinder Seagal. Ikka presents an even worse rap in this song than he did in the former. Payal Dev tries to sound like Neha Kakkar, and obviously fails. Too loud for my liking.

The only song where Gurinder remotely proves that he can compose, and not just program, is Lagi Hawa Dil Ko, which just happens to be the best song of the album because all the others are nowhere near it. It sounds refreshing to get a normal, romantic melody after so much noise, and my brain felt glad to get to process something for once. Altamash Faridi leads the vocals wonderfully, while others like Gurinder Singh, Shivay Vyas, Nettle and even Mika Singh in a short energetic departure from the romantic tune, complement him well. The reason this song stands out from the others is that it has variety. The arrangements are pleasant — guitars, harmonica, tablas, even, in a short Qawwali portion, drums, trumpets and rock guitars in a rock-and-roll portion, this song has a wide range. Sandeep Nath’s lyrics are nothing great, but more of better-than-the-rest.


Except for one experimental song, this album is mainly going to be heard and forgotten. In fact, I can’t even guarantee that the experimental song won’t be forgotten!!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 5.5 + 7 + 5 + 3 + 7.5 = 34.5

Album Percentage: 57.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Lagi Hawa Dil Ko > Tere Naal Nachna > High Rated Gabru > High Rated Gabru (Female) > Amma Dekh > Mummy Kasam

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 27 (from previous albums) + 02 = 29

Which is your favourite song from Nawabzaade? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 😊


 

SADLY, NO EMOSANAL ATYACHAAR!! (BLACKMAIL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Badshah, Guru Randhawa & Preet Hundal
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya, Badshah, Guru Randhawa, Sabi, DIVINE & Dhaval Parab
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 23rd March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 6th April 2018

Blackmail Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Blackmail is a Bollywood dark comedy, starring Irrfan Khan, Kirti Kulhari, Arunoday Singh and Divya Dutta in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Delhi Belly’ fame Abhinay Deo, and produced by Abhinay Deo, Ramesh Deo, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Now, the film’s music has been given by Amit Trivedi, with one guest composition each by Badshah and Guru Randhawa. Let’s see why I found that the two guest songs were better than Amit’s songs here!!


Now, who knows what blackmailed Amit Trivedi into accepting an album with two songs by other artists, something I believe he has never done after a certain point in his career! Anyway, he starts his part of the album with a pulsating, electrifying rap song Badla, an ode to the underdogs in the world, who wish to take revenge on the people who’ve been unfair to them. The song starts off entertainingly, with Amit singing in his trademark robotic voice, making the song actually sound as if it’s sung by one frustrated with the ways of the world. It’s the rap by DIVINE though, that lifts the song up and makes it what it is, and I’m glad Bollywood has started getting actual rap songs this year, starting from ‘Mukkabaaz’s ‘Paintra’. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics for the melody portion are functional; nothing great, but DIVINE and Dhaval Parab do a better job for the rap lyrics. Everything else like the techno sounds, is just as expected in a rap song.
Bewafa Beauty doesn’t work as much as the first song; Amit seems to be trying to hard to make it sound like a 90s song just because Urmila Matondkar features in the video! The singing by Pawni Pandey is jarring at places, and the whole song as such doesn’t sound at all like an Amit Trivedi song. The lazy pace of the song and its neverending length makes it seem all the more boring. The arrangements too, are typical for such songs — there is no innovation in the synth sound, the dholaks, and it ends up sounding just mediocre. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are the only high point of the song; they summarize the story of the movie in five minutes.
Nindaraan Diyaan starts as a nice sad song with a pleasant acoustic backdrop, very similar to Amit’s ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’ (Raid) that came earlier this year. Amit’s own voice works wonders for the song, and it gives vibes of the signature Amit Trivedi sound. But when the song breaks into rock for the entire second half of the song, it seems unnecessary and loud — it would’ve been better, had it been restricted for an interlude and not till the end of the song. Just like ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’, Amit adds a soothing backing chorus that finds its way through the mist of the rock and manages to soothe the ears. The lyrics again, by Bhattacharya, are the highlight of this song that sounds like any other Trivedi song, and has nothing much working for it other than that.
Trivedi’s last song Sataasat is a quirky song, again, falling in the trademark Trivedi quirky zone, but again, it fails to impress, even with its jazz sound, the slurred vocals of Trivedi and Amitabh’s lyrics. It joins ‘Nindaraan Diyaan’ in being a “good, but not quite there” song. I can’t even see myself revisiting these four songs anytime in the near future, which is unfortunate, because Amit Trivedi was in great form last year, and to see him give an entire chunk of songs with none standing out, is disheartening.
Surprisingly, or maybe not, the mass caterers please my sensibilities even more. Badshah’s Happy Happy really manages to make you feel happy, with the signature Badshah techno loop, and groovy rhythm, not to mention Aastha Gill’s playful vocals. In fact, the portions sung by her are some of the best in the song. The lyrics are just alright for this kind of a song, but at least the song manages to make an impression and stay in the mind.
Guru Randhawa’s Patola is less memorable, but my personal favourite. That cheesy 90s sound, which he adds to Preet Hundal’s pop single ‘Patola’, to transform it from a typical Punjabi pop song, into a catchy wedding song, really works! The similarity to ‘Suit Suit’ (Hindi Medium) is forgivable, mainly because Guru takes out Bohemia’s rap, and adds his own touch to the lyrics, to tweak them as per the requirements of the movie. The same cheesy sound that ‘Ishqyaun Dhishqyaun’ (Goliyon Ki Raasleela Ram-Leela) carried, this song too carries, and in such an innocuous way, that it does create an impact.


Once again, who knows what blackmailed Trivedi into signing such an album where he was to share the field with two immensely popular hit makers, who end up surpassing him too, this time, as unbelievable as it sounds. Sadly this album is devoid of the usual Trivedi ’emosanal atyachaar’!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6 + 8 + 7 + 8 + 8 =

Album Percentage: 74.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Happy Happy = Patola = Nindaraan Diyaan > Badla > Sataasat > Bewafa Beauty

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 01 = 19

Which is your favourite song from Blackmail? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOT TOO JUNGLEE, BUT JUST RIGHT!! (DIL JUUNGLEE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Anand-Milind, Sharib-Toshi & Abhishek Arora
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arafat Mahmood, Guru Randhawa, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Vayu Shrivastav, Devendra Kafir & Abhiruchi Chand
♪ Music Label: T-Series / Pooja Music / Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: The music hasn’t released as a full album
♪ Movie Released On: 9th March 2018

Dil Juunglee

Listen to the T-Series songs: Gaana

Listen to the Pooja Music songs: Gaana


Dil Juunglee is a Bollywood rom-com starring Saqib Saleem and Taapsee Pannu in lead roles. The film is directed by Aleya Sen and produced by Jackky Bhagnani and Vashu Bhagnani. The film’s music is by multiple composers — Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Sharib-Toshi and Abhishek Arora. All of these composers have given something listen worthy in the past, and their style of music suits the romcom genre very well, so it’s probably going to be a fun music album.. let’s see!


Now, this album is somehow split between two music labels — T-Series, and the newly-conceived Pooja Music (belonging to Vashu Bhagnani’s Pooja Entertainment) whose digital marketing is being done by Sony Music. The makers probably wanted a remake of ‘Gazab ka Hai Din’ to feature in the album, but since its rights were with T-Series, that song had to be on T-Series as well, right? Because, obviously! And so I guess the Guru Randhawa song was a bonus add-on, like a ‘Buy one get one free’ kind of deal. So yeah, that’s how I guess this album ended up being on two different music labels. Anyway, since that has nothing to do with the music, let’s move on!
The first song on the T-Series part of the album happens to be composed by Guru Randhawa, along with co-composer Rajat Nagpal, the composers of ‘Ban Ja Rani’ (Tumhari Sulu) and ‘Suit Suit’ (Hindi Medium). While his previous songs in Bollywood have been rehashes of his pop singles, Nachle Na is an entirely original song, and no prizes to guess that it is his best and least contrived-sounding song in Bollywood.. (At the moment of writing this review, ‘Kaun Nachdi’ from “Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety” hadn’t released, which I now believe to be his best yet.) The beats are groovy, and the electronic loop, though harking back to ‘Aa Toh Sahi’ (Judwaa 2), is quite fresh-sounding. Vocals are good, and I’m surprised Neeti Mohan, of all singers was chosen for this song; she does a brilliant job, and surprises me at the same time. It is the lyrics that fall flat.
Now of course, since Guru Randhawa didn’t remake his own song, the music company had to call in someone who could remake some other song. So we have the more-than-part-time remake artist Tanishk Bagchi presenting Gazab Ka Hai Din, a remake of the song with the same name from ‘Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak’. I must say, he has done a good job providing the padding around the old hook; the mukhda is especially beautiful, but the antara is forgettable. But the addition of the old hook sounds so contrived, the beauty of the song ends there. For me, the mukhda of this song is the only memorable part! I wish he had been allowed to build a new song after this mukhda and not borrow from an old one! Jubin and Prakriti sound functional as always; nothing great in either of their renditions. The strings during the hookline are beautiful, they keep your interest intact through the boring parts of the composition. I also noticed that Tanishk has written the lyrics as close as possible to the old song, thereby keeping a small touch of it alive even in the new composition.
However, Tanishk’s other song Beat Juunglee, which features in the Pooja Music part of the album, is an amazing and instantly catchy one, and though he uses the iconic “Yaahooo!” from Shammi Kapoor’s ‘Chahe Koi Mujhe Junglee Kahe’ (Junglee), I’m happy that he hasn’t been made to recreate that number, because his original composition in this song is so insanely catchy!! Armaan Malik was the best choice for this, and the results show brilliantly. Prakriti Kakar gets not much to do, but does well in her one or two lines. Most insane though, is the programming by Tanishk, which has been getting better day by day. The electronic loop which starts the song is crazy and so are the percussions and horns throughout the song. Vayu’s lyrics are always entertaining and they are just that here as well. It just goes to show you how well Tanishk can actually compose when given the freedom. (As if last year’s ‘Shubh Mangal Saavdhan’ wasn’t proof enough!)
Sorry for rambling about that song, but the next song, by Sharib-Toshi, Bandeya, deserves just as much praise. Now this composer duo hasn’t been in the picture for a long time. And by in the picture I mean the way Tanishk is constantly in the picture, every month. The last song they composed was in the recently released “Fukrey Returns”, and now they return with another Punjabi song, this time a sad song sung by Arijit Singh. The composition is soulful, the arrangements heart-warming and the lyrics by Devendra Kafir amazing. The composition has the feel of Anu Malik’s ‘Mere Humsafar’ (Refugee) but the similarity is only in the first line of the hook. Arijit himself is quite at ease with this kind of a song, and is his usual soulful best.
The second best song of the album, after ‘Beat Juunglee’, has to be Abhishek Arora’s Dil Jaane Na, an amazing fusion track that starts off as a soft romantic number, but segues into a pumped-up electronic number with a groovy beat to it. Seasoned voices like Mohit Chauhan and Neeti Mohan are the perfect choice for the song, and they deliver well. I love the way composer Abhishek Arora makes the seamless transition from the soft portions of the song to the upbeat ones, and not just once but numerous times throughout the song. All in all, this song is a treat for people who like light and fluffy music!


The album was “Juunglee” after all, but I loved the Pooja Music part of it much, much, much more than the two songs on the T-Series label. Some things are just meant to be less “Juunglee” and hence less likeable than others!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 7 + 9 + 8 + 8.5 = 39

Album Percentage: 78%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Beat Juunglee > Dil Jaane Na > Bandeya > Gazab Ka Hai Din > Nachle Na

Which is your favourite song from Dil Juunglee? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 10 (from previous albums) + 01 = 11

YO YO KE COMEBACK KI SEETI!! (SONU KE TITU KI SWEETY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Yo Yo Honey Singh, Rochak Kohli, Amaal Mallik, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Saurabh-Vaibhav & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Yo Yo Honey Singh, Singhsta, Oye Sheraa, Kumaar, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa, Swapnil Tiwari & Sham Balkar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd February 2018

Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety is a Bollywood comedy film starring Kartik Aaryan, Sunny Singh and Nushrat Bharucha in lead roles. The film is directed by Luv Ranjan, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Luv Ranjan and Ankur Garg. The film’s “success” (by which I only mean box office success) can be attributed to the hit music the album featured, by artists like Yo Yo Honey Singh (who is back after a long break), Rochak Kohli, Amaal Mallik, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa and debutants Saurabh-Vaibhav. Let’s jump right into my review because there’s not much to say, three weeks after the film released! 😂


Yo Yo Honey Singh, after an I-don’t-know-how-long hiatus returns to Bollywood, with this album. What a surprise T-Series gives him only remakes to handle. And surprisingly, he too, handles them with care! Dil Chori, remake of Anand Raaj Anand composed and Hans Raj Hans sung pop single ‘Dil Chori Sada Ho Gaya’, becomes a catchy party number, and since the original song itself featured the words nasha and talli, Honey Singh needs no extra efforts in structuring his rap all around daaru. But the digital dhol rhythm really makes it lively. The female vocalist Simar Kaur also does well in a Kaala Doreya-esque cameo. It took a long time to grow on me though. His other song Chhote Chhote Peg is a remake of Anand Raaj Anand composed, Hans Raj Hans sung Bollywood Song ‘Tote Tote’ (Bichchoo), and this song too, sounds better than the original, if not good. The song is an ugly mishmash of a weird Neha Kakkar line that doesn’t match at all with the hook of the old song, though Navraj Hans sings the new hook better than his father had in the old song. Also, these lyrics fit into the tune more than “Tote Tote Ho Gaya Dil Tote Tote Ho Gaya“. 😆 Bt that doesn’t mean the lyrics themselves are exceptional — they’re quite the opposite. And they’re by people who call themselves weird names like Oye Sheraa and Singhsta. Again, Honey Singh steals the show with arrangements only. The trap music is catchy, as are the other techno sounds used. I can’t really say either of his songs are bad as such, but they’re just not good either.
Amaal Mallik returns with another ‘Sooraj Dooba Hai’ but this time it has tropical house vibes. Also this time the “Sooraj Dooba Hai” actually happens Subah Subah. 😂 Arijit doesn’t sound as fresh as he sounded in ‘Sooraj Dooba Hai’, probably because he sang so many such songs after that. And Prakriti sounds functional, but then nobody else could’ve sung her parts better, either. Overall, a good song, but could have been better.
The next song is by a composer who is quite on the rise these days, Guru Randhawa, being helped by T-Series to get his songs into any movie where there’s the scope of a clubbish number with Punjabi lyrics. Of course, ‘Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety’ was the obvious film that his song Kaun Nachdi was made for. The Punjabi sound is merged well with the electronic sound, giving it a fresh and enjoyable groove. The surprise element here is Neeti Mohan, getting back to back songs, where she aces her portions with amazing vocals. Her high-pitched voice sounds so good! And Guru himself sings and writes the song entertainingly, befitting to the movie’s theme.
Rochak Kohli, another composer who seems to be getting a lot of movies one after the other, but still hasn’t done a complete album (at least as far as I can recall), enters the album next, with two songs that are quite templatised with respect to the sound they carry. Lakk Mera Hit is a typical Punjabi ladies’ sangeet number, with Sukriti Kakar not doing her best behind the mic, but Rochak’s arrangements are entertaining, even though they have nothing new in them. The composition is such a heard-before one, it is hard to like it, especially in 2018.
Tera Yaar Hoon Main fares better, the melancholia channeled this time not for a breakup between lovers, but for a rift between best friends. The lyrics here (Kumaar) are the best lyrics of any song on the album, obviously, and Arijit delivers yet another beautiful rendition. The composition, though again not very fresh, does create an impact with its stretched notes and abrupt hookline. The Punjabi intermission towards the end was unexpected, but amazing. The arrangements are soulful, with great use of guitar and piano.
The seemingly debutant duo Saurabh-Vaibhav come up with a song tailor-made for Mika, Sweety Slowly Slowly, but I must say, the song itself isn’t bad. Though Mika, as is his habit, eats up half of each word in the lyrics, the entertaining composition coupled with the nice groovy beats makes for an entertaining but situational listen! I don’t understand why Mika drops the “z” from “badtameez“, the “se” from “Please” and so on, in the antara, though!
Probably the grooviest of the groovy numbers is what I’ve saved for the end — Bom Diggy Diggy. Now, this isn’t the kind of song I usually like. But I’ve got to admit, Zack Knight has churned up something really catchy here! Sounding a lot like those English pop songs until the Punjabi/Rajasthani interruption in the middle, the song really holds your attention from the initial harmonium portion. Of course, T-Series must’ve had to buy rights to Zack Knight’s single from 2017 ‘Bom Diggy’, but it has turned out to be worth the deal. Jasmin Walia’s voice is cute, despite the numerous mispronunciations.


Overall, this is an album full of club numbers, each one different from the rest, but it is the soulful song that stands out of the bunch of club songs, and a well-made club song adapted from a pop song by an independent artist, steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 6 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 8.5 = 59.5

Album Percentage: 74.38%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Yaar Hoon Main = Bom Diggy Diggy > Subah Subah = Kaun Nachdi > Sweety Slowly Slowly = Dil Chori = Lakk Mera Hit > Chhote Chhote Peg

 

Which is your favourite song from Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 02 (from previous albums) + 03 (from Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety) = 05

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

FORMULA FOR SUCCESS: SIMPLE REHNE DE!! (SIMRAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya & Vayu Srivastava
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 25th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th September 2017

Simran Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To hear “Baras Ja” on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy “Baras Ja” on iTunes CLICK HERE

♪ To hear “Baras Ja” on YouTube:


Simran is an upcoming Bollywood drama film, directed by Hansal Mehta, produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Shailesh R. Singh, and Amit Agarwal. The film stars Kangana Ranaut, Soham Shah, Mark Justice, Hiten Kumar and Esha Tiwari Pande in crucial roles. The film revolves around a Gujarati lady settled in the United States of America, who gets involved in crime. The film does seem quirky and very racy, and definitely very humorous. Now, Hansal Mehta usually does not rely on music to carry his films forward, as is evident from the fact that out of his recent film, ‘Shahid’ had just one song (not even released properly by a music label), and ‘Aligarh’ had no songs. Then there was ‘Citylights’, which, due to it being a joint venture with the Bhatts, had a stellar album by Jeet Gannguli. This film seems to be Hansal’s lightest film in a long time, and the result is that we can read the names of Sachin-Jigar in the credits, for music. Now, roping in Sachin-Jigar can’t mean anything except that Hansal wants great music for this film, doesn’t it? Accordingly, Sachin-Jigar have scored six songs for the film, and very situational too. Still, before I reveal much, let’s see how the music fares!!


1. Lagdi Hai Thaai

Singers ~ Guru Randhawa & Jonita Gandhi, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Doodho nahaao, phoolo phalo tum,
LED jaisi karna glow tum,
Sabko duayein yeh naseeb rakhna,
Jodi sada ye muskuraaye!
Maike ki photo ik kareeb rakhna,
Aisa na ho ki bhooli jaaye, jaaye, jaaye!
Jadon nache baby sajj dhajj, Lagdi hai thaai!”

– Vayu

It must be so difficult to compose for seven film albums in a year, but Sachin-Jigar are up and about, composing for the fourth album, which happens to be ‘Simran’. The first song matches Sachin-Jigar’s roots, as it is a Gujarati track by soul, but Punjabi by sound. Actually, it’s a beautifully thought out fusion of Gujarati and Punjabi, something nobody would ever be able to do this well and this seamlessly! The composition is perfectly suitable for a song that should make you get up and dance, and the desi touch, both Punjabi and Gujarati, add to the enjoyability of the song. Both the mukhda and the antara have been composed on the same tune, and Sachin-Jigar follow the trend to keep the song short and more appealing. The short length never hampers the beauty of the song. The hookline is amazing as well, but it is the arrangements that makes the song sound amazing. When it starts, you may be quick enough to dismiss it as yet another typical Punjabi number, added into the album just to be another ‘London Thumakda’ (Queen), but later you realise the magic, when the Gujarati dhols begin to awe you. The brass band (Trumpets by Kishore Sodha) is used very nicely here, and without sounding stale or heard-before, it provides a nice and fresh touch. But what is really amazing, is that wonderful flute (Naveen Kumar) which has been played in a very typical Gujju style, and it does nothing but inspire you to learn how to play flute! 😛 But I’m sure this kind of a flautist would take years to become so good! The vocals are amazing. At first, I thought Guru Randhawa has been chosen just because he has a history of many pop songs with T-Series, but turns out, he has given the Punjabi touch to the song very genuinely, and keeps aside all his pop song background for this one filmy song! Jonita is a surprise package; singing in Gujarati and all — though I think she is Gujarati. Anyway, she sings the old lady portions with as much ease as she does the lead heroine’s portions! In fact, she sings the Dadi Maa portions in Gujarati even better!! One thing I didn’t enjoy was the drunk part at the end, it seemed forced. Vayu’s lyrics are some of the most positive wedding song lyrics I’ve seen in Bollywood, a place where people come to weddings only to eat, drink and dance. But here, Vayu makes the characters sing things like “LED Jaisi Karna Glow Tum!” I swear, it is one of the most positive blessings I’ve heard in a Bollywood wedding song, and so less dramatic than the blessings they used to sing in songs like ‘Maahi Ve’ (Kal Ho Naa Ho) and all! All in all, this is a very enjoyable Gujju-Punjabi fusion, with amazing arrangements to accompany the energetic vocals!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

2. Pinjra Tod Ke

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Jannat ke saaye, jannat le aaye hai,
Baahon mein, ab zindagi,
Kismat ki dori jo, baandhi woh kholi,
Jeene chali, main abb zindagi,
Pinjra tod ke, tod ke, udd jaana hai,
Baahein kholke, kholke, udd jaana hai!”

– Priya Saraiya

The next song starts off as a mellow composition, with piano notes almost assuring you that this is going to be a sad number. However, it is wonderful to see how Sachin-Jigar seamlessly change the mood of the song, making it uplifting and motivational as the song progresses. That is almost like a symbol infused into the song by Sachin-Jigar. The lyrics by Priya Saraiya talk about breaking free of restrictions, and flying freely — so Sachin-Jigar have probably structured the song in a way to resemble that, starting off very slowly, but breaking free subsequently! What a wonderful form the song takes on, once you realise that! Sachin-Jigar’s composition is nothing new, it is the usual Sunidhi pathos, but it works wonders even though it is heard-before. After all, it isn’t necessary for things to be complicated to like them, is it? The hookline is very motivating, as is the second antara, a sprightly conclusion to the otherwise soft song. It takes on a more energetic tempo and composition, and even has more energetic arrangements, since the electric guitars and drums truly break out in that part. The rest of the arrangements have a soothingly Western touch — starting off with amazing piano, progressing into a euphoric acoustic guitar-led arrangement, until the aforementioned second antara arrives. The interludes contain a wonderful “Oley Oley“, by a backing vocalist I suspect is Jonita Gandhi, she sounds exactly like her. This type of song nowadays, usually goes to Sunidhi, and she aces it, as always. It’s nice to see her finally getting recognised not only as a singer of those upbeat numbers she was terribly typecast for in the late 2000s. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics, as mentioned before, are motivating and uplifting, in the true sense! This is probably Priya’s best work in a long time! A beautiful song, with a simple and heard-before vibe, but still manages to impress monumentally!!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Meet

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Tu hi mera meet hai ji,
Tu hi meri preet hai ji,
Jo labon se ho sake naa judaa,
Aisa mera geet hai ji!”

– Priya Saraiya

The next song happens to be a very happy-go-lucky romantic song, sung by Arijit, the kind of song Sachin-Jigar have usually done many times with Atif. Since their songs with Arijit have always been unconventional and never-heard-before, this comes as a surprise, as it conforms to the regular Arijit school of romance. However, the composition is really charming, and has you hooked (at least to the hookline) in the first listen. In the subsequent listens you “try” to get hooked to the mukhda and antara. Sadly, I still can’t recall the tunes of these portions immediately, even after having listened to the song at least six times by now. Does that mean the song is bad? Not at all. The song is amazing. Sachin-Jigar weave magic even with those notes that evoke memories of compositions by other composers, but doesn’t really evoke memories of any song in particular. It has the charm of an old Bollywood song, and it is the kind of composition to which we would say “Ah, the nostalgia”, after listening to it after a long time somewhere in the future. It is for this reason that the song gets such a huge repeat value even though it isn’t hooking as such. The hook has wonderful variations Arijit takes not every time, so they remain exclusive, but you keep waiting for the times he does take those variations! The arrangements are just as soothing as the composition; again, a wonderful piano piece opens the song, coupled with a magical and fairy-tale-like strings portion, until the Acoustic guitars come in to lighten up the mood. The whole thing sounds so fulfilling with that wonderful composition. The guitar riff repeats throughout the song. The interlude has a nice flute portion, which keeps you listening, if not hooked. Arijit aces such songs, and does so yet again. Again, I must mention those wonderful aalaaps of his, in the hookline. Priya writes amazing lyrics here too, but here they’re quite simple, even more simple than ‘Pinjra Tod Ke’, and has a plain and straightforward theme — love. A charming love song, with simplicity ruling it.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Single Rehne De

Singers ~ Shalmali Kholgade & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Mere dad bole karle shaadi, varna marr jaayegi boodhi daadi,
Shaadi kar, shaadi kar, shaadi kar, aakkho din shaadi kar,
Aur koi kaam nahi hai kya??”

– Vayu

A laugh riot arrives next, with a song that’s evidently about the main character trying to convince her father to let her stay single. There is actually very less by way of composition in the song, whatever little there is, just keeps repeating. The song is more like a rap, but it is the lyrics that hold it higher than it would have been. Vayu cracks you up with humorous lines that usually don’t find their way into songs; they are typical to scripts of rom-coms, but I find it very cool for them to find their way into a song. The production too, is good, but very repetitive again. Nevertheless, it goes with the unconventional nature of the lyrics. Shalmali Kholgade renders the rap with a feisty attitude, and Divya Kumar, relegated to the background does his one line well. Shalmali says the conversational portions of the song, at the beginning in such a funny, humorous way, that you start to get interested in the song due to her! Not a very fresh composition, but fresh lyrics and vocals, and even arrangements, which are sadly repeated too much!

Rating: 4/5

 

5. Simran

Singer ~ Jigar Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Chulbuli hai, chulbuli hai, nakchadhi hai, manchali hai,
Palak jhapakte falak churaa le apni Simran!
Jaani anjaani, thodi si deewaani,
Deewaana sabko banaa de apni Simran!
Ho, suljha ke hi khud hi yeh badhaye apne dil aur dimaag ki uljhan!
Oye oye oye Simran, alhad si Simran!
Na jaane tu chali re kahaan!”

– Priya Saraiya

The title song which we heard in the trailer is presented to us next, and it is this song which is actually the one that took the most time for me to like. The composition is very likeable, and has a lilting charm to it, in a very playful way, and has a charming ‘Barfi’-esque vibe to it, with the numerous sound effects and the whole description of the main character. The composition is great, if you look at it, but the arrangements confused me. Firstly, I was apprehensive about them because they were so similar to the ‘Barfi’ title track, with the whole accordion, mandolin and vocal sound effects, that I wasn’t sure if I liked them! I love ‘Barfi’, but I just felt weird about this song being so close to that. Later on, I started appreciating the arrangements, because of their lilting European touch and it was definite that Sachin-Jigar’s music would be inspired by Pritam’s as they were his disciples after all! Jigar has sung the song himself, and he has carried it out very well, and his raw, Un-autotuned vocals make the song even better as it sounds more natural and casual! The lyrics by Priya too, do a great job in acquainting us with the character of Simran, and her nature. A good title song, with an amazing arrangement.

Rating: 4.5/5

 

♪ Bonus Song

♪ Baras Ja

Singer ~ Mohit Chauhan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Jo nainon mein hai boondein,
Inhe rukhsaar ko, jee bhar ke chhoone de zara…
Ae dil, baras jaa, baras jaa na!
Abb toh aakar bhigo de tu mujhe!”

– Priya Saraiya

Now this song released later, a few days after T-Series had released the “Full Album”. Coincidentally, it had flooded in Mumbai on that day, and they came with a song called ‘Baras Ja’ the same night, so maybe they were waiting. 😶 Anyway, the song is probably the best, and least simple song on the soundtrack. It has a very complicated tune, but in spite of that, it is so easily loveable! It starts with a very sublime sound of the matka, and again, a soothing flute portion (Sachin-Jigar have really gotten it right with the flute in this album!!) that ensures you that this song was worth the wait! The composition is beautiful, very 90s, and very earthy at the same time, being very soothing. The antara is very, very amazingly composed, and Sachin-Jigar mix elements of Pritam’s and Rahman’s style of composition, to present to us a song, that is rooted to Indian music, especially in the arrangements. The song is decorated with beautiful flute pieces, and the Indian percussion really helps give it that earthy feel. Wonderful piano notes provide the much needed Western touch to the song too, but the Indian-ness overpowers it. Mohit Chauhan reminds us of his ‘Tum Se Hi’ (Jab We Met) days, and croons the song just as mellifluously. He does get a beautiful song all to himself after a long time, after having two songs by Pritam in ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’, sharing space with a co-singer in both of them. This is his first solo song after a long time! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics again, are very effective in bringing out the romance, and help give the song another thing to boast about. If it had been released earlier, it would’ve been easier for people to find, with all the other songs of the album, and got more audience! I am sad because this is definitely the best of the album!!

Rating: 5/5


Simran is yet another beautiful album from Sachin-Jigar. After three albums this year, out of which one was a multicomposer one, they strike gold yet again with their fourth one. I definitely think we can attribute the beauty of this album to one and only one reason — that it’s a solo composer album, and the director Hansal Mehta was clear in what he wanted. The freedom and creative liberty given to Sachin-Jigar is evident, because they’ve made some of the most beautiful melodies, without making things too complicated. That shows us how things can be made more attractive by following a simple formula — “Simple Rehne De!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 91.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Baras Ja = Pinjra Tod Ke > Meet = Simran = Lagdi Hai Thaai > Single Rehne De

 

Which is your favourite song from Simran? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂