ROCHAK’S Ph.D IN PUNJABI FOLK! (KHANDAANI SHAFAKHANA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Tanishk Bagchi, Badshah, Payal Dev, Jasbir Jassi, Shyam Bhateja & Anand-Milind
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk Bagchi, Mellow D, Shabbir Ahmed, Kumaar, Badshah, Gautam G Sharma, Gurpreet Saini, Davinder Khandewal & Deepak Chaudhary
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 2nd August 2019

 

Khandaani Shafakhana Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Khandaani Shafakhana is a Bollywood comedy film starring Sonakshi Sinha, Varun Sharma, Badshah and Annu Kapoor. The film is directed by Shilpi Dasgupta and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Mahaveer Jain, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba, Divya Khosla Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film revolves around a woman who has to take over her uncle’s infamous sex clinic. The music of the film has been given by the remake expert Tanishk Bagchi, the rapper who is acting in the film Badshah, Rochak Kohli, fresh from the success of his brilliant work in ‘Music Teacher’ earlier this year, and Payal Dev, Who is surprisingly debuting as a composer, making it another mainstream female singer doing so after Kanika Kapoor last year with ‘Chhod Diya’ (Baazaar). So let’s see how this multicomposer album to this film turns out to be.


Music promotions for any film these days start with remakes, and ‘Khandaani Shafakhana’ makes sure it isn’t the norm-breaker. Tanishk Bagchi’s interpretations of old Bollywood super hit songs and/or Punjabi pop songs are a norm these days: another norm this album shies away from breaking.
The album hence starts with Koka, a Tanishk Bagchi remake of Jasbir Jassi’s pop song ‘Koka Tera Kuch Kuch’ from the album ‘Just Jassi’. Tanishk does add his own composition to the hookline from Jassi and Shyam Bhateja’s original, and manages to present us with a catchy and groovy remake. Badshah’s presence in the film warrants a rap from him, while Jasbir Jassi is called to dub the rest of the vocals, and he delivers them in top form. Dhvani Bhanushali, taking the support of oodles of autotune, however, sounds odd; not that singing prowess matters so much in a dance track like this. The beats are catchy, and there’s also a T-Series advertisement thrown in very abruptly in the beginning. If that’s your kind of thing, ‘Koka’ is for you.
Tanishk’s second remake happens to be that of a 90s Bollywood song. Sheher Ki Ladki is a highly unimaginative, though still attractive, recreation of Anand-Milind’s ‘Shehar Ki Ladki’ (Rakshak), with Badshah donning the singer’s cap, obviously coming nowhere close to the original singer Abhijeet Bhattacharya in doing so. His ‘Hi, how are you?’ and ‘How do you do’ sounds so bland as compared to Abhijeet’s (which also features in this song as a bonus addition, I guess, as Tanishk likes to sample the original singers’ voices like Kumar Sanu in ‘Aankh Maarey’ from ‘Simmba’ and Kavita Krishnamurthy in ‘Hawa Hawai 2.0’ from ‘Tumhari Sulu’). Chandana Dixit too, gets her original line featured behind an extremely loud and high-pitched Tulsi Kumar. The latter gets her own original verse too, sounding not as bad! Badshah’s rap is more irritating here than in ‘Koka’, where it actually went with the flow of the song. Also irritating is how Bagchi never lets the hook of the song complete, always interrupting it with that jarring electronic loop that plays so many times throughout the song. A good attempt to revive the song, but people would obviously go for the original!
Apart from acting in the film and rapping in two remakes, Badshah also gets selected to prepare his own original song for the film, which, not surprisingly, tops the two remakes by Tanishk. Saans Toh Le Le is a groovy song with the trademark Badshah beats, but with a retro Punjabi folk twist, a la ‘Naughty Billo’ (Phillauri) and ‘Bhangra Ta Sajda’ (Veere Di Wedding), both songs by Shashwat Sachdev. The programming really makes the song interesting, especially Tejas Vinchurkar’s folksy flute pieces, and makes the middling composition sound more interesting to listen to. Badshah, along with Rico, deliver the lines well, too, making it an all in all fresh listen.
Payal Dev makes her composing debut with this album, in a song called Dil Jaaniye, a very sweet romantic duet by Jubin Nautiyal and Tulsi Kumar. The composition, though reminiscent of many romantic Punjabi songs Bollywood has churned out over the years, still makes a mark, and especially the mukhda gets you gripped enough to listen forth. Aditya Dev’s arrangements are soothing, the Indian percussions (Chari, Shashi, Mushtaq and Sharafat) taking centre stage, along with the wonderful Pianica piece by Aditya Dev himself. The antara sung by Jubin is great, but the one with Tulsi sounds a bit unnecessary, because it stretches the song a bit too long, and then we have to listen to it in Tulsi Kumar’s double-layered, badly processed voice. Shabbir Ahmed, a rare choice for romantic songs as this, writes functional lyrics. However, the stars of the song are definitely Payal with her composition, Aditya with his arrangements and Jubin with his part of the vocals.
Two more soft songs follow, both by Rochak Kohli. In Bheege Mann, he goes back to the style of music he composed for the songs he did for Luv Ranjan films, ‘Tera Yaar Hoon Main’ (Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety) and ‘Dil Royi Jaaye’ (De De Pyaar De). The same kind of dulcet melody decorated with guitar riffs, piano notes (arrangements courtesy Aditya Dev) and stray aalaaps, but this time Arijit Singh is replaced by an equally efficient Altamash Faridi, thereby giving the song a rustic touch with his earthy voice. The composition is strong, and will have you enraptured for its entire duration, in spite of its similarities with Kohli’s previous numbers. Gautam G Sharma and Gurpreet Saini write pensive lines to accompany the serious composition, but all-in-all, it is a pleasant song to listen to.
Rochak’s second song, Udd Jaa, is a delight to listen to, because it starts with ethnic strokes of the bouzouki, mandolin and rabab (Tapas Roy), immediately blending into a folksy dholak rhythm, very Rochak-ish (reminding one of ‘Meer-e-Karwaan’ from ‘Lucknow Central’!) which is then followed by the beautiful voice of Tochi Raina (where was the man for so long!?) which suits the motivational and inspirational nature of the song so well! Rochak churns out a very creative composition, which sounds straight out of Coke Studio thanks to the gratuitous folk sounds. While listening to this song, I realise how heavily Rochak relies on folk music to make his songs sound rich, right from the initial days (I think he started using it mainly with ‘Mera Yaar Funtastic’ from ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’) to his songs in ‘Hawaizaada’, to the earlier mentioned ‘Meer-e-Karwaan’ (Lucknow Central), the beautiful Punjabi romantic song ‘Nain Na Jodeen’ (Badhaai Ho), right to the very recent songs in ‘Ek Ladki Ko Dekha Toh Aisa Laga’. Rochak is incomplete without presenting Punjabi folk music in a very flattering way in his songs! Back to the song, Kumaar’s lyrics in the song suit the inspirational aspect of it, and complement the melody well, and put together, Tochi, Rochak and Kumaar end this album on a high note, with a strong folksy melody!


This album turns out to be one of the better-compiled multicomposer albums by T-Series after a while, the last ones being ‘Kabir Singh’ and ‘De De Pyaar De’ in my opinion! All four composers here try to bring what the movie needs, Tanishk with his mass-attracting remakes with club beats, Badshah with his trademark catchy beats, Payal Dev with her great composing debut and finally Rochak with his astounding use of Punjabi folk music.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 = 46

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Udd Jaa > Bheege Mann > Dil Jaaniye > Koka > Saans Toh Le Le > Sheher Ki Ladki

 

Which is your favourite song from Khandaani Shafakhana? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SITUATIONALL HAI KYA? (JUDGEMENTALL HAI KYA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rachita Arora, Arjuna Harjai, Daniel B. George, Tanishk Bagchi & Badshah
♪ Lyrics by: Prakhar Varunendra, Kumaar, Prakhar Vihaan, Navi Kamboz, Tanishk Bagchi & Raja Kumari
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 20th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 26th July 2019

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Judgementall Hai Kya is a psychological thriller / black comedy film that stars Kangana Ranaut, Rajkummar Rao, Amyra Dastur, Amrita Puri and Hussain Dalal. The film is directed by Prakash Kovelamudi and produced by Ekta Kapoor and Shailesh R Singh. The film has a music album by four composers — Rachita Arora of ‘Newton’ and ‘Mukkabaaz’ fame, Daniel B. George, the background music composer for the film, Arjuna Harjai (‘Titoo MBA’ and ‘Lucknow Central’ fame) and Tanishk Bagchi (remakes fame). I have already watched the movie, so my music review will refer to it in some places, but rest assured that it is completely spoiler-free!


The wacky album to this quirky film starts off with a not-so-wacky remake by Tanishk Bagchi; this time, the song that arrives at Bagchi’s parlour for a makeover is Navi Kamboz-written, Badshah-produced & -composed,  and Navv Inder-sung ‘Wakhra Swag’, a Times Music single from 2015. Now, I’m not much of a sucker for the original either, the repetitive nature of it getting on my nerves, and as such, I was not all that disappointed with the remake, named The Wakhra Song. Foot-tapping, though cliché, beats are all over this remake, while Badshah’s rap is replaced with Raja Kumari’s refreshing rap (sounding as refreshing here as she did in her last Bollywood outing, ‘Husn Parcham’ from ‘Zero’, with Ajay-Atul). Also joining the proceedings is Lisa Mishra with some new lyrics from the female point of view, also penned by Bagchi. The song still suffers from the repetitiveness syndrome though, thanks to the predictable tune of the not-so-impressive-to-start-with original, and the alternating nature of verse, rap, verse, rap, verse.

The other guest composer for this album, Arjuna Harjai, who we are getting to hear after two years (still find myself visiting his songs from ‘Lucknow Central’ sometimes; a pity he didn’t get more work between that and this!) gets to compose a dulcet melody, Kis Raste Hai Jaana, a song that plays a nice and sweet role in the film, and sounds even better with the visuals. The song starts with a calming guitar riff, followed by Surabhi Dashputra (remember ‘O Soniye’ and ‘O Ranjhna’ from ‘Titoo MBA’? Which were also composed by Harjai) in her husky voice, rendering Harjai’s composition impeccably. Arjuna kicks in with the antara, his Arijit-esque yet not-completely Arijit-esque voice providing great contrast to Dashputra’s husky one. His aalaaps towards the end of the antara are beautiful. Harjai’s composition (sounds quite like something out of Jasleen Royal’s studio!) and arrangements are wonderful. The “jaawaan main, jaawaan main” part is the best portion of the song. Especially since Harjai arranges a mini-harmony there with two tracks of Surabhi’s voice, and even throws in his own voice the last time that section plays. Kumaar’s lyrics are the conventional existential crisis lyrics that we often hear in Bollywood, but work in favour of the song.

Background score composer Daniel B. George’s offering Kar Samna is a short piece with Ramayana references that are best understood after watching the film. An ensemble of singers including the composer, a somebody named Amir Khan, Protijyoti Ghosh and Brijesh Shandilya, deliver it to their best ability, considering the little scope they had. Prakhar Vihaan’s lyrics are, as mentioned, Ramayana references that are best left undeciphered until you watch the film. The arrangements by Ujjwal Kashyap and Protijyoti Ghosh are jarring, full of angst, shown by strings (that quintessential horror-movie rapid movement of strings), electric guitars and drums.
That being said, I’m kind of unhappy that some other great background pieces that were included in the film, couldn’t make it to the album. For example, there’s an amazing recreation of Rajesh Roshan’s ‘Tauba Tauba Kya Hoga’ (Mr. Natwarlal) and I hope Saregama has plans of releasing that!

That brings us to lead composer Rachita Arora, with her two songs for the movie. The lead character of Bobby is introduced to us with the boisterous Para Para, a throwback to R.D. Burman’s school of music. The length is off-putting at first, but again, it is one of the songs that seem better on screen than on earphones. Arun Dev Yadav’s part-R.D. Burman, part-Usha Uthup-esque rendition, complete with the frantic breathing patterns as were heard in Burman’s songs, is refreshing. Also, the arrangements (OmDixant) do not leave a sense of datedness, as was heard in songs like, say, ‘Paisa’ (Super 30). What stands out is the saxophone (Bhushan Suryakant Patil). Prakhar Varunendra’s lyrics are a perfect description for the wacky nature of the character Kangana plays in the film.
In her second song, Judgementall Hai Kya, Rachita creates another very experimental sounding track, starting like one of those nursery rhymes you hear in horror movies, in the voice of a child — Nivedita Padmanabhan. Jaspreet Jasz takes the song forward with a rap, followed by a quite cliché EDM drop (programming and arrangements by Nitish Rambhadren and Daniel Chiramal). Varunendra’s lyrics are outrageously wacky, but don’t really hit home. The song could’ve been much better. It just makes me ask ‘Over Experimental Hai Kya?’


An album, best heard while watching the movie; other than ‘Kis Raste Hai Jaana’, I don’t see any track that is palatable enough for me to listen to after even a month. Situational and experimental tracks don’t always make the cut.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 7.5 + 5 + 6 + 5.5 = 30.5

Album Percentage: 61%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kis Raste Hai Jaana > The Wakhra Song > Para Para > Judgementall Hai Kya > Kar Samna

 

Which is your favourite song from Judgementall Hai Kya? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SABKA MUSIC STYLE BADLA!! (BADLA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Anupam Roy & Clinton Cerejo
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, A.M. Turaz, Manoj Yadav, Anupam Roy, Siddhant Kaushal & Jizzy
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 1st March 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 8th March 2019

Badla Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes

 


Badla is a Bollywood film starring Taapsee Pannu and Amitabh Bachchan in lead roles, and directed by Sujoy Ghosh. The film is produced by Gauri Khan, Shah Rukh Khan, Sunir Kheterpal, Akshai Puri and Gaurav Verma. The review of this album being already as it is, I’ll jump right into talks about the music, which is by Amaal Mallik, Clinton Cerejo and Anupam Roy. This is Amaal Mallik’s return to film music after a year, after his one-odd song in ‘Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety’ last year, and it is his first for Sujoy Ghosh. Whereas the other two have composed for Sujoy previously in his productions and/or directorials — Clinton in ‘Te3n’ and ‘Kahaani 2’, and Anupam in ‘Pink’. So let’s see how these ever-trustworthy composers of Sujoy’s fare, this time being guest composers to the lead composer Amaal Mallik!


We hear Amaal Mallik composing for a Bollywood film after a year from ‘Subah Subah’ (Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety), and he returns with two songs (but three tracks) in the same album. Kyun Rabba appears in two versions, the first a traditional Bollywood/Bhattish Rock-Sufi melange, which we have gotten enough of in the 2010s, but I guess some more was needed before the decade ends, just to bring back a.sense of nostalgia. That way, the song is quite nostalgic, what with Amaal employing heard-and-loved elements like the rock guitars accompanying the Sufi elements like Dholak and Tabla (Satyajit and Ratnadeep Jamsandekar). The most attractive part of the arrangements though, are the drums, especially the cymbals, evoking a feel of the chimta from Qawwalis, making it sound like a rock Qawwali! The melody is plain, with a beautiful hookline, and it is catchy, I have to give it that due credit. Armaan’s vocals are spot-on as always; the fact that even though Amaal was relatively absent from the composing scene, Armaan was still singing for other composers, proves the point. The Acoustic Version is yet another traditional Bollywood take on the melody, this time with piano included as a main instrument. The punch that the Rock Version had is missing in this, but this version has a flow that one would want if they wanted to hear a more subtle variant of the song. Personally, I favour the first version!
Amaal’s second offering is a sad song, Tum Na Aaye, in the voice of K.K., another singer we mostly get to hear in only Amaal’s soundtracks over the past year. The song immediately arrives to its melancholic point, wasting no time in long mukhdas or preludes. That is a bit off-putting, but the hookline is strong enough to keep the listener listening. K.K.’s voice soars in the high notes, reminding us how there is an amazing singer who doesn’t get as many songs as he deserves anymore! The arrangements are again, a rock template, with guitars and drums driving the arrangements all the way. A.M. Turaz’s lyrics are standard Bollywood sad song lyrics; nothing remarkable there. The song is a good listen, but I would have preferred a mellower, softer version of the song.
And after Amaal’s part of the album, we get two songs from the other composers, Clinton Cerejo and Anupam Roy, who have both previously worked with Sujoy Ghosh in his productions and/or directorials.
Clinton returns to the Ghosh camp after two short soundtracks — ‘Te3n’ and ‘Kahaani 2’, both in 2016. Those two albums were very mellow and had the Clinton touch all over them, but what he presents here in ‘Badla’, is not at all like what he gave in those albums. Aukaat is a rap song following the new rap craze that ‘Gully Boy’, Emiway Bantai’s ‘Machayenge’, and some other Indie pop songs have brought into the scene. The song starts with Clinton’s trademark haunting piano notes, and goes on to a haunting rap song, carrying the film’s mystery theme well. However, as soon as Amitabh Bachchan and Amit Mishra start with the proceedings of the song, you feel a disconnect, because the song isn’t really catchy in terms of its rap. It is the music that manages to keep you gripped for the short duration of the song, but other than that, the song is yet another typical Bollywood rap song that has nothing new to offer, not even with the lyrics by Siddhant Kaushal.
Anupam Roy’s song is a similar situational track, Badla. Now this song carries a sound you’d never associate with Anupam Roy, a kind of retro digital sound that first irks you out, but then sets in as something weirdly new and addictive. The lyrics by Manoj Yadav and Anupam Roy are all about things changing in the world around us, and the tune manages to keep you hooked, especially in and around the hookline. The mukhda is enough to pique your interest. The minimalistic digital beat is perfect, while the composer adds the occasional eleftronic music sounds to make the song sound atmospheric. The song turns into a drag after the antara starts, though, and it is safe to skip the rest of the song after that.


Badla is yet another one of those albums where one composer has to compose all the musically perfect songs, the songs that would attract the audiences, while the others have to create situational tracks that wouldn’t matter to the public once they’re already seated for the movie. Yes, Amaal is the one who does the best job here, followed by Anupam Roy. A disappointing song by Clinton Cerejo still doesn’t make me worried though; he has the potential to do much better, and just didn’t get the scope here.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7.5 + 7 + 5 + 6.5 = 34

Album Percentage: 68%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kyun Rabba > Kyun Rabba (Acoustic) > Tum Na Aaye > Badla > Aukaat

Which is your favourite song from Badla? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NAWABS THAT PARTY AND DANCE IN CLUBS..? (NAWABZAADE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gurinder Seagal, Guru Randhawa & Badshah
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Kunaal Vermaa, Ikka, Kumaar, Sandeep Nath & Badshah
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th July 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th July 20181400x1400bb2

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Nawabzaade is an upcoming comedy film starring Raghav Juyal, Dharmesh Yelande, Punit J. Pathak and Isha Rikhi. The film is directed by Jayesh Pradhan and produced by Lizelle D’Souza and Mayur K Barot. The music for the film is composed by Guru Randhawa, Gurinder Seagal and Badshah. I don’t really expect much from the album, looking at the composer names, and I’ll be honest: I’m reviewing it so I don’t have to have only two big albums, Dhadak and Soorma competing in the monthly awards. 😅 So let’s see what entails…


Guru Randhawa continues his spree of rehashing his pop sinhles under T-Series, into Bollywood club tracks; he also continues making the Bollywood variants sound fresher and less raw than the pop songs — giving them a more polished sound. High Rated Gabru is propelled by the two special appearances by Varun Dhawan and Shraddha Kapoor, though. The song is your typical Guru Randhawa EDM number that attracts you at first, but wears off with further listens. As for me, it hasn’t worn off yet though, so I guess this is one of the stronger ones. I like the drum beats Guru has put in occasionally, and the club sound still sounds fresh, so I guess he still has the audience grooving. The Female Version is even more unnecessary than having ice cream in December. Aditi Singh Sharma’s over-stylised vocals seem to say “Remember me? I haven’t got a song in Bollywood for a long time, but I still can’t sing in a normal voice.” The Punjabi reprise of the lyrics just sounds odd. The programming in this version isn’t as fresh and bubbly as in the male version, so it’s bound to get less takers.

Badshah too, is made to rehash his tried-and-tested formula, with a steady beat running throughout the song, Tere Naal Nachna is adorned with noises like an Indian auntyji going “Hainn?” The bass line though, is really addictive, and the hookline by newcomer (?) Sunanda Sharma is irresistible. Badshah has the most catchy female singer portions in his songs! Looks like after Aastha Gill, he is now introducing another quirky singer. The lyrics are the usual Badshah rap stuff, while vodka makes a cameo in the hookline, as always.

Lead composer Gurinder Seagal gets three songs to his credit: he doesn’t make much of the opportunity, though. Amma Dekh is a pacy dubstep number that should have been released two or three years ago. Sukriti Kakar awkwardly tries to sing like Neeti Mohan, while Ikka provides a banal rap portion. Gurinder does give it a cool sound though, with a variety of sound effects used throughout the song. Kumaar’s lyrics are nothing except for Sameer’s hookline from the song ‘Amma Dekh’ (Stuntsman).

If that was cringeworthy though, what awaits you in Mummy Kasam will have you wincing in terror. The staid-by-now Bollywood kuthu rhythm has been given a tedious presentation here, with cringeworthy lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, and weird vocals by Gurinder Seagal. Ikka presents an even worse rap in this song than he did in the former. Payal Dev tries to sound like Neha Kakkar, and obviously fails. Too loud for my liking.

The only song where Gurinder remotely proves that he can compose, and not just program, is Lagi Hawa Dil Ko, which just happens to be the best song of the album because all the others are nowhere near it. It sounds refreshing to get a normal, romantic melody after so much noise, and my brain felt glad to get to process something for once. Altamash Faridi leads the vocals wonderfully, while others like Gurinder Singh, Shivay Vyas, Nettle and even Mika Singh in a short energetic departure from the romantic tune, complement him well. The reason this song stands out from the others is that it has variety. The arrangements are pleasant — guitars, harmonica, tablas, even, in a short Qawwali portion, drums, trumpets and rock guitars in a rock-and-roll portion, this song has a wide range. Sandeep Nath’s lyrics are nothing great, but more of better-than-the-rest.


Except for one experimental song, this album is mainly going to be heard and forgotten. In fact, I can’t even guarantee that the experimental song won’t be forgotten!!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 5.5 + 7 + 5 + 3 + 7.5 = 34.5

Album Percentage: 57.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Lagi Hawa Dil Ko > Tere Naal Nachna > High Rated Gabru > High Rated Gabru (Female) > Amma Dekh > Mummy Kasam

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 27 (from previous albums) + 02 = 29

Which is your favourite song from Nawabzaade? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 😊


 

ALLAH DUHAI HAI, SELFISH YEH ____ HAI!! (RACE 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Meet Bros., Tushar Joshi (for JAM8), Vicky-Hardik, Shivai Vyas, Gurinder Seagal, Kiran Kamath, Deep Money & Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Salman Khan, Kumaar, Shabbir Ahmed, Shloke Lal, Raja Kumari, Hardik Acharya, Shivai Vyas, Shanky, Kunaal Vermaa, Rimi Nique & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 12th June 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th June 2018

Race 3

 

Listen to the songs: Gaana


Race 3 is an upcoming action thriller (read horror comedy) film starring Salman Khan, Anil Kapoor, Bobby Deol, Jacqueline Fernandez, Saqib Saleem, Daisy Shah and Sonakshi Sinha, directed by Remo D’Souza and produced by Salma Khan, Salman Khan and Ramesh Taurani. The film blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’ blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’ blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’ and has music by Salman Khan Vishal Mishra, Meet Bros., Tushar Joshi, Vicky-Hardik, Shivai Vyas and Gurinder Seagal. blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’.


NOTE: After reading the review, you are to fill-in the blank in the heading of this review. 😊 Have fun thinking of words that rhyme with ‘Duhai’, like the makers do in every instalment of the ‘Race’ franchise.


I must admit that lead composer Vishal Mishra’s first song Selfish is much better in its music and composition, than it is in its lyrics and female vocals. Salman Khan, who has now proclaimed himself as a lyricist as well, writes lyrics like a ‘Baybeh’. Poor Vishal Mishra gets to decorate his beautiful composition and soulful arrangements with Salman’s awkward lyrics and Iulia Vantur’s just as awkward voice. Her pronunciation isn’t bad though, for somebody who doesn’t know Hindi. Atif Aslam saves what’s left of the song; and that makes the song work anyway. Vishal’s strings and piano actually deserved a better treatment by the production house and the lead actor. Thankfully, we get a Solo Version sung only by Atif Aslam, and it does sound half less awkward than the duet. The Unplugged Version is a duet with Vishal Mishra himself, and though the composer sings well, against the acoustic guitar backdrop, Atif still steals the cake. The bad part is, the exact same lyrics in all three versions — adding up to 15 minutes of ‘Selfish’ on this album. Are you trying to tell us something, Salman?
I started loving ‘Selfish’ even more after listening to I Found Love. Vishal Mishra tries to recreate something like his own ‘Pyar Ho’ (Munna Michael), with similar piano portions and digital beats, but it ends up being so awkward, you wonder how somebody can find love singing this song. The rock part in the hook tries to be Pritam-ish but fails miserably. At least in the previous song, we had a good composition. Here we have no such luck. And Salman sings it as well as writes it. “Ik Baat Achhi Hui Ki Khoobiyon Ke Pehle Khaamiyan Pata Chali.” (I can’t find the *slow claps* emoji… Come on Android, we need one.. fast!) Newcomer Veera Saxena has a functional voice, but I can’t help but wonder why she didn’t sing ‘Selfish’, the good song, and why Iulia didn’t sing this, which was already sounding bad!
The second song Iulia sings on the album, actually sounds good. Party Chale On by newcomer composer duo Vicky-Hardik sounds closest to Pritam’s music, almost consciously mimicking ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz), and even Iulia sounds good in this one. So does Mika. That doesn’t mean it’s exceptional or anything, but it sure seems so after the two awkward songs. That said, Hardik’s lyrics aren’t all that comfortable either. I appreciate that at least some efforts have been taken in making the arrangements good, but Pritam has been credited with special thanks in the YouTube credits, so now I don’t know what to assume. It’s the only song of the album I sat through without cringing once.
Heeriye is Salman Khan’s attempt to imbibe Punjabi pop in his films as well, given that he has somehow steered clear of it till now. Meet Bros “compose” (since it is a note-to-note remake of Deep Money composed ‘Naina Da Nasha’ which released 3 years ago) a 2000s-ish tune and decorate it with EDM that reminds me of ‘It’s Magic’ (Koi Mil Gaya). Deep Money’s vocals are underwhelming but thankfully, someone else didn’t sing it. Neha Bhasin sounds awesome, but I don’t know why she’s signing songs where she has so little to do. (Swag Se Swagat, and now this). Kamaal Khan’s irritating interruptions of ‘I’ve been thinking about you’ and ‘You blow my mind’ do nothing to add any class to the song. Side note: I just love, love, love the contrast between Jacqueline’s dance and Salman’s dance in the video.
Another newcomer Shivai Vyas is given a ‘big break’ by Salman with the song Ek Galti. Now, this song is decent. But as I said before, it isn’t one where I didn’t cringe. Shivai Vyas composes quite well, and towards the hookline, it actually sounded like something Pritam would offer back in 2008 (that’s ten years ago already! 😱😱) for the ‘Race 1’ album. The song needed someone like Atif Aslam or Arijit Singh (that would be great right? Salman saying to Arijit — ‘Hey, you can sing in ‘Race 3′ if you want’ and then Arijit would reject it and then five more years of waiting for forgiveness from Salman.) But Shivai sings it himself, and ends up shouting in the antara, where the song would’ve sounded intense and serious in someone else’s voice, but now it sounds like a hastily made pop song which ended up in (what’s supposed to be) a big film. He even tries to put tablas and other instruments that make the song sound decent.
Saansain Hui Dhuan Dhuan starts with someone singing “R, A, C, E, 3”, as if the characters of the film know that they’re in a film which is the third instalment of a film franchise called ‘Race’. 😹 That said, Gurinder Seagal makes sure the song has some class; the music is clearly up-to-date, and the composition suits the sinister theme of the film (or the sinister theme the film should have.. which has turned into comedy in this film). Payal Dev sounds impressive, and Iulia must’ve sung that English part, but it still sounds like an Indian accent, so I don’t know why she puts on her Romanian or whatever accent in Hindi songs but puts on an Indian accent in an English part. 😒
Tushar Joshi, acting under JAM8 gets to remake his mentor Pritam’s iconic theme song. Allah Duhai Hai is a sick (I mean sick, not the modern ‘sick’ which people use for saying “Yo man dat’s sick!”) reinterpretation of Pritam’s theme song. The song starts off well enough, thanks to Amit Mishra, but as soon as Sreerama pitches in with that ear-splitting ‘nasha, tera, nashaaa‘, which was oh so graceful when Sunidhi sang it ten years ago, I lost interest in the song. As a result, even with some of the best singers of today (Amit & Jonita) the song turns out underwhelming. The antara has no memorable tune, it just sounds like the singers were given some words and asked to put some tune to it. Shabbir Ahmed’s new lyrics are not bad, considering the standard of lyrics in the rest of the album. Raja Kumari’s rap takes up a major portion of the song, backed with sick (again, you know which ‘sick’) EDM that falls on its face.
Kiran Kamath’s Mashup is a mashup. Don’t listen to it. I’m not gonna tell you ‘well made’ or whatever because mashups are mashups. I’ll just give it a 2/10 based on what I heard. 😏


blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5.5 + 6.5 + 6 + 2 + 7 + 5.5 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 + 2 = 49

Album Percentage: 49%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: If possible, don’t even try the songs below 5/10

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 21 (from previous albums) + 04 = 25

Do you have a favourite song from the Race 3 album? Please don’t vote for it. Instead, participate in this poll! Thanks! 🙂

5 SONGS THAT SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN REMADE!! (MUSICAL LIST #1)

So today marks the start of a new section in the blog — The “LISTS” Section, where I’ll be listing songs based on one particular theme, depending on what theme I’m feeling like listing songs about. :p

What better way to start this section off, than doing it in collaboration with one of my close blogger friends, Jemma Rajyaguru from the Girl At The Piano blog! Her blog is full of random musical thoughts, lists of songs, throwbacks to the Golden Era of Bollywood music, and new releases by new and upcoming artists!

Today, we will both be listing five songs each, which we wish would never have been remade! And yes, after reading my list, be sure to read Jemma’s, as her song choices are just as exciting, if not more exciting, than mine!! Correction: they definitely are more exciting!😁 So let’s get started with my five songs so you can check her list out! 🙂 If you want to check it out now though, here it is!

P.S.: I believe no song should be remade, but these are the ones where I just don’t agree with the remake!

P.P.S: These are in no particular order; it isn’t a Top5 list 🙂


1. Mere Rashke Qamar (Pop Song by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan)

• Original Song Details:

Music by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by Ustad Qamar Jalalvi, Sung by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, First Performed in 1988, Music Label: Hi-Tech Music

• Remake Details:

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by Fana Buland Shehri & Manoj Muntashir, Sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Tulsi Kumar, Used in 2017 Bollywood film ‘Baadshaho’, Music Label: T-Series

One would think that nephew Rahat Fateh Ali Khan would object to mauling his uncle’s gem of a qawwali, but instead, he helps maul it even more, with loud and screechy vocals that would even make the laziest person cringe. Tanishk Bagchi’s constant mandolin hook doesn’t help when it keeps repeating itself all the time amidst the din of Rahat and the backing vocalists shouting.


2. Dum Maaro Dum (Hare Rama Hare Krishna; 1971)

• Original Song Details

Music by R.D. Burman, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Asha Bhosle, for the 1971 Bollywood film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’, Music Label: Saregama

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Pritam Chakraborty, New Lyrics by Jaideep Sahni, Sung by Anushka Manchanda, for the 2011 Bollywood film ‘Dum Maaro Dum’, Music Label: T-Series

One of the party songs I doubt Pritam is proud of making, ‘Dum Maaro Dum’ stands high as a song that ruined the original for me big time. Yes, a lot of cool stuff is going on in the music, but the major letdown is Anushka Manchanda’s vocals, where they create a mess of what Asha Bhosle ji and R.D. Burman actually created in the 70s. And don’t even ask me about the rap.


3. Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast (Mohra; 1994)

• Original Song Details

Music by Viju Shah, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Udit Narayan & Kavita Krishnamurthy, for the 1994 Bollywood film ‘Mohra’, Music Label: Venus Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, New Lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed, Sung by Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, for the 2017 Bollywood film ‘Machine’, Music Label: T-Series

Probably the best remake on the list, but again, Tanishk stuck to his mandolin template here, where he kept repeating the hook of the song on mandolin, and though Neha Kakkar sounds passable, Udit Narayan seems to be the saving grace of the song, sounding younger than ever. The awkward dubstep mid way through the song is just *awkward*!


4. Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas (Blackmail; 1973)

• Original Song Details

Music by Kalyanji-Anandji, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan, Sung by Kishore Kumar, for the 1973 Bollywood film ‘Blackmail’, Music Label: Universal Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan retained, Sung by Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neumann Pinto, for the 2016 Bollywood film ‘Wajah Tum Ho’, Music Label: T-Series

Arijit himself wasn’t happy with the way Abhijit Vaghani programmed his voice in this one; and I can’t help but agree! How would you like it if you got to remake a song by the legendary Kishore Kumar, and get your voice all destroyed by electronic touches? To complement Arijit’s bad voice, we had Tulsi Kumar, who surprisingly sounded better!


5. Waqt Ne Kiya Kya Haseen Sitam (Kaagaz Ke Phool; 1959)

• Original Song Details

Music by S.D. Burman, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi, Sung by Geeta Dutt, for the 1959 Bollywood film ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’, Music Label: Saregama-HMV

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Rohan-Vinayak, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi retained, Sung by Amitabh Bachchan, for the 2018 Bollywood film ‘102 Not Out’, Music Label: Saregama

The most recent remake on the list. One would think Amitabh Bachchan ji would be a bit more sensitive when singing old classics as these, but sadly, he drones the song out in such a way, that you wonder “Waqt ne Kiya, kya Haseen sitam”. Rohan-Vinayak literally do nothing but stand and watch as they treat the listeners to almost six minutes of that torture without any enjoyable music in the background either!!


Well, all in all, I feel recreations were fine until they started to be blown out of proportion and being forced into every single album that Bollywood produced. Thanks to Jemma for giving me the mauka and dastoor to vent out my feelings about remakes; I hope you guys enjoyed our collaboration, and please make sure to check out Jemma’s list (it’s amazing)!

Thanks for reading, and stay tuned for more such lists about varied topics! 😁

NOT A VERY SWEET KHAJOOR!! (KHAJOOR PE ATKE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Bickram Ghosh
♪ Lyrics by: Harsh Chhaya & Kumaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 7th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 18th May 2018

Khajoor Pe Atke Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Khajoor Pe Atke is a Bollywood comedy film starring Manoj Pahwa, Seema Pahwa, Vinay Pathak, and Sanah Kapur in lead roles. The film is directed by Harsh Chhaya, and produced by Amrit Sethia. Now, I least care what this movie is about; it seemed like a rip-off of the 2016 Marathi film “Ventilator”, but what made me interested to review it was that the music was by Bickram Ghosh, the tabla player who used to compose along with Sonu Nigam back in 2013-14. Well, let’s see how well his music for this one goes, when he goes solo. Not that he has never gone solo, but I’ve never heard his film music for when he has gone solo. 😂


Bickram Ghosh’s first album after a long time starts with a signature Bickram Ghosh song Aao Na Dekha, with impressive Indian percussions taking centre stage, along with a nice mandolin riff. The vocalists Timir Biswas and Ujjaini Mukherjee do a nice job sticking to the Bickram Ghosh style of singing, which is a kind of folksy style, and it sounds entertaining for sure, just not unforgettable. The “Na Re, Na Re, Nanna RE” sounds quite familiar, if you’ve heard a certain A.R. Rahman-Shreya Ghoshal song. 😛
The next song that entertains at least a bit is Duniya, where Divya Kumar and Ujjaini Mukherjee croon the quirky melody with a nice mixture of fun and enjoyability. Bickram’s arrangements here do not work much, and the programming is meh, if I may say that word in a review. 😂 The lyrics make it sound like some feel good song, and at least it works to that intent.
Sumdi Mein Jhol is a passable number by Kalpana Patowary, and the most unnecessarily long song in terms of duration. I must say Ghosh’s arrangements are slightly better here, especially the dholaks, and the harmonium. However, the composition and the vocals are just ignore-worthy. I also don’t know where this kind of song fits into the script, but filmmakers these days seem to conjure such situations just for the heck of it.
Dhoka, “sung” by director Harsh Chhaya, is another passable song, that is supposedly a sad song, but ends up making you laugh, thanks to Bickram’s insistence on making everything sound quirky! The arrangements are fun, but the composition is just so boring, that it’s funny. The vocals are not too great, either!


That album wasn’t even ‘Khajoor Pe Atke’; at least a ‘Khajoor’ (date) tastes sweet and not as bland as this album!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 6 + 5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 57.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aao Na Dekha > Duniya > Sumdi Mein Jhol = Dhoka

 

Which is your favourite song from Khajoor Pe Atke? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂