APTLY SIMPLE AND MINIMALISTIC!! (PARTITION: 1947 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman
♪ Lyrics by: Navneet Virk
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th August 2017

Partition: 1947 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Partition: 1947 is an upcoming historical film, starring Hugh Bonneville, Gillian Anderson, Manish Dayal, Huma Qureshi and Late Om Puri in central roles. The film is directed by Gurinder Chadha, and produced by Paula Mayeda Berges, Gurinder Chadha and Deepak Nayar. The film has already released as ‘Viceroy’s House’ in the United Kingdom, and is ready for a Hindi release in India, in the Independence month, August. A.R. Rahman has scored the background music for the English version, but in the Hindi album, T-Series released only three songs, all the vocal songs (which are also not in the English soundtrack). So we get a short album. Let’s see whether it does justice to the movie’s theme.

P.S. I don’t know whether the Traditional songs are by Rahman, so I’ve not credited him for them. If you have any idea, do let me know.


1. Do Dilon Ke

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Hariharan, Music by ~ A.R. Rahman, Lyrics by ~ Navneet Virk

The only A.R. Rahman-composed song makes its place as he first song of the album, and ironically, it is going to be the end credits song for the movie. Just like any other A.R. Rahman song, this one takes time to grow, but eventually grips you. The composition is very similar to Rahman’s songs of the 90s, and particularly has a great hangover of ‘Tu Hi Re’ (Bombay). The antaras are beautiful, while the mukhda takes time to get accustomed to. What increases the déjà vu of the song, is Hariharan’s beautiful voice. It takes you back to the 90s Rahman vibe, and you just drown into his voice. Even better is Shreya, singing for him after quite some time. Her voice is the perfect mixture of sweet and silky and grave and solemn. The solemnity with which both of them render the song gives it an amazing aura. The arrangements are good, and very minimal. The piano stands out wonderfully, and strings towards the end make the song sound more rich. The richest part of the song, are the lyrics, by Navneet Virk, which are a beautiful metaphor seeing the 1947 Partition as a heartbreak. A good song, but lacks repeat value, as I believe it should!
Rating: 4/5

 

2. Duma Dum Mast Kalander

Singer ~ Hans Raj Hans, Music & Lyrics Traditional

The most famous folk song, probably, in India gets yet another recreation here. This is not much of a recreation though, as Hans Raj Hans is just singing the folk song in the least innovative manner possible. Of course, the experience of hearing the song yet again is wonderful, but I would’ve appreciated it had there been some variations, as Mikey McCleary had done in ‘David’. But since this is a historical film, I guess it is fitting they didn’t do that. The arrangements are jovial, with the amazing tablas and dholaks, accompanied by the harmonium, sounding rich and earthy. The tumbi and chimta, an essential part of Punjabi folk, make their way in here too. Hans Raj Hans’ vocals are amazing, as expected. Would this song have sounded any better if Rahman had been given the opportunity to recreate it? That is, assuming, he hasn’t!
Rating: 3/5

 

3. Jindwa

Singer ~ Hans Raj Hans, Music & Lyrics Traditional

Another folk song, one that I’ve never heard this time, makes its way into the album. This one sounds much better than ‘Duma Dum Mast Kalander’ because of the freshness and the fact that it is not something we have heard before. Of course, the composition overlaps many other songs we have heard that are based off of Punjabi folk songs, and now we know where those songs were inspired from. The arrangements here are so beautiful, with rich ethnic flutes and that tabla percussion going on throughout. Guitars also make it sound more fresh. The harmonium is an obvious part of it. There are sudden portions that escalate into high-octane dhols and bhangra. The flute actually sounds like the flute in ‘Chalo Chale Mitwa’ (Nayak), which was by Rahman, so I do suspect that Rahman was indeed, in charge of these two folk songs. Who knows!
Rating: 3.5/5


Partition 1947 is another one of those albums that sticks true to the film’s script. If all the songs are by Rahman, and there’s no way to know if they are or not, thanks to T-Series’ vague crediting style, the album is a letdown, particularly with the folk songs, because we know that Rahman can compose folk songs beautifully. Anyway, the album is aptly short, and situational!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 3.5 = 10.5

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  Do Dilon Ke > Jindwa > Duma Dum Mast Kalander

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 22 (from previous albums) + 02 = 24

 

Which is your favourite song from Partition 1947? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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