A BREACH IN THE RAABTA!! (RAABTA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: JAM8, Meet Bros., Sohrabuddin & J-Star
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Kumaar, Jitendra Raghuvanshi, J-Star & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 3rd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Raabta Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raabta is an upcoming Bollywood romantic reincarnation drama, starring Kriti Sanon, Sushant Singh Rajput, Jim Sarbh, Varun Sharma and Rajkummar Rao. The film is the directorial debut of already many times successful producer, Dinesh Vijan. The film is produced by him along with Homi Adajania, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s official gist is this: “When a human being dies, they lose 21 grams from the body. This, they say, is the weight of the soul. The journey of a soul transcends over space and time… beyond the realms of this earth. This film tells the story of two seemingly ordinary individuals, going about their lives until their paths cross and they realize that they belong with one another. Unaware of a connection that was forged several hundred years ago, Shiv and Saira are inexplicably drawn to each other, and it takes them on a hysterical rollercoaster of love, intrigue, entertainment and life (twice over!). When two souls unite, they become one.” 😴 Hopefully, it is executed well. The music of the film is by JAM8, and a guest composition by Meet Bros. also features on the album. I guess we all know the controver(sies) surrounding the music of the film, due to that one guest song, so there is no point reiterating them. We all know who the actual composer of the songs credited to JAM8 is, but he wishes that his name shouldn’t be associated with ‘Raabta’ because of his policy to only compose for solo-composer albums, so there’s no point in naming him. I just hope the music company learns its lessons and reconsiders it’s actions!! On this grave (😄) note, let’s start with the music review of ‘Raabta’. 


1. Ik Vaari Aa / Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hai pyaar toh kayi dafaa kiya,
Tujhse nahi kiya toh kya kiya,
Tera mera yeh vaasta,
Hai iss zindagi ki daastaan,
Ya phir koi hamaara pehle se raabta?
Toh ikk Vaari aa, aa bhi jaa!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The album starts off with a very happy-go-lucky, romantic club number, with a lilting yet groovy sound. The composition has the stamp of Pritam all over it, and the way it flows is in the trademark way that almost all Pritam songs flow. The song’s melody starts off right with the hook, which is a wonderfully composed piece, that efficiently works in pulling you into the song. The antara following it, too, is very happy-sounding and charming, but it is the last stanza, which I call the ‘conclusion’ because it just doesn’t seem like an antara, is what steals the thunder. That part has been composed in a very entrancing manner, and is a major throwback to the corresponding ‘conclusion’ part in Pritam’s ‘Tu Chahiye’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The high-pitched bridge line that leads to the hookline, is just amazing. The arrangements are quite similar to Pritam’s previous club song arrangements, with the upbeat EDM portions, and that wonderful “chipmunk” that we heard in ‘The Breakup Song’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) last year. There is a Sajid-Wajid touch in the arrangements somewhere (‘Mukhtasar’ from ‘Teri Meri Kahaani’ and ‘Raat Bhar’ from ‘Heropanti’). But on a whole, the EDM has a very international touch to it, and it sounds like JAM8 is trying to recreate Pritam’s club arrangements in an international style. But because I always something out-of-this-world in a Pritam club song, and since this song is by his company, this song was quite underwhelming in that department. The pumped-up portions of the arrangements sometimes clash with Arijit’s super-high-pitch, and that sounds quite odd at times. That brings us to Arijit’s vocals. Definitely not the best he’s performed, but he still manages to carry the song in a quite charismatic way, and doesn’t drive you to sleep like he did in ‘Half Girlfriend’. But of course, the parts where he goes super-high-pitch, made me uncomfortable, and that doesn’t happen with every other singer. In the second version of the song which takes a sans EDM route, and is more reliant on guitars to propel it, everything that sounded wrong in the arrangements is set right. A slight rock guitar backdrop makes the song lighter than it was in the original version, and definitely more enjoyable. The company also replaces the fun chipmunk-like EDM with a nice vocal chorus, which gives off ‘Tum Mile’ vibes somehow,and immediatel removes all Sajid-Wajid vibes. As for the vocals, they have improved due to Jubin’s smooth treatment of the composition, taking care not to sound like he is straining his voice too much, and handling the high notes much better than Arijit did. And the small nuance he takes while singing “yaara” and all of its rhyming words, is just magnificent! In the conclusion stanza, Jubin gets to sing an entirely differently-tuned line that fits in perfectly and sounds as good as its counterpart in the original version. Oh, and it is a welcome change, considering that we have been hearing the original for over a month now. So this reprise is really one of the best reprises to have come out, ever! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are great, and suitable for a fun romantic number. I don’t know what I missed in the first version, but something is surely missing. To cover it up though, the Reprise takes a nice romantic twist!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4.5/5 for Jubin’s Version

 

2. Raabta (Title Track)

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Arijit Singh, Original Composition by ~ Pritam, Music Recreated by ~ JAM8, Original Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya, New Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Hadd se zyaada mohabbat hoti hai jo,
Kehte hain ke ibaadat hoti hai woh,
Kusoor hai, ya koi yeh fitoor hai,
Kyun lage sab kuch andhera hai,
Bas yehi noor hai,
Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”

– Irshad Kamil

The recreation craze continues as ‘Raabta’ (Agent Vinod) is recreated in this movie, which takes its name from that song. But how fortunate are we, that the man who made the original song, is the one who is remaking it (through his company, that is). The track, originally a romantic number, and probably the first time Arijit Singh actually came into large notice, though he had sung other songs before that, has now been remade into a dance track for the film. But this dance track is as far from a regular Bollywoodish dance track as you can imagine. It has a very quite and soothing vibe to it, and a very unexpected twist in the form of a nice interruption wherein JAM8 introduces to Bollywood, a new genre of music called ‘Tropical House’, which sounds like some techno Caribbean music. Anyway, the new composition that the group has made for the remake, is great. The mukhda, sung by newbie (in Bollywood) Nikhita Gandhi, is charming and scintillating, with its romantic vibes really reaching you. The way they have joined it to the hookline of the original song too, is quite cool. The time the song goes downhill is when, after the nice and refreshing Tropical interlude, Arijit comes back to reprise his portion, the antara from the original song, a part I felt didn’t quite merge with this song. Yes, I know that if the hookline adapted well into this song, every other part should too, but I just didn’t feel the antara this time. When it went back to the new composition, I started grooving to the beats again. So it was like a sudden disconnection from the song. But then, JAM8 makes up for it in the fantabulous (which is a very small word to describe it!) ‘conclusion’ part of the song, which has a lilting and entrancing tune. Especially the oddly-but-fantastically placed line, “Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”, is a wonderful bridge from the ‘Conclusion’ to the hookline. And the continuous EDM beats, really infuse life into the song. The composers also add wonderful piano notes occasionally, and the guitars that start off the song are so vibrant! So I guess I have already spoken about the arrangements as much as I could. Moving on to the vocals, Nikhita Gandhi, another singer from the Rahman camp of singers, joins Pritam’s camp for this one (quite similar a story to that of the other well known ‘Gandhi’ singer, Jonita — not sisters!) And she totally owns her debut. Yes, Arijit gets the major part in the song, but because she opens it so smashingly, the listeners get hooked and keep waiting for her voice to return. Sadly, it comes back only for the hooklines. Arijit is his usual self, trying to be charming , succeeding and also acing that aforementioned ‘conclusion’ portion. Irshad Kamil writes the new lyrics for this song, wrapping Amitabh Bhattacharya’s already awesome lyrics with an awesomeness of his own. A song that takes itself miles away from its original, neither better nor worse, but just at par, in a different genre. Barring the copy-paste antara, the song is quite good.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Sadda Move

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh, Pardeep Singh Sran & Raftaar, Additional Vocals ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Bhangra ke rhythm mein, tuney Bharatnatyam kyun milaaya?
Mere mehboob, dekho sadda move!”

– Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya

In the next song, JAM8 cuts out the whole international feel that was looming over the album all this time, to replace it with a street hip-hop number in Punjabi style. And I must say, how disappointed I was, hearing this song. The composer takes a very weird route with this song. There isn’t much by way of composition, but whatever is, sounds like very often recycled Punjabi lines used innumerable times. Like the antaras. And the mukhda just starts off so abruptly, it takes time to adjust to it. Actually, a rap starts the song, and it is quite obnoxious. Raftaar. That “Sadda Move Move” line by Raftaar is so irritating. The hookline of the song, too, isn’t too impressive. Arrangements are what lift the song up for me. That flute loop that plays every now and then is just insane — a glimpse of the trademark Pritam-ish insanity that JAM8 has so far, cruelly kept out of this album. The digital beats are quite groovy, but they don’t really provide anything new and innovative, which is what I would like to hear when I listen to a Punjabi street hip-hop number. The tumbi and “burrrhhhaaaa“s are the typical Punjabi people clichés, thrust into the song just to stereotype Punjabi music. But I must say, the dhols are quite engaging. The vocals are above average — Diljit sounds good but not excellent; probably the composition is barring me from liking his rendition too. On the other hand, his co-singer, Pradeep Singh Sran, who made it big in Bollywood with his song ‘Cutiepie’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), brings back his Labh Janjua-ish voice and steals the listeners’ hearts. Raftaar is strictly annoying, and his rap is least enjoyable. Overall the song has a strong Meet Bros-ish vibe. Legends Amitabh Bhattacharya & Irshad Kamil come together to write something that Kumaar or Shabbir Ahmed would’ve written by themselves, if they had been approached. Quite stereotypical, and ‘enjoyable’ would be an exaggeration. A clear dip in the level of the album. 

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Altamash Faridi & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Tere nishaan, yaadon mein hai,
Tu kyun nahin, taqdeer mein?
Naadaan dil, hai dhoondhta,
Qurbat teri tasveer mein.
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Dekhe khudaya, do aashiqaan diyaan tabaahiyaan
Ve badi lambiyaan si judaiyaan!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After three relatively happy-sounding songs, it was necessary, I guess, for the composers to bring in a touch of pathos in the album. So they bring a sad song sung by Arijit, which I feel is loosely modelled on Pritam’s ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), because of the slight Sufi touch to it. The composition, I have to say, is something that disappointed me highly. I just couldn’t find anything great in it. The song is trying so hard to be emotional, but manages to ve not even one bit emotional! And that almost never happens with Pritam songs. The first two stanzas are composed on the same tune, and that is a major drawback, because it is what makes the song sound very, very monotonous. The very first line of the song made me think, “What?” because the music that starts off the song is very promising! After that it becomes a crying fest, something so overdramatic I wouldn’t have expected it to be a song from a big banner films as ‘Raabta’. The hookline is so unidimensional, it hardly managed to touch my heart as an emotional song should. The composition ends with another “conclusion” stanza, and this time, that stanza is clearly trying to emulate the “conclusion” of ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) with its composition, arrangements and Arijit’s singing style. The arrangements of the song are also very heard-before, and stale arrangements. The Dholak rhythm has gotten so old and typical, I wish no composer uses it in sad songs anymore! The music that starts the song though, the violin one, is very good! And that is what made me believe the rest of the song too, would follow suit. Arijit sings this one with utmost lack of expression, almost like a robot. It seems he spent all his energy in ‘Ik Vaari Aa’. The Faridi brothers pitch in for a good but again, clichéd, Sufi interlude, that only makes the song sound more artificial. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are good, but not amazing. A sad song that makes me sad that it had to be in this film.

Rating: 2/5

 

5. Main Tera Boyfriend

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Neha Kakkar & Meet Bros., Original Composition by ~ J-Star & Sohrabuddin, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Na Na Na Na!

– J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi

Guest composers, Meet Bros, step into the album now, for their remake of the popular track of J-Star’s, ‘Na Na Na Na’. Now there’s a huge controversy regarding who stole the song from whom and blah blah blah. But besides all that, I think the whole nation is raving about the song and how catchy it is. The original was definitely one of the catchiest pop songs of that year and even now, and Meet Bros try to keep its catchiness intact. They have built a typical Bollywoodish composition around it, which sounds least like a Meet Bros. composition, and more like a Pritam one. How coincidental because JAM8’s ‘Sadda Movie’s sounded like a Meet Bros song. The Mukhda starts the song off on a very nice tune, and expectations rise right away. It is the antara that could’ve been better, and repeating each Antara twice was not needed; it just made the song that much longer. The hook… Do I need to speak about it! 😀 The arrangements too, are very similar to Pritam’s, complete with the chipmunk noises here too. The club sounds are great as well, and make the song enjoyable at all points. The vocals are energetic, with Arijit replenishing all his drained energy, and giving a very spunky rendition of the song. Is it just me, or does anyone else also think he sounds amazing in upbeat numbers as well!? Neha cannot match up to her co-singer’s level and performs a bit disappointingly this time. Meet Bros. also come and sing an interlude that would have sounded better had it stayed out of the album. 😥 And after that, there’s a lady’s voice that says “I Wanna be your boyfriend.” 😮 Kumaar’s lyrics are the usual type of lyrics that go into such songs. A song that I didn’t expect much from, since it was a remake, turns out to be quite foot-tapping!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Darasal

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Inkaar mein jo chhupa hai woh ikraar ho!”

– Irshad Kamil

Finally, to finish off the album, JAM8 bring an Atif Aslam romantic melody, something that is quite quintessential in recent T-Series albums. As soon as the song started, it reminded me of ‘Jeena Jeena’ (Badlapur) because of the similar pattern of the guitar piece. The composition is actually very sweet, and it is also slow-paced like ‘Jeena Jeena’, and would suit well for a waltzy arrangement too. But JAM8 choose to keep things minimal and grace the song with nothing more than a nice and sweet guitar riff, and occasional amazing strings. The tune, though slow-paced, grows on you instantly. It is instantly likeable, unlike all the other JAM8 songs in the album, which I took some time to get accustomed to (Except the Jubin ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). I loved the way how they repeated the last line of every antara twice, and the last line of the song thrice. The antara itself is very calm and soothing, and gives a very breezy feel to the song. In the Mukhda, the line where he repeats the words twice, is just outstanding! (“Teri Ada, Ada Pe Marta…” etc.) This is actually what is expected from an ideal romantic comedy. Sadly, it comes in at the end of this album! 😪 Atif’s vocals are some of the best I’ve heard from him in quite a while; he sings the song with a totally different charm than he sung his other songs of late. It draws the picture of the typical boy-next-door image in Bollywood rom-coms. Kamil’s lyrics are just beautiful! Some of them are just salute-worthy, like the one I’ve featured up there at the beginning of this song’s review. Finally, a cute romantic song that befits the film’s romantic aspects. 

Rating: 4.5/5


Raabta is an album I wouldn’t have expected (read, I would have expected much more) from a romantic film like this. Most of the songs are prohibited to be the usual fun-and-frolic that we associate with Pritam, for no specific reason. In fact, the dance song from guests Meet Bros is better than the dance song from JAM8 itself. JAM8 sticks to a very conventional route, save the title track, and only manages to deliver well in two songs in that conventional barrier (‘Darasal’ and ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). But I can’t take away from the album that, as an entire album, it is full of variety and sounds good. It is just lacking on the innovative quotient, and likeability quotient, and hence, the repeat value. ‘Raabta’ means ‘connection’, but there is a slight breach in this Raabta!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 + 3 + 2+ 3.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darasal = Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version) > Raabta (Title Track) > Ik Vaari Aa = Main Tera Boyfriend > Sadda Move > Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 = 17

 

Which is your favourite song from Raabta? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

THODI DER AUR THEHER JAAUN??? (HALF GIRLFRIEND – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Tanishk Bagchi, Rishi Rich, Farhan Saeed, Rahul Mishra & Ami Mishra
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Arafat Mehmood, Tanishk Bagchi, R. Rekhi, Veronica Mehta, Yash Anand, Yash Narvekar, Ishita Moitra Udhwani, Kumaar, Anushka Shahaney, Laado Suwalka & Kunaal Vermaa
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 27th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Half Girlfriend Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Half Girlfriend is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama film, starring Shraddha Kapoor and Arjun Kapoor. The film is directed by Mohit Suri, and produced by Shobha Kapoor, Ekta Kapoor, Mohit Suri and Chetan Bhagat. The film is an adaptation of Chetan Bhagat’s 2014 super-hit novel {In that everyone started hitting it after reading it, so it became super hit} of the same name. I have read that book and didn’t think much of it. And I’m not going to waste time on the plot. So let’s see who is behind the music this time. Now Mohit Suri is always up for new musical talent, and he brought Arijit Singh, Ankit Tiwari and Ami Mishra into the limelight with his previous film albums. I must say, ‘Ek Villain’ and ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ were better off than ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was full of clichés. And now this movie seems like it will be a complete detour from the usual type of music we hear in his other films. Maybe, just maybe, the songs with the lead characters staring at each other for infinite amounts of time, and shots of Shraddha Kapoor crying her eyes out, will not be removed and maybe we will be spared the melodrama that exists in all other Suri movies. But then again, maybe not. Maybe Mohit Suri will make Chetan’s rom-com into a romantic drama just like his other films. And of course, maybe the music will follow suit. That is confirmed as soon as I read the name of the first music director, Mithoon. He has collaborated with Mohit Suri in almost all of his movies, and the only collaboration I didn’t like of theirs, was ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (‘Aashiqui 2), after which I loved the sings from the next two movies. He gets three tracks here, but all are based on the same song. Tanishk Bagchi, the latest composer going tons of places this year, gets a single song here, and hopefully he opens his account with Mohit Suri fabulously so that we get to hear him in more Mohit Suri albums. Rishi Rich, after a long hiatus after the ‘Hum Tum’ song, returns {he has two more albums upcoming this year!} and he gets two tracks. Next up is Ami Mishra, who debuted with ‘Hasi’ from ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ in 2015, and vanished after that. He gets one song too. Then we have the debutants. Rahul Mishra with one song (I have never heard of him so can’t say what I’m expecting), and Farhan Saeed, who is debuting only as a composer; he has sung a couple of songs previously, and in this album, he gets to compose two tracks, out if which one is a version of the other. So with an astounding ten tracks to review, I must start right away.


1. Baarish

Singers ~ Ash King & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk Bagchi & Arafat Mehmood

Tanishk gets to open the album with his only song in the film. The song is a romantic song, with a tune that will have any Bollywood music lover hooked right away — because it adheres to all Bollywood sensibilities so obediently. The composition is like a trademark Bollywood romantic composition, and sweet too, at that. The mukhda makes the song start in a very sweet way, but that bridge from the mukhda to the hookline, which goes “Aankhon Ke Darmiyaan…” comes so abruptly, you are baffled for a moment. But afterwards, it is nothing but an uphill journey for the composition. The antara is how antaras in romantic songs traditionally are — calm and soothing. Again, an abrupt pause has been added at the end of the antara, which could’ve been avoided since the two lines fit together perfectly even without a pause! The tune for the mandolin loop that plays throughout the song is just so lovely! The hookline itself is yet again, something that will appease all Bollywood lovers, especially 90s music lovers. The arrangements which Tanishk has used in the song work in favour of the song, and as I said, that mandolin loop is sooooo catchy and hummable. The santoor starts off the song wonderfully, and it suits the ‘rainy’ theme of the song. The flute and strings too, add to the beauty of the song. As for the vocals, Ash King does well, but we have heard more outstanding renditions from him, in front of which this seems so ordinary. Shashaa just has to hum a line in an interlude. Tanishk & Arafat Mehmood wield the pen and produce utterly nonsensical words, defying all the laws of grammar. And however serious they might be trying to sound, it just sounds ridiculous. A song that sticks to those criteria that would make it a hit in Bollywood, but doesn’t dare to go experimental.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Thodi Der

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Farhan Saeed, Music by Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The next song in the album is another romantic song; the only difference is that this time, both of them love each other — in the first song it was like one-sided. Like tape. This song marks Farhan Saeed’s Bollywood debut as a composer, and it is actually a re-work of his own pop single of the same name. Thank goodness, he brings in a female singer to sing this one with him, and it is none other than Shreya Ghoshal. She handles the nuances very well, and her saccharine voice suits the composition very well. Farhan too, sings his parts well, but it doesn’t have the same impact. The composition itself, sounds very nice to the ears, but clearly has something missing and like the last song, only caters to people who like traditional, typical, same-old-kind of music. The hookline has a great tune though. The arrangements are better off here, with a wonderful sarangi taking care of the people who want variation in the song, and that sarangi solo in the interlude is not to be missed. The guitars are evidence of the fact that the song would’ve sounded so bland without the sarangi — they’ve been played that boringly. It would’ve been quite nice to hear a Sufi treatment given to the song, like tablas/dholaks and the like. A harmonium can be heard, but in very miserly quantities. Occasionally the sarangi reminds you of ‘Roke Na Ruke Naina’ (Badrinath Ki Dulhania), and I even started humming its antara, after the mukhda of this was over. Kumaar’s lyrics are not great, and there are places where they’re about the day not being able to live, and the night not breathing when the two characters aren’t together. Good for a couple of listens, but not something to repeat over and over again.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Tu Hi Hai

Singer ~ Rahul Mishra, Music by Rahul Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Laado Suwalka

The piano notes of the next song start and instantly you think ‘Bhatt’. Even though they aren’t in any way associated with this film, the piano notes just scream ‘Bhatt’ at you — “BHATT! BHATT! BHATT!” And when you continue listening to the song, you realize that the piano notes were right and you should have listened to their warning cries. Rahul Mishra, a debutant helms this track, and tries to make it as bland and dead as ever. The composition is a trademark Bhatt-ish one, and even though those songs sometimes do impress me, this one falls into category of them which I utterly despise right from the first time I hear them. The hookline is something decent, and that’s pretty much it, because it has been composed so drearily. Dreadfully slow, the song seems to get nowhere and leaves no impression on you after it ends. And the duration doesn’t help, because five and a half minutes is pretty long, for a staid composition. The only part of the song that seems impressive (only to an extent, because it is nothing new) is when the chorus singers try to make the song a Sufi song, and they succeed, but then Rahul starts with the Pakistani pop stuff again. Rahul Mishra’s vocals are quite good; he should carry forth his singing in the industry. The arrangements sound like a terribly-slowed-down version of the arrangements of the ‘Sanam Re’ title track. That tablas and electric guitars arrangement got old after just one song — ‘Sanam Re’. The lyrics by Laado Suwalka are even more typical than the composition. Not a very impressive debut, but hopefully somebody likes it and gives Rahul Mishra another chance.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

4. Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga / Pal Bhar (Chaahunga Reprise)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shashaa Tirupati / Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon steps in with the next track, and that’s something I was looking forward to, because he has been giving somewhat impressive songs in Mohit Suri’s film albums. However, when I played the song, the result was so anticlimactic I can’t express it in words. Mithoon’s composition sounds like a very desperate attempt to recreate the magic of ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (Aashiqui 2), a magic which I was immune to anyway, so this song too, didn’t affect me with its supposed magical composition. Of course, the song will become a rage nevertheless. Come on! It is Arijit and Mithoon after all! The song fares well for the mukhda, after which it seems to disassemble itself and both antaras sound like a different song altogether. Especially the female antara, seems like Mithoon strung together some completely unrelated notes to construct it. The first antara is slightly better, and it is a relief they’ve repeated it like thrice in the Reprise Version. But the drawback of the Reprise is that there’s no mukhda there. Also, the words and tune don’t match, creating that “Dubbed Music” effect, when you understand the song is dubbed because the words don’t fit well into the composition. Arijit gets into his dull mode here, and in some places you really feel that he drifted off to sleep. Shashaa in her antara does well, but not excellent. The arrangements are also boring. In the first version, they are fine, until those ‘Tum Hi Ho’ beats take over and you go like “Oh Goddddd! Not again!”. I loved the piano notes in the beginning though, and the santoor interlude. There’s a place before Shashaa’s antara where a wonderful flute mesmerizes you. But after that, there’s a staccato piano piece that sounds so random, haphazard and horrible. The Reprise gets the arrangements better. It starts with some weird harp-like sound, and a sound like water dripping from a leaking pipe, and Arijit’s voice is programmed such that you’ll actually believe he’s in some dingy underground basement where a pipe is leaking. But the better part of the arrangements is later, when strings are added in. Otherwise, everything is almost the same as the first version. So both versions have their own plus points. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are definitely the highlight of both the tracks. They surpass Mithoon’s arrangements, his dull composition and Arijit’s dreary rendition. One read through them and you’ll be stunned. Mithoon in his uncreative form.

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 2.5/5 for the Reprise

 

5. Lost Without You

Singers ~ Ami Mishra & Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Ami Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kunaal Vermaa & Anushka Shahaney

A bit of freshness seems to enter the album with the next song, Ami Mishra’s contribution to the album. It is a song with half-English, half-Hindi lyrics, and with a rock backdrop. The composition of the Hindi parts again, sticks to the normal Bhatt music criteria. The only way the song sounds fresher is due to the English parts, which are interspersed with the Hindi portions quite gratuitously. There’s a catch to that too, though. The “singer” behind those English parts, Anushka Shahaney, seems to be putting on a very artificial accent, something that will barely impress you once you hear it, and it sounds like nonsense because you can’t make out her English. Meanwhile, Ami continues droning on his Hindi portion, which isn’t quite different from his other song ‘Hasi’ (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Especially the “aaaaa aaaaa” sounds very similar to ‘Hasi’. The arrangements consist of very typical rock elements, the guitars and drums playing throughout the song. There is an interlude where Ami has added some oriental sounding guitar-like sound. The Hindi lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, are again, nothing innovative, and you barely pay attention to them as the song continues to play. Anushka Shahaney, who has written whatever she rambles herself, should’ve sung in such a way that we could’ve understood what she had written. Ami Mishra disappoints this time, but at least something is fresh here — the addition of English parts, even though they’re unintelligible. The album is just going more and more downhill.

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Stay A Little Longer

Singer ~ Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Anushka Shahaney, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Farhan Saeed returns, this time with Anushka Shahaney. And they spoil ‘Thodi Der’ for us. This song is basically an English version of that song, as is evident from its name.. a direct translation from Hindi to English. The composition, I already liked before, but here, even the little nuances that featured in the Hindi version have been gotten rid of, because it’s English right? And English songs can’t have nuances in them right? The song just sounds mediocre, even more so because of the way Anushka sings them in that accent. Her lyrics this time can at least be made out — but they sound very ridiculous. And of course, they don’t fit into the tune, so she has to sing “come” as “cu-uhm”, “love” and “lu-uhv”, “new” as “nyu-oo”, and she has to add “Oh”s and “Ah”s anywhere randomly. Ishita Moitra Udhwani helps her with “additional lyrics”, a term which I don’t understand because can’t two people write a song together? Or did she just replace one word by another so she deserves less credit? 😏 The only thing better here, is the arrangement, which has not only sarangi, but a very opulent symphonic orchestra towards the end, something that wouldn’t have suited in the Hindi song, but something which this English version didn’t deserve, frankly. Supposed to be soothing, but the singer makes sure it is anything but that. At least the arrangements respect us.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Mere Dil Mein / Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta / Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Yash Anand & Yash Narvekar, English Lyrics ~ R. Rekhi & Veronica Mehta, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Rishi Rich comes into the album very, very late, with a song you can call the title song of the film. And it is the only so-called upbeat number in the entire album. As such, we are bound to love it, especially people like me who were bored to death by the previous songs. The song is essentially a hip-hop number, with a groovy beat, and Rishi Rich informs us right at the beginning, “This is the Rishi Rich beat”. The song starts with some dialogue by someone sounding like Kangana Ranaut… Don’t miss it! The hookline is insanely catchy, and that “I gotta let you know…” line too, is very catchy. The composition is very repetitive though, and these two things are repeated over and over again so many times, you get annoyed after some time. There are not many more things constituting the arrangements, except that trippy beats and various weird sound effects. Veronica Mehta, who also featured in Rishi Rich’s “Hum Tum” song, at least sings in a more believable accent, but again, many of the words are not decipherable. Yash Narvekar, on the other hand, sings the male portions well, and I think Bollywood has a new Benny Dayal now. In charge of the lyrics are two people each for English and Hindi lyrics. 😂😂 And again, that additional lyricist, Ishita Udhwani, helps them, but they seem to not want to place her in the main lyricist’s list. Poor girl. There’s another version called the Dialogue Version, which has some of the most cringe-inducing dialogues from the film. That ‘Sentiyaa Gaye Hum Toh‘ dialogue is so cheesy! The dialogues come across as very annoying, and it is so evident that Arjun Kapoor wasn’t the right choice for playing this village boy. 😑 At least this song breaks the seemingly neverending spree of depressing songs!

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 1.5/5 for the Dialogue Version

 

8. Half Girlfriend (Love Theme)

(Instrumental, Music by Mithoon)

An instrumental track by Mithoon arrives to finish the album off. Mithoon provides us with a love theme, similar to the love theme he gave in ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was, I admit, a soul-stirring track. Here, he gives us an instrumental with selected lines from “Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga” played on the piano. Since I loved the piano notes in the song, I loved the first part of this track, where everything is just on plain piano. Later on, the orchestra pitches in, and brings a haunting and grand feel to the track. A choir can be heard as well, trying to make it sound even more haunting. After that comes a flute part which is beautiful. The orchestra returns to support the flute, and the song ends on a very grand note, like every instrumental should. Though I didn’t like the actual song which this track is based on, I thoroughly enjoyed the instrumental, and four and a half minutes just flew by.

Rating: 3.5/5


Half Girlfriend is a half-baked album. You know, when you fry something and it remains raw inside? That’s what this album is like. The makers have gone into such trouble making ten tracks for this movie, and sadly, not even one is memorable. All of them stick to typical clichéd song-making styles, and even a simple would be memorable, only if the composition were better. Tanishk and Farhan’s songs stand out by far, the rest seem to lag behind. I’ve heard a lot of good things going around about this album, and I waited. I heard it thrice like I do for any album before writing its review. And then I heard it while reviewing and that’s when I really understood how good (read bad) it is. Now I can’t wait any longer for my brain to like this album, can I? Thodi Der Aur Theher Jaaun? No way!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 1.5 + 3.5 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 53%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thodi Der > Baarish = Half Girlfriend (Love Theme) > Lost Without You > Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga = Pal Bhar = Mere Dil Mein > Stay A Little Longer > Tu Hi Hai = Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

 

Which is your favourite song from Half Girlfriend? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

PUNJABI MEDIUM!! (HINDI MEDIUM – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Intense, Sukhbir & Abhijit Vaghani
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Kumaar, Guru Randhawa, Arjun & Ikka
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Hindi Medium Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Hindi Medium is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film, starring Irrfan Khan, Saba Qamar and Deepak Dobriyal in lead roles. The film is directed by Saket Chaudhary and produced by Dinesh Vijan, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film follows a young couple who wish to enter the English-speaking society for the sake of their daughter. After watching the trailer, this one looks like it will be a laugh riot, and I’m eagerly waiting for it. The music for this one is given by Sachin-Jigar, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal and Abhijit Vaghani. While Sachin-Jigar have worked hard and given two new and original songs, the rest have “remade” hit pop songs, and you’ll get to know soon why “remade” is in inverted commas.


1. Suit Suit

Singers ~ Guru Randhawa & Arjun, Original Composition by ~ Intense, Music Recreated by ~ Guru Randhawa & Rajat Nagpal, Lyrics by ~ Guru Randhawa & Arjun

“Oh tenu suit suit karda!” 

– Guru Randhawa

The album starts with something that T-Series are experts at. Recreating old songs. After butchering many songs from Bollywood, T-Series now expands its reach to the Punjabi pop singles they have released earlier. And thus, we get “Suit Suit”, by Guru Randhawa and Arjun (the guy who shot to fame by reprising Bollywood songs into English in a quite ludicrous manner). The song is as typical as a Punjabi pop song can get and after getting to know the soul of Punjab in ‘Phillauri’, thanks to Shashwat Sachdev and Jasleen Royal, we are just taken back to the fake Punjabi feels. Nobody’s going to get tricked into thinking this is what Punjabis listen to all day. Well, maybe at weddings. Anyhow, the song is not even eligible of being called a remake, because it is the exact same thing copied and pasted here, with faster beats. I heard the original, and it has such slow beats, it sounded odd. Thankfully, the new song has faster beats to go with the song. I must admit that the song itself is catchy and my hatred towards the act of remaking songs cannot make me deny that. The beats are something on the lines of the EDM beats that many American artists just add into their songs by default, even before constructing the tune and all. The clichéd tune, originally composed by someone going by the name of Intense, is far from intense, but it is interspersed with Arjun’s English rap, which seems to sound the same in all his songs. In fact, he starts the song off, and that’s how all his female fans will instantly be drawn into the song. The interludes comprise of a weird sound that sounds something like a pig squealing. The hookline is one of the most commonplace tunes, but it still manages to be catchy. Sadly, the rest of the song just sounds repetitive. There’s an impressively rapid rap by Arjun in the second interlude though. I don’t really know what Guru Randhawa and Rajat Nagpal have done by way of recreation here, because everything just sounds the same, but then, they have done the monumental task of making the beats faster. And then again, I am not so well-versed with the original song. Guru Randhawa’s voice is so rustic and earthy, it would “SUIT” a rustic folk song, and I would love to see him do that! As for the lyrics, the hookline is the only reason I can see, for the song to be added in this film — Saba Qamar’s character in the movie must’ve worn a suit to try to fit in with the elite society. But then, couldn’t Sachin-Jigar have made an original, even comedic and better, song for that situation!?

Rating: 2.5/5 {Only for the beats and the hookline!}

 

2. Hoor

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Backing Vocals by ~ Dawn Cordo, Arun Kamath & Shambhavi Singh, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Lafzon ke haseen, dhaagon mein kahin,
Piro rahaa hoon kabse main huzoor,
Koshishein zara, hain nigaahon ki,
Tujhe dekhne ki ho khataa zaroor,
Deewangi kahoon isey, ya hai mera fitoor?
Koi hoor, jaise tu!”

– Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar step into the album with the second song, a romantic song with a heavenly Qawwali-ish treatment. The song also brings together Atif Aslam and Sachin-Jigar yet again, after so many beautiful songs that trio has given us over the years. I can’t really say the same about this song though, unfortunately. The song starts with wonderful humming by an awesome backing chorus (Dawn Cordo, Arun Kamath & Shambhavi Singh) but when the actual melody sung by Atif begins, it loses you somewhere. Sachin-Jigar have constructed a very iffy composition there, something that leaves you confused as to whether you like it or not. No, I don’t mean it is bad at all! It is a lilting composition, with the words flowing into one another very freely, but the composition just didn’t connect with me, something I felt very guilty of, and odd about, because I loved that spectacular album of theirs, ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’. The antara was something I could hardly pay attention to as it was not gripping. I kept waiting for that one part in the song that would have me hooked, but it never came. 😦 The few great things I can rave about in the song, though, were the arrangements. A wonderful harmonium-led (Rinku Rajput) portion starts off the song, with occasional tabla beats (Rupak Dhamankar), that sound marvellous. And then the piano (Rinku Rajput) and Drums (Lindsay D’mello) too, are wonderful. The guitars (Kalyan Baruah) that conclude the song sound amazing! It provides a nice lounge-ish feel, with the fusion of Classical and Western Contemporary. Atif’s vocals are great, and his trademark faltering voice infuses beauty into the vocals. He sings the high-pitched line in the hookline beautifully! I’ve already written about the beauty with which the backing vocalists support him. That leaves the lyrics by Priya Saraiya. These are amazing as well, aptly romantic. The hookline has been written very well! A song that excels in everything except the composition, which could’ve been much better compared to Sachin-Jigar’s previous compositions.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Oh Ho Ho Ho (Remix)

Singer ~ Sukhbir, Original Composition by ~ Sukhbir, Music Recreated by ~ Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written and Performed by ~ Ikka

“Oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ho, oh ho ho ishq tera tadpaave!” 

– Kumaar

This song is like a bonus addition. Yeah, because it is just a remix (and a futile one too, at that) of a very famous Bhangra song, “Ishq Tera Tadpaave” by Sukhbir. And guess who’s the chosen one to remix it? Abhijit Vaghani. And guess what he does? Just adds a rap by Ikka somewhere in the middle, which makes the song sound vulgar, and he obviously adds a line about drinking. Who is going to listen to this song, when the original is still fresh in the people’s minds? If they wanted to make the characters dance to it in the film, they could’ve done so without adding a song in the album. I guess Abhijit has added extra beats, but it doesn’t really make a difference. And by the way, kudos to the way T-Series has named the song. “Oh Ho Ho Ho” is like the way I used to search on Google when I heard this song playing in weddings and didn’t know what it is! 😏 A song banking on the popularity of the original. 

Rating: 1/5 {including 0.5 as a bonus for at least choosing this song.}

 

 

4. Ek Jindari

Singer ~ Tanishka Sanghvi, Backing Vocals ~ Sugandha Date, Karishma Butia, Stiphen Ghorpade, Prateek Mane, Arya Mahale, Anica Chabra, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Suraj jaise chamkenge, dekhe hain saddi ankhiyaan ne hai sapney ambraan de, eh sapney ambraan de,
Boond boond jodenge pal pal, door door beh jaayenge, eh naal samandaraan de, eh naal samandaraan de!
Assi, aithe khade, hai jaana pare,
Na kum humko tol!
Assi, zidd pe adde, junooni bade,
Eh dil ke ne bol!
Haan ek jindari meri, sau khwahishaan,
Ek ek main poori karaan,
Haan ek jindari meri, sau khwahishaan,
Mushkil humein rokna!”

– Kumaar

Sachin-Jigar get to wrap up this album, thankfully. And the song really does make for a grand finale! It starts with a vocal rhythm sung by the cute Tanishkaa Sanghvi, Sachin’s daughter, coupled with wonderful rhythms by Taufiq Qureshi, someone who always makes the song sound great when he works with Sachin-Jigar. The song is a motivational one, and stands true to its theme, with a hard-hitting rhythm and a composition that does succeed indeed to move you. The mukhda starts the song off on such a high level, that it must’ve been difficult to compose the rest of the song without letting that level drop. And I must say, Sachin-Jigar succeed in that mission exceptionally well. That neverending, breathless styled line in the mukhda is astounding! The two antaras that follow are amazing, the first being another “strong will and motivation” type stanza emulating the tune of the mukhda, while the second is a toned-down and calm one, a nice respite in an amazingly hard-hitting song. The “assi…” effect in the lines before the hookline is really intriguing, and Tanishka renders it with spunk. The hookline itself is so well-placed, and the chorus (Sugandha Date, Karishma Butia, Stiphen Ghorpade, Prateek Mane, Arya Mahale, Anica Chabra) joins Tanishka to make it sound more effective. The arrangements are electrifying, with the rock guitars, drums, and Taufiq Qureshi’s amazing percussion lifting up the already amazing composition manifold. Tanishkaa handles the composition with maturity and cuteness, a deadly combination. How cool is it that motivational songs sung by kids are the most motivational! 😄 Kumaar’s lyrics are some of the best lyrics by him this year, and maybe in his career. The song I was waiting for arrives at the end!

Rating: 5/5


Hindi Medium is quite a decent album, overall. It is a Sachin-Jigar show all the way, and I wouldn’t have minded if the other two songs hadn’t been there. Anyway, those two are the reason this album will score very low. Though Sachin-Jigar leave me confused with one song, the other ones makes up for that completely. Abhijit Vaghani can keep on “remaking” songs, while Guru Randhawa will hardly be seen again in Bollywood, I guess, especially not as a music composer. They just added this song because they needed it. Anyway, since all the songs but one are Punjabi, why don’t we call the album Punjabi Medium? 😄

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 1 + 5 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ek Jindari > Hoor > Suit Suit > Oh Ho Ho Ho (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes in 2017: 10 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Hindi Medium) = 12

Which is your favourite song from Hindi Medium? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

AMAAL’S ‘NOOR’AANI ALBUM!! (NOOR – Music Review)

Music Album Details

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st April 2017

Noor Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Noor is an upcoming Bollywood drama starring Sonakshi Sinha in the titular role and Purab Kohli, Kanan Gill, Shibani Dandekar in supporting roles. The film, directed by Sunhil Sippy and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Vikram Malhotra, is based on Pakistani author Saba Imtiaz’s novel, ‘Karachi, You’re Killing Me!’ which is the account of a Pakistani journalist and her misadventures in both her profession and her love life. The film takes the setting to Mumbai, of course, or else who knows who would have to incur the wrath of You-Know-Who. Anyway, we are here for the music. So, the music of the film has been given by Amaal Mallik, making it his second ever completely solo album after ‘M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story’. Of course, I expect something fresh and light-hearted in keeping with the movie’s promos and theme. After two good songs in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ earlier this year, it is his second venture this year and hopefully it will get just as amazing a response.


1. Uff Yeh Noor

Singer ~ Armaan Malik, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Aditi Paul, Abin Thomas, Shishir Samant & Akshay Jadhav, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Seedhe seedhe sab chale, par ye tedhi chale,
Afra-tafri ho jahaan, ye bas nahi miley,
Paagalon se zyaada paagal, miley zameen aur maange baadal,
Kahin se jaake zara akal laa,
Uff ye Noor, Wallah!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The first song happens to be an apt title song, a song that enlightens us on what we can expect from the character of Noor in the movie. And it does give us quite a detailed insight on that, as well. Amaal’s composition is not only buttery and light-hearted, forcing you to groove to it, but it is also instantly catchy. A very Amit Trivedi-ish vibe accompanies the composition, and that hookline is one of the cutest stuff I’ve heard in a while. The groove that the song carries with it, is just unmatchable. The composition of the antara is just amazing. What helps the composition big time are the arrangements, trying to lighten the mood even more, what with the amazing brass instruments — the trumpet (Ketan Sodha), the Saxophone (Shyaam) and the trombone (Blasco). These three instruments remind one of another song from the genre, ‘Suno Aisha’ (Aisha) which was by Amit Trivedi. There’s an amazing flute portion (Tejas Vinchurkar) towards the end of the song, that’s very easy to miss, so listen carefully, and there is also another flute/woodwinds portion in one of the interludes, which is amazingly played! Occasional strings and those two dholak beats (Akshay Jadhav) at the beginning of the hookline, are some easily missable additions that Amaal has added into the song. Of course, you can’t talk about this song without talking about the instrument that gives it most of its fresh vibes, which is the guitar (Meghdeep Bose). The vocals by Armaan are amazing, and show his versatility; of course he doesn’t just sing romantic songs! It is probably one of his best performances. He controls our emotions of fun and laughter so well in this song, and also conveys the character of Noor very perfectly, as does lyricist Manoj Muntashir. The lyrics are where the similarities to ‘Suno Aisha’ end officially. In ‘Aisha’, Aisha was placed on a pedestal and how her ego was raised when Amitabh Bhattacharya wrote stuff like “Tum ho kamaal, tum bemisaal, tum lajawaab ho Aisha.” On the other hand, Manoj is doing nothing but hurting Noor’s ego, by saying stuff like “Kahin se jaake nayi shakal laa, and “Aankhon mein gussa bhara hai, chehre pe baarah baja hai“! Jokes apart, Manoj does a great job writing the lyrics! A nice protagonist-oriented song, with innumerable fresh vibes!

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Gulabi 2.0 / Gulabi Redux

Singers ~ Amaal Mallik, Tulsi Kumar & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated & New Composition by ~ Amaal Mallik, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal!!!”

– Kumaar

We are all familiar with probably the most famous Rafi song ever, ‘Gulabi Aankhein’ (The Train), a song that almost everyone, from the kids, to the grandparents in India, know by heart. Why wouldn’t we know it, considering that it has been through so many remakes and recreations and revamps by the likes of Atif Aslam, Raghav Sachar and of course the wonderful performance by Sonu Nigam in London. Well, now, the makers of ‘Noor’ make sure we get yet another version of the song, this time, a club revamp. Well, this song actually un-grew on me. I used to like it (just like) the first time I heard it, but it just slipped away after that; I couldn’t bring myself to love it any more, and whatever I liked also started to seem ordinary. The good thing about this remake is, that it only retains the hook of the old song. However, the tune that works as padding, is a bit weak, except the “haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal” loop. The antara is super-ordinary, something I never expected from Amaal. The numerous interruptions going “gulabi, gulabi“, sound boring after some listens. There is an English female rap though, that is quite entertaining. The arrangements are mostly EDM, which is loud for the most part, but I will still maintain that it is better than all the noisy cacophony we find ourselves tripping to nowadays. Vocals are okay-ish as well, and the two versions differ from each other only in terms of vocals, the first one sung by Amaal, the second by Yash Narvekar. Still, Yash has backing vocals in the first song, and Amaal has backing vocals in the second. 😄😄 The two songs sound pretty much the same. The female singer is Tulsi Kumar, supposedly singing in a newly thick voice she has obtained. I just hope she doesn’t think that voice is good, and I hope she stops using this kind of voice. The additional lyrics by Kumaar are functional considering it is a club song. A cacophonous remake, which I hadn’t expected!

Rating: 3/5 for Gulabi 2.0, 3/5 for Gulabi Redux

 

3. Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai

Singer ~ Sukriti Kakar, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Mohini Gaur, Shishir Samant & Meghdeep Bose, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Yeh sabhi mausam ho rahe apne
Kal talak thhe jo ajnabi
Yeh safar yunhi le chala aage
Piche ab raahein na rahi!
Saari khwahishein,
Dil ki yeh farmaishein,
Tune suni iss tarah,
Koi duaa, jis tarah, sunle Khuda!”

– Kumaar

The next song turns out to be a very light-hearted romantic song, something that we know Amaal is an expert at, especially after ‘Sau Aasmaan’ (Baar Baar Dekho). This song is quite similar to that one in terms of overall feel of the song; a very sprightly and vivacious sound helps you forget your worries for the entire length of the song. The mukhda starts off quite abruptly, but you get used to it. The hookline is the peak of the song, obviously. But it is the antara that really surprised me pleasantly. I’ve never heard an antara starting so calmly and without making any ruckus like “Oh, I’m the antara now, you guys!” In fact, it just merges in so well with the interludes, you feel it is some extra stanza in the interlude, until it is so long that it has to be an antara. The arrangements add to the lightness of the song, the guitar (Ankur Mukherjee) played in this very MJ kind of way, is so oddly placed in such a song, yet so wonderful-sounding. The vocals are nice as well, Sukriti sounds cute in her very energetic rendition. I couldn’t help missing Neeti though, who usually sings such songs. Then I realised it would just sound like ‘Sau Aasmaan’ Part 2, so I started accepting Sukriti’s voice after that. 😂 The way she sings the sargam, in the first interlude is very beautiful. Kudos to Amaal for composing that. The backing vocalists really have a spectacular job, repeating the lines of the hookline after Sukriti. Lyrics are just as happy and boisterous as everything else, and suitable for the theme of the song. An enjoyable romantic song!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Hai Zaroori

Singer ~ Prakriti Kakar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Nasamajh thhe hum, jo yeh bhi na samjhe,
Waqt aane par, sab badalte hain!
Manzilein kya hain, aur raaste kya hain,
Log pal bhar mein, yahaan rabb badalte hain!
Kisi ke vaaste kahaan, kinaare aayi kashtiyaan,
Yeh dooriyan hai bas dooriyan!
Ke chori chori chupke se chupke se rona, hai zaroori,
Ke paani paani ankhiyon ka, ankhiyon ka hona, hai zaroori,
Reh gayi aarzoo ik adhuri,
Ke kabhi kabhi aisa bhi, aisa bhi hona, hai zaroori!”

-Manoj Muntashir

A sombre and pensive melody brings up the rear of the album, and it is a sheer delight to the ears. In spite of the song being pensive and slow-paced, it touches your heart in a way that probably no song has, recently. The song has a very beautiful tune, which makes you feel as if you are flying high in the sky. The composition has a very Western classical touch to it, and the arrangements just support the same feeling. The mukhda itself is so hard-hitting, you can’t help but listen further. And that hookline, that’s what can be charged legally for making people go crazy and making them speechless. The antaras carry forward the serious feel of the song perfectly, and it makes for a great listen overall. That bridge line between the antara and hookline is so heartbreaking! The arrangements as I was saying, are amazing. They ooze out grandeur like a leaking pipe. The live strings are so overwhelming (in a positive way), it transports you to a whole different world. You will feel like you are sitting in an Orchestra Hall in Europe. The slow pace is made up for by the grand arrangements, which make sure nobody has the audacity to dismiss this song by calling it boring. Twinkly sounds, heavenly wind instruments and amazing guitars (Joell Mukherjee) in an interlude, constitute the rest of the arrangements. Amaal’s piano notes are amazing, and he plays them like little treats throughout the larger treat that the song is. Prakriti steals the show, and after ‘Bheegh Loon’ (Khamoshiyan), it is her second song where she gets the opportunity to shine by herself. Her graceful, lilting voice in this song is something that I frankly never expected her to pull off, and she has!! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are a spectacular piece of poetry, and it is after such a long time that I’m hearing a sad song that doesn’t go overboard with its sentimentality. I’m ready to be sad for a day, listening to this song on loop! Amaal surpasses his own ‘Kaun Tujhe’ (M.S. Dhoni) with this one!

Rating: 5/5


Noor is a charming album. With just four tracks, it still has the most variety I’ve seen in recent albums. With not song sounding even close to the next, Amaal provides us with a mixed bag, wherein anything you pick out from it, will be a treat to the ears. Barring one. Of course, everything has some flaws. Here, it is the club song. I’m sure Amaal would’ve been better off producing an original club song than remaking an old song! Anyway, the rest of the songs are a breeze of fresh air, something that has dwindled nowadays, what with music makers following some unnecessary clichés that will make their music hit for a week or so. But this album seems like something that will stay on my playlist for sure. ‘Noor’ means ‘light’, and the songs are so light-hearted, so I call this album Amaal’s Noor-aani album!! Bright and light!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 20

Album Percentage: 80%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hai Zaroori = Uff Yeh Noor > Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai > Gulabi 2.0 = Gulabi Redux

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes in 2017: 09 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Noor) = 10

Which is your favourite song from Noor? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SHREYA + SUNIDHI = SHABANA!! (NAAM SHABANA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Meet Bros. & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 9th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 31st March 2017

Naam Shabana Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


P.S. The song ‘Dil Hua Besharam’ can be heard on Saavn, while its reprise ‘Baby Besharam’ can be heard on the YouTube audio jukebox. The Saavn link doesn’t have the latter whereas the YouTube jukebox doesn’t have the former. Thought it necessary to inform in case you get confused! 😀


Naam Shabana is a Bollywood thriller, starring Taapsee Pannu in the titular role, and Manoj Bajpayee, Prithviraj Sukumaran, Elli Avram and Taher Shabbir in supporting roles. The film has been directed by Shivam Nair, whose ‘Bhaag Johnny’ flopped in 2015. The film has been produced by Neeraj Pandey and Shital Bhatia. It is a spin-off to the 2015 super-hit film ‘Baby’, and shows the journey of Taapsee Pannu’s character Shabana from ‘Baby’, before she was roped in to be a part of the mission. The movie is definitely awaited, because of it being the first of its kind; Bollywood has been free of any spin-offs as such, and it is just wonderful that the first Bollywood spin-off is that of such a wonderful thriller. Anyway, let’s go over to the music, because we have a little more time to wait for the movie. We all remember that ‘Baby’ had been touted to be a songless film. Nevertheless, three songs had been included in its album — technically two, because one of the songs had a male and female version. Meet Bros. Anjjan had composed one promotional track, while M.M. Kreem, had composed the two-version track in question. The soundtrack was like an accessory to the film, and not something to cherish in your playlist for a long, long time. This movie seems to be different, in that it has four original tracks, with one having two versions, thus making it five songs. Rochak Kohli, who of late, just composed single additional songs that released after the albums of ‘M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story’ and ‘Wazir’ released, comes back with a substantial chunk of an album after a long time. He last composed three songs out of the five-track ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’ (which were quite ignorable) and before that, three out of ten in ‘Hawaizaada’ (which I still listen to!) So I am not quite sure what he can give in this album, where he has three out of five songs. The other two songs are two versions of the same song, composed by Meet Bros, without Anjjan. Hopefully, they don’t give something too-hard-to-grasp like ‘Baby’s ‘Beparwah’. So let’s see what kind of music this album to a much-awaited thriller, holds in hand!


1. Rozana

Singer ~ Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Inn aankhon se yeh bataa, kitna main dekhun tujhe,
Reh jaati hai kuchh kami, jitna bhi dekhun tujhe,
Rozana main, sochun yahi,
Ki jee loongi main besaans bhi,
Aise hi tu mujhe, milta rahe agar, rozana, rozana!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rochak decided to start the album off with a mellow, soothing song that would be enough to transport us to dreamland. The first song in the album is a romantic song that has a very beautiful composition; Rochak gets everything right in that he composes this one with the perfect Bollywood ideals of ‘romance’. Each and every note hits your heart and hits hard. The mukhda gives a nice headstart to the song, and the hookline is one which doesn’t care much about imposing itself on you but grows on you like slow poison just as I like it. The antaras hold all the magic of the song; the very powerfully lilting tune of the antaras just leaves you spellbound. The arrangements are quite minimal, but Rochak gives an impressive strings backdrop for most of the song, especially the strings in the interlude are very impressive. Guitars and piano soothe your senses like nothing else can. And also, Rochak has employed a kind of Marching rhythm to the antara. I don’t know why that’s there, but it doesn’t hamper the song in any way. The arrangements provide for a nice nighttime lullabyish listen. And the vocals are by none other than the melody queen, Shreya Ghoshal. She handles each word with utmost care, and the whispery way in which she sings the song proves yet again how wonderful she is as a singer. Unnecessary bouts of loudness can never be found when she is behind the mic. The lyrics by Manoj Muntashir are mind blowing, especially the paragraph I’ve showcased above! A MINDBLOWING start to the album, and it will definitely consolidate Rochak’s career in Bollywood.

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Zinda

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Ziddi raaston se paanv yeh, aaj bhi, jhagadna toh bhoole nahin,
Haare hain kayi dafa toh kya, aaj bhi, hum ladna toh bhoole nahin,
Aaj bhi dil baaghi hai, bas yehi kaafi hai,
Zinda hoon abhi, baaki hoon abhi,
Meri har saans mein thodi si zindagi hai abhi!”

– Manoj Muntashir

After the lulling romantic song, Rochak throws in a motivational kind of song next. This time, the composition is a bit weak. It sounds great in the first listen, but later on I found that it is quite typical and offers nothing new. The mukhda starts off the song on a slow pace, which only speeds up when the hookline arrives: the only portion of the song that remains with you after the song ends. Wonderfully composed on pensive sounding high notes, that part will definitely hook you on to the song and assure that you don’t leave it halfway. The antara that follows is also quite sombre, and doesn’t leave an impact on you, unless you hear it many times. On a whole, the song’s tune has nothing much to lap up. The arrangements also fail to offer anything different or innovative. The tune is already so laidback, but the arrangements refuse to make it more interesting, staying very minimal until, again, the hookline comes. Strings and guitars can be heard, but nothing stands out very boldly. Sunidhi Chauhan provides to the song, everything that the tune and arrangements could not. Her energy, though diffused in the song, manages to make the song repeat-listenable, even if only once or twice. Lately, she seems to have gotten stereotyped to these kind of songs. The lyrics by Muntashir, too, are good in their purpose of being motivational. A motivational song that fails to motivate a lot, but is functional to an extent. 

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Zubi Zubi

Singers ~ Sukriti Kakar & Rochak Kohli, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Rochak Kohli, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Mere dil, gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi,
Masti mein gaaye jaa, zoo zoo zoobi zoobi zoobi!”

– Anjaan

Next up we have Rochak’s final song for the album, and it happens to be an upbeat club number. This one is a remake, of Bappi Lahiri-composed ‘Zooby Zooby’ (Dance Dance), and it is quite a decent remake too, at that. The composition, though faltering at the beginning, turns out to be quite catchy. The mukhda is what I have a problem with — it seems forced and a bit childish. But right from the first time the hookline is sung, till the end of the song, it is an enjoyable track! The great thing is that, like it used to happen before, only the hookline of the original song has been taken, while the rest has been composed afresh. The antara is a nice continuation of the sensuous dance song, but then that line from the mukhda, “humko hai jaan se bhi pyaari aashiqmizajiyaan“, comes back to irritate. The arrangements are fantastic discoesque arrangements, recreating the Bappi Lahiri era in today’s style. Rochak has added groovy beats, and that amazing programming effect he has added to his own voice when he sings the hookline, keeps me waiting for his parts to come! It makes him sound like an awesome robot. 😀 Sukriti also, has sung well, except the mukhda. (Again!) She sounded a lot like a fake Shefali Alvares there, and I found it quite irritating, as I would have if Shefali herself had sung it. The rest of the song, she shines. Kumaar reworks around Anjaan’s original hookline, and pens down aptly enjoyable lyrics. A good remake, spoiled by a mediocre first stanza.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Baby Besharam / Dil Hua Besharam

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas & Meet Bros / Aditi Singh Sharma & Meet Bros, Music by ~ Meet Bros, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

(Nothing to showcase, thanks to Kumaar’s lyrical masterpieces which you’ll read of later on in the passage)

The next song is yet another club song, this one by Meet Bros. The composition sticks quite close to Bollywood’s conventions of composing a ‘catchy’ club song. Right from the beginning Meet Bros “try” to get us caught on to the composition, which, unfortunately, is very staid. The mukhda is bad, and the hookline follows suit. The antara doesn’t provide much respite in this respect either. The arrangements are typical club beats, and it sounds like it should’ve released a year or two ago. Meet Bros have added this weird synthesiser tune, which sounds like the song is part of a comedy movie, an adult comedy to be precise. I wonder if this song was actually composed for some other movie before, and then moved over to ‘Naam Shabana’ Because it couldn’t find a place anywhere else. The vocals are what differentiate one version of the song from the other. It actually had released first in Jasmine’s voice, and that one is outright banal, sounding like it is trying to imitate ‘Yaar Na Miley’ (Kick). Aditi Singh Sharma, though not eligible to win a Best Singer prize or anything for her rendition, provides respite MERELY IN COMPARISON TO Jasmine Sandlas. At least her voice is more club-environment-friendly. Yes, she does spoil some lines with her unnecessarily stylish accent. Oh yeah, and she knows how to pronounce the “Baby” as “Bebe” (which you need to practise if you ever want to make it big in Bollywood as a club singer!), as opposed to Jasmine singing “Baby” as “Bebi”. The way they sing “beyyyyyysharam” is quite torturous. I guess it was first going to be included in ‘Besharam’ as the title track (that would explain the comedic arrangements), until Ishq Bector & Shree D saved us by stepping in. Kumaar’s lyrics feature lyrical masterpieces like “Rafaa dafaa sufi bandon ko karke nasha vasha karlo“, and “Thoda sa bigadne mein bolo na kya harz hai?“. *Slow claps*

Rating: 1/5 for Baby Besharam, 1.5/5 for Dil Hua Besharam


Naam Shabana is a decent album, but not great. Its predecessor had two songs, so it was okay that only one worked. This has four songs, out of which only one works perfectly, the others are decent, and one is bad. For a thriller, the album is apt, with a romantic song, a motivational song, and two situational club songs. However, it will have less of a connect with the audiences. Rochak has done a commendable job though! The only good thing I might remember about this album years later is that it has both Shreya and Sunidhi, modern stalwarts of the Bollywood music industry, lending their voices to the songs.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 1 + 1.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 58%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rozana > Zubi Zubi = Zinda > Dil Hua Besharam > Baby Besharam

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 08 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Naam Shabana) = 09

 

Which is your favourite song from Naam Shabana? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A COMMANDO WITH LESS COMMAND ON TUNE! (COMMANDO 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mannan Shaah, Gourov-Roshin & Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Aatish Kapadia, Raftaar & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 3rd March 2017

Commando 2 Album Cover

Commando 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To but this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Commando 2 is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film starring Vidyut Jammwal, Adah Sharma, Esha Gupta and Freddy Daruwala, directed by Deven Bhojani, and produced by Vipul Amrutlal Shah. It is a sequel to 2013 sleeper-hit, ‘Commando’, which is still famous for its wonderful action scenes. That film had more of a rustic setting, wheras this one is a sleek, urban film. And that might reflect somehow in the music as well. Which is by the composer of the first movie, Mannan Shaah. I don’t know whether he did some other small albums during these four years, but I definitely didn’t hear any. He has composed three songs for the movie, while the guest composers Gourov-Roshin have “composed” another. It is a remake. My expectations are 50-50, considering that the music of the first film was good as per the movie’s theme, and that T-Series has changed over the years. And also, Gourov-Roshin have remade something, which succeeds only sometimes. At least I hope the Mannan Shaah part of the album is good. So let’s see how the album is, though I’m a bit apprehensive!


1. Hare Krishna Hare Ram

Singers ~ Armaan Malik, Ritika & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Sameer Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Hare Ram, hare Ram, Hare Krishna Hare Ram!”

– Sameer Anjaan

T-Series’ habit of rehashing old hits continues with the first song of the album itself. And the song isn’t a hit from the 70s, 80s, or even 90s! It is a (relatively) new song (can’t believe ten years have passed already!!) from 2007! The goat that gets sent to the slaughterhouse this time is ‘Bhool Bhulaiyaa’s title track, by Pritam! And the remake is in the hands of the people I least trust with remakes nowadays, Gourov-Roshin! (With Abhijit Vaghani doing the programming) So yeah, lethal combination. Now, the song’s new composition by Gourov-Roshin cleverly doesn’t stray too far away from the original one, and in doing so, sounds quite similar to the old one in totality. However, it sounds completely incomplete! The song starts off with a rapid rap from Raftaar (if you don’t know, his name means speed 😛 ) which is quite impressive as far as rap is concerned. Then comes the new mukhda, which, as I said, sticks very close to the original. The hookline is the only thing here that deserves to be heard, because of its original catchy and haunting tune by Pritam. The antara too, can’t survive without the old tune serving as a structure. So yeah, I bet the duo did a lot of put-this-note-here-and-that-there, and composed the new parts with the same notes, but jumbled up. The arrangements are quite cool, and there’s a nice tap dance part after the rap at the beginning, which sounds amazing. And that plucked instrument loop from the original has been incorporated in the places you would least expect it to be, sometimes played on some trumpet-like instrument. The beats are groovy. And that synthesiser loop that starts the song is mind blowing. Vocals by Armaan Malik are one of his worst performances ever. The makers have made him song in a different voice, yes, but it doesn’t suit him or the song at all. The female vocalist hardly gets scope to say anything, and that too, is unintelligible. Raftaar, as mentioned before, raps efficiently. The new lyrics by Kumaar are no weirder than the original by Sameer. 😀 Good as a song, but not as a remake as it doesn’t meet the standards of the original, which was way ahead of its time!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Tere Dil Mein / Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Armaan Malik & Shefali Alvares, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Aatish Kapadia

“Abb toh intezaar hai, bas tere jawaab ka,
Milta hai khayal kya, tere mere khwaab ka,
Mera dil toh ho chala, ikk khuli kitaab re…
Tere dil mein kya hai tu bataa re!”

– Aatish Kapadia

Composer Mannan Shaah takes over from here, and his first song is a dulcet romantic ballad, that instantly gets you hooked. The composition is one of the sweetest I’ve heard this year. Each month seems to be having its own ‘Best romantic Song’, and while January’s and February’s songs were ‘Enna Sona’ (Ok Jaanu) and ‘Bawara Mann’ (Jolly LLB 2) respectively, I would vouch for this one as March’s best romantic track till now. Mannan’s composition is heart-rending, especially the hookline, which has an innate Indian touch to it. It is just so emotional-sounding for some reason! And the line going “Tu hi mera sach hai re…” has been composed beautifully! The antara just continues with the beauty of the composition, and I especially loved the part where the antara bridges to the hookline! That’s when the maximum goosebumps showed up. The arrangements are amazing, with acoustic guitar riffs (Warren Mendonsa) forming the base of the arrangements, and a ravishing Strings section by the Chennai Strings Conducted by Sax Raja blows away your mind. Electric guitar, also by Warren Mendonsa, makes a cameo in the interlude, and that’s quite interesting to listen to too. The vocals by Armaan are cute and sweet, but his diction falters at places, like “kaab” for “khwaab“, and he hasn’t seemed to have got time to rehearse those intricate aalaaps in the mukhda and hookline! Sad, because that makes a technical glitch in such a beautiful song! Armaan is usually good, but I cant help but miss Arijit here. The song is like a modern equivalent to ‘Commando’s romantic song ‘Saawan Bairi’, but gets nowhere close to it in terms of compositional intricacy and perfection. Then again, that was a semiclassical composition. There is a “Club Mix” included in the soundtrack, which is basically a remix, with the original track played at a very high tempo, that barely does any justice to it. There’s a female portion in that track, which is sung by Shefali Alvares (I got that even before reading the credits! Yayyyy! :p ). The song makes for a nice club track, but doesn’t at all do justice to the surreal composition. And yes, I am rating that because if the makers want to degrade their album by adding unnecessary remixes, it’s not my fault! Note that it is the first remix in all of 2017, and that means we are changing! The remix has been essentially done to bring forward another antara, which wasn’t in the original, and unused. So if you want to hear that, hear this club mix. Otherwise, I will only suggest that you hear it if you work as a DJ. The lyrics by Aatish Kapadia are simply wonderful, and I really loved them, both in the original and the antara of the song that got used in the remix. A romantic song straight from the heart.

Rating: 4.5/5 for original, 2/5 for Club Mix

 

3. Seedha Saadha / Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Amit Mishra / Jubin Nautiyal, Music By ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Seedha saadha dil, Seedha saadha,
Mera Kam hai tera zyaada!”

– Kumaar

A melancholic rock song is the next song Mannan Shaah has to offer here, and from the way it starts, you can tell that it isn’t headed anywhere. The first version, at least. It has that feel to it right at the beginning, which tells you right away that it is a weird, unlikeable composition. And it definitely does start off that way. The composition is as colourless and dull as it can be, before the hookline. The only part the composition ever becomes likeable is in the hookline. The antara too, is decent, but because of the mukhda and other factors we’ll come to later, the song just doesn’t appeal to you. It is a pity that such a good hookline couldn’t get a better fitting part to it. Now for the other factors. Like Amit Mishra’s vocals. Amit Mishra. The one who stunned or entertained us with his renditions in ‘Manma Emotion Jaage’ (Dilwale), ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ (Dishoom) and the best, ‘Bulleya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), does nothing but disappoint in this song. His faltering voice doesn’t go with the composition, for which even K.K. would’ve worked. Jubin does way better in his version, but then, his version is a subtly arranged one, without as many hard-hitting rock noises as Amit’s version has. And I must say, Mannan’s composition sounds way better as a soft rock song, than a heavy rock song. Jubin’s soft voice had the right voice texture for it to come out right, which is why his version is way better. The arrangements in Amit Mishra’s version are too distracting, and the melody can’t be enjoyed as such. Whereas Jubin’s version has a wonderful, sway-inducing soft rock arrangement, enhanced by a synthesiser loop playing in the interlude. In a nutshell, you should go for the wholesome Reprise, than the incomplete and weird first version. Lyrics by Kumaar are good, but quite typical here. A sad song better felt in Jubin’s voice than Amit’s. It is basically a middling composition relying on voices to uplift it, out of which one clearly could not!

Rating: 2/5 for Original, 3.5/5 for Reprise Version

 

4. Commando (Title Track) / Commando (English Version)

Singer ~ Aditi Singh Sharma, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Commando, commando, commando, commando!” :p

– Kumaar

The last song of the album is the title track of the film. Of course, it isn’t exactly the title track because they don’t say ‘Commando 2’, but then whatever. The composition is yet another middling composition by Mannan, and I don’t get why it flies all over the place and has so many turns and twists, that nobody will be able to decipher or even enjoy it. The mukhda makes it start off like a very run-of-the-mill track, without any shine whatsoever. The hookline is the easiest possible way you could imagine to put a tune to the word ‘Commando’. The interlude sees the song going all fusion-y, and then there’s a tempo increases that gets the song taking off at last. From there, the song at least sounds decent. There’s a nice traditional percussion in that part, and it is followed by a nice electric guitar piece. The antara that follows is also better composed, and has the required attitude that is seen in the action scenes of the movie’s trailer. There’s an English Version, in which just the mukhda’s Hindi parts have been replaced by lines in English, and it was actually unnecessary. They could’ve secretly added it in the movie without giving us another audio track, like some filmmakers do for certain songs that are actually good. Aditi is at her pretentious best, and stylises the words so much that it sounds too false! Mannan’s techno sounds do fare well for the song though. Kumaar’s lyrics are just bland. One of the most boring title tracks of late. *Remembers Raees title song*. Or maybe not.

Rating: 1.5/5 for original , 1.5/5 for English Version


Commando 2 is such a letdown, I can’t explain it in words. Only one song matches any expectations, and that too isn’t as good as the best song of “Commando”. Gourov-Roshin’s remake is good except for the fact that is unnecessarily relies on Pritam’s song to propel it forward. Mannan’s other songs are below the standards he set for himself with the first film’s album. Also, unnecessary reprises bog down the album. This Commando lacks command over tune, and composition! And maybe, choice of singers too.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4.5 + 2 + 2 + 3.5 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 50% (How convenient!) 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Dil Mein > Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version) > Hare Krishna Hare Ram > Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix) > Seedha Saadha > Commando (Title Track) > Commando (English Version)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Commando 2) = 07

 

Which is your favourite song from Commando 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SURRENDER YOUR EARS TO THIS ALBUM!! (BADRINATH KI DULHANIA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Akhil Sachdeva & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Kumaar, Akhil Sachdeva, Indeevar, Ikka & Badshah
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 10th March 2017

Badrinath Ki Dulhania Album Cover

Badrinath Ki Dulhania Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Badrinath Ki Dulhania is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com starring Alia Bhatt and Varun Dhawan. The film is directed by Shashank Khaitan and produced by Karan Johar, Hiroo Yash Johar and Apoorva Mehta. So we had a film in 2014 named ‘Humpty Sharma ki Dulhania’, which was a bit of a sleeper hit, and the cast and crew behind it happens to be the same that is behind this one. But according to the makers, it has no connection to the film except that the director, the producers and even the actors, are exactly the same. This film continues the ‘Dulhania’ franchise (If we can call it a franchise with just two films) in U.P., contrary to the setting in Punjab in the first film. Anyway, over to the musical department. Karan Johar has always delivered back-to-back hit soundtracks, and this should be no exception. I still feel guilty that I misjudged the ‘Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania’ album terribly when it released. After a month or so, it started growing amazingly. And now I love it. So I’ll be careful this time around not to make that mistake again. Here, we get a trio of composers, starting with Bollywood’s newest hit-machine, Amaal Mallik, who has composed two songs. Next up is a newcomer named Akhil Sachdeva, with one song, which hopefully is strong enough to bag him a debutant award this year, and lastly is young talent Tanishk Bagchi, who has been composing for so many multicomposer albums here and there that I’ve lost track. Both Amaal and Tanishk have delivered good songs in the past, and with Karan Johar both have a hit record, so I can’t expect anything more than catchiness (sticking to the rowdy look of the movie’s posters and all) in their tunes. As for Akhil, I hope he has something great in hand! So let’s jump right into this soundtrack!


1. Aashiq Surrender Hua

Singers ~ Amaal Mallik & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Arey bhagyawaan, maan bhi jaa, ladna befizool hai,
Pyaar dikhe na kya, aankhon mein padi dhool hai?
Pyaar dikhe na kya, aankhon mein padi dhool hai!!
Taj Mahal banvaana Shah Jahan ki bhool hai,
Uske paas paisa, apne haathon mein toh phool hai!
Tune gusse mein phone mera kaata toh aashiq surrender hua!”

– Shabbir Ahmed

The rowdiness starts from the very first song. And who better to get the catchiness in that rowdiness right than Amaal Mallik, who I believe is following Pritam’s footsteps in this regard? The song is an enjoyable chhed-chhad number, the type of which Bollywood’s music records of the past abound in. But very few fit the bill and actually get everything in the right place. And though this one isn’t PERFECT, it definitely gets you grooving. Amaal’s composition doesn’t rely on complicated turns and meanders for it to get famous. Instead, it takes a very heard-before but enjoyable tune, and carries it forward to make a song that impresses with its simplicity and innocence! The tune is of a type we Indians love to dance to; play it in any wedding and people will dance like crazy even if they don’t know it! And the song will propagate just like that! People will play it somewhere, it will catch on to someone else, and then to someone else, and someone else and someone else. Like a viral fever, but a good one. :p The antaras have been composed very playfully and one cannot miss that overlying South Indian flavour that the beats infuse into the song. That brings us to the arrangements. The aforementioned beats are full of heavy percussion (Dipesh Verma and team) following a kuthu rhythm, which has been laid down by Dipesh Verma, Keyur Barve and Omkar Salunkhe. As of that was not enough, the composer decides to let his assistant Krish Trivedi go all-out with the whistles. The noises with which the song starts off are just so instantly gripping! The occasional brass instruments really bring an Indian-wedding touch to the song. Other digital beats really decorate the song, which would otherwise sound like a recording from a wedding at a village. The song aptly ends with that quintessential ‘play-the-hookline-on-brass-instruments’ trick. Vocals are perfectly enjoyable and help the song to get through to the listener. The composer himself takes the mic and sings the song very efficaciously and mischievously. But of course, nobody sings such songs as well as Shreya Ghoshal, who was a great decision for it, considering that she isn’t getting too many songs like this these days! In her short one-stanza cameo, she does very well, while Amaal carries the rest of the song on his shoulders! Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics are a clever kind of rowdy, and at least they’re decipherable and their meaning comes out clearly! Rowdy but classy!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Roke Na Ruke Naina

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Haathon ki lakeerein do, milti jahaan hain,
Jisko pata hai bata de, jagah woh kahaan hai..
Ishq mein jaane kaisi yeh bebasi hai,
Dhadkanon se milkar bhi dil tanha hai,
Doori main mitaaoon kaise, jaane na manaaoon kaise, tu bataa?
Roke Na ruke naina, teri ore hai inhe rehna..”

– Kumaar

Next up is a pathos-filled romantic song composed by Amaal. And Amaal has composed this one in one of my favourite styles of composition for sad songs — rustic and earthy. Quite recently we heard ‘Naina’ from Pritam’s ‘Dangal’. Quite similar to that in that the song is a sad song with a traditional tune and traditional instruments. The song starts with a heart-rending sarangi piece, and gets to your heart right away. The composition by Amaal has to be one of his maturest compositions in this genre. The mukhda does a nice job in making the ambience damp and melancholic. The soothing piece is followed by an ethereal hookline, something that isn’t blurted out by the singer and forced onto the listener, but proceeds quite calmly. The antaras have yet some more beautiful notes strung together to make a heard-before but engaging stanza. Amaal treads over both high and low octaves with the antaras, and that one odd line in the antara which is made of high notes, just finds its way directly to your heart. The arrangements do half of Amaal’s work in making listeners teary-eyed. Of course the aforementioned sarangi brings in the Indian part of the pathos, as do the wonderful tablas and the oh-so-majestic flute. But Amaal cleverly tops it with acoustic guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) and drums (Debashish Banerjee), in a kind of soft rock template. When the drums interrupt out of nowhere in the till-then very traditional arrangements, I just couldn’t help but remember ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani). And then Amaal also puts to use nice oriental instruments like the mandolin (Tapas Roy) which sends chills down your spine when they play. The vocals are top-notch; Arijit infuses the rustic touch to them. He splendidly covers both low and high notes impeccably, as always. Kumaar has penned one of his finest lyrics for this song. A beautiful sad song, which excels in the instrumentation department!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Humsafar

Singers ~ Akhil Sachdeva & Mansheel Gujral, Music by ~ Akhil Sachdeva, Lyrics by ~ Akhil Sachdeva

“Jitni haseen ye mulakatein hain, unse bhi pyari teri baatein hain
Baaton mein teri jo kho jaate hain, aaun na hosh mein main kabhi
Baahon mein hai teri zindagi, haaye
Sun mere humsafar, kya tujhe itni si bhi khabar?”

– Akhil Sachdeva

The new composer Akhil Sachdeva enters the album next, with his sole song, a romantic ballad, the type of which we haven’t not heard before in Bollywood. The composition follows the familiar template of Pakistani romantic songs, but nevertheless manages to tug at your heartstrings. The song starts with a nice Punjabi couplet rendered by Mansheel Gujral in her strong voice. The mukhda itself gets you swaying to the song, and it actually makes you feel happy. The hookline here too, is quite subtle, but you still get that forced feel. The antara is soothing, with its low notes, again, making you fall in love with them. But overall, there is nothing innovative in the composition. It kills with its simplicity. The arrangements are basically acoustic guitar (Veljon) riffs and digital beats that don’t really leave any scope for anything else. However, the newcomer adds a wonderful harmonica that magically uplifts the mood whenever it plays. The vocals by the composer are fine, not excellent. At places he sounds a lot like Atif Aslam, but doesn’t get the prolonged notes as right as Atif does. Also, his pronunciation needs a lot of improvement. He needs to work on his ‘jh’ sounds, which come across as ‘zzzzh’. I say this not in a demeaning manner though. On a whole, his rendition is soulful. Mansheel has more of a backing vocalist role here, but stuns in her parts. Akhil himself has written the lyrics here, and he uses all the possible Bollywood romance clichés in one song — ‘sunn mere humsafar’, ‘baahon mein teri kho jaate hain’, ‘tujhe maan loonga khuda‘ and whatnot. Nevertheless, the song makes for a good listen.

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Badri Ki Dulhania (Title Track)

Singers ~ Dev Negi, Neha Kakkar, Monali Thakur & Ikka, Additional Vocals ~ Rajnigandha Shekhawat, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, Rap By ~ Ikka

“Khelan kyun na jaaye, tu hori re rasiya,
Khelan kyun na jaaye, tu hori re rasiya,
Poochhe hain tohe saari guiyaan kahaan hai Badri Ki Dulhania?”

– Shabbir Ahmed

And Tanishk makes a grand entry with the next song, which happens to be the title song of the movie. The song is an enjoyable one with a folksy rhythm and whose upbeat tempo makes you dance and sing along. The song starts with a wonderful folksy line, composed playfully. After that and a rap, Tanishk’s mukhda to the song begins, and it has all the required spunk for a successful Bollywood dance track. And then when we come to the hookline, he cleverly incorporates the tune of the folk number ‘Chalat Musafir’ to Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics. (Or maybe Shabbir wrote it after he composed. Any which way, both of them went about it very cleverly!) The antara is a short stanza that efficiently carries forward the naughtiness and catchiness in the composition. Tanishk has to be commended for this composition, because I’ve never heard such a good song of this genre from him after ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns) and that was what he composed with his friend Vayu. So hats off to him. The arrangements are amazing. The percussion (Dipesh Verma) is topnotch with a strong U.P. flavour to it, and the harmonium (Pradip Pandit) is another star of the song. The song is a holi song, and so the quintessential dhols (Deepak Bhatt) do the needful. The vocals are the strong point of the song. If someone doesn’t like the composition, they’ll fall in love with the song anyway, because of the vocals. Dev Negi, at his exuberant best, renders the male portions spot-on, while the three female vocalists all impress with their respective portions. Neha Kakkar, who takes the major chunk of the female portions, sounds cute, naughty and funny. The way she sings ‘muniya re muniya‘ is enough to melt your heart. Monali, whose ‘Cham Cham’ (Baaghi) is still on the majority of Indians’ playlists, and whose ‘Dhanak’ (Dhanak) is still on mine, renders the antara with ease, but doesn’t sound quite the innocent girl she always sounds, here! It is surprising that Neha sounds more innocent in this song! 😀 And when Neha takes over from Monali in the antara, I couldn’t even recognize Neha the first time I heard the song, and that’s saying something! The third lady vocalist is classical singer Rajnigandha Shekhawat, who sings the introductory folksy lines so beautifully, I’m in love with them. Ikka raps here, and his rap isn’t as irritating as it could have been. Maybe he toned it down a bit. He suits the rustic environment of the song, and doesn’t really rap anything odd. Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics here are functional, if not good. An apt title song!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Tamma Tamma Again

Singers ~ Bappi Lahiri & Anuradha Paudwal, Chorus ~ Dattatray Mestry, Archana Gore, Arun Ingle, Aparna Ullal, Mandar Apte, Mayuri Patwardhan, Nitin Karandikar, Deepti Rege, Voice-over ~ Ameen Sayani, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Indeevar, Rap by ~ Badshah

“Been bajaati hui…. NAAGIN!”

– Ameen Sayani

And Tanishk, with his second song, also closes the album, with another remake. If the previous song was a remake, then this one is definitely a remix. The makers have decided to rehash ‘Tamma Tamma’ (Thanedaar) for the movie. And thankfully, they retain the original track and just construct other additional around the sample. The composition by Bappi Lahiri (which was also ‘inspired’ by Mory Kante’s ‘Tama Tama’) was a rage in India when it released and the portion sampled in this song is the mukhda, hookline (obviously!) and one antara. Tanishk has rehashed this so well, I almost disliked it at first. He has used the song-break technique by stopping the song multiple times before actually getting to the hookline, something else which we hardly get to hear completely twice or thrice (or maybe more. I didn’t count!) But then, I realised that I had started liking the song. It happened spontaneously. One moment I was all about ‘Remakes are bad!’ and the next moment I was a freak dancing to a remake. Because it has been done very diligently, not to mention cleverly. Club beats have been added that really enhance the disco touch of the song, and the original voices have been muffled in such a way that actually does make the old song sound ‘old’! Tanishk has added very efficient beats to the hookline, like the electronic tabla. And the interlude, besides containing another interruption by Badshah, also contains a wonderful mandolin solo by Tapas Roy. The only tampering Tanishk has done with the original track is, he has added a new chorus to sing the hook, and it sounds pretty good too. Badshah’s rap does sound agitating at first, but Tanishk has enhanced that too with his nice electronic tabla beats. Ameen Sayani, the RJ of Binaca Geetmala, has done a voiceover, and the “been bajati hui naagin” part is particularly INSANE!!! Tapas Roy’s mandolin returns to play the hookline at the end of the song, and it sounds awesome then! An efficient remake!

Rating: 4/5


Badrinath Ki Dulhania is yet another feather in the cap of so many people. First of all, the composers, two relative youngsters doing so well in the competitive industry, Amaal and Tanishk, who have made two stellar songs each, and one newcomer, Akhil, who plays it safe in his debut. Next, the singers, who have really outdone themselves with their singing in this album! Dev Negi and Amaal Mallik for instance. After that, Karan Johar, because his productions always have enjoyable music, and he gets yet another successful album. Here is an album I would happily surrender my ears to. It is a kind of antidepressant album!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 86%

Final rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Roke na Ruke Naina > and then any order you like

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes: 04 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Badrinath Ki Dulhania) = 06

 

Which is your favourite song from Badrinath Ki Dulhania? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂