A RISHI RICH BEAT SAVES THE POSTER BOYS!! (POSTER BOYS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Daler Mehndi, Dilip-Sameer, Rishi Rich, Sunai Marathe, Shreyas Iyengar & Sonny Ravan
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Javed Akhtar, Kumaar, Saurabh Pandey & Sonny Ravan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 8th September 2017

Poster Boys Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Poster Boys is an upcoming satirical Bollywood film, starring Sunny Deol, Bobby Deol and Shreyas Talpade in lead roles. The film is an official remake of Shreyas-directed Marathi film ‘Poshter Boyz’, and is also directed by Shreyas Talpade himself. The film is produced by Sunny Sounds Pvt. Ltd., Shreyas Talpade and Deepti Talpade. The film revolves around three men who suffer humiliation in their village when they appear on an advertisement for vasectomy, without their knowledge or permission. The film seems like a comic caper, at the same time trying to create awareness about this. The music, which I actually expect to be bad, just because this film seems like one of those films where music plays a minuscule role, is by four composer entities. Remake master Tanishk Bagchi comes back with a remake here, while Rishi Rich gets to compose an original. The album also serves as the debut vehicle for three new composers, a duo, Sunai Marathe Shreyas Iyengar, and an individual, Sonny Ravan. So let’s see how this album with half its songs by known personalities, and half by newcomers, fares!


1. Kudiyan Shehar Diyan

Singers ~ Daler Mehndi & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Dilip-Sameer & Daler Mehndi, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Javed Akhtar, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

So T-Series messes up with credits again — the old song ‘Kudiya Shehar Di’ (Arjun Pandit; 1999) which this song is a remake of, was credited to Dilip and Sameer Sen, but now they credit Daler Mehndi as its composer! Anyway, Tanishk (the go-to recreator these days) tries to infuse more life into the already lifeless and staid Punjabi number (or so I personally feel), by giving it a better mixed dhol arrangement, and having Neha Kakkar sing the female parts. But replacing one screechy singer (Alka Yagnik in the original) with another screechy singer, is not too wise! The only energy in the song is because of Mehndi’s amazing singing. Tanishk hasn’t actually newly composed anything; the song is just permutation and combination of the parts in the old song. Lyrics are functional, nothing great. An okayish remake of an okayish song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Kendhi Menoo

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Sukriti Kakar & Ikka Singh, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Rishi Rich is in charge of the next song: a nice hip hop number with a peppy and groovy beat that instantly has you hooked. The composition too, is quite catchy. Especially the hookline’s tune. The antara isn’t great, but good enough to go with the amazing beats. The arrangements are the highlight of the song, and those trumpet sounds are some of the best beats in a Bollywood hip-hop song this year. That being said, it isn’t like the song is extraordinary either, just surprisingly good enough and compared to the others in the album, it is a masterpiece. The vocals are nice too, with Yash Narvekar and Sukriti carrying the hip-hop vibe very well. I wish Sukriti wouldn’t mumble though. Ikka’s rap is good too! The lyrics are understandably ordinary. A good hip-hop number with a groovy “Rishi Rich beat”.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Noor-E-Khuda

Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Sunai Marathe & Shreyas Iyengar, Lyrics by ~ Saurabh Pandey

This song is the typical Bollywood sad Qawwali, which gets played in movies whenever things are going wrong. Usually it’s Sukhwinder Singh or Kailash Kher singing these Qawwalis, and sure enough, here, the newcomer duo, Sunai Marathe & Shreyas Iyengar, present the song in Kher’s voice. The composition itself is very maudlin and typically dramatic. The roopak rhythm, as overused as it is, sounds very heavy here, and I am beginning to feel like it should be used less often now! The tablas and claps too, are very typical — nothing new. The lyrics are good as they should be, but again, very typical. Kailash Kher has the tendency to bore in such songs, but here it’s everything else that draws you away from the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

4. The Posterboys Anthem

Singer ~ Shree D, Music by ~ Sonny Ravan, Lyrics by ~ Sonny Ravan

Now the second debutant gets to end the album with something called the “Poster Boys Anthem”, and I must say, it is quite a tedious anthem. And also one of the saddest debuts I’ve seen. The composition is dead, and seems like someone who doesn’t know much about what it takes to make a good song, came out and composed a song for an everyday morcha, and decided to use it here. I don’t even know where this kind of a song would fit as the theme song to a satire as this. The vocals are so bad, it’s unbelievable. SKIP!

Rating: 0.5/5


Poster Boys is yet another bad multicomposer album. It pains us reviewers when our point is proved that the multicomposer trend is slowly corroding the quality of music. Well, actually, the trend isn’t to blame here. The makers could’ve gone for more established and seasoned artists, who would’ve composed some good music!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2.5 + 3.5 + 2 + 0.5 = 8.5

Album Percentage: 42.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kendhi Menoo > Kudiyan Shehar Diyan > Noor-E-Khuda > The Posterboys Anthem

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 30 (from previous albums) + 01 = 31

 

Which is your favourite song from Poster Boys? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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PARTIAL MUSICAL ROBBERY!! (BANK CHOR – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Kailash Kher, Shamir Tandon, Baba Sehgal & Shrikanth Sriram
♪ Lyrics by: Adheesh Verma, Gautam Govind Sharma, Kailash Kher, Ambili Menon, Varun Likhate & Baba Sehgal
♪ Music Label: YRF Music
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 16th June 2017

Bank Chor Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bank Chor is an upcoming Bollywood crime comedy, starring Riteish Deshmukh, Vivek Oberoi, Bhuvan Arora, Sahil Vaid, Vikram Thapa and Rhea Chakraborty in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Luv Ka The End’ fame Bumpy, and produced by Ashish Patil. The film is apparently a comic caper about someone who chooses the wrongest day possible, to rob a bank. Along with two sidekicks who do not know how to even pick a lock. It looks like a spoof on YRF’s own ‘Dhoom’ franchise, and it would be hilarious, I’m sure. The music album is another multicomposer album, as is the norm nowadays. Kailash Kher, Rochak Kohli, Shamir Tandon, Baba Sehgal and Shrikanth Sriram are behind the music. Kailash Kher knows how to compose for comedies, as he proved to us in ‘Chandni Chowk To China’s, so expecting something just as cool as ‘Phatte Chak Lein De’ which was in that film. Rochak Kohli takes the lead, as he has three songs in the album, and after his cool music for ‘Naam Shabana’, a thriller, it will be interesting to see how he moulds himself for a comedy. It’s not that he hasn’t composed for a comedy before, though — remember ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’? Hopefully his songs here are better than those. Shamir Tandon, who has barely impressed me ever before, gets one song, while rapper Baba Sehgal is back with this album, with a single song. Shrikanth Sriram has an instrumental piece to his credit. Hopefully these five men have put together an album that is catchy as well as humorous and sticking to the theme of the movie. Let’s see!


1. Hum Hain Bank Chor

Singers ~ Kailash Kher & Ambili Menon, Music by ~ Kailash Kher, Lyrics by ~ Kailash Kher, Rap Written by ~ Ambili Menon

Kailash Kher, known for his legendary Sufi songs, kicks off the album with its title track, a song that banks on repetitive shouts of the movie’s “clever” title, to propel it forward. Sure enough, the continuous repetition of the title of the film in the way Kailash does it, manages to elicit a few guilty laughs from the audience. The tune as such is very, very artificial and generic, something that wouldn’t have got even one listener if it hadn’t been for the repetitive gag that is the repetition of the “hook”. And I must specify one thing: if you come across this song and you’re like “Oh, how nice, Kailash Kher is back at composing! Let’s give this a go, maybe it’s a Sufi fusion track!”, I’m sorry to tell you that you will be disappointed, so it’s better not to dive into this one with those outrageous expectations, because you know this is a comedy film. And anyway, he has done music for another comedy film in the past, “Chandni Chowk To China”, in which his songs were quite enjoyable too! Looking at it from that point of view, the song is quite enjoyable. The only fun part in the actual composition is the “Jab chori kar loon, chor ke ghar chori, chori karke khoob karoon munhjori!” That line in the antara is the only catchy part of the tune. The arrangements are quite cool, too, by the way. The saxophone is just amazing, and some comedic sound effects entertain the listeners throughout. Kailash’s husky, high-pitched voice is perfect for the song, and he manages to at least sing his faulty composition right. And yeah, since “Bank chor” doesn’t really sound like what he clearly intends it to sound like, he pronounces “Bank” as “Bhank” so that it does. His companion, Ambili, raps something somewhere in the middle that really doesn’t go well with the rest of the song. Kailash pens down the lyrics himself, and I must admit, some of the lyrics are just as hilarious as a song’s lyrics can be. {Which isn’t much; I mean, how loud can you laugh out because of a song!!} An apt song for the film, but not a repeat-listen song! 

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tashreef / Tashreef Unplugged (Cups Version)

Singer ~ Rochak Kohli / Rochak Kohli, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Adheesh Verma

Rochak Kohli steps in now, with his first song out of the two he has composed for the film. And this song, is one of the most innovative stuff we have got from a comedy film of late. If only the makers of ‘Housefull 3’ had roped in Rochak. Anyway, the song is a breezy, feel-good song, about the protagonist who is clearly not feeling very good. The composition is highly innovative and creative, with a country flavour that I’ve lately noticed Rochak uses a lot, like he did in most of his songs from “Hawaizaada”. The composition sounds odd at first, but later, it grows on you amazingly. The arrangements really stand out right away. The guitars are what bring in a nice Goan flavour, similar to that “Crazy Mode” of Pritam’s songs, like ‘Agal Bagal’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and ‘Chicken Kuk-Do-Koo’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The very weird additions of noises like “Toing toing toing” and other hen and pigeon sounds make the song sound lovely in a very different way. And also cute! The ukulele also sounds beautiful, and makes the arrangements sound very creative. Rochak sings in various different noises, as told earlier, but even when he’s singing in the normal way, it sounds very different from how he usually sings, and it is amazing! He keeps the pitch low, and it makes the song even more effective in bringing out the stress of the protagonist. An unplugged version is actually true to its name (sounds a lot like an unrefined cover version), and the cups that were used in the original too, are more prominent here, due to it being unplugged. It has less of a repeat value though. Adheesh Verma’s lyrics are very impressive, because they’re actually funny in an intellectual way. A highly creative song from a composer who has always meddled around with this kind of arrangement, but never gone up to this level. And now I doubt whether he can outdo himself after this!!

Rating: 4/5 for the Original, 3/5 for Unplugged Version

 

3. BC Rap Knockout: Mumbai Vs Delhi

Singers ~ Naezy & Pardhaan, Music by ~ Shamir Tandon, Lyrics by ~ Varun Likhate

Next up we get something, which at least I have only seen in YouTube videos till now. And it is a Rap Battle. Yes, it is perfectly alright to add the word ‘Epic’ in there, because the song is really an epic showdown between a resident of Mumbai and one of Delhi. There’s no composition as such, as the whole song is a Rap Battle. The arrangements by Shamir Tandon are cool as the backdrop of the battle, and they’re completely digital. What is actually worth hearing the song for, though, are the two amazing rappers behind it. Naezy stands for Mumbai, and Pardhaan for Delhi, and then we get to hear a hilarious competition about which city is the best. The whole attitude which the two rappers carry about themselves is what hooks the listeners to the song, even if it is merely on audio (as of now). Some of the lines they throw at each other are so outlandish, you end up laughing out loud, or at least smiling. And all the credit for that goes to the Lyricist, Varun Likhate. He has penned down an efficient rap battle, and it really sounds very genuine. A nice rap battle.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Jai Baba Bank Chor

Singer ~ Nakash Aziz, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Gautam Govind Sharma

This song is the second song by Rochak Kohli on the soundtrack, and after the very creative song, ‘Tashreef’, I bet nobody would have qualms in saying that this one disappoints big-time. The composition is very mediocre, and something we have heard many times. On top of that, Rochak equips a very stale Mumbaiya rhythm to act as the arrangements. Very loud arrangements, and not programmed well enough, makes it sound even more irritating. Nakash’s singing is as usual, energetic and full-hearted. Sadly, the composition doesn’t support him. Gautam Govind Sharma’s lyrics are sad to hear too. A disappointment from Rochak Kohli.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

5. Bae, Baba Aur Bank Chor

Singer ~ Baba Sehgal, Music by ~ Baba Sehgal, Lyrics by ~ Baba Sehgal

This song starts with beats making it sound as if it is a song from an English zombie film. Baba Sehgal is back in Bollywood after quite some time, and he has made this rap song. That makes it the second complete rap song in the soundtrack. This one grips you from the beginning just because of that Zombie-ish background. The rap isn’t too impressive, but you manage to keep listening just because of that background sounds. There is a nice rap in the interlude where Baba Sehgal sings random Spanish names. There isn’t much more by way of arrangements, either, other than that Zombie-ish background, and random sounds of people shouting, lions roaring and whatnot. This time, the shouts of ‘Bank chor!’ aren’t as effective as they were in Kailash Kher’s song. Baba Sehgal raps fine, but the lyrics are very boring. Another stale track, relying on a tune in the background and Baba Sehgal’s name to make it work.

Rating: 2/5

 

6. Mela – The Bank Chor Theme

(Instrumental), Music by ~ Shrikanth Sriram

Someone called Shrikanth Sriram produces this instrumental piece which is so boring, you will be surprised. It is basically the same sounds playing over and over again for five and a half minutes. There is a weird trumpet-like sound playing the main part, and cool percussion in the background, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, but the same thing over and over for such a long duration, … You get the point.

Rating: 1/5


Bank Chor‘s music album starts off quite promisingly, but then just diffuses into a typical, monotonous and trying-to-be-funny kind of zone. I must salute Rochak Kohli though, for his creativity in ‘Tashreef’, and Kailash Kher for his versatility in the title song. The other songs, barring the rap battle by Shamir Tandon, are easily forgettable. An album that only partially manages to steal your heart

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 + 2 + 1

Album Percentage: 51.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tashreef > BC Rap Knockout: Mumbai Vs Delhi > Hum Hain Bank Chor = Tashreef Unplugged (Cups Version) > Bae, Baba Aur Bank Chor > Jai Baba Bank Chor > Mela – The Bank Chor Theme

 

Which is your favourite song from Bank Chor? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

LOOK, THEY RELEASED THE BGM!! (SARKAR 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ravi Shankar, Niladri Kumar & Rohan-Vinayak
♪ Lyrics by: Rohit Teotia, Sirasri & Mandar Cholkar
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 2nd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th May 2017

Sarkar 3

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Sarkar 3 is an upcoming Bollywood political crime thriller, starring Amitabh Bachchan, Jackie Shroff, Manoj Bajpayee, Amit Sadh, Rohini Hattangadi and Yami Gautam in crucial roles. The film is directed by Ram Gopal Varma, and produced by Rahul Mittra, Anand Pandit, Gopal Shivram Dalvi, Krishna Choudhary and WeOne. It is the third instalment in the “Sarkar” franchise, and it is the story of a girl who has set out to avenge her father’s death, which she blames “Sarkar” (Bachchan) for. The franchise is not really known for its music; music is like a side business for the franchise (Except the “Govinda” theme), and practically every Ram Gopal Varma film after his collaborations with A.R. Rahman and Sandeep Chowta. If at all any money arises from the sale of the music album, it is well and good for the film. 😂 After having Bapi-Tutul (last heard in ‘Saat Uchakkey’ last year) compose for the first two films, RGV ropes in a Ravi Shankar for this instalment, someone I’ve never heard of, and the only Ravi Shankar I could find in Google is the Indian Classical composer who died in 2012. So I don’t know who exactly this Ravi Shankar is. Along with him are 2016’s amazing finds, found by Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari in “Nil Battey Sannata”, Rohan-Vinayak, and another musician who debuted in 2016 with “Shorgul”, Niladri Kumar. I have substantial expectations from these two, and whatever Ravi Shankar gives will be an added bonus. So here’s the review for “Sarkar 3”!


1. Angry Mix

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mika Singh, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

The album starts with a song that starts with Sukhwinder singing “Sarkaaaaaaarrrrr….”, followed by club beats that were the thing in around 2002-2003. The beginning of the song itself fails to raise eyebrows, and I assure you, none of the rest will surprise you either. The composition is so dated and haphazard, you don’t even know what you’re listening to. Ravi Shankar has tried to co pose it in a chantlike manner, but fails due to the datedness and blandness of the composition. The arrangements are nothing but an overdose of techno music that doesn’t fit in today’s era of techno music. But it suits the crime theme of the film, and that’s pretty much all that it gets right. The vocals are by Sukhwinder Singh and Mika Singh, who are two people that can make boring songs sound slightly better, but here, even they can’t succeed in saving the dead composition. The “Govinda Govinda” chants by Sukhwinder sound blatantly dull. The lyrics are the normal, run-of-the-mill lyrics that usually feature in such tracks. What a bore.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

2. Ganpati Aarti

Singer ~ Amitabh Bachchan, Music by ~ Rohan-Vinayak

Okay, so it’s weird to be reviewing an Aarti, but I will have to judge it only on the basis of vocals and arrangements. This song is basically the Ganpati Aarti, as the name suggests. Rohan-Vinayak, who made a smashing debut last year with “Nil Battey Sannata”, get to helm this one. And I must say, they do it with utmost integrity and respect. The dignity of the Aarti is retained, and nothing is changed except the arrangements, and those too, are very simple and traditional. Claps, bells, Mridangam, manjeeras, strings and other traditional instruments are used to enhance the Maharashtrian feel of the song, and much like any well-arranged devotional song, it gives you goosebumps. Amitabh Bachchan’s deep and resonant voice just complements the wonderful arrangements and gives the Aarti a very respectable touch, which might not have been there, if someone else had sung it. The chorus singers are wonderful, and play an important role in making the song what it is! Your everyday Aarti, treated with utmost care and presented to you with the Maharashtrian flavour intact.

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Gussa

Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

This is the original version of the track that arrived previously as Angry Mix. The track is the same as far as the composition goes. If it isn’t, I was too lazy to make out the difference. To hear that boring and banal composition yet again is a punishment to the ears. What makes this one slightly better than the “Mix”, is the arrangements. Very aptly, they provide a BGM-like quality to the song, the kind of music that would play when you’re watching a thriller and a crucial moment arrives. The brass instruments provide a regal quality to the song, but they get monotonous after a while. Later, a very clichéd sound sets in, with the dholaks and manjeeras, as if a politician’s procession is going through town. Who would want to hear that in a song? Sukhwinder reprises the vocals, and the song actually sounds better without Mika, as Sukhwinder’s voices oozes of command and power. The “govinda govinda” chants are even more pronounced here, and because of the dholak-manjeeras rhythm, it sounds all the more commonplace. A song only apt for being a background piece. 

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Sam Dham

Singers ~ Kailash Kher & Saket Bairoliya, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

The “Sam Dham Dand Bhed” chants from “Sarkar” return here, coupled with the “Govinda Govinda” chants. And then Kailash Kher comes and sings a strictly lifeless composition that will bore you to infinity. Ravi Shankar’s composition doesn’t deserve to be heard; at the same time, the arrangements are the usual dholak rhythm, with those bells that are supposedly trying to intimidate us with their sound. The brass and strings get sidelined due to the overbearing sound of the dholaks. (They only manage to make you go to sleep, though) Kailash sounds least interested in singing this one. And I am least interested in listening it to it over and over, so I am stopping the review here.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

5. Thamba

Singer ~ Navraj Hans, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Sirasri

This one starts with the famous “Mujhe jo sahi lagta hai…” dialogue in Big B’s voice, and what follows is a formulaic crime song that sounds like so many of those gangster-themed songs of Bollywood that try to showcase gangsters as superheroes, except here, it is a politician and not a gangster. The composition seems to be trying hard to be cool, but succeeds not even one bit. Things are a bit better in the arrangements department, but that’s because Ravi Shankar takes the help of techno sounds, and regal brass tunes to uplift the song. The beats are good but very laidback, and get very monotonous after a point. The electric guitar parts are impressive to an extent, until it gets all weird. The “govinda govinda” chants haven’t been kept out of this song either. And then those random outbursts of “thamba” (Which means “Stop” in Marathi) are so miserable. How boring. Navraj Hans brings in an avatar of his that I have never heard, and after hearing it, I wish I never had! There is a rap somewhere in the middle by someone who is unfortunately uncredited. The lyrics by Sirasri (??) are something that we have heard so many times already. Another epic fail, and it isn’t even funny.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

6. Shakti

Singers ~ Mika Singh, Adarsh Shinde & Saket Bairoliya, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Mandar Cholkar

The “Govinda Govinda” chants start off the next song, and then a random shout of “Go! Win! Da!” (Which is “Govinda” horribly pronounced). As soon as Mika starts rambling out the words of this sing, and as soon as the dhols and bells start playing, you roll your eyes and press the “Next” button. At least you can press that. I can’t. I have to review it. The composition is yet another clichéd composition that suits only in a Ram Gopal Varma film. And it is tailor made for Mika Singh. Adarsh Shinde, a singer we hear mostly in the Marathi industry singing folksy numbers, supports him ably, and the best parts in the song are by him, like the aalaaps. The arrangements are the typical fare of dholaks and bells, but I loved the stop-and-play manner in which the dholak is played in the antaras. A song that seems extra long just because all the songs before it sounded just like it. 

Rating: 1/5

 

7. Sarkar Trance

(Instrumental), Music by ~ Niladri Kumar

Niladri Kumar’s instrumental arrives at the very end of the album, as instrumentals usually do. The Zitarist produces a very hodgepodge mix of Sarkar dialogues and techno sounds with this track. And no, the “Govinda govinda” isn’t absent. A minute into the track, it changes from a dull dialogue delivery of Bachchan’s, to a cool, sinister-sounding track, where the synthesiser tune actually does sound deserving of some attention. And then some uncredited lady very sinisterly sings something that sounds like a mantra. The racy nature of the song makes it feel more like a track from an Anurag Kashyap film, than a RGV film. Impressive, but far from excellent.

Rating: 2/5


Sarkar 3 is an album you’d best not listen to. Unless you want to be bombarded by “Govinda govinda” chants. Unless you want to hear all the dialogues and chants that were already heard in ‘Sarkar’ and ‘Sarkar Raj’, again, like revision, to prepare you for the third film. Unless you want to hear songs that sound the exact same and you can’t differentiate one from another. Unless you want to hear a unidimensional soundtrack. Unless you want to just hear dholaks and bells. And finally, unless you want to miss a wonderful Ganpati Aarti sung by the effervescent Bachchan and arranged by the wonderful Rohan-Vinayak. {Hint: Just hear that song, and that’s it}. A movie that could’ve gone without a seven-track music album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 0.5 + 5 + 1 + 0.5 + 0.5 + 1 + 2 = 10.5

Album Percentage: 30% {In case you want to know, Without the Aarti, it  18.33% 😂}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ganpati Aarti > Sarkar Trance > SKIP THE REST!

 

I’m not bothering to make a “What’s Your Favourite Song?” poll.

GRAND BUT BLAND!! (BAAHUBALI 2: THE CONCLUSION – HINDI VERSION – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: M.M. Kreem
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th April 2017

Baahubali 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Baahubali 2: The Conclusion is an upcoming Indian epic historical fiction film, starring Prabhas, Anushka Shetty, Rana Daggubati, Sathyaraj, and Tamannaah Bhatia. The film has been directed by S.S. Rajamouli, and produced by Shobu Yarlagadda and Prasad Devineni. The film is being distributed in Hindi by Karan Johar’s Dharma Productions. The film is a sequel to 2015’s super-duper hit ‘Baahubali: The Beginning’. Technically this one is a prequel and (SPOILER ALERT FOR ALL WHO HAVEN’T WATCHED THE FIRST FILM, IF ANY OF YOU EXIST) shows the story of Baahubali himself, as opposed to his son Shiva’s story in the first film. It also gives the answer that all India is awaiting — Why Katappa Killed Baahubali. The makers have even made it into a trend called #WKKB. 😂 Anyway, the music director of the film is the same man who did the first film (of course!), M.M. Kreem. The first album was very situational, but three songs nevertheless stood out, out of seven. This album is smaller in size, with five songs, and I also hope it is better in terms of quality too. What I’m expecting is grand, royal and majestic music. And I’m pretty sure I will get it too. Without further delay, let’s jump right into the album to this much-awaited film of 2017.


1. Jiyo Re Bahubali

Singers ~ Daler Mehndi, Sanjeev Chimmalgi & Ramya Behra

“Gali gali teri lau jali, jiyo re Baahubali,
Praanon se badhke humko hai, tu pyaara,
Sab gaayenge, dohraayenge, abb tera jayjaykara!”

The album starts off aptly with a grand, anthemic title song giving the titular character, Baahubali, a larger-than-life image, projecting him as a Superman. The composition by Kreem is quite similar to his other such songs that were included in the first movie. It flows freely, the only impediment it face being the anthemic “Aisa, woh aisa, jaise parvat avichal sa” chants, that kind of restrict the flow of the song. The female portion has been composed very beautifully, and also the mukhda by Daler Mehndi. The rest is very passable, and forgettable as soon as you finish listening to the song. Kreem uses the strings section from ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ from the first film, a very clever inclusion because that portion was like the definition of the song, and the theme song of the film. That brings us to Kreem’s arrangements, which are, very suitably, full of grand war-based sounds, like the booming percussions and impressive strings. The chorus portions are least effective however, and fail to raise the interest of the listener. Vocals are grand, and Daler Mehndi aces the mukhda and hookline. He has just as much scope in the song as Bombay Jayshri had in ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ and Kailash Kher in ‘Jal Rahi Hain’ (Both songs from the first film, in which these singers had negligible portions compared to the chorus, who took away the most part of the song). Similarly, here, Ramya Behra in her stunning antara, and Sanjeev Chimmalgi in his antara. Again, I reiterate that the chorus portions, though important in keeping with that whole war theme of the movie, sound very mediocre. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics take the grandeur to another level. Only partially impressive in every department except lyrics, in which it is completely impressive!

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Veeron Ke Veer Aa

Singers ~ Aditi Paul & Deepu

“Oh oh re raja, veeron ke veer aa,
Nainon se tu na door hona,
Main toh hoon teri, phir kaisi deri,
Le jaa jahaan tera thikaana,
Haath se ye haath jod lo na,
Hai saath dono ko behna,
Bas teri hai Devasena!”

As soon as the song starts, I got reminded of a construction site, metal clanging against metal, hammers and construction tools at the go. It reminded me a bit of ‘Manohari’ from the first movie. Turns out it isn’t a construction song though, as the lyrics clearly indicate. Anyway, first things first — the composition. M.M. Kreem provides this very weird-sounding composition, which sounds seductive at places (as it is supposed to be), but falls flat in others. The “na na, na na, na na” loop sounds amazing, and the mukhda hooks you, but, as happened in the first song, you will lose your interest in the antara. It just has such a haphazard composition which you can’t keep track of, so you just give up. The bridge line between the antara and hookline though, is cleverly done. The vocals are good, not great. Neeti Mohan would’ve been perfect for the song. I’m still waiting for Aditi Paul to come with another stellar song like ‘Ang Laga De’ (Ram-Leela). That being said, she manages to convey the romance nicely, and does the seductive-Devasena thing properly. Her companion, Deepu, also does well. Kreem’s arrangements barring the construction site sounds are fascinating; a very nice assortment of strings and brass instruments give the song a much-needed grandeur. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are functional for the situation. Good but not great.

Rating: 3/5

 

3. Soja Zara

 Singer ~ Madhushree

“Gopiyon ke peeche, phire tu nisdin, palchhin,
Thhak gaye paanv tere!
Saans zara le le, ruk jaa Kanha, thham ja,
Maan bhi jaa pagle!
Saanvare! Baawre!
Kal bhi hongi ye rang raliyaan,
Kal phir aana oh re chhaliya,
Dooba yeh din, chal so jaa!
Kanha soja zara, oh Kanha soja zara!”

Now this is what I was waiting for from this album. A song with a very charming old-world 90s charm to it, this one is a nice and sweet romantic song, using the example of Radha-Krishna, like so many romantic songs like to do in Indian songs. Kreem’s composition is majestic and magnificent, obviously based in a Carnatic Raaga, and the result is just enticing! The mukhda pulls in the listener right away, wih its lilting and upbeat tune, two qualities we don’t quite get in the same song nowadays! The mellifluous hookline is a respite from the jarring hooklines of many recent songs, and the antara is just fabulous with its sweetness double than that of the mukhda. The composer also decorates the composition with wonderful arrangements — on a catchy beat that almost sounds Caribbean if the Carnatic melody is removed from the song! The flute stands out, as it should if the song is based on Lord Krishna! Guitars too, have been played very enticingly, and you can’t not like them! The duff gives a nice old-fashioned-sounding beat to the song. The flute show in the second interlude is MIND-BLOWING!! Madhushree (after a long time!!) proves herself yet again, and though I was initially wishing Shreya Ghoshal had sung this one after hearing its Telugu version, I’m satisfied with Madhushree’s rendition as well. The backing chorus in this song surpasses any backing chorus I’ve heard this year! Their conclusion to the song from 4:00 onwards in the song, ends the song on a beautiful note. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here are as cute and sweet as those two words can get! MAGNIFICENT!

Rating: 5/5

 

4. Jay-Jaykara

Singer ~ Kailash Kher

“Kya kabhi ambar se, surya bichhadta hai?
Kya kabhi bin baati, deepak jalta hai?
Kaisi hai yeh anhonee, har aankh hui nam,
Chhod gaya jo tu, kaise jiyenge hum?
Tu hi kinaara, tu hi sahara, tu jag saara,
Tu hi humaara suraj, tu hi taara,
Jay-Jaykara, Jay-Jaykara,
Swami dena saath humaara!”

Kailash Kher, who had sung two songs in the previous film’s album, out of which I loved none, rather got bored by both, returns in this album to sing yet another melancholic song, something I get really apprehensive of hearing. However, to my pleasant surprise, this song is actually better than all the other melancholic Kailash Kher songs out there. The tedium hits you initially but wears off with the advent of that war-chant-like chorus in the interlude after the mukhda. The composition is soulful, but I wouldn’t exactly call it heart-rending. Again, the humming from ‘Mamta Se Bhari’ is incorporated into this song. From the antara, the song sounds very lively, and not melancholic. Kreem’s arrangements help to make this easier, the booming percussion providing an awesome beat, and the strings infusing grandeur and a majestic quality to the song. Kailash Kher has sung well, in his trademark style, and he has been well supported by the chorus singers, who take it away in that interlude I wrote about above. The lyrics make out to us that it isn’t exactly a sad song, it is rather a plea from the subjects to their king Baahubali. And Manoj Muntashir has written them so well, they actually compel you to focus on them instead of the composition for most of the time! A song with great lyrics, a good composition and supported by amazing arrangements, but lacking in repeat value. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Shivam

“Kya mrityu uss maha samar ki janani hai,
Jiska, varnan, srushti karti,
Kya ambar ki nagari se woh rakhwala aaya,
Jiske paanv choome dharti?”

Another melancholic-sounding song starts, but yet again, the beginning deceives us as it changes course soon enough. This song is like a short background score, an anthem of sorts. There is very less by way of composition, and so, it doesn’t quite stay with you as a listener. The arrangements too, are minimal except for a nice background percussion that gives the song its anthemic quality. The santoor that starts the song is great. The chorus again takes centre stage for most of the song, but the lead vocals are by Kreem’s son, Kaala Bhairava. The lyrics have very little substance, but are very well written. A song made to be heard in the cinema hall.

Rating: 2/5


Baahubali 2 is an album that fits in with its predecessor. The songs do not make much sense or appeal to one without the visuals. The case was similar with the previous album. At least that one had two to three amazing songs to hear as audio songs. Here? Just one. I’m happy at least that one song is outstanding! A soundtrack that sounds grand, but deep down below, is bland!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 3 + 5 + 3.5 + 2 = 16.5

Album Percentage: 66%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Soja Zara > Jay-Jaykara > Veeron Ke Veer Aa = Jiyo Re Bahubali > Shivam

 

Which is your favourite song from Baahubali 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE MUSICAL DIVINITY THAT WORKS ONLY PARTIALLY! (SHIVAAY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon & Jasleen Royal
♪ Lyrics by: Sandeep Shrivastava, Sayeed Quadri & Aditya Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th October 2016

Shivaay Album Cover

Shivaay Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Shivaay is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film starring Ajay Devgn, Erika Kaar and Sayyeshaa Saigal in lead roles. The film is directed and produced by Ajay Devgn himself. The film seems grand at every scale, and hopefully, Ajay’s direction proves to be fruitful and the movie becomes a success. The trailer makes everything looks so magnanimous, that I am really getting excited for the movie. For the time being though, all we can do to get close to the movie, is spend time with its music. The music of ‘Shivaay’ has been composed by Mithoon, a music composer who rarely gets to experiment these days because of the incessant demand of the public for more and more ‘Tum Hi Ho’s, and Jasleen Royal, who debuted just last month in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’. She is more of a guest composer as she has composed one song in the album, with one version, and Mithoon has composed the remaining three songs. Hopefully, the two have worked well to make Ajay Devgn’s directorial a good musical as well. Let’s find out! 😀


1. Bolo Har Har Har
Singers ~ Mithoon, Mohit Chauhan, Sukhwinder Singh, Badshah, Megha Sriram Dalton & Anugrah, Backing Vocals by ~ Parthiv Gohil, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Shrivastava

The album starts off on an epic, grand note, with a devotional song in a very innovative style. The song starts off with a couplet by Mohit Chauhan, who sings it with immense perfection and concentration. And then there’s Mithoon’s electrifying rock guitar riff, along with Sukhwinder Singh’s classical bols. The composition of Mohit’s part has been done in a very typically Mithoon style by Mithoon, and the rest of the song is actually rap. The only thing that has a tune, is the hookline (Sukhwinder’s part). Megha Sriram Dalton very effectively leads the way with a mystical Aghor Mantra throughout the song, and her parts are what I keep waiting for in the song. The lead singer is obviously Badshah, and with his raps, he praises Lord Shiva a lot. Mithoon’s electrifying arrangements are very attractive, and help to attract the new generation towards the song. The rock guitars really crank up things in the song, while club beats and a very striking EDM makes the song worthwhile. Percussion by Bobby Shrivastava gets full marks. The vocals by all singers are awesome, and the confidence with which Badshah performs the rap, is applause-worthy. There are many parts of the rap that stand out among the rest. One such line I loved was “Wohi shunya hai, wahi ikaay, jiske bhitar basa Shivaay”, and yet another was the climax line, “Ja ja Kailash, ja kar vinaash”. The way these lines are repeated in the song, is just awesome. Megha Dalton sings her mantras very convincingly, while Mohit Chauhan’s parts are haunting and Sukhwinder’s parts are the energy of the song — whenever you feel it going a bit weak, his parts come and lift it back up. Backing vocals by Anugrah and Parthiv Gohil are good as well. Towards the end, all the singers’ parts come together, and with the help of a strong backing rock template, Mithoon brings a very good end to the song. The lyrics are by the film’s scriptwriter Sandeep Shrivastava himself, and he’s also written the raps, which are merely performed by Badshah, fortunately, and fortunately, performed very well! His lyrics are very good, describing Lord Shiva gloriously. A strong opening to the album, and a song that will give the movie a strong opening too! 😀 Also, happy to see that Mithoon tried out something different!!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Darkhaast
Singers ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Arijit Singh & Mithoon, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sayeed Quadri

After the electrifying rock song, Mithoon mellows things down with a song that starts with a very comforting piano tune, and Sunidhi’s sweet voice. The song is a romantic one, and sees Mithoon back in the ‘vintage Mithoon’ mode, which is totally different from the Mithoon who gives endless ‘Tum Hi Ho’s. The composition is very pleasant, uplifting and calm, and gives you a sense of calm as well. The starting paragraph by Sunidhi is the mukhda, and it is a kind of unplugged start to the song, after which Arijit comes with the hookline, a very beautiful tune that Mithoon seems to have saved for a special movie, like this, for a superstar like Ajay. The line “Tu meri baahon mein duniya bhula de” hits you so hard (with love) that you just fall in love immediately. Arijit renders the hookline with a very happy tone, and makes you smile after hearing it. However, he has used his very bored, casual voice tone here sometimes, and sometimes, suddenly becomes interested in delivering a good rendition. 😀 I don’t know what that’s about, all I know is that the final result is amazing. He sounds awesome in the high notes, and a little less in the low notes, but it works anyway. Sunidhi is perfect as usual. Her notes are mostly on the high scale in this song, and she sings them gracefully. Her vocals here remind me of her vocals in ‘Yaaram’ (Ek Thi Daayan) where she went oh-so-gracefully from low notes to high notes and back! The first antara, sung by Arijit, has a very typical and heard-before tune to it, but Arijit delivers it so passionately, that it sounds awesome. Sunidhi, on the other hand, aces the wonderful, mellow composition of the second antara. After both antaras, there is a wonderful addition by Mithoon where he sings “Tu meri baahon mein duniya bhula de” in a very different, rhythmic way. At the end of the song, Sunidhi wraps things up with a very soft and gentle rendition of the hookline, just like she opened up the song. She does it so nicely, that she would impress anybody’s grandmother, as she places everything right where she takes it out from. 😀 😛 (Don’t worry if you didn’t understand that, it was ridiculous anyway) The arrangements are scintillating. Mithoon decorates the song with very lively percussion (programmed by Bobby Shrivastava) and that gives the song a quite pleasant, upbeat touch. Of course, Mithoon’s piano keeps impressing you throughout the song, and guitars (Kalyan Baruah) are very breezy. The singers complement the arrangements so well, that everything falls into place perfectly. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are mind blowing. Once again, he impressed with simple words, and Mithoon has taken them and woven a beautiful melody out of them. Romance at its simple best! Arijit and Sunidhi ace this one, and Mithoon should start giving more such songs!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Raatein / Raatein (Reprise)
Singers ~ Jasleen Kaur Royal / Jasleen Kaur Royal, Music by ~ Jasleen Kaur Royal, Lyrics by ~ Aditya Sharma

Jasleen steps into the album as a guest composer for this song, which appears in two versions in the album. The first version is a sweet, breezy composition that I would have liked, had it not been so, so, so similar to Jasleen’s ‘Kho Gaye Hum Kahan’ (Baar Baar Dekho). The composition style, the dulcet, calm and breezy melody, we’ve all heard before in the song from ‘Baar Baar Dekho’. It seems like Jasleen has modified some notes somewhere and presented this song after modification. The vocals too, are very similar to the way she sang in that song. Arrangements might be the only difference in both songs, but very slight. The guitars are here too, but it is joined by pleasant percussions that will sound awesome in the theaters. Strings do their job very well. At the end of the first antara, Jasleen has added a wonderful strings orchestra, with crisp strokes, which is worth hearing the song for! And at the end of the second, she adds a strings piece which is in one piece and not broken into strokes. The flute that she has placed in places throughout the song, is wonderful, while the banjo towards the end really makes the mood lighter. However, at the end there’s an “Oooooo-ooooo-oooo” which is a copy paste of the “Oooooo-ooooo-oooo” from ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ (Baar Baar Dekho). The “Hey-ya-hey-ya” effect that she has put in places around the song, is pleasing though. Aditya Sharma, who had written ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ too, writes this one quite nicely, but it gets boring after a while. The reprise is just as opulent in terms of arrangements. The reprise starts with a tune that Jasleen had used in the antara in the original version. This version is more of an unplugged version, with a slow pace and a haunting sound about it. Jasleen sings in a whispery voice for this one, and it turns out to produce a very haunting effect. In the first half, the song is unplugged, until a grand, striking percussion takes away the silence to gradually pull you into a more sinister land. The oboe very nicely conveys the sinister nature of the song. In the second half, Jasleen starts singing in a high pitch and louder, to make that sinister touch more evident. The ‘Hey-ya” tune is tweaked to make it sound more sinister, too! 😀 Basically, this song is just the original tweaked, to make it sound sinister. The arrangements are more opulent, with strong percussion and graceful strings bringing out the haunting quality of the song. The lyrics here have also been tweaked, and work for the theme of this version. Overall, both versions have great arrangements, but the first one is too similar to Jasleen’s previous song, while the second one is not soemthing I would take out time to listen to again and again — it will sound great in the theaters! A bit of a disappointment from the promising Jasleen Royal! 😦

 

4. Tere Naal Ishqa
Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sayeed Quadri

The last song on the album started off with a tune that resembles the opening tune of ‘Ji Huzoori’ (Ki & Ka) a bit, and I was so excited for a moment, because Mithoon with another ‘Ji Huzoori’ would be as fun as the world with another India. 😀 But to my disappointment, what followed was a composition that seemed to have worn out right away. The mukhda was so melancholic, that you get set back right away after it starts, and it just gets more boring after that. The hookline is decent, with the typical Mithoon trademark over it. The whole song reminded me of ‘Zaroorat’ (Ek Villain) instead of ‘Ji Huzoori’. 😦 And that isn’t good! The antara is quite slow-paced and hard to catch. The cross line which joins the antara to the hook, is also so outdated. The song has a very laid back tune in general. Kailash Kher’s vocals don’t help, as it just makes the song sound more outdated. He ends up boring the listener as the song progresses. The arrangements by Mithoon were a sort of a saviour for the mediocre composition, with rock livening things up a bit. The typical electric dafli-like beats just follow the tried-and-tested formula, which I’ve started hating after Vishal-Shekhar have overdone it in such songs. The length of the song is also a letdown. Such a melancholic composition, and six minutes, is a too long time! I really don’t like it when Mithoon takes such outdated tunes and stretches them for six minutes. On the other hand, I didn’t even notice how six minutes passed during ‘Darkhaast’. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are good here too, but could’ve done with better composition by Mithoon. A lacklustre melody that has worn away with time.


Shivaay partly lives up to expectations. The album offers a very electrifying song that will be the cracker for this Diwali, and a very sweet romantic song, but other than that, the other songs seem to suffer. Jasleen seems to be stuck in her comfort zone, and must get out of it, considering that this is only her third song and it smells so much of her first. Ankit Tiwari was different. He took so long to get out of ‘Sunn Raha Hai’ that all his songs started overlapping and then we got used to it, and got a pleasant surprise whenever he let go of it. But I don’t wish that to happen in Jasleen’s music, as she seems very promising a composer. Mithoon’s last song is just avoidable, as it reeks of the 2005-2007 era so much. At the end of the day, the musical divinity only partially works.

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darkhaast > Bolo Har Har Har > Raatein (Reprise) > Raatein > Tere Naal Ishqa

 

Which is your favourite song from Shivaay? Please vote for it below! Thanks 🙂

THE 6 MUSIC-ETEERS!! (SAAT UCHAKKEY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Jaidev Kumar, Bapi-Tutul, Vivek Kar, Niranjan Khound & Saket Singh
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Amir Khusro & Sahil Sultanpuri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2016
♪ Movie Released On: 14th October 2016

Saat Uchakkey Album Cover

Saat Uchakkey Album Cover

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Saat Uchakkey is a Bollywood comedy film starring Anupam Kher, Manoj Bajpayee, Kay Kay Menon, Annu Kapoor, Vijay Raaz and Aditi Sharma. The movie is directed by Sanjeev Sharma, and produced by Wave Cinemas, Crouching Tiger Films and Shital Bhatia. Since the film has already released, and not created much of a buzz among the public, there’s no use discussing the film, so I’m gonna dive right into what concerns me i.e, music. The music album for this film has four songs, each composed by different composers or composer duos. The first composer is Jaidev Kumar, who came into Bollywood with his ‘Nagin Dance’ (Bajatey Raho) and is still struggling to survive without making these weird party-sharty songs. The second song is by a duo, Bapi-Tutul, whose names I’ve seen in many RGV films like ‘Rann’, ‘Sarkar’, ‘Sarkar Raj’ and ‘Rakht Charitra’. Next up, there’s Vivek Kar, whose name too, I’ve seen in many films, the biggest one I remember being ‘One Night Stand’. And the last song is by another duo, Niranjan Khound Saket Singh. The ayre debuting with this song, and hopefully, they have something fun in hand. My expectations from the album? Quite a bit of nothing, along with some songs about drinking, and some more of nothing. Basically, I have no expectations. This is like a filler review for me while I wait for the ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ album to release. 😛 So can we get on with it? 😀


1. Neat Quarter
Singer ~ Late Labh Janjua, Music by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Jaidev Kumar starts off the album with his song that starts off with a tune oh-so-reminiscent of the ‘Nagin Dance’ (Bajatey Raho), which I guess was his only (though undeserved) hit song, though he did give that wonderful song ‘Das Dae’ in ‘Ishqedarriyan’. Anyway, let’s analyze Jaidev’s career graph later. So, the song starts off with the very generic tune that plays on that typical shehnaai/harmonium mix type of wind instrument. The composition that follows is just more typicality heaped up on top of typicality. The mukhda is another very generic tune, while the hookline is just irritating. Not that the antara is any good either. The arrangements by Jaidev Kumar are quite fun, with a nice Punjabi dhol rhythm throughout overshadowing the average composition. The shehnaai thing is irritating though. Vocals by Labh Janjua, who sadly passed away last year, right when we were all dancing on his ‘Dil Kare Chu Che’, are effusive and seem very lively. This is a song he recorded before his death, of course. The lyrics by Kumaar are those type of lyrics that revolve all around drinks and nothing else. And the line “Liver Ki hai ye demand” just makes you laugh. 😛 A bad opening to the album, with nothing good except the arrangements and Labh’s singing.

2. Chhap Tilak
Singer ~ Kirti Sagathia, Music by ~ Bapi-Tutul, Lyrics by ~ Amir Khusro

Next up, we have a very mystical rendition of the Sufi song by Amir Khusro, ‘Chhap Tilak Sab Chheeni Re’. And what can I say about this one?? It is pure bliss, this song! It starts with a nice aalaap by Kirti Sagathia, who is the go-to for Garbas usually. Here, though, he has clearly been approached by Bapi-Tutul for a Qawwali, arranged quite innovatively. The mukhda reminds you of A.R. Rahman’s ‘Naina Milaike’ (Saathiya). However, that is just a slight resemblance. The composition is very sweet, and the duo seems to have taken extra care to handle this song with care. The hookline is what does the magic. Whenever Kirti sings the word “Cheeen” or any word corresponding to the same tune, you should observe the ease with which he sings them, and the sweetness in the composition that that word imparts. Though the song is practically the same tune repeated over and over again, you never get bored and it never seems repetitive. The arrangements are one of the main reasons for this. The Qawwali arrangements are complete with harmonium, but the percussion is not done by the tablas, and it is done by something quite unexpected — bongos and congos! The ethnic folk drums really add something of a Caribbean touch to the song, and that’s what I loved the most about the song. The claps have been used perfectly and they’ve given a wonderfully catchy rhythm to the song. Kirti’s rendition is fabulous, and his backing chorus helps him really well and it sounds even more fabulous. The lyrics have not been touched, and Khusro’s immortal piece of writing remains as it is, thankfully. Innovative and catchy at the same time! A song that excels in every department! #5StarHotelSong!!

3. Cycle Se Chalaang
Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Vivek Kar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

After Kirti singing the previous song, we have Kailash Kher himself singing the next. The song has been composed by Vivek Kar, and he has really worked hard to make a quirky and catchy song, on the lines of Kailash Kher’s other quirky and catchy songs. The composition turns out to grow on you after just a few listens, and then it just takes over all the tunes in your head, until only this song is playing in your head all day! Believe me, it happened to me! Vivek Kar’s mukhda is amazing, with all the fun elements in the song appearing right from the beginning, and not from the middle of some line. And the best thing is, they remain throughout the song. Kailash Kher’s style of singing helps to make the song even more catchy, though it might become irritating for others. The antara too is quirky and catchy. The arrangements are tough to follow as there is so much happening everywhere. The harmonium and (again) that shehnaai thing (which sounds good here), and even a santoor help to give the song its fun elements. The percussion is strong and gives the song a catchy beat. Kailash is at his best trying to make us laugh but it is Kumaar’s lyrics that do the job at last. The satire is evident — “Mehnat Ki roti, pad gayi chhoti, isliye neeyat ho gayi khoti!” (What we earned by hard work wasn’t enough, so our intentions became evil!) The lyrics are a dig at the lifestyle of the uchakkey (thieves) of course. 😀 And the way it has been written really makes you smile, if not laugh. A good fun song after quite some time. Proof that you don’t need the mention of drinks to get people laughing in songs! #5StarHotelSong!!

4. Husn Wale Farebi
Singer ~ Saket Singh, Music by ~ Niranjan Khound & Saket Singh, Lyrics by ~ Sahil Sultanpuri

The last song on the album starts and right away, you can guess the genre. A very typical AdLib coupled with a bulbultarang gives it away right away. The disappointing thing though, is that, after the AdLib, the song jumps right into the Qawwali’s hookline! The composition is so outdated, and 90s, that there was actually no use of the makers asking for a Filmi Qawwali. The composers have tried to do it, but all they managed was to ape some old Qawwalis, probably by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, and the composition falls flat on its face. As it is, people in this generation are queasy when it comes to Qawwalis (Not me!) and so it was the responsibility of the composers to make the Qawwali sound catchy and not typical. Bollywood has given so many fun Qawwalis over the years. The arrangements offer nothing in terms of innovation, and we have the usual harmonium and tabla leading the way. The singer (and one half of the composer duo) seems bored halfway and seems to be singing for the sake of it. He also sounds like Wajid of Sajid-Wajid. I don’t know if that’s good or bad… 😛 The lyrics by Sahil Sultanpuri (that surname though! 😵) are obviously talking about girls and their ways of rejecting boys. The lyrics are so funny, that they might’ve been paid attention to, had the composition been attractive. But here, that’s doubtful. Nothing is intriguing here except the lyrics, which are funny.


Saat Uchakkey gives a bit more than I expected! I didn’t expect anything at all (which I didn’t get), and I expected a song about drinks (which I got). So my expectations are more than fulfilled as they were so minuscule. Bapi-Tutul, who have been in the industry for more than ten years, give a great interpretation of a classic Qawwali, while on the other hand, debutants Niranjan-Saket screw up a chance to compose a great and funny filmi Qawwali. I would’ve liked ‘Chhap Tilak’ even if it wouldn’t have been innovative and if it would’ve had a traditional arrangement, as it is a traditional song. But the filmi Qawwali has a scope to modify tradition, doesn’t it? The other two songs are supposed to be fun songs, out of which Vivek Kar’s excels, while Jaidev Kumar’s flops, save for Labh Janjua’s rendition. These six music-eteers give quite a mixed bag!

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Chhap Tilak > Cycle Se Chalaang > Neat Quarter = Husn Wale Farebi

Which is your favourite song from Saat Uchakkey? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DEMOLITION OF THE MUSICAL HOUSE THAT WAS ONCE FULL!!! (HOUSEFULL 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sohail Sen, Mika Singh, Milind Gaba, Sharib-Toshi & Tanishk Bagchi
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Sen, Farhad-Sajid, Earl Edgar, Sanjeev Chaturvedi, Mamta Sharma, Arafat Mehmood, Rani Malik, Manoj Yadav & Danish Sabri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 9th May 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 3rd June 2016

Housefull 3 Album Cover

Housefull 3 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Housefull 3 is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film, starring Akshay Kumar, Riteish Deshmukh, Abhishek Bachchan, Jacqueline Fernandez, Lisa Haydon and Nargis Fakhri in lead roles, with Boman Irani and Jackie Shroff in supporting roles. The film is directed by Farhad-Sajid, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. The movie is the third part in the ‘Housefull’ franchise, and we can see where the franchise is heading. The quality of the second part was nohere near that of the first; I doubt that the third one will even match the second, going by the trailer. As for the music, the first part had an awesome and enjoyable album by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. The second had quite a decent album by Sajid-Wajid, which didn’t match up to the first, but was good anyway. The third part however, has a multicomposer album, and I’ve seen where multi-composer albums go with comedy films (Ahem, ‘Welcome Back’, we’re hinting at you…!) The list of composers isn’t so impressive, either, and each team gets only one song, so, yeah…! Sharib-Toshi, fresh from the success (*cough cough*) of their three songs from the ‘1920 London’ album, are the first music directors in the album. Not expecting something great from them, but I will be happy if they manage to give something good, because here they can’t give typical Bhatt-ish stuff, can they? 😂 The next is Sohail Sen. I wonder from where he ended up doing this album, but nevertheless, expectations are high from him as he seems to be the composer I like the most in this album! After ‘Gunday’, a great song is expected. The third composers on the list are Mika Singh and his all-time partner Millind Gaba. (I think it’s the other way around.. Mika is the partner of Millind… I guess…?) I am not expecting anything from them, going by their ridiculous title song in ‘Welcome Back’. And the last composer is Tanishk Bagchi. Now, he has been impressing right from ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’ to ‘Kapoor & Sons’ to the recent ‘Sarbjit’. He had got a rom-com action film ‘Direct Ishq’ in between, where he didn’t impress much, so let’s see how he does in this rom-com! Read on to find out how the songs of the much awaited ‘Housefull 3’ are!


1. Pyar Ki
Singers ~ Nakash Aziz, Anmol Malik, Divya Kumar & Sharib-Toshi, Rap by ~ Earl Edgar, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav, Farhad-Sajid & Danish Sabri

Sharib-Toshi, back after their middling songs in ‘1920 London’ (I thought they wouldn’t dare to make music after that!) get the very first song in the album. Sharib-Toshi have had a decent track record with upbeat songs, the best being ‘Emotional Fool’ (Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania) for me. Here, they give an upbeat track with literally no meaning, except a trying-to-be-catchy composition, which works to some extent. The makers play it safe by employing four lyricists on this track, so we can’t catch the culprit who is feeding nonsense to our ears! Well, good escape!! Sharib-Toshi’s composition does appeal on and off, but when it does, something has to spoil it — either the lyrics or the vocals. Frankly, the composition is catchy. A hookline that is perfect for Bollywood and specifically, such movies in Bollywood, does grab your attention, while the other parts of the song have been composed pretty good too. Divya’s Qawwali portion is a good addition. In spite of the decent composition, the lyrics are atrocious. Manoj, Farhad, Sajid and Danish team up to give lyrics that try to be smart with a very stupid double meaning hookline, that doesn’t even shock you in the least. In the rap portion, I’m guessing written by Danish, as I can even hear him singing (though not credited!), it is suggested that the relationship of two lovers is just like that of bread and JAM! 😛 In the song, the moon gains weight (“Chaand ko chadh gayi hai charbi”) and the Sun starts talking in Arabic! (“Sooraj bhi laga bakkne Arabi”) These idiotic lines make the song appeal even more, and cater to your laughter. And the rap (I’m mentioning it again..) is a must-hear! 😂😂 On the vocals front, two singers try to save the song, with Nakash using his totally lovable voice, and Divya singing a wonderful Qawwali bit. Anmol, however, is back with her over-stylish vocals singing ‘baby’ like ‘baibaa’ and interfering by inserting random “yeaaahh”s everywhere. Earl’s rap is stupid. Sharib-Toshi’s arrangements are catchy, too. Mostly techno sounds, but they do surprise by adding good Spanish guitars and harmonium in between. A ridiculously funny start to the album! This time Sharib-Toshi do commendably well, but others spoil their work! Oh, yeah.. And salute to the lyricists! They’re surely gonna win awards worldwide for that!

 

2. Taang Uthake
Singers ~ Mika Singh, Mamta Sharma, Neeti Mohan & Sohail Sen, Backing Vocals by ~ Hrishikesh Chury & Madan Shukla, Music by ~ Sohail Sen, Lyrics by ~ Sameer Sen, Farhad-Sajid, Mamta Sharma & Sanjeev Chaturvedi

Here comes another song with a Topsy-Turvy name. Sohail Sen holds the baton for this one, and fails to do much wonder with it. The composition is the typical Bollywood-Dappankuthu combo, with the typical kuthu rhythm supporting the Bappi Lahiri-styled composition. Sohail tries hard to create another ‘Tune Maari Entriyaan’, but fails miserably. All he manages to create is a decent dance track, which isn’t a sureshot earworm. The composition being very stale and heard-before types, it does not appeal as much as ‘Tune Maari Entriyaan’ either. Sohail has roped in Mika as the lead male singer, singing for three actors, while Mamta and Neeti get their voices superimposed on each other, and thank God Neeti’s voice is clearly audible, while you have to strain your ears to hear Mamta’s, which I’m sure nobody will do. Their parts, trough, have been composed very good, and are actually catchy, especially the second antara. Mika, as always, eats up most of his words, and in a line says something like “Kiltapille pultapille”. He puts in that unusual dog sound while singing, and it seems more dog-like ever since he sang that wonderfully catchy song ‘Tu Mere Agal Bagal Hai’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero)! But sadly, the same magic hasn’t been repeated here. Sohail’s arrangements remind you of ‘Tune Maari Entriyaan’, and I guess he has copy-pasted the same rhythm into this song. The dhols, rock guitars, are all the same. He seems to have added the brass band and Shehnaai. And now, coming to the lyricists! Here, there are not two, not three and not even four, but a total of FIVE lyricists! (Plus, Mamta is one of them!) And what can they offer? A song about lifting up your legs and dancing the whole night! What an amazing concept!! I was really awestruck on hearing the lyrics! Too good! If you think I would say all that, you’re so much mistaken. Judge for yourself. Here are some lines — “Jhoomega body ka har part taang uthake”… So are you telling me that our legs have legs, toes have legs, fingers have legs, our eyes have legs, our ears have legs, our stomach has legs, our pancreas has legs, our appendix has legs, our lungs have legs and everything else has legs? Thanks for the wonderful lesson on anatomy! I never knew all this! 😀 Here’s another one — “Main wine Ki bottle, jismein nasha total, all the guys just want a piece of me”… No comments… So, you get the idea! All the lines are just a mishmash of supposedly “fun” words, but none appeal. It’s just a compilation of lines from various dance songs which have come and gone across the years. A catchy composition, but everything else, boring! Lyrics again, deserve a standing ovation, for giving such an unknown fact about human anatomy!

 

3. Malamaal
Singers ~ Mika Singh, Akira, Miss Pooja & Kuwar Virk, Music by ~ Mika Singh & Millind Gaba, Lyrics by ~ Rani Malik & Farhad-Sajid

Mika has already driven us crazy in ‘Taang Uthake’, and now he’s here to compose a song with Millind Gaba, someone whose songs I’ve never liked. This is a Punjabi wedding song, which has a pretty enjoyable composition, but gets boring after a minute, because if the atrocious vocals and lyrics, again! The starting has a dholak portion that sounds like the start of ‘Balam Pichkari’, but just for a second. After that, a very poorly recorded female sangeet portion, only to be disturbed by Bhangra elements like that phurr phurr sound. Mika sings in an utterly intolerable high pitch, which is sure to puncture your eardrums if you hear it for too long. The female singers don’t help. Miss Pooja’s voice isn’t as harsh as usual, but is more irritating than ever. Akira, who had a song in the recent ‘Santa Banta Pvt. Ltd.’, has only one single line in the song, which I suspect is a line that had to be replaced, because it’s smack in the middle of Miss Pooja’s stanza. And her voice is atrocious! Hear it in ‘Ishq Karle Anytime’ (Santa Banta Pvt. Ltd.) for a more detailed hearing experience. Millind and Mika have horribly and terribly recorded the “song”, if I can call it one. It sounds as if we are hearing it on a radio in some garage. Heck, garages pick up a better signal, than this song’s recording makes it sound like! Irritating Bhangra sounds make up most of the arrangements, with harmonium, techno sounds, and the quintessential tumbi pitching in occasionally. The lyrics are by Rani Malik, a pretty renowned lyricist of the 90s, and she writes lyrics that will put all the lyricists of the album to shame. They’ll wonder how they couldn’t come up with such bad lyrics and they’ll curse themselves for not torturing the listeners as much as she has. Here’s an example — “Mauka hai dastoor bhi hai, Par why you standing far. Take me in your arms raja, Like a true sardar”. It is an insult of Hinglish!! Farhad-Sajid too force their names in the lyricists list; I guess they must’ve made up one or two lines in each song, and hence, they feature as lyricists on every song. ATROCIOUS!!!! RIDICULOUS!!! YUCK!! Stepping on cow dung in the village with bare feet is better than hearing this, because at least we can wash our feet, whereas this song won’t even get washed out of your brain!

 

4. Fake Ishq
Singers ~ Kailash Kher, Nakash Aziz & Altamash Faridi, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood & Farhad-Sajid

Tanishk is back after a mediocre and a mindblowing song in ‘Sarbjit’. I had praised him for not making his rock Qawwali ‘Allah Hu Allah’ in ‘Sarbjit’, filmy at all. And lo and behold! Here he comes with a filmy rock Qawwali, just against my wishes. Just as I expected, he overdoes the filminess, and ends up spoiling everything. The singers lineup will not make you think so, by trust me, the singing is horrendous! I’ve never seen Kailash Kher singing so badly, in such an unnecessarily high voice, and whenever I have, it sounded pleasant! Nakash’s talent has been purely wasted by making him wail random “Abbaaaa”‘s all throughout the song, which is a real pest to the ears. Altamash is the most modest, only showing up in the hookline — that too, overshadowed by Kailash’s booming voice. Nakash gets to do an atrociously worded AdLib before the Qawwali actually starts, but he sings it decently. Tanishk’s core composition is pretty boring, too, desperately trying to ape Sohail Sen’s ‘Isq Risk’ (Mere Brother Ki Dulhan) which was leagues ahead, and of a totally different level. The composition is ridiculously high-pitched, and a troublesome one too, at that. It is tooooooo dull and toooooo trying-to-be-emotional. Arrangements too, sound odd. I’ve never heard a shehnaai in a Qawwali before, and it doesn’t sound good, I’ve learned today! The rock element hasn’t been overdone, though, and thankfully, most of the arrangements are the usual tabla and harmonium. The lyrics, yet again, do not impress at all!!! “Bada fake tha pehle, yeh ishq ishq, yeh ishq ishq. Abb nek lagey hai, yeh ishq ishq”.  Wow, you must have got a very weak heart, man. “Emotion Ke jo taar hil gaye, kele Ke chhilke jaise chhil Gaye, love mein hum kill Gaye”. This line is trying so hard to be funny.. Hahahaha! Here, I laughed.. Happy? And lines like “Aeroplane Se rail ho Gaye” and “Topper se hum fail ho Gaye”, “Heaven Se hum hell ho Gaye” (pronounced by Kailash as ‘Hail’, so that makes sense, because hail comes from heaven, right?) just degrade the song even more. An insult to the Qawwali genre, a miserable copy of ‘Isq Risk’, an insult to a legend like Kailash, and a waste of his talent. Was expecting better from Tanishk!


You saw how “good” Housefull 3 was. Yes, it was funny. Yes, it is a comedy movie. But comedy movies can have better soundtracks. I think a single composer would’ve done way better on the album! And if they really wanted multiple composers, just to keep on with the trend, I guess, more experienced composers would have done better. In my opinion, Sohail should have done the Qawwali. 😀 Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Sajid-Wajid’s albums guaranteed a house full opening for the first two films… Not sure about this one, though!! 😂

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pyar Ki > Taang Uthake > Fake Ishq = Malamaal

 

Which is your favourite song from Housefull 3? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Note: ‘Housefull 3’ being a June release, it will be counted in the June Music Mastani Monthly awards… Just reviewed it because ‘Waiting’ and ‘Veerappan’ albums are still awaited! 😣