CRYBABYIEE WEDS NRI!! (SWEETIEE WEDS NRI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo & Shah Jahan Ali
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Dr. Devendra Kafir, Late Shyam Bhateja, Palak Muchhal, Shakeel Azmi & Banjara Rafi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Sweetiee Weds NRI Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

{P.S. The song “Shiddat (Reprise)” is sung by Mohd. Irfan on Saavn and YouTube, and Sharad Patel on iTunes. Since the former is there on two sites, I will review that}


Sweetiee Weds NRI is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, with the clichéd theme of a wedding. The film stars Himansh Kohli and Zoya Afroz in the lead roles, and is directed by Hasnain Hyderabadwala, and produced by Cyrus Dastur, Dhaval Patel, Sada Bhuvad, and Tariq Mohammed. I couldn’t care less about the plot of the film, so heading on towards the music front. We have a multicomposer album, as is the norm for T-Series, but it is shocking to not see any of the T-Series protégés working for the film. Except maybe Arko. Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo and newcomer Shah Jahan Ali are the other composers for the film. Jaidev just gave us a better-than-the-original mata-ki-chowki recreation of Badshah’s ‘Kala Chashma’, and he gets one song here. Palash, back after doing nothing in films for three years, gets five songs all of a sudden in this film. Let me break the suspense. It is actually two songs, one of them having four versions. Raaj Aashoo, who has composed quite passable music before, gets a song and its reprise too, while Shah Jahan Ali, newcomer, gets one song too. Let me specify that even Arko has one song only. So with five composers and ten tracks, let’s see whether this grand wedding is just all quantity or has some substance too.


1. O Saathiya

Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Prakriti Kakar, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Thankfully, the first song is composed by the person whose song I was waiting for and at least expecting something from, Arko. And sure enough, the song is a pleasant and enjoyable listen. The composition is a breezy one, and starts off quite pleasantly. The soothing quality of the song continues as it progresses, and the  peak point of the song is the “Humrahi” hook, which is like fresh air. (Don’t watch that part in the video song though! 😂) There is no antara as such, the mukhda is repeated twice in the song, once by the male singer Armaan and the other time, by the female singer, Prakriti. That’s why the song ends up sounding shorter than it is, because the mukhda is repeated twice and that’s it. The arrangements are breezy as Arko’s arrangements usually are. The Acoustic guitars, and shakers and those digital beats in the hookline, giving a ballroom feel, are amazing. The interlude consists of a nice, feel-good, guitar piece, followed by a refreshing flute portion, which is in turn followed by a sweet piano piece. The vocalists carry the song out with ease, Prakriti sounding amazing with the nuanced singing. Armaan sings in that slightly uncomfortable low pitch which he rarely sings in, in the beginning, but gets better in the high pitched hookline. Arko’s lyrics are typical romantic song lyrics, but suit the ambience of the composition. A simple but sweet and effective song.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kudi Gujarat Di

Singers ~ Jasbir Jassi, Sonia Sharma, Akasa Singh & KD, Music by (Original and Recreation) ~ Jaidev Kumar, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Shyam Bhateja, New Lyrics by ~ Dr. Devendra Kafir, Rap Written by ~ KD

Jaidev Kumar steps in here, and with another remake, after his remake of ‘Kala Chashma’ in the recent ‘Behen Hogi Teri’. As we know, this music company’s latest fad is to remake hit Punjabi pop numbers of the 90s, and after they remade ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ by Sukhbir, in ‘Hindi Medium’ last month, they choose ‘Dil Le Gayee’ by Jasbir Jassi to remake this month. And the ingenious naming system of T-Series starts again, naming this one ‘Kudi Gujarat Di’, which are just the words that appear right after ‘Dil le gayee’ in the song’s lyrics. However, I’m quite pleased with this remake. The main reason is that Jaidev Kumar, who had composed the original, which was in fact his debut, has recreated it. So he keeps the flavour of the song intact, and yet manages to add a pleasant club touch. The composition has been kept the same, and lyrics have been changed. Unlike the ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ remix, this one actually is a remake. The arrangements have been changed to good club arrangements that are actually enjoyable. The techno sounds here, make the song more viable for today’s audience, who is only behind club songs. The vocals are great too, with Jasbir showing that he is still sounding as young as ever. The female singers, get very less scope, and I don’t even know which of them has sung what. A rap by someone called KD sounds very spoofish and amateurish. The new lyrics by Dr. Devendra Kafir, who wrote ‘Bolna’ (Kapoor & Sons) before this, are fun but typical. An enjoyable remake. 

Rating: 3.5/5

3. Musafir / Musafir (Reprise) / Musafir (Remix)

Singers ~ Atif Aslam & Palak Muchhal / Arijit Singh / Atif Aslam & Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

The next song witnesses Palash entering film music after a long time; his last release was ‘Amit Sahni Ki List’ in July 2014 if I’m not wrong. And this song, he provides in as many as three different versions. The composition is a very typical, Bhatt-ish composition that at first seems very bland and boring, but sounds better the next time. And when you start liking it, you start listening to it frequently, and after listening to it a lot, you start hating it. So like almost all Bhatt-ish songs, this song has a quite uninteresting life story. Jokes apart, Palash’s composition, though nothing innovative, provides temporary relief like Zandu Balm and sticks in your head for that short while as if it has been stuck with Fevicol. (There, I managed to put ‘Dabangg’ references in my review.) The mukhda is very typical, and so is the hookline, so much so that the first time I tried to listen to the song, I didn’t go past the hook. The antara is nothing great either. But despite all this, the song somehow manages to get in your head. So it’s like a Rohit Shetty film — not perfect, but manages to get you watching ahead. The arrangements must be the reason we are able to go forward. Both actual versions (not counting the remix for now) have different arrangements. While the Atif Aslam version has a clichéd-to-the-core acoustic guitar setting with occasional electronic tabla beats, the Arijit Singh version has better arrangements, starting off with a flute, and progressing with a more unplugged-ish acoustic background, piano and guitars. The flute really impressed throughout the song, and Palash isn’t stingy with the use of the flute. Atif’s diction is very irritating in his version, and when he says “Gira” for “Ghira”,Batakta for “Bhatakta“, and “Dikka” for “Dikha“, you can’t help but cringe. Palak joins him to repeat the mukhda at the end of the song. Arijit goes solo in his version, and he rectifies all of Atif’s diction mistakes. However, Palash makes another mistake here, which is making Arijit sing the repeated mukhda at the end, making the song seem extra long. He could have stopped after the antara, or made Palak sing it for some respite from the overbearing drowsiness. The remix is a miserable attempt to quieten the two ever-at-war fan bases of Atif and Arijit, by cramming both into one song. But why would anyone want them to be together in a remix. And I can’t even say how sappy the vocal programming sounds when Palash uses it on Atif, making him sound like a goat. The beats are typical remix beats that make your ears explode. The lyrics by Palak are suitable for the song, but again, very typical and nothing innovative. I don’t even know whether I like this one or not, so I’ll say it’s somewhere in the middle.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Musafir, 3/5 for Musafir Reprise, 0.5/5 for Musafir Remix

 

4. Wedding

Singers ~ Shahid Mallya & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Palash’s second song is the wedding song of the album, very uncreatively titled “Wedding”. The composition is something that totally belongs to an Indian animated film for children. Come on, even children’s songs are composed more thoughtfully than this. The “Saiyaan Oh Saiyaan” refrain by Palak is very cheesy. Some of it is way too sweet to digest, and the lack of usual Punjabi arrangements, makes it even more bland. Instead, Palash uses weird-sounding techno sounds that make it sound very over-the-top. And of course, the typical brass band, which is also, unfortunately, digital. A weird EDM-ish interlude tries to makes things “cool”. Palash tries to bring in a folksy feel to the song by roping in Shahid Mallya to sing it, but he sounds so uninterested, it comes out through his singing. And the lines he’s made to sing! 😵 Palak sounds too, too, sweet, like the syrup in Gulabjamun if someone adds too much sugar. Her lyrics too, are straight out of a fairy tale; the cringeworthy Hinglish takes a toll on you by the time the song ends. When EDM and an overly sweet melody spoil everything.

Rating: 1.5/5 

 

5. Shiddat / Shiddat (Reprise)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Mohd. Irfan, Additional Vocals by ~ Priyanka Negi, Seepi Jha & Bhuvan Ahuja, Music by ~ Raaj Aashoo, Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

With Raaj Aashoo’s song, things take an even more downhill turn. Totally overloaded by a very overbearing melancholic sound, the song exhausts you by the time it is over. The composition is something even the Bhatts would shy away from nowadays. What’s more, the song spans for over five minutes, something utterly unbearable. And two versions. So it sadly has eleven minutes of unmerited footage in this already long album. The arrangements are typical digital beats that would be a rage if it were 2007 right now. The vocalists in neither version could keep the interest of the listener in place, till the end. Armaan, trying to be K.K., disappoints like never before. On the other hand, Mohd. Irfan in his version sings in a voice that defies the beauty of his real, silky smooth voice. The female backing vocalists are irritating throughout. I would rather not talk about the unstylish lyrics. Welcome to 2007.

Rating: 1/5 for Shiddat, 1/5 for Shiddat Reprise

 

6. Zindagi Bana Loon

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Shah Jahan Ali, Lyrics by ~ Banjara Rafi

Newcomer Shah Jahan Ali comes into Bollywood with this song, and brings yet another old-fashioned, slow-paced song into the album, much to the dislike of the audience. The tune is so complicated, with so many pauses in random places, and no indication as to whether it is a happy romantic or a sad romantic song, that you just forget about it after you hear it once. Shah Jahan Ali must have been feeling like Roop Kumar Rathod felt while composing ‘Agar Tum Mil Jao’ (Zeher), or M.M. Kreem while composing ‘Jaadu Hai Nasha Hai’ (Jism), because the song is like a wannabe version of those. The slow pace doesn’t help either. Neither do the arrangements. The guitars are played so typically, the lack of innovation makes you go crazy. Palak tries to bring nuances like Shreya Ghoshal into her singing, succeeding at none of them. She sings in such an unnaturally high-pitched voice, it even surpasses the cheesiness of ‘Kaabil Hoon’ (Kaabil). The lyrics of the song are cringeworthy again. Another staid composition.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

7. Kinara

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Finally the album comes to an end. But waiting right at the end for us, is another version of ‘Musafir’ by Palash Muchhal. This time it has been disguised under another name, ‘Kinara’ because the word ‘Musafir‘ doesn’t come in the new lyrics. But it is a version of ‘Musafir’. This album has so many versions of ‘Musafir’, which means tourist. As if the album is a tourist destination! The composition and lyrics are much the same, except one line in the hook, where the lyrics have been changed. The arrangements comprise an overtly sentimental combination of violin, piano and jingle bells. Palak tries again to imitate Shreya, when she does her Female Versions, like the one of “Sunn Raha Hai” (Aashiqui 2) and that of “Hasi” (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Even Palash tries to imitate the arrangements of the former, with those jingles and the occasional tabla. Clearly, the makers were under the false impression that the public would love ‘Musafir’ so much that they would hover around long enough to wait for a mediocre female version. 

Rating: 1.5/5 


It looks like the album of Sweetiee Weds NRI was finalized years ago. Dated melodies, arrangements that originated sometime before the dinosaurs, and a tracklist trying to imitate ‘Aashiqui 2’ with vocals that sound bland to say the least and the same vocalists used over and over again, this album isn’t really as good as the makers made it out to be when they were promoting it. Instead of Sweetiee Weds NRI, the name should’ve been Crybabyiee (you can throw a few more e’s in there if you want) Weds NRI!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 3 + 0.5 + 1.5 + 1 + 1 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  O Saathiya > Kudi Gujarat Di > Musafir (Reprise) > Musafir > Wedding = Zindagi Bana Loon = Kinara > Shiddat = Shiddat (Reprise) > Musafir (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 14 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Sweetiee Weds NRI) = 15

 

Which is your favourite song from Sweetiee Weds NRI? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A BEHEN WHO CAN’T DANCE, BUT CAN ONLY ROMANCE! (BEHEN HOGI TERI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Rishi Rich, Jaidev Kumar, Amjad-Nadeem, Yash Narvekar & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Bipin Das, Yash Narvekar, Amit Dhanani, Late Anand Bakshi, Sonu Saggu, Rohit Sharma, Parry G & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 23rd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Behen Hogi Teri Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Behen Hogi Teri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy starring Shruti Hassan, Rajkummar Rao, Gautam Gulati and Gulshan Grover in lead roles. The film is directed by Ajay K. Pannalal and produced by Tony D’Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. The film’s slogan is “All Indians are NOT Brothers and Sisters!” Well, going by the trailer and this slogan thingy, it seems like a quirky and light hearted romantic comedy, but you know Bollywood, they can add drama into anything and everything. The music of the film, as expected is by multiple composers, including Pritam’s A&R venture JAM8 (Kaushik-Akash-Guddu this time), Rishi Rich, Amjad-Nadeem (after a long time, huh!), Jaidev Kumar and Yash Narvekar. Out of these composers, none, I repeat none, have given anything outstanding in the past, so one can just hope that some miracle occurs and they give us great music for this film. Expectations are moderate, but hoping for the best, let’s explore the music of ‘Behen Hogi Teri’.


1. Jai Maa

Singers ~ Sahil Solanki, Jyotica Tangri & Parry G, Original Composition by ~ Prem Hardeep & Badshah, Music Recreated by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap Lyrics by ~ Parry G

Wow. So now the music industry has started remaking remakes. ‘Kala Chashma’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which was a quite banal remake by Badshah, of the Punjabi pop number ‘Kala Chashma’ by Prem Hardeep, itself, now gets remade into a mata-ki-chowki song. Jaidev Kumar, who had earlier remade ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz) into a similar satirical devotional song, ‘O Meri Mata’ in ‘Bajatey Raho’, takes the same composition that Badshah had made. Nothing changed in the tune, and that’s why it would make the public even crazier. The arrangements seem more toned down and not as harsh and shrill as they were in the original (I mean the original remake). I guess they added the dhols here specially for the jagraata setting. And they’ve, quite to my immense pleasure, gotten rid of the EDM at the end, and the shouting ladies and breaking glasses from the ‘Baar Baar Dekho’ song. Vocals here sound good and aptly funny as per the Goddess prayer setting. Sahil Solanki sounds much better than Amar Arshi, the original singer of both the original and Badshah’s remake. A rapper called Parry G {I don’t know why these people like to write a single letter after a weird nickname; we are going to meet another one later in the album!} reprises Badshah’s “sadkon pe chale jab ladkon ke dilon mein tu aag laga de baby firrrreeeeee” with a rap that sounds much more pleasant. Jyotica Tangri is a nice replacement for Neha Kakkar, but with less of an edge in her voice. The replacement lyrics by Sonu Saggu are quite funny too, but not something that will make you “ROFL” or “LOL” either. Interesting how the remake of a remake turns out to be better than the original remake. Let’s start remaking remakes now. P.S. I hope a certain music company doesn’t read that or else we will be over-flooded with ‘Baby Doll’ remakes. (Then again, aren’t we already over flooded by them!)

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tera Hoke Rahoon

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash-Guddu (KAG for JAM8), Lyrics by ~ Bipin Das

Next up, we get a dulcet melody from Pritam’s A&R company, JAM8. This time, the composers of the two songs in ‘1920 London’, Kaushik-Akash, are joined by someone calling himself Guddu, thus making it a trio. And this way, they produce a song that I will remember as one of the best (and the best till now) from any composer for JAM8. The composition, for once, doesn’t sound like a Pritam composition; for once the composers working behind the JAM8 label do not try to emulate Pritam’s late 2000s style of composition. In fact, the composition kind of reminded me of Bobby-Imran’s songs in ‘Badmaashiyan’, or some of Jeet Gannguli’s works. The free flow of the hookline makes it instantly likeable, and the mukhda and antara has a calm, soothing but haunting touch to it, something I’m always ready for if it isn’t too maudlin. The arrangements are fabulous; they just add to the haunting characteristic of the song. The guitar has been played in such a subtle manner, in the beginning, that it is impossible to not be sucked in right away. And when the orchestra sets in, the song just gets many times better. The electronic tabla adds to the serenity, while that wonderful flute interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. In the antara guitars have been played in a wonderful play-stop-play-stop manner that is so comforting. And the tabla doesn’t stop either! Arijit, the first choice for any composer associated with Pritam, and Pritam himself, renders the mellow composition with such ease, in the voice of his that I love, as opposed to that droning voice he uses in sleepy songs. The way he sings the “uff tak na yaara karoon”, is so beautiful! Bipin Das (newcomer?) writes lyrics that are instantly lovable. The first time JAM8 do something that doesn’t resemble their mentor’s work heavily, and it turns out to be a success. 

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Jaanu

Singers ~ Juggy D, Shivi & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

So after the remake of a remake, we get a remake of another classic, in fact, one of my favourite songs by R.D. Burman. The likeable, sweet and fun-to-listen-to classic gets a makeover and now it looks horrendous. Rishi Rich seems to have struck a big deal in Bollywood after his long hiatus, because after he returned in ‘Half Girlfriend’, with a mediocre title song, he gets to do another (though horrible) song here. The man makes sure that somebody says “This is a Rishi Rich refix” before the song starts, and that is so annoying! We have the credits in front of us and we can read your name there. I know here are some music listeners out there who don’t care about who made a song, and they will continue not caring, so even if you say your name there, they wouldn’t care. And then comes the cliché of saying the names of the singer (Juggy D) and the rapper (Raftaar). And what I don’t understand is, why not say the name of the female artiste! Hasn’t she contributed anything to the song? They did the same thing in ‘High Heels’ from ‘Ki & Ka’ and they repeat it here. If anything, Shivi is shining in this song amongst the hackneyed renditions of the male artist and Raftaar. Oh by the way, Juggy D. 😄 Another artist naming himself like that. Rishi Rich has kept the composition intact, fortunately. But what he does instead, is even more unfortunate. He breaks up the hookline, making it sound like a cassette that is stuck at one point. And then it stops to make way for a weirdly-placed techno music piece. And then it proceeds and ends. How boring. There are so many raps in the song, it is hard to concentrate on the actual song. And Raftaar raps so oddly. Just to keep the “Behen” theme intact, he adds so many lines about sisters, that were so unnecessary. And now for thr vocals. Juggy D can’t sing at all. The proof? If someone isn’t able to sing the nuance in the word “Hindustan” in this song, he or she is definitely not a good singer. Shivi barely manages to sing that part, but does much better than her co-singers, making her stand out even with a mediocre performance. Of course, they don’t match the singing calibre of the legendary combination of Kishore Kumar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle & Usha Mangeshkar from the original song. The arrangements are irritating club sounds, EDM thrown here and there. But I enjoyed the parts with the Spanish guitars, and the strings incorporated from the old song. A horrible remake of a song that deserved a much better remake, or no remake!

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Teri Yaadon Mein / Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai, Pawni Pandey & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar & Sukriti Kakar, Music Composed by ~ Yash Narvekar, Music Produced by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Yash Narvekar & Amit Dhanani

Rishi Rich comes back for the next song too, but this time, things are different. This time, the song is a romantic song. And this time, Rishi Rich has only produced the song. Rishi Rich gives a composing break to someone I’ve seen many times in the singer category in various Amaal Mallik, Meet Bros. and even Rishi Rich songs, Yash Narvekar. He gets to compose the tune. And I must say, it is quite a commendable tune! Yes,  does follow the usual Bollywood romance template, with its tune, but it manages to engage the listeners. However, the listener does lose interest in some places. The hookline is very typical, but still, it managed to garner my interest. The antara too, follows the same pattern. What really engages the listeners, though, is Rishi Rich’s beats and arrangements. In the first version, Rishi employs a nice and groovy beat, a hip-hop beat in a romantic song, which at first elicits a weird reaction from the listener, but it sets in perfectly after a couple of listens. Especially the tablas which Rishi has added occasionally, are amazing. The second version, the Reprise, takes a more templated route, with guitars and piano taking the lead, making for a more calm listen. A harmonium too pops up later on, quite oddly. The piano interlude in that version is a must-hear. The vocals are good in both versions. While Yasser, sounding as similar to Arijit as ever, and Pawni Pandey stir up a nice chemistry in the first version, the essence of the song only reaches us in the Reprise because the voices of Yash & Sukriti haven’t been touched. Programming ruins the feel of the voices in the first version. However, I loved Yash’s backing vocals in the first song, that sound like tabla bols. Yash & Amit Dhanani together write a song that is full of typical lines and phrases, like the song title itself. Experimental, but works to some extent. The Reprise version fares better!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Original Version, 4/5 for Reprise Version

 

5. Tenu Na Bol Pawaan / Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Jyotica Tangri / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Amjad-Nadeem, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Sharma

Amjad-Nadeem, back in the composing scene after quite some time, have been roped in for the final song on the album. Amjad-Nadeem are usually known to meddle in typical romantic songs or horrendous massy item songs. This time around too, they have provided a typical romantic song, but that typicality is very enjoyable. The composition is sugary-sweet, something that is very rare from Amjad-Nadeem, who usually produce melodramatic sounding songs. The hookline is so heard-before, so clichéd, yet it manages to click with the listener. There is a high-pitched line that just makes you love the song even more. The antaraa are a bit less engaging, but still manage to keep the flow of the song intact. There are two versions to this song as well; one being a male version (with female humming in the background, hence the credit for Jyotica) and the other being a female version, which is kind of unplugged. The male version has heavenly instrumentation. It starts off with nice chimey sounds, followed by the sweetest flute portion I’ve heard in quite a while. The melody is structured on a simple guitar riff that, though it is very simple and typical, engages the listener. Strings join in later, bringing the third dimension to the song, and how! The second version is, as I said before, unplugged, and has a nice acoustic guitar riff playing in the background, and nothing else. The minimalistic feel of it, makes it even more appealing. Vocals are perfect in both versions. This is no doubt, Yasser’s best performance ever, and he sounds so different than usual here! Jyotica does the humming in Yasser’s version. Asees Kaur, on the other hand, renders her unplugged version with such a beautiful aura around her, that it is mesmerizing. Though her track is longer by one minute than Yasser’s, it makes for a good calm listen. The lyrics by Rohit Sharma (I don’t know whether he’s the Sharma who composed the songs of ‘Anaarkali of Aaraah’ or any other one. He’s definitely not the cricketer, right?) are sweet too. A song full of sweet things. Sweetness lies in simplicity after all.

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Reprise Version


Behen Hogi Teri is an unexpectedly cool multicomposer album! Going by the composers’ names, I was least expecting such a good album. However, it seems like all the composers have pitched in to provide their best. For a romantic comedy, a good album is a must, and fortunately, this album delivers as expected, if not less than expected. Yes, one song is very bad, but the others make up for it. And since the finance theme predominates the album, maybe that’s why they managed to wrench out such good songs from the music directors. An album predominantly made of romantic songs, but still works fine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 4.5 + 1 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hoke Rahoon = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein > Jai Maa > Jaanu

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 12 (from previous albums) + 02 = 14

 

Which is your favourite song from Behen Hogi Teri? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

THE 6 MUSIC-ETEERS!! (SAAT UCHAKKEY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Jaidev Kumar, Bapi-Tutul, Vivek Kar, Niranjan Khound & Saket Singh
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Amir Khusro & Sahil Sultanpuri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2016
♪ Movie Released On: 14th October 2016

Saat Uchakkey Album Cover

Saat Uchakkey Album Cover

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Saat Uchakkey is a Bollywood comedy film starring Anupam Kher, Manoj Bajpayee, Kay Kay Menon, Annu Kapoor, Vijay Raaz and Aditi Sharma. The movie is directed by Sanjeev Sharma, and produced by Wave Cinemas, Crouching Tiger Films and Shital Bhatia. Since the film has already released, and not created much of a buzz among the public, there’s no use discussing the film, so I’m gonna dive right into what concerns me i.e, music. The music album for this film has four songs, each composed by different composers or composer duos. The first composer is Jaidev Kumar, who came into Bollywood with his ‘Nagin Dance’ (Bajatey Raho) and is still struggling to survive without making these weird party-sharty songs. The second song is by a duo, Bapi-Tutul, whose names I’ve seen in many RGV films like ‘Rann’, ‘Sarkar’, ‘Sarkar Raj’ and ‘Rakht Charitra’. Next up, there’s Vivek Kar, whose name too, I’ve seen in many films, the biggest one I remember being ‘One Night Stand’. And the last song is by another duo, Niranjan Khound Saket Singh. The ayre debuting with this song, and hopefully, they have something fun in hand. My expectations from the album? Quite a bit of nothing, along with some songs about drinking, and some more of nothing. Basically, I have no expectations. This is like a filler review for me while I wait for the ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ album to release. 😛 So can we get on with it? 😀


1. Neat Quarter
Singer ~ Late Labh Janjua, Music by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Jaidev Kumar starts off the album with his song that starts off with a tune oh-so-reminiscent of the ‘Nagin Dance’ (Bajatey Raho), which I guess was his only (though undeserved) hit song, though he did give that wonderful song ‘Das Dae’ in ‘Ishqedarriyan’. Anyway, let’s analyze Jaidev’s career graph later. So, the song starts off with the very generic tune that plays on that typical shehnaai/harmonium mix type of wind instrument. The composition that follows is just more typicality heaped up on top of typicality. The mukhda is another very generic tune, while the hookline is just irritating. Not that the antara is any good either. The arrangements by Jaidev Kumar are quite fun, with a nice Punjabi dhol rhythm throughout overshadowing the average composition. The shehnaai thing is irritating though. Vocals by Labh Janjua, who sadly passed away last year, right when we were all dancing on his ‘Dil Kare Chu Che’, are effusive and seem very lively. This is a song he recorded before his death, of course. The lyrics by Kumaar are those type of lyrics that revolve all around drinks and nothing else. And the line “Liver Ki hai ye demand” just makes you laugh. 😛 A bad opening to the album, with nothing good except the arrangements and Labh’s singing.

2. Chhap Tilak
Singer ~ Kirti Sagathia, Music by ~ Bapi-Tutul, Lyrics by ~ Amir Khusro

Next up, we have a very mystical rendition of the Sufi song by Amir Khusro, ‘Chhap Tilak Sab Chheeni Re’. And what can I say about this one?? It is pure bliss, this song! It starts with a nice aalaap by Kirti Sagathia, who is the go-to for Garbas usually. Here, though, he has clearly been approached by Bapi-Tutul for a Qawwali, arranged quite innovatively. The mukhda reminds you of A.R. Rahman’s ‘Naina Milaike’ (Saathiya). However, that is just a slight resemblance. The composition is very sweet, and the duo seems to have taken extra care to handle this song with care. The hookline is what does the magic. Whenever Kirti sings the word “Cheeen” or any word corresponding to the same tune, you should observe the ease with which he sings them, and the sweetness in the composition that that word imparts. Though the song is practically the same tune repeated over and over again, you never get bored and it never seems repetitive. The arrangements are one of the main reasons for this. The Qawwali arrangements are complete with harmonium, but the percussion is not done by the tablas, and it is done by something quite unexpected — bongos and congos! The ethnic folk drums really add something of a Caribbean touch to the song, and that’s what I loved the most about the song. The claps have been used perfectly and they’ve given a wonderfully catchy rhythm to the song. Kirti’s rendition is fabulous, and his backing chorus helps him really well and it sounds even more fabulous. The lyrics have not been touched, and Khusro’s immortal piece of writing remains as it is, thankfully. Innovative and catchy at the same time! A song that excels in every department! #5StarHotelSong!!

3. Cycle Se Chalaang
Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Vivek Kar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

After Kirti singing the previous song, we have Kailash Kher himself singing the next. The song has been composed by Vivek Kar, and he has really worked hard to make a quirky and catchy song, on the lines of Kailash Kher’s other quirky and catchy songs. The composition turns out to grow on you after just a few listens, and then it just takes over all the tunes in your head, until only this song is playing in your head all day! Believe me, it happened to me! Vivek Kar’s mukhda is amazing, with all the fun elements in the song appearing right from the beginning, and not from the middle of some line. And the best thing is, they remain throughout the song. Kailash Kher’s style of singing helps to make the song even more catchy, though it might become irritating for others. The antara too is quirky and catchy. The arrangements are tough to follow as there is so much happening everywhere. The harmonium and (again) that shehnaai thing (which sounds good here), and even a santoor help to give the song its fun elements. The percussion is strong and gives the song a catchy beat. Kailash is at his best trying to make us laugh but it is Kumaar’s lyrics that do the job at last. The satire is evident — “Mehnat Ki roti, pad gayi chhoti, isliye neeyat ho gayi khoti!” (What we earned by hard work wasn’t enough, so our intentions became evil!) The lyrics are a dig at the lifestyle of the uchakkey (thieves) of course. 😀 And the way it has been written really makes you smile, if not laugh. A good fun song after quite some time. Proof that you don’t need the mention of drinks to get people laughing in songs! #5StarHotelSong!!

4. Husn Wale Farebi
Singer ~ Saket Singh, Music by ~ Niranjan Khound & Saket Singh, Lyrics by ~ Sahil Sultanpuri

The last song on the album starts and right away, you can guess the genre. A very typical AdLib coupled with a bulbultarang gives it away right away. The disappointing thing though, is that, after the AdLib, the song jumps right into the Qawwali’s hookline! The composition is so outdated, and 90s, that there was actually no use of the makers asking for a Filmi Qawwali. The composers have tried to do it, but all they managed was to ape some old Qawwalis, probably by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, and the composition falls flat on its face. As it is, people in this generation are queasy when it comes to Qawwalis (Not me!) and so it was the responsibility of the composers to make the Qawwali sound catchy and not typical. Bollywood has given so many fun Qawwalis over the years. The arrangements offer nothing in terms of innovation, and we have the usual harmonium and tabla leading the way. The singer (and one half of the composer duo) seems bored halfway and seems to be singing for the sake of it. He also sounds like Wajid of Sajid-Wajid. I don’t know if that’s good or bad… 😛 The lyrics by Sahil Sultanpuri (that surname though! 😵) are obviously talking about girls and their ways of rejecting boys. The lyrics are so funny, that they might’ve been paid attention to, had the composition been attractive. But here, that’s doubtful. Nothing is intriguing here except the lyrics, which are funny.


Saat Uchakkey gives a bit more than I expected! I didn’t expect anything at all (which I didn’t get), and I expected a song about drinks (which I got). So my expectations are more than fulfilled as they were so minuscule. Bapi-Tutul, who have been in the industry for more than ten years, give a great interpretation of a classic Qawwali, while on the other hand, debutants Niranjan-Saket screw up a chance to compose a great and funny filmi Qawwali. I would’ve liked ‘Chhap Tilak’ even if it wouldn’t have been innovative and if it would’ve had a traditional arrangement, as it is a traditional song. But the filmi Qawwali has a scope to modify tradition, doesn’t it? The other two songs are supposed to be fun songs, out of which Vivek Kar’s excels, while Jaidev Kumar’s flops, save for Labh Janjua’s rendition. These six music-eteers give quite a mixed bag!

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Chhap Tilak > Cycle Se Chalaang > Neat Quarter = Husn Wale Farebi

Which is your favourite song from Saat Uchakkey? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

BITTER-SWEET MUSICAL RELATIONS!! (ISHQEDARRIYAAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Jaidev Kumar, Jeet Gannguli, Bilal Saeed & Bloodline
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir, Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Bilal Saeed
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th April 2015
♪ Movie Releases On: 29th May 2015

Ishqedarriyaan Album Cover

Ishqedarriyaan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Hungama CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Ishqedarriyaan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama, starring Mahaakshay Chakraborty (Mithun Chakraborty’s son), Evelyn Sharma and Mohit Dutta. The film has been directed by V.K. Prakash and produced by Rajesh Banga. It is a story about love, sacrifice, family values and relationships. The title of the movie means the relationship of love. The plot is about Luvleen, a teacher who wants to collect donations for her grandfather’s school, and her relationships with Aagam, a millionaire and Arjun, an aspiring singer. The plot is a typical love triangle. So what interests me more, is of course, the music! The album is a multi-composer album, in which two songs are composed by Jeet Gannguli, two by Punjabi music composer Jaidev Kumar, and one by Pakistani singer/composer Bilal Saeed (debuting in Bollywood as a composer with this album). So, since the two names other than Jeet aren’t familiar to me, all I can do is expect from Jeet, and hope hope hope that the other two do well! Let’s see how they did!


1. Judaa
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

So the makers let Jaidev Kumar, a popular and successful Punjabi composer, start off the album! This man has scored for the award-winning Punjabi movie ‘Chaar Sahibzaade’ and now he finally gets his break in Bollywood with two songs in this movie. Yes, he did that horrendous remake of ‘Subha Hone Na De’ called “O Meri Mata” (Bajatey Raho) which half of you might not even know of, but that was a remake of a Pritam song. This is his first original song in Bollywood. And no, he’s not as young as you might be thinking. 😛 Anyways, back to the song! It starts with piano notes that make you think “Wow, so peaceful!” As Arijit steps in, it instantly creates a fully melancholic and calming, but haunting atmosphere. However, it isn’t very deep and heart-touching, but on the contrary, seems very fake and artificial. Yes, I know you must be silently cursing me while reading this, but I found this song way too typical, and on top of that, too fake. The composition didn’t grasp me all that much. However, Arijit’s rendition was fabulous. The arrangements are great too, with the piano, strings and beats perfectly in sync with the composition. In the antaras, everything gets pretty quiet and soft, and the hookline brings the sing back to its original instensity. Kumaar’s lyrics are good, though heard-before. The only thing disappointing here (for me) is the composition, which might impress you, but for me… that is not the case! Mild debut by Jaidev!

 

2. Ishqedarriyaan
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

Jeet comes back into the scene after hardly a month since his last songs in ‘Mr. X’, one of which was highly touching. Here he comes without his regular singer, Arijit. This time Jeet opts for one of his colleagues on various projects (if I name them, you’ll get bored and also feel like you’re reading “The List Of All The Cities That There Are In The Whole Wide World”) and I’m pretty sure you can guess who. Yup, it’s our Maharaja of Autotuning — Mr. Ankit Tiwari. Jeet gets the title song here, and what does he do? He creates a composition, that grabs our attention here, then leaves it, then grabs it again somewhere after some time and so on. So you get that the composition isn’t all that continuously attractive. Moving on to the vocals. How does the autotune master sound under someone else’s direction, you ask? I say, he sounds good enough. Since he has made it known to the world clearly what he sounds like, and he wants to sound like, of course every single person who directs him, is going to make him sing in his trademark voice (which nobody likes, I believe!) So poor Jeet suffers once more because of wrong choice of singer. Kausar writes efficient lyrics for Jeet, but at places it seems that they’ve written anything just to provide fillers, which go “Ishqaaaaa… Ishqaaa” and irritate you. And Jeet does try to cover this up. Maybe he realized that it is of no use to try and change the composition, which will anyways get spoiled by Ankit’s autotune voice as the makers must’ve told him to use nobody else. So he quite expertly puts in mind blowing arrangements, like the acoustic guitars, piano, and moreover, the rock guitars and drums. The arrangements do give listeners something good at least to hear. So, barring arrangements and lyrics to some extent, this song has not much to offer!

 

3. Das Dae
Singer ~ Mohit Chauhan, Music by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Here comes Jaidev Kumar again. After giving that average song which started off the album, he returns with something that really changed my opinion about him. Going by that song, I thought he always gave such typical Bhatt-ish things. However, he proves me wrong with this song. With the ever-reliable Mohit Chauhan behind the mic, this song is a beautiful romantic melody, which attracts you right from the first listen. The composition is something that is sure to have you falling in love with it instantly, and is enough to soothe you down whenever you need to be calmed down. Both mukhda and antaras have been composed very, very efficiently, and whatever the makers wanted, they have achieved. Mohit’s splendid voice works its magic for this song as well (where doesn’t it?) and provides listeners with a wonderful experience hearing the song. Wonderful guitars accompany Mohit throughout the song, and the guitars in turn are supported by so many effective beats and sounds. Written by Kumaar entirely in Punjabi, this song is really meaningful and sure to have you listening to it on loop. Jaidev proved his worth finally with his second song, perfectly rendered by Mohit and wonderfully written by Kumaar in pure Punjabi! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Mohabbat Yeh / Mohabbat Yeh (Reprise)
Singers ~ Bilal Saeed / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Bilal Saeed / Bilal Saeed & Bloodline, Lyrics by ~ Bilal Saeed

So the last composer comes into the album, and it marks the much-awaited entry of Bilal Saeed into Bollywood. And he definitely grabs this opportunity, and makes the best out of it, giving us a song which we can tolerate and actually listen happily, and not with a face like those frustration emoticons people send when they’re frustrated. Of course, it’s another romantic song. Yes, a bit typical, but it instantly struck a chord with me. Bilal has composed it with great proficiency, and it does have shades of that Pakistani pop, but not as much as I expected. For one, I never expected him to churn out such an appealing track! I was sure he would come up with a typical pop-like song, with that angry rock and all. But what I got really got me happy, because I wasn’t expecting it at all. He doesn’t sing that spot-on perfectly, but at least he doesn’t sound too out of tune. Arrangements have been done beautifully, mostly those catchy beats in the hookline and the strings in the hookline, which make you swing to the tune, and at the same time pay close attention to them in admiration. In other parts, the guitars will entertain you, no doubt. Lyrics also don’t fall behind at all. Bilal has written surprisingly good. The reprise, apparently composed by both Bilal and some Bloodline (even though the tune is not different at all from the original version) has to be heard only for the rearrangement that has been done. A wonderful Spanish/Latino rhythm takes the lead in this one with awesome guitars hooking you. However, the singer is too over-dramatic. Asees pronounces half the words wrong, and seems as if she’s just trying to show off, while failing miserably! :\ The original version is my pick, whereas the arrangements of the reprise are pretty captivating! The first version is a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Georgia Sae Jalandhar
Singer ~ Master Salim, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Jeet returns to wrap up the album with a song, which you won’t believe he has composed, until you hear it. Master Salim gets to sing a song after a long, long time. But he shouldn’t be too happy about that. Because it isn’t a really good song that he gets to sing. It’s one of Jeet’s most horrible compositions, because whenever he tries to do dance songs, this always happens. Like in ‘Shirin Farhad Ki Toh Nikal Padi’. Anyways, the composition barely hooks you except the line “firangi hai na Desi hai…” Also, Manoj has written lyrics which I can’t imagine him writing. He has made new discoveries in physics. Somehow the girl is an electric shock, and the boy calls himself a live wire. :\ Oh god!!! Arrangements are very annoying. Some techno beats sound good, but with the tune and lyrics sounding boring, what’s the use? Even Master Salim can’t save this disgraceful song. Jeet Gannguli should not have even agreed to make such a song!! Or he could have made it for himself and kept it with himself.


Ishqedarriyaan is an average album. What else can you say for an album in which a titan like Jeet Gannguli fails in both his songs? The two Bollywood debutants do better than him! Bilal impresses with his song, while Jaidev impresses with one of his. I cannot say much for this because it’s pretty awkward when two newcomers do better than someone who has consistently been giving good songs, and suddenly disappoints. :\ Therefore I’ll call this the Bitter-sweet relationship of music in this album!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Das Dae > Mohabbat Yeh > Judaa > Ishqedarriyaan > Mohabbat Yeh (Reprise) > Georgia Sae Jalandhar

 

Which is your favourite song from Ishqedarriyaan? Please vote for it below! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Tanu Weds Many Returns, Chefs: Tanishk-Vayu, Krsna & Surj RDB