THE MERCURY OF MITHOON’S VERSATILITY RISING!! (MERCURY – Music Review) : Dessert Review

Single Track Details
♪ Singers: Haricharan & Gajendra Verma
♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Song Released On: 
♪ Movie Released On: 13th April 2018

The Mercury Song

 

Listen to the song: Saavn

Buy the song: iTunes


Mercury is a silent thriller directed by Karthik Subbaraj, starring Prabhudeva. The film has one promotional track in Hindi composed by Mithoon, and it’s out of Mithoon’s usual composition style, so let’s get started with the review!


The last time I checked, The Mercury Song was over seven minutes long. Now, it seems they’ve cut it short and now it’s just four minutes long! Well, all the better for them because the song was quite tedious earlier. Now, I’ll review this short version. The song is really different from what we usually get to hear from Mithoon; I give credit for that to Subbaraj, the director. He is probably the one responsible for giving Mithoon the freedom he needed. Earlier this year, we’ve heard maudlin tracks like “Tum Mere Ho’ (Hate Story IV) and “Lo Safar” (Baaghi 2) from Mithoon. Here, he composes a catchy dance song that is perfect for Prabhudeva. Haricharan sings the song amazingly, almost in the vein of Benny Dayal’s style of singing. I’m guessing Gajendra Verma is responsible for the rap (which is boring). Mithoon’s programming is impressive, but also gets repetitive as the song progresses. I can’t believe Sayeed Quadri has written the song. I mean, what’s the point of roping in Quadri if you don’t want something poetic?


It was necessary to hear something like this from Mithoon, just to remind us that it isn’t his fault that he’s been composing boring songs lately!

Total Points Scored by this Track: 7

Percentage: 70%

Final Rating: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

COMPLETELY REBELLIOUS!! (BAAGHI 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sandeep Shirodkar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Mithoon, Gourov-Roshin, Pranay M. Rijia, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Panjabi MC
♪ Lyrics by: Ginny Diwan, Javed Akhtar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Sayeed Quadri, Kumaar & Channi Khannewala
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 30th March 2018

Baaghi 2 Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baaghi 2 is a Bollywood action film (read comedy) starring Tiger Shroff, Disha Patani, Manoj Bajpayee, Prateik Babbar, Darshan Kumar, Randeep Hooda and Deepak Dobriyal in crucial roles. The film is directed by popular dance choreographer Ahmed Khan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. If you remember, the first film (which I hated) had a quite likeable album, by Meet Bros., Amaal Mallik and Manj Musik. A “bonus” song by Pranay Rijia was released later. For this album, the music composers of the first film are completely forgotten, and except for Pranaay, they have all been replaced, by Sandeep Shirodkar, Gourov-Roshin, Arko Pravo Mukherjee and Mithoon. Now, I basically know that there will be a horde of remakes in this album, just by looking at the composers’ names — Sandeep Shirodkar and Gourov-Roshin have basically just created almost only remakes ever since they debuted. Arko and Mithoon’s songs do pique my interest, but nothing like “Oh, I’m so excited, I’m dying of excitement”.. nothing of that level. Anyway, let’s see just how well this album upholds the reputation (or demolishes it) of its predecessor.


Just because he has two songs, both remakes, Sandeep Shirodkar becomes lead composer for Baaghi 2. (It was Meet Bros. in ‘Baaghi’). His first remake is Mundiyan, a remake of Labh Janjua’s ‘Mundiyan Toh Bachke Rahi’. I must say, though, the song is quite enjoyable. Sandeep gets the Bhangra vibe right, and that’s the most important in such songs. Navraj Hans and Palak Muchhal make for some interesting vocals — especially Palak, who explores such songs once (okay, maybe twice, but not more) in a blue moon. She even raps! Navraj Hans is a vocal powerhouse as it is; there’s no use writing that he’s done well (it was taken for granted that he would). The one place Sandeep does mess up though, is the uncountable vocal breaks, disturbing proceedings many times, slowing down the pace of the song.
He doesn’t fare as well in his second song Ek Do Teen, remake of the song with the same name from ‘Tezaab’. Now, this is a very iconic song, not so much for its composition and music, (which was quite clichéd, if I may say so) than for Madhuri’s iconic moves on the dance floor. But even then, the flak the song is receiving is quite unjustified. Maybe it’s because the dance moves have been slaughtered (they have), or maybe it’s because the remake trend has achieved this abominable level these days. But the song isn’t that bad. Shreya substituting for Alka is a great decision; she sounds okay in the mukhda but amazing in the antaras. At least we haven’t gotten somebody like Neha Kakkar in charge of this song. The music is functional at best, with nothing remarkable in Sandeep’s new arrangements, except the easy-to-miss electric guitar riffs, and the spunky Bappi-ish disco sounds. Also, why does she only count till 20 here! That’s destroying the point of the song! 😂
Mithoon’s Lo Safar is a better result of his composition sung by Jubin Nautiyal, than the last one, which was ‘Tum Mere Ho’ (Hate Story IV). Here, at least, the composition isn’t overly sensuous, and not even trying to be. It is just a humble typical Mithoon melancholic melody, supposed to be a romantic song but playing more like a sad song. Jubin sings it well, and Mithoon’s arrangements consisting of nice guitar riffs, an amazing rap on many drums at the same time, and a serene flute, work wonders. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are just not the kind of lyrics he’s known for. Having written so many beautiful lyrics (especially the amazing ‘Ji Huzoori’ from ‘Ki & Ka’) for Mithoon, this should have been much better.
Gourov-Roshin’s Soniye Dil Nayi is also a remake of some T-Series pop single, whose credits on YouTube are so vague, they don’t credit the original composer, even in the video for the original song! The only good thing about this song, is that it doesn’t let Ankit Tiwari’s lazy voice get too much control over the song, because Shruti Pathak arrives at the right times to save us, with amazing aalaaps. Her portions are amazing, but the composition both of these singers have to sing is lazy, boring, dull and any other negative adjective you can think of. The composers try their best to ape Ankit’s composing style, so that his lines always end with us expecting a “Sunn Raha Hai Na Tu..” or a “Teri galliyan..” to follow. Too much said about this song.
The only composer repeated from ‘Baaghi’ is Pranaay Rijia, whose song ‘Get Ready To Fight’ from ‘Baaghi’ I neither reviewed nor heard (except in the movie) because it released late as a single track. Here he comes back to present Get Ready To Fight Again a song which you should be ready to fight again. That’s about it. I won’t tell you about the horde of singers roped in to sing a worthless song, and I won’t tell you about the actionless arrangements, even though this is probably the background song for when Tiger Shroff is showing off his stunts. This time the song gets a more folksy vocal treatment, thanks to Jatinder Shah’s vocals. Benny Dayal in the original song sounded terrible. (Let’s just put that out there since I hadn’t reviewed that.)
The best song of the album, more out of helplessness, than actually on its merit, is Arko’s O Saathi, a romantic melody sung by Atif Aslam, which fits perfectly into the Arko template of romantic songs. It might be a rehash of ‘Nazm Nazm’ (Bareilly Ki Barfi) and ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ (Rustom), with the exact same duff rhythm, and strings, and everything else, but it nevertheless sticks with you, because it is charming in spite of being heard before. Payal Dev’s humming lends the song a serene quality. The antara of the song is amazing; it follows a really unconventional composition, at least unconventional for Arko’s music. Atif sings it impeccably, especially the “Allah Mujhe” line. The hookline’s tune seemed forcibly stretched to cover about fifteen seconds of runtime each time it plays.. that’s about a minute that could’ve been spent in adding another antara! But I must say, Arko’s lyrics are beautiful, especially the mukhda!


While I still listen to ‘Baaghi’s music album sometimes even now, when I’m bored, I doubt I’ll listen to this album even one month from now. While “‘Baaghi’s album had zero remakes, this has four. While “‘Baaghi’s album was not a ‘BAAGHI’ (rebel) at all, this one totally is!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 4 + 8 =

Album Percentage: 65%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Saathi > Lo Safar = Mundiyan > Ek Do Teen > Soniye Dil Nayi > Get Ready To Fight Again

 

Which is your favourite song from Baaghi 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 04 (from Baaghi 2) = 10

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

A PERFECT, SOOTHING, SHAB-TIME ALBUM!! (SHAB – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh S. Verma & Mithoon
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 22nd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 30th June 2017

Shab Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Shab is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama, starring Ashish Bisht, Arpita Chatterjee and Raveena Tandon in key roles. The film has been directed by Onir, the director of films like ‘My Brother Nikhil’, ‘Bas Ek Pal’ and ‘I Am’. The film has been produced by Sanjay Suri and Onir for Anticlock Films, WSG Entertainment and Surya Entertainment. So since I don’t know much about this film, let’s jump right into talks about the music. Onir’s one-time collaborator for ‘Bas Ek Pal’, Mithoon, has been roped in for the music of this film as well, and in the process, he bags his first solo album after 2013’s ‘3G’ {Yes, it too, had one background piece by Amar Mohile, in which case his last non-infiltrated soundtrack was 2010’s war film ‘Lamhaa}. The music of ‘Lamhaa’ (and even ‘3G’, at that) was amazing, and that just goes to show us how Mithoon can free himself in solo albums, unlike the restricted Mithoon we see in multicomposer albums. For this film, since he has composed the majority of the ‘Bas Ek Pal’, in which Pritam had played the infiltrative role, we know he shares a great rapport with Onir, and can just hope that this collaboration between the two turns out to be just as great. With no further ado, let’s get into this short soundtrack!


1. O Saathi

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Lyrics by ~ Mithoon

Of course, along comes Arijit, right in the first track because this is a Mithoon soundtrack after all, which is rather incomplete without an Arijit song nowadays. (Then again, any soundtrack without Arijit these days, is deemed as incomplete, so I don’t really know what to say.) So Mithoon starts the album of ‘Shab’ (which means ‘Night’), with a song that is perfect to listen to at night-time, preferably just before going to sleep, and I say that because it is so soothing and emotional. Yes, it has a sensuous tinge to it too, and that soothing tinge is quite like that heard in many old Western songs. The composition itself starts off in a very Western manner, with those short lines with a nuance in the middle. And Arijit renders them spot-on. After those lines, though, there is the real black magic that starts, and black magic of a Mithoon song is superior to any other composer’s black magic for me, and when Mithoon is in the form, he will definitely produce a very successful, addictive composition that just haunts you. And the portion that gives you these amazing goosebumps, is the part that goes “Tuuuu Iss Jagah…”. 💜. Arijit’s intricate nuances during that part, really give you gooseflesh such as you might never have experience before, in any song, except in a Mithoon song itself. And yet, the composition isn’t something you could call ‘typical Mithoon’ either. He seems to mould himself accordingly, each time. But one thing is for sure: after the underwhelming music he gave in ‘Half Girlfriend’, he makes up for it highly, with this single song! The arrangements just help to increase the haunting nature of the song. A very soft guitar starts off the song, and that hooks you instantly. Later, a very templated Mithoon beat sets in, but it doesn’t hamper the song at all, because at the same time, the beautiful cross line starts. And how do I even explain the hookline? The amazing variations Mithoon has made Arijit take in the hookline, each time he sings it, are just so awe-inspiring! They touch your heart instantly. The guitar and digital beats continue for the rest of the song, and nothing much more by way of arrangements caught my attention, except a couple of drum beats occasionally. Arijit’s vocals are topnotch. I don’t know why composers hesitate to give him different types of songs, and though this isn’t completely different from his stereotype, it still shines because he sings in such a nuanced manner, and not in a templated manner, as if he is trying to recreate the magic of a former song of his. This song is trying to create history on its own merit, and that is what is amazing about it. One place where Arijit just stole my heart then and there was, when, in the ‘antara‘, which actually has the same tune as the mukhda, he sung the word “Zindagi” in such a professional way, with a nice variation on the “Gi” syllable at the end of the word. And of course, he sung the hookline so beautifully, I can’t imagine anybody else singing it; they wouldn’t have done as much justice to it. The lyrics by Mithoon too, are amazing! A perfect, soothing song to start the album off. 

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Musafir

Singer ~ K.K., Lyrics by ~ Amitabh S. Verma

The way the next song starts off, with a very highly promising harp portion, you would think that it would blow you off your feet by the time the melody starts off. However, after the harp portion ends, the song just goes downhill from there, barring some occasional interruptions of catchy music. I can say very confidently though, that the composition is the major spoilsport here. The hookline provides brief respite intermittently, with the “Aiyyayyaa Aiyyayyaa” loop that, though very heavily influenced by many such songs that have released over the past ten years, is catchy nevertheless. A line in the antara, goes abruptly low-pitched, and it sounds quite forced and awkward. Mithoon, once again, succumbs to peer pressure and tries to spin up a composition that reeks a lot of many other songs, and of course, using K.K. as the singer makes it sound even more clichéd. That having been said, I must admit, that K.K. has really done a great job at singing, as always. It is the music arrangements that redeem the song’s favour in our hearts. The harp in the beginning of course, is amazing, but all throughout the rest of the song, a nice drum-and-guitars rhythm stabilises the arrangements and make them listenable. A nice interlude on a mouth organ, is a nice and pleasant thing to listen to. The second interlude on the accordion is even better! Mithoon’s clever additions of chimey sounds, also helps in keeping us listening. The lyrics by Amitabh Verma are not excellent, but good enough. Quite disappointing after the first song which was a masterpiece, this one is a one-time listen; any subsequent listens will be due to the amazing arrangements!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

3. Awaari / Awaari (Reprise)

Singers ~ Mithoon / Neha Bhasin, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh S. Verma

The first note on the guitars, of the following song gives a feeling that a jazz song is about to follow. And the riff that follows is so catchy, you instantly get drawn into the song. The composition of this song is like a breeze of fresh air after the tedious composition of the previous song. The Mukhda starts a bit too abruptly to digest, but it steadies down as it approaches the hook. The hook is a very sweet and catchy one, reminding me of Hawaiian folk. The first antara follows the structure of the Mukhda, with that oddly-placed first line. But it is the second antara that has all the magic in it. That tune is so like a Mithoon trademark magical composition. The magic of the composition only comes out full-fledgedly, though, in the Reprise, and I’ll tell you why later. First, the arrangements. While the original version sung by Mithoon, has a very breezy and pleasant touch with the nice jazzy guitars mentioned before, and a very nice Caribbean touch through the percussion, the Reprise sung by Neha Bhasin has more of a lounge-ish feel, complete with calming guitars, and a slower pace and tempo. The lovely piano and finger snaps in Mithoon’s version make it seem more lively, and more of a daytime song, if you know what I mean. But Neha’s version is beautifully arranged so that it sounds like a perfect night-time, soothing song. The Reprise really won over my heart with its simplicity and less stuff happening in the background, giving more space for the listener to get drowned in its magical sound. Coming to the vocals, recently Neha expressed her desire to sing all-female songs in an interview, and surprisingly, one of her solos released not long after that. She aces the beautiful composition with a very layered and nuanced rendition of the song, in her trademark husky voice. This time, she takes up a higher pitch than she usually sings her songs in. The slow pace that she gets to sing the song in, make the composition sound better, and that’s how we finally get the gravitas of the composition in this version. After ‘Jag Ghoomeya’ (Sultan) last year, she gets another song to shine in, solo. Mithoon, on the other hand, sings his version with a lively and playful aura around him, and manages to connect with the listeners, but not quite as much as Neha could. Amitabh Verma’s lyrics are good here as well, mostly they are a description of the male protagonist’s dream girl. Experimentation by Mithoon pays off here, with a typical Mithoon composition arranged to a playful Caribbean rhythm in one version, and a serene and graceful arrangement in the other.

Rating: 3.5/5 for Mithoon’s Version, 4/5 for Neha’s Version

 

4. Afiya

Singers ~ Mohammed Irfan & Arun Daga, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh S. Verma

The final song on the album comes in form of a Qawwali-ish song, much similar to the types of songs Mithoon used to give us before the whole ‘Tum Hi Ho’ turnabout. The composition is a very strong sad song, and has every element of Mithoon’s beautiful composing skills. The song has heavy influences of Mithoon’s ‘Banjaara’ (Ek Villain), but still manages to stand tall. The hook is beautiful, and the antaras manage to keep you listening. That lower pitched line in the Antara is mind blowing, and the way it proceeds till the next interlude, has to be some of the best parts of the song. By way of arrangements, Mithoon employs a beautiful digitally-produced rhythm that really works in the Qawwali genre. The claps always work, and work here too. The Saarangi is one beautiful addition to the arrangements, as is the santoor. These were two instruments I would least expect in a Qawwali. The vocals by Mohammed Irfan and Arun Daga are very impressive as well. They harmonize with each other and complement each other spectacularly. Amitabh Verma has written great lyrics here too, but I don’t really know what “Aafiya” itself, means! A perfect end to the album; a trademark Mithoon Qawwali!

Rating: 4/5


Shab, is quite an impressive album from Mithoon, after a long time. It has been a long time since he has been allowed to compose solo for a film, like he used to back in the day, and he lives up to expectations. Though there is an overpowering romantic theme in the album, the album manages to escape from being monotonous or repetitive. And a reason for that is, that there are only four songs. But since only one of them is distinctly disappointing, I can say that Mithoon has really performed well, considering that he never gets solo albums nowadays. Overall, this is a perfect ‘Shab’ (Night) time album, full of soothing music! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Saathi > Awaari (Reprise) = Afiya > Awaari > Musafir

 

Which is your favourite song from Shab? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THODI DER AUR THEHER JAAUN??? (HALF GIRLFRIEND – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Tanishk Bagchi, Rishi Rich, Farhan Saeed, Rahul Mishra & Ami Mishra
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Arafat Mehmood, Tanishk Bagchi, R. Rekhi, Veronica Mehta, Yash Anand, Yash Narvekar, Ishita Moitra Udhwani, Kumaar, Anushka Shahaney, Laado Suwalka & Kunaal Vermaa
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 27th April 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 19th May 2017

Half Girlfriend Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Half Girlfriend is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama film, starring Shraddha Kapoor and Arjun Kapoor. The film is directed by Mohit Suri, and produced by Shobha Kapoor, Ekta Kapoor, Mohit Suri and Chetan Bhagat. The film is an adaptation of Chetan Bhagat’s 2014 super-hit novel {In that everyone started hitting it after reading it, so it became super hit} of the same name. I have read that book and didn’t think much of it. And I’m not going to waste time on the plot. So let’s see who is behind the music this time. Now Mohit Suri is always up for new musical talent, and he brought Arijit Singh, Ankit Tiwari and Ami Mishra into the limelight with his previous film albums. I must say, ‘Ek Villain’ and ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ were better off than ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was full of clichés. And now this movie seems like it will be a complete detour from the usual type of music we hear in his other films. Maybe, just maybe, the songs with the lead characters staring at each other for infinite amounts of time, and shots of Shraddha Kapoor crying her eyes out, will not be removed and maybe we will be spared the melodrama that exists in all other Suri movies. But then again, maybe not. Maybe Mohit Suri will make Chetan’s rom-com into a romantic drama just like his other films. And of course, maybe the music will follow suit. That is confirmed as soon as I read the name of the first music director, Mithoon. He has collaborated with Mohit Suri in almost all of his movies, and the only collaboration I didn’t like of theirs, was ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (‘Aashiqui 2), after which I loved the sings from the next two movies. He gets three tracks here, but all are based on the same song. Tanishk Bagchi, the latest composer going tons of places this year, gets a single song here, and hopefully he opens his account with Mohit Suri fabulously so that we get to hear him in more Mohit Suri albums. Rishi Rich, after a long hiatus after the ‘Hum Tum’ song, returns {he has two more albums upcoming this year!} and he gets two tracks. Next up is Ami Mishra, who debuted with ‘Hasi’ from ‘Hamari Adhuri Kahani’ in 2015, and vanished after that. He gets one song too. Then we have the debutants. Rahul Mishra with one song (I have never heard of him so can’t say what I’m expecting), and Farhan Saeed, who is debuting only as a composer; he has sung a couple of songs previously, and in this album, he gets to compose two tracks, out if which one is a version of the other. So with an astounding ten tracks to review, I must start right away.


1. Baarish

Singers ~ Ash King & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk Bagchi & Arafat Mehmood

Tanishk gets to open the album with his only song in the film. The song is a romantic song, with a tune that will have any Bollywood music lover hooked right away — because it adheres to all Bollywood sensibilities so obediently. The composition is like a trademark Bollywood romantic composition, and sweet too, at that. The mukhda makes the song start in a very sweet way, but that bridge from the mukhda to the hookline, which goes “Aankhon Ke Darmiyaan…” comes so abruptly, you are baffled for a moment. But afterwards, it is nothing but an uphill journey for the composition. The antara is how antaras in romantic songs traditionally are — calm and soothing. Again, an abrupt pause has been added at the end of the antara, which could’ve been avoided since the two lines fit together perfectly even without a pause! The tune for the mandolin loop that plays throughout the song is just so lovely! The hookline itself is yet again, something that will appease all Bollywood lovers, especially 90s music lovers. The arrangements which Tanishk has used in the song work in favour of the song, and as I said, that mandolin loop is sooooo catchy and hummable. The santoor starts off the song wonderfully, and it suits the ‘rainy’ theme of the song. The flute and strings too, add to the beauty of the song. As for the vocals, Ash King does well, but we have heard more outstanding renditions from him, in front of which this seems so ordinary. Shashaa just has to hum a line in an interlude. Tanishk & Arafat Mehmood wield the pen and produce utterly nonsensical words, defying all the laws of grammar. And however serious they might be trying to sound, it just sounds ridiculous. A song that sticks to those criteria that would make it a hit in Bollywood, but doesn’t dare to go experimental.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Thodi Der

Singers ~ Shreya Ghoshal & Farhan Saeed, Music by Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The next song in the album is another romantic song; the only difference is that this time, both of them love each other — in the first song it was like one-sided. Like tape. This song marks Farhan Saeed’s Bollywood debut as a composer, and it is actually a re-work of his own pop single of the same name. Thank goodness, he brings in a female singer to sing this one with him, and it is none other than Shreya Ghoshal. She handles the nuances very well, and her saccharine voice suits the composition very well. Farhan too, sings his parts well, but it doesn’t have the same impact. The composition itself, sounds very nice to the ears, but clearly has something missing and like the last song, only caters to people who like traditional, typical, same-old-kind of music. The hookline has a great tune though. The arrangements are better off here, with a wonderful sarangi taking care of the people who want variation in the song, and that sarangi solo in the interlude is not to be missed. The guitars are evidence of the fact that the song would’ve sounded so bland without the sarangi — they’ve been played that boringly. It would’ve been quite nice to hear a Sufi treatment given to the song, like tablas/dholaks and the like. A harmonium can be heard, but in very miserly quantities. Occasionally the sarangi reminds you of ‘Roke Na Ruke Naina’ (Badrinath Ki Dulhania), and I even started humming its antara, after the mukhda of this was over. Kumaar’s lyrics are not great, and there are places where they’re about the day not being able to live, and the night not breathing when the two characters aren’t together. Good for a couple of listens, but not something to repeat over and over again.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Tu Hi Hai

Singer ~ Rahul Mishra, Music by Rahul Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Laado Suwalka

The piano notes of the next song start and instantly you think ‘Bhatt’. Even though they aren’t in any way associated with this film, the piano notes just scream ‘Bhatt’ at you — “BHATT! BHATT! BHATT!” And when you continue listening to the song, you realize that the piano notes were right and you should have listened to their warning cries. Rahul Mishra, a debutant helms this track, and tries to make it as bland and dead as ever. The composition is a trademark Bhatt-ish one, and even though those songs sometimes do impress me, this one falls into category of them which I utterly despise right from the first time I hear them. The hookline is something decent, and that’s pretty much it, because it has been composed so drearily. Dreadfully slow, the song seems to get nowhere and leaves no impression on you after it ends. And the duration doesn’t help, because five and a half minutes is pretty long, for a staid composition. The only part of the song that seems impressive (only to an extent, because it is nothing new) is when the chorus singers try to make the song a Sufi song, and they succeed, but then Rahul starts with the Pakistani pop stuff again. Rahul Mishra’s vocals are quite good; he should carry forth his singing in the industry. The arrangements sound like a terribly-slowed-down version of the arrangements of the ‘Sanam Re’ title track. That tablas and electric guitars arrangement got old after just one song — ‘Sanam Re’. The lyrics by Laado Suwalka are even more typical than the composition. Not a very impressive debut, but hopefully somebody likes it and gives Rahul Mishra another chance.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

4. Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga / Pal Bhar (Chaahunga Reprise)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shashaa Tirupati / Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon steps in with the next track, and that’s something I was looking forward to, because he has been giving somewhat impressive songs in Mohit Suri’s film albums. However, when I played the song, the result was so anticlimactic I can’t express it in words. Mithoon’s composition sounds like a very desperate attempt to recreate the magic of ‘Tum Hi Ho’ (Aashiqui 2), a magic which I was immune to anyway, so this song too, didn’t affect me with its supposed magical composition. Of course, the song will become a rage nevertheless. Come on! It is Arijit and Mithoon after all! The song fares well for the mukhda, after which it seems to disassemble itself and both antaras sound like a different song altogether. Especially the female antara, seems like Mithoon strung together some completely unrelated notes to construct it. The first antara is slightly better, and it is a relief they’ve repeated it like thrice in the Reprise Version. But the drawback of the Reprise is that there’s no mukhda there. Also, the words and tune don’t match, creating that “Dubbed Music” effect, when you understand the song is dubbed because the words don’t fit well into the composition. Arijit gets into his dull mode here, and in some places you really feel that he drifted off to sleep. Shashaa in her antara does well, but not excellent. The arrangements are also boring. In the first version, they are fine, until those ‘Tum Hi Ho’ beats take over and you go like “Oh Goddddd! Not again!”. I loved the piano notes in the beginning though, and the santoor interlude. There’s a place before Shashaa’s antara where a wonderful flute mesmerizes you. But after that, there’s a staccato piano piece that sounds so random, haphazard and horrible. The Reprise gets the arrangements better. It starts with some weird harp-like sound, and a sound like water dripping from a leaking pipe, and Arijit’s voice is programmed such that you’ll actually believe he’s in some dingy underground basement where a pipe is leaking. But the better part of the arrangements is later, when strings are added in. Otherwise, everything is almost the same as the first version. So both versions have their own plus points. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are definitely the highlight of both the tracks. They surpass Mithoon’s arrangements, his dull composition and Arijit’s dreary rendition. One read through them and you’ll be stunned. Mithoon in his uncreative form.

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 2.5/5 for the Reprise

 

5. Lost Without You

Singers ~ Ami Mishra & Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Ami Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kunaal Vermaa & Anushka Shahaney

A bit of freshness seems to enter the album with the next song, Ami Mishra’s contribution to the album. It is a song with half-English, half-Hindi lyrics, and with a rock backdrop. The composition of the Hindi parts again, sticks to the normal Bhatt music criteria. The only way the song sounds fresher is due to the English parts, which are interspersed with the Hindi portions quite gratuitously. There’s a catch to that too, though. The “singer” behind those English parts, Anushka Shahaney, seems to be putting on a very artificial accent, something that will barely impress you once you hear it, and it sounds like nonsense because you can’t make out her English. Meanwhile, Ami continues droning on his Hindi portion, which isn’t quite different from his other song ‘Hasi’ (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Especially the “aaaaa aaaaa” sounds very similar to ‘Hasi’. The arrangements consist of very typical rock elements, the guitars and drums playing throughout the song. There is an interlude where Ami has added some oriental sounding guitar-like sound. The Hindi lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, are again, nothing innovative, and you barely pay attention to them as the song continues to play. Anushka Shahaney, who has written whatever she rambles herself, should’ve sung in such a way that we could’ve understood what she had written. Ami Mishra disappoints this time, but at least something is fresh here — the addition of English parts, even though they’re unintelligible. The album is just going more and more downhill.

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Stay A Little Longer

Singer ~ Anushka Shahaney, Music by ~ Farhan Saeed, Lyrics by ~ Anushka Shahaney, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Farhan Saeed returns, this time with Anushka Shahaney. And they spoil ‘Thodi Der’ for us. This song is basically an English version of that song, as is evident from its name.. a direct translation from Hindi to English. The composition, I already liked before, but here, even the little nuances that featured in the Hindi version have been gotten rid of, because it’s English right? And English songs can’t have nuances in them right? The song just sounds mediocre, even more so because of the way Anushka sings them in that accent. Her lyrics this time can at least be made out — but they sound very ridiculous. And of course, they don’t fit into the tune, so she has to sing “come” as “cu-uhm”, “love” and “lu-uhv”, “new” as “nyu-oo”, and she has to add “Oh”s and “Ah”s anywhere randomly. Ishita Moitra Udhwani helps her with “additional lyrics”, a term which I don’t understand because can’t two people write a song together? Or did she just replace one word by another so she deserves less credit? 😏 The only thing better here, is the arrangement, which has not only sarangi, but a very opulent symphonic orchestra towards the end, something that wouldn’t have suited in the Hindi song, but something which this English version didn’t deserve, frankly. Supposed to be soothing, but the singer makes sure it is anything but that. At least the arrangements respect us.

Rating: 2/5

 

7. Mere Dil Mein / Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta / Yash Narvekar & Veronica Mehta, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Yash Anand & Yash Narvekar, English Lyrics ~ R. Rekhi & Veronica Mehta, Additional Lyrics ~ Ishita Moitra Udhwani

Rishi Rich comes into the album very, very late, with a song you can call the title song of the film. And it is the only so-called upbeat number in the entire album. As such, we are bound to love it, especially people like me who were bored to death by the previous songs. The song is essentially a hip-hop number, with a groovy beat, and Rishi Rich informs us right at the beginning, “This is the Rishi Rich beat”. The song starts with some dialogue by someone sounding like Kangana Ranaut… Don’t miss it! The hookline is insanely catchy, and that “I gotta let you know…” line too, is very catchy. The composition is very repetitive though, and these two things are repeated over and over again so many times, you get annoyed after some time. There are not many more things constituting the arrangements, except that trippy beats and various weird sound effects. Veronica Mehta, who also featured in Rishi Rich’s “Hum Tum” song, at least sings in a more believable accent, but again, many of the words are not decipherable. Yash Narvekar, on the other hand, sings the male portions well, and I think Bollywood has a new Benny Dayal now. In charge of the lyrics are two people each for English and Hindi lyrics. 😂😂 And again, that additional lyricist, Ishita Udhwani, helps them, but they seem to not want to place her in the main lyricist’s list. Poor girl. There’s another version called the Dialogue Version, which has some of the most cringe-inducing dialogues from the film. That ‘Sentiyaa Gaye Hum Toh‘ dialogue is so cheesy! The dialogues come across as very annoying, and it is so evident that Arjun Kapoor wasn’t the right choice for playing this village boy. 😑 At least this song breaks the seemingly neverending spree of depressing songs!

Rating: 2.5/5 for the Original Version, 1.5/5 for the Dialogue Version

 

8. Half Girlfriend (Love Theme)

(Instrumental, Music by Mithoon)

An instrumental track by Mithoon arrives to finish the album off. Mithoon provides us with a love theme, similar to the love theme he gave in ‘Aashiqui 2’, which was, I admit, a soul-stirring track. Here, he gives us an instrumental with selected lines from “Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga” played on the piano. Since I loved the piano notes in the song, I loved the first part of this track, where everything is just on plain piano. Later on, the orchestra pitches in, and brings a haunting and grand feel to the track. A choir can be heard as well, trying to make it sound even more haunting. After that comes a flute part which is beautiful. The orchestra returns to support the flute, and the song ends on a very grand note, like every instrumental should. Though I didn’t like the actual song which this track is based on, I thoroughly enjoyed the instrumental, and four and a half minutes just flew by.

Rating: 3.5/5


Half Girlfriend is a half-baked album. You know, when you fry something and it remains raw inside? That’s what this album is like. The makers have gone into such trouble making ten tracks for this movie, and sadly, not even one is memorable. All of them stick to typical clichéd song-making styles, and even a simple would be memorable, only if the composition were better. Tanishk and Farhan’s songs stand out by far, the rest seem to lag behind. I’ve heard a lot of good things going around about this album, and I waited. I heard it thrice like I do for any album before writing its review. And then I heard it while reviewing and that’s when I really understood how good (read bad) it is. Now I can’t wait any longer for my brain to like this album, can I? Thodi Der Aur Theher Jaaun? No way!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 1.5 + 3.5 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 53%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thodi Der > Baarish = Half Girlfriend (Love Theme) > Lost Without You > Phir Bhi Tumko Chaahunga = Pal Bhar = Mere Dil Mein > Stay A Little Longer > Tu Hi Hai = Mere Dil Mein (Dialogue Version)

 

Which is your favourite song from Half Girlfriend? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

WAJAH REMAKES HAIN!! (WAJAH TUM HO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Abhijit Vaghani, Kalyanji-Anandji, Meet Bros., R.D. Burman, Gourov-Roshin & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Rajendra Krishan, Kumaar, Anand Bakshi & Dev Kohli
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 5th November 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 16th December 2016

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Wajah Tum Ho Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Wajah Tum Ho is an upcoming Bollywood crime thriller, starring Sana Khan, Gurmeet Choudhary, Rajniesh Duggal and Sharman Joshi in lead roles. The film is directed by Vishal Pandya and produced by Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Those two names are enough to tell us that it’s a T-Series production, and that we may expect some good songs, and some remakes. Sure enough, three out of the four songs on the album are remakes of old songs. Only Mithoon composes an original song, in three versions, while Abhijit Vaghani, Meet Bros, and Gourov-Roshin recreate old songs, Abhijit’s appearing in two versions. Abhijit is debuting as a composer in Bollywood, having been on the programming panel before, and going by his pop single, a remake of ‘Pyaar Manga Hai’ that released earlier this year, the sing might be good enough. The Meet Brothers are back after long as a duo, and I’m expecting a lot from their remake as well. Gourov-Roshin are just done giving me a shock with their atrocious techno music in ‘Force 2’, and they had remade a song there too, so I don’t expect much from this remake of theirs. Without further ado, let’s see how good the remakes, and Mithoon’s original song, is!


1. Wajah Tum Ho / Wajah Tum Ho (Male) / Wajah Tum Ho (Lounge)
Singers ~ Altamash Faridi & Tulsi Kumar / Altamash Faridi / Altamash Faridi, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Bikhre bikhre se thhey hum pehle, abb sawarne lage
Tumhare galiyon se rozana jo hum guzarne lage!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon starts off this ambitious album, that has set out to remake many classics, but he starts off the album on an original note — just in case the remakes, are safely protected deep inside the album by a five-minute long buffer period that consists of Mithoon’s song, which happens to be the title song of the movie. The song is a new, interesting take on this title. The title is actually taken from the song ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ (Hate Story 3) from Vishal Pandya’s last film. While that song, composed by newcomer (and already-goner) Baman, was composed on typical Bhattish lines, this one has a nice old-world-charm mixed with the omnipresent Mithoon touch. The composition is more of a soft and soothing one, in contrast to the sensual and intense one of that song. Of course there’s no reason to compare, so I should just stop. Back to this song, the mukhda brings it to a nice beginning, but it is in the hookline where it receives its shocks and jerks, and starts slowing down. Repetition of the song’s title so many times in a seemingly ultra-slow pace, isn’t your everyday idea of a soothing romantic song. The antara gets better because of more high notes, which kind of lessen the laziness in the composition. The song is included in three versions in the album — One being a duet between Altamash Faridi and Tulsi Kumar, while the other two are solely sung by Altamash. The duet version works because of the male and female voices, and I must admit, Tulsi sounds good in the song, if not great. Just like Amaal Mallik does, Mithoon has used her voice nicely here. Altamash sounds a bit sleepy in places but the high notes in the antaras let us know that he is very much awake. In the male version, though, it gets tedious to hear the song in a complete male voice. The lounge version is a different case altogether. Though it has been sung by Altamash solo, the arrangements in the lounge version are BEAUTIFULLLL! While Mithoon graces the other two versions with the same arrangements consisting of soothing and breezy acoustic guitars (Kalyan Baruah), he has something more mystical and magical in store for you in the lounge version. Of course, a nice lounge touch has been added to the song, and many things happen all of a sudden, which suddenly transforms that lazy composition into one sounding utterly beautiful! The arrangements consist of some beautiful guitar work (Joell Mukherji), while the flutes (Madhu Mukherjee) are brilliant. Nice percussions with the drums make the song sound complete. The sarod (also by Madhu Mukherjee) and tablas are what give the song more of a lounge touch, though! It is this version that finally brings out the beauty of the composition and makes it succeed. Sadly, I don’t think it will be promoted much! 😦 About the lyrics, I would rather say that they are very sappy and icky, instead of praising them by saying they’re nice romantic lyrics. 😛 Manoj Muntashir writes words like “Kahan pe tu ho shuru, kahan main khatam, pata na chale“. I’m like, “Are you a blob of clay? Are you mud? Are you sand? Or are you the European and Asian parts of Russia? Please tell me so I can solve that problem for you so that you don’t have to sing it in songs!” The lyrics are rather a nice get-to-know-yourself course. A middling start to the album, but the lounge version of this track is surely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Dil Ke Paas / Dil Ke Paas (Unplugged)
Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neuman Pinto / Armaan Malik, Tulsi Kumar & Shamita Bhatkar, Composition by ~ Kalyanji-Anandji, Music Recreated by ~ Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by ~ Rajendra Krishan

“(Male) Kal tujhko dekha tha, Maine apne aangan mein
Jaise keh rahi thi tum, Mujhe baandh lo bandhan mein

(Female) Ye kaisa rishta hain, Ye kaise sapne hain
Begaane hokar bhi, Kyon lagte apne hain
Main soch mein rehti hoon, Dar dar ke kehti hoon”

– Rajendra Krishan

Aah! Here are the “awaited” (by T-Series to release and torture us with) remakes, finally! Reading the name of the song, you won’t know that this song is a remake of “Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas” (Blackmail) because T-Series has cunningly named it in such a manner that you’ll never guess it. The music producer/arranger Abhijit Vaghani, who has earlier composed in Bollywood for ‘Chaarfutiya Chhokare’ with his partner Sameer, gets to remake this evergreen Kishore Kumar classic. Well, he hasn’t really composed anything new in the song, and Kalyanji-Anandji’s original composition has been kept intact (What a relief, that at least that has been done!) This song also comes in two versions, one that has the never-too-popular Arijit rendering it, and another tagged as “Unplugged”, which has his close successor, Armaan Malik singing it. They both are accompanied by the T-Series behnaa, Tulsi Kumar. The first version of the song really has everything going against it, in terms of the vocals, what with Arijit sounding like a terrible robot, while Tulsi gets her voice tripled and quadrupled. The original recorded voices will never reach us; we get the adulterated version of their voices, and the result is quite revolting! At least Tulsi sounds better than usual in her tripled voice, but Arijit sounds horrendous with his robotic voice, that is way too thin for it too be actually believed to be his. Neuman Pinto has a rap portion in the middle of this version, and it is just disgusting how such a rap can be shoved into a classic song like this! As if that wasn’t enough, Abhijit tries to make the song sound more sensuous (and fails too) by slowing the pace down by some kilometers per second. 😦 Armaan, in his version, gives us the pleasure of listening to a good, unadulterated rendition of the timeless classic, which we sadly couldn’t hear in Arijit’s voice. Thankfully, Armaan’s version is enough to make up for it, at least in terms of vocals. While in the first version, Arijit and Tulsi took turns singing one line each or something, this song is mostly Armaan’s, and Tulsi only sings the second antara, quite blandly, at that. Shamita Bhatkar’s backing vocals provide a good harmony to accompany Armaan, and it sounds good more so because the overdone harmonizations with the voices in Arijit’s version just failed to make a mark. The arrangements are better in the second version too, but they become quite boring after a while. At least real instruments like the guitar (Nyzel D’Lima) and violin (Manas Kumar) are brilliant here. The first version however, is overdone with techno sounds, and that kills the original old song. Rajendra Krishan’s lyrics from the original song have also been retained, thankfully. Except when Tulsi sings and they have to change the gender of the sentence, which was originally from the male point of view. (Like changing leta to leti). More of a revival, rather than a remake, but all that this so-called “revival” could do, is to make us return to the original classic!

 

3. Dil Mein Chhupa Loonga
Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Tulsi Kumar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Aise na mujhe tum dekho, seene se laga lunga
Tumko main chura lunga tumse, dil mein chupa loonga”

– Anand Bakshi

The Meet Brothers step into the album, hopefully in order to save it.. I mean, I really expect a lot from them after their work after their split with Anjjan. So this song happens to be a remake of R.D. Burman’s immensely popular ‘Aise Na Mujhe Tum Dekho’ (Darling Darling), and just hearing that this song has been remade, made me excited! But I must say, what I got wasn’t exactly what I was expecting. Of course, the hookline is amazing, what with more sensuality infused into its tune by slowing down its pace, but the padding is quite disappointing. The mukhda starts the song off on a faltering note, which gets stabilised only when the hookline arrives. The antara too sounds very generic and seems like an attempt to redo the ‘Aaj Phir’ (Hate Story 2) and ‘Tumhe Apna Banane Ka’ (Hate Story 3), which just seems more accentuated because of that slow-paced guitar-and-tabla arrangement that all three of these songs have. Anyway, the arrangements are good and suitable for the theme of the song. The acoustic guitars (Pawan Rasaily) sound nice and soothing, while those very typical tablas (in these songs) give it a more earthy touch, along with certain Arabic-sounding elements. The digital beats too, sound very typical. On the vocals front, ws have Armaan and Tulsi again, and Armaan sounds awesome as always, again reminding one of his rendition of ‘Tumhe Apna’ (Hate Story 3). The way he sings the hookline, he’s sure to get even more female followers. Tulsi, on the other hand, sounds atrocious trying to sound different. Meet Bros’ experimentation to make her sound more “you-know-what” fail when she starts sounding like Manjulika. Plus, that double-voice-overlapping thing doesn’t work with even Shreya Ghoshal, (remember ‘Mashallah’ from ‘Ek Tha Tiger’?) so how did the composers think it would work Tulsi? Lastly, the lyrics. Kumaar’s new lyrics suit the theme of the song, but aren’t really innovative; all the Bollywood clichés repeat themselves yet again. A revamp that could’ve been great, but ends up being mediocre.

 

4. Maahi Ve
Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Backing Vocals ~ Amit Gupta, Original Composition by ~ Anand Raaj Anand, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Dev Kohli, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Judke bhi tooti rahi ishqe di dor ve,
Kisko sunaaye jaake toote dil ka shor ve”

– Kumaar

The last song on the album is also a remake, but happens to be a remake of a relatively newer song, ‘Maahi Ve’ (Kaante). People are still coping with the craze of the old song, and T-Series decides to remake it even before the old song’s magic wears away. Anyway, that’s none of our business. The song has been recreated by composer duo Gourov-Roshin, the same duo who remade ‘Kaate Nahin Kat Te’ in ‘Force 2’ and Punjabi Folk song ‘Nachna Aaonda Nahin’ in ‘Tum Bin 2’. Both of those songs, they didn’t quite get it right, what with excessive techno sounds and loud noises overpowering he melodies. This time, not only is Anand Raaj Anand’s original tune sounding great in the hookline, but the padding hat the duo provides in the form of the mukhda and antaras, also sounds nice. It has been composed nicely, perfect for the lounge song theme and NOT excessively and unnecessarily sensual-sounding. It actually sounds like a sad song, like the old song did. I myself cannot believe that I liked the remake. Maybe it is because I didn’t really love the old song too much either.. though I did like it. The arrangements by the duo are cool, especially the minimalistic techno sounds in the hookline. There is not much more to hear in terms of arrangements, but the whole sound of the song is lounge-ish. The interludes are good, having some kind of Arabic music playing in both of them. Neha Kakkar, Gourov-Roshin’s regular Singer, renders this one perfectly. Who could be a better replacement for Richa Sharma than Neha Kakkar? (Well maybe Sonu Kakkar could, but “assi ki kariye!?”) Amit Gupta’s robotic voice might sound irritating at first, but you learn to ignore that as the song progresses. Kumaar’s new lyrics, thankfully, are not cheap, but they take forward the a!bience of he song nicely in connection with Dev Kohli’s original words. A surprisingly good remake!! #5StarHotelSong!!


Wajah Tum Ho doesn’t really cater to my likes. An album full of remakes of great classics, out of which two remakes do not live up to the standards of the original. One original song, which fails because of a certain female singer, but excels in one of its three versions. Not a very enticing summary of an album, is it? But will T-Series understand? No. They’ll always be adamant on ruining old songs to add into their films; so be it. The album reeks of stale compositions and/or boring arrangements. One song, by Gourov-Roshin, a duo that has only disappointed up till this song, stands out as a good one, though it will be forgotten in no time. All in all, it is an album depending on the remakes to propel it forward. 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Maahi Ve > Wajah Tum Ho (Lounge Version) > Wajah Tum Ho (Male) > Dil Mein Chhupa Loonga > Dil Ke Paas (Unplugged) > Wajah Tum Ho (Duet) > Dil Ke Paas

 

Which is your favourite song from Wajah Tum Ho? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Dangal, Chef: Pritam Chakraborty 

 

‘Dangal’ will be the last review of 2016!! 😀 I’m so excited! Stay tuned for a fun 2016 end-of-the-year wrap-up! 😉

THE MUSICAL DIVINITY THAT WORKS ONLY PARTIALLY! (SHIVAAY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon & Jasleen Royal
♪ Lyrics by: Sandeep Shrivastava, Sayeed Quadri & Aditya Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th October 2016

Shivaay Album Cover

Shivaay Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Shivaay is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film starring Ajay Devgn, Erika Kaar and Sayyeshaa Saigal in lead roles. The film is directed and produced by Ajay Devgn himself. The film seems grand at every scale, and hopefully, Ajay’s direction proves to be fruitful and the movie becomes a success. The trailer makes everything looks so magnanimous, that I am really getting excited for the movie. For the time being though, all we can do to get close to the movie, is spend time with its music. The music of ‘Shivaay’ has been composed by Mithoon, a music composer who rarely gets to experiment these days because of the incessant demand of the public for more and more ‘Tum Hi Ho’s, and Jasleen Royal, who debuted just last month in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’. She is more of a guest composer as she has composed one song in the album, with one version, and Mithoon has composed the remaining three songs. Hopefully, the two have worked well to make Ajay Devgn’s directorial a good musical as well. Let’s find out! 😀


1. Bolo Har Har Har
Singers ~ Mithoon, Mohit Chauhan, Sukhwinder Singh, Badshah, Megha Sriram Dalton & Anugrah, Backing Vocals by ~ Parthiv Gohil, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sandeep Shrivastava

The album starts off on an epic, grand note, with a devotional song in a very innovative style. The song starts off with a couplet by Mohit Chauhan, who sings it with immense perfection and concentration. And then there’s Mithoon’s electrifying rock guitar riff, along with Sukhwinder Singh’s classical bols. The composition of Mohit’s part has been done in a very typically Mithoon style by Mithoon, and the rest of the song is actually rap. The only thing that has a tune, is the hookline (Sukhwinder’s part). Megha Sriram Dalton very effectively leads the way with a mystical Aghor Mantra throughout the song, and her parts are what I keep waiting for in the song. The lead singer is obviously Badshah, and with his raps, he praises Lord Shiva a lot. Mithoon’s electrifying arrangements are very attractive, and help to attract the new generation towards the song. The rock guitars really crank up things in the song, while club beats and a very striking EDM makes the song worthwhile. Percussion by Bobby Shrivastava gets full marks. The vocals by all singers are awesome, and the confidence with which Badshah performs the rap, is applause-worthy. There are many parts of the rap that stand out among the rest. One such line I loved was “Wohi shunya hai, wahi ikaay, jiske bhitar basa Shivaay”, and yet another was the climax line, “Ja ja Kailash, ja kar vinaash”. The way these lines are repeated in the song, is just awesome. Megha Dalton sings her mantras very convincingly, while Mohit Chauhan’s parts are haunting and Sukhwinder’s parts are the energy of the song — whenever you feel it going a bit weak, his parts come and lift it back up. Backing vocals by Anugrah and Parthiv Gohil are good as well. Towards the end, all the singers’ parts come together, and with the help of a strong backing rock template, Mithoon brings a very good end to the song. The lyrics are by the film’s scriptwriter Sandeep Shrivastava himself, and he’s also written the raps, which are merely performed by Badshah, fortunately, and fortunately, performed very well! His lyrics are very good, describing Lord Shiva gloriously. A strong opening to the album, and a song that will give the movie a strong opening too! 😀 Also, happy to see that Mithoon tried out something different!!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Darkhaast
Singers ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Arijit Singh & Mithoon, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sayeed Quadri

After the electrifying rock song, Mithoon mellows things down with a song that starts with a very comforting piano tune, and Sunidhi’s sweet voice. The song is a romantic one, and sees Mithoon back in the ‘vintage Mithoon’ mode, which is totally different from the Mithoon who gives endless ‘Tum Hi Ho’s. The composition is very pleasant, uplifting and calm, and gives you a sense of calm as well. The starting paragraph by Sunidhi is the mukhda, and it is a kind of unplugged start to the song, after which Arijit comes with the hookline, a very beautiful tune that Mithoon seems to have saved for a special movie, like this, for a superstar like Ajay. The line “Tu meri baahon mein duniya bhula de” hits you so hard (with love) that you just fall in love immediately. Arijit renders the hookline with a very happy tone, and makes you smile after hearing it. However, he has used his very bored, casual voice tone here sometimes, and sometimes, suddenly becomes interested in delivering a good rendition. 😀 I don’t know what that’s about, all I know is that the final result is amazing. He sounds awesome in the high notes, and a little less in the low notes, but it works anyway. Sunidhi is perfect as usual. Her notes are mostly on the high scale in this song, and she sings them gracefully. Her vocals here remind me of her vocals in ‘Yaaram’ (Ek Thi Daayan) where she went oh-so-gracefully from low notes to high notes and back! The first antara, sung by Arijit, has a very typical and heard-before tune to it, but Arijit delivers it so passionately, that it sounds awesome. Sunidhi, on the other hand, aces the wonderful, mellow composition of the second antara. After both antaras, there is a wonderful addition by Mithoon where he sings “Tu meri baahon mein duniya bhula de” in a very different, rhythmic way. At the end of the song, Sunidhi wraps things up with a very soft and gentle rendition of the hookline, just like she opened up the song. She does it so nicely, that she would impress anybody’s grandmother, as she places everything right where she takes it out from. 😀 😛 (Don’t worry if you didn’t understand that, it was ridiculous anyway) The arrangements are scintillating. Mithoon decorates the song with very lively percussion (programmed by Bobby Shrivastava) and that gives the song a quite pleasant, upbeat touch. Of course, Mithoon’s piano keeps impressing you throughout the song, and guitars (Kalyan Baruah) are very breezy. The singers complement the arrangements so well, that everything falls into place perfectly. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are mind blowing. Once again, he impressed with simple words, and Mithoon has taken them and woven a beautiful melody out of them. Romance at its simple best! Arijit and Sunidhi ace this one, and Mithoon should start giving more such songs!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Raatein / Raatein (Reprise)
Singers ~ Jasleen Kaur Royal / Jasleen Kaur Royal, Music by ~ Jasleen Kaur Royal, Lyrics by ~ Aditya Sharma

Jasleen steps into the album as a guest composer for this song, which appears in two versions in the album. The first version is a sweet, breezy composition that I would have liked, had it not been so, so, so similar to Jasleen’s ‘Kho Gaye Hum Kahan’ (Baar Baar Dekho). The composition style, the dulcet, calm and breezy melody, we’ve all heard before in the song from ‘Baar Baar Dekho’. It seems like Jasleen has modified some notes somewhere and presented this song after modification. The vocals too, are very similar to the way she sang in that song. Arrangements might be the only difference in both songs, but very slight. The guitars are here too, but it is joined by pleasant percussions that will sound awesome in the theaters. Strings do their job very well. At the end of the first antara, Jasleen has added a wonderful strings orchestra, with crisp strokes, which is worth hearing the song for! And at the end of the second, she adds a strings piece which is in one piece and not broken into strokes. The flute that she has placed in places throughout the song, is wonderful, while the banjo towards the end really makes the mood lighter. However, at the end there’s an “Oooooo-ooooo-oooo” which is a copy paste of the “Oooooo-ooooo-oooo” from ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ (Baar Baar Dekho). The “Hey-ya-hey-ya” effect that she has put in places around the song, is pleasing though. Aditya Sharma, who had written ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ too, writes this one quite nicely, but it gets boring after a while. The reprise is just as opulent in terms of arrangements. The reprise starts with a tune that Jasleen had used in the antara in the original version. This version is more of an unplugged version, with a slow pace and a haunting sound about it. Jasleen sings in a whispery voice for this one, and it turns out to produce a very haunting effect. In the first half, the song is unplugged, until a grand, striking percussion takes away the silence to gradually pull you into a more sinister land. The oboe very nicely conveys the sinister nature of the song. In the second half, Jasleen starts singing in a high pitch and louder, to make that sinister touch more evident. The ‘Hey-ya” tune is tweaked to make it sound more sinister, too! 😀 Basically, this song is just the original tweaked, to make it sound sinister. The arrangements are more opulent, with strong percussion and graceful strings bringing out the haunting quality of the song. The lyrics here have also been tweaked, and work for the theme of this version. Overall, both versions have great arrangements, but the first one is too similar to Jasleen’s previous song, while the second one is not soemthing I would take out time to listen to again and again — it will sound great in the theaters! A bit of a disappointment from the promising Jasleen Royal! 😦

 

4. Tere Naal Ishqa
Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Sayeed Quadri

The last song on the album started off with a tune that resembles the opening tune of ‘Ji Huzoori’ (Ki & Ka) a bit, and I was so excited for a moment, because Mithoon with another ‘Ji Huzoori’ would be as fun as the world with another India. 😀 But to my disappointment, what followed was a composition that seemed to have worn out right away. The mukhda was so melancholic, that you get set back right away after it starts, and it just gets more boring after that. The hookline is decent, with the typical Mithoon trademark over it. The whole song reminded me of ‘Zaroorat’ (Ek Villain) instead of ‘Ji Huzoori’. 😦 And that isn’t good! The antara is quite slow-paced and hard to catch. The cross line which joins the antara to the hook, is also so outdated. The song has a very laid back tune in general. Kailash Kher’s vocals don’t help, as it just makes the song sound more outdated. He ends up boring the listener as the song progresses. The arrangements by Mithoon were a sort of a saviour for the mediocre composition, with rock livening things up a bit. The typical electric dafli-like beats just follow the tried-and-tested formula, which I’ve started hating after Vishal-Shekhar have overdone it in such songs. The length of the song is also a letdown. Such a melancholic composition, and six minutes, is a too long time! I really don’t like it when Mithoon takes such outdated tunes and stretches them for six minutes. On the other hand, I didn’t even notice how six minutes passed during ‘Darkhaast’. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are good here too, but could’ve done with better composition by Mithoon. A lacklustre melody that has worn away with time.


Shivaay partly lives up to expectations. The album offers a very electrifying song that will be the cracker for this Diwali, and a very sweet romantic song, but other than that, the other songs seem to suffer. Jasleen seems to be stuck in her comfort zone, and must get out of it, considering that this is only her third song and it smells so much of her first. Ankit Tiwari was different. He took so long to get out of ‘Sunn Raha Hai’ that all his songs started overlapping and then we got used to it, and got a pleasant surprise whenever he let go of it. But I don’t wish that to happen in Jasleen’s music, as she seems very promising a composer. Mithoon’s last song is just avoidable, as it reeks of the 2005-2007 era so much. At the end of the day, the musical divinity only partially works.

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darkhaast > Bolo Har Har Har > Raatein (Reprise) > Raatein > Tere Naal Ishqa

 

Which is your favourite song from Shivaay? Please vote for it below! Thanks 🙂