FORGETTABLE KAHIN KA!! (JHOOTHA KAHIN KA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sanjeev-Ajay, Rahul Jain, Siddhant Madhav, Amjad-Nadeem-Aamir, Kashi Richard & Yo Yo Honey Singh
♪ Lyrics by: Amjad-Nadeem, Enbee, Lil Golu, Sanjeev Chaturvedi & Alok Ranjan Jha
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 12th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 19th July 2019

Jhootha Kahin Ka Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Jhootha Kahin Ka is a Bollywood comedy film starring Rishi Kapoor, Jimmy Sheirgill, Omkar Kapoor and Sunny Singh in lead roles. The film is directed by Smeep Kang and produced by Anuj Sharma and Deepak Mukut. The film has music by Amjad-Nadeem and their new partner Aamir, Yo Yo Honey Singh, Siddhant Madhav, Sanjeev-Ajay, Rahul Jain and Kashi Richard. I’ve known about Amjad-Nadeem for years, and they have some decent songs, so expecting something worthwhile from them. Not expecting from Honey Singh, and Siddhant Madhav, Rahul Jain, and Kashi Richard, I’ve read their names in passing in some Zee Music albums which I haven’t reviewed or heard. So, let’s see what this album has to offer.


Amjad-Nadeem-Aamir’s Saturday Night happens to be Neeraj Shridhar’s second one with that name, the former being from ‘Bangistan’, composed by Ram Sampath. While in that song, Sampath fused club beats with Celtic sounds, here we get an annoying mix of overused club beats with the intermittent tumbi sounds. Neeraj Shridhar isn’t bad at singing such songs, so the vocals don’t annoy as much as they would’ve with another singer. The rap by Enbee is utterly avoidable, and the female singer Jyotica Tangri barely gets anything to sing. Do we have to talk about the lyrics by Amjad-Nadeem?
Funk Love by Yo Yo Honey Singh has the quintessential Honey Singh beats that have been missing from Bollywood for some time, and Lil Golu’s lyrics, something else that has been missing in Bollywood for quite some time. And after listening to the song, you know why. Though the beats start off quite intriguingly (though there’s nothing new, but that’s just Yo Yo’s forte, I guess) the vocals and lyrics make you cringe all throughout the song. Especially the title lyrics. Which do not sound like ‘Funk Love’ at all.
Out of Sanjeev-Ajay’s two songs, they collaborate with Siddhant Madhav for Munde Da Character, which starts with interesting Punjabi folk sounds created digitally, as can be made out from the sound of it. Brijesh Shandilya handles the vocals of the mukhda and the hookline well, and is accompanied by a horde of other vocalists (Siddhant Madhav, Rani Indrani Sharma, Nazim Ali, Deepak Yadav and Makrand Patankar) who mostly come into action in the antaras. The female vocalist, Rani Sharma, sounds great particularly, in the second antara. The composition is catchy, and thanks to the fresh Punjabi arrangements, it is a song I don’t mind listening to in its entirety, unlike the previous two songs on the album. Sanjeev Chaturvedi’s lyrics are also suitable and how lyrics for a normal Bollywood song should be.
Sanjeev-Ajay’s other song, Jhootha Kahin Ka, is composed in collaboration with Rahul Jain. Again, it starts with a heard-before but catchy Punjabi tumbi piece, which later is joined by harmonium, dholaks and Navraj Hans’ strong voice. The song carries a sound close to Gurdas Mann’s pop numbers, and thanks to Navraj Hans’ vocals, it sounds better. Rahul Jain and Ankit Saainraj accompany him with the vocals, but it is mostly a Navraj show all the way. The hookline is quite weak, and the lyrics (Sanjeev Chaturvedi) too are functional and nothing more.
The last song on the album, Jugni, is another song with club beats, and starts like a Yo Yo Honey Singh song, but it is actually composed by Kashi Richard. Yes, the beats are catchy here, and Enbee doesn’t irritate as much as he did in ‘Saturday Night’. The beats engage you throughout the length of the song, and the four singers, (Enbee, Kapil Thapa, Rohit Sharma and Chintan Bakiwala) though you can’t really differentiate one from the other, seem to have done a good job because the end result sounds good. The hookline has been composed in that typical designed-to-be-annoyingly-catchy way, but the beats and the ‘kadak maamla‘ refrain help the song get my green signal.


Not an album I’ll revisit again for any reason, because none of the songs stuck with me, but I would remember it for the way it is so typical with its beats, in both its club songs and Punjabi songs.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 2 + 7 + 5.5 + 6 = 25.5

Album Percentage: 51%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Munde Da Character > Jugni > Jhootha Kahin Ka > Saturday Night > Funk Love

 

Which is your favourite song from Jhootha Kahin Ka? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

IMPRESSIVE TEAMWORK!! (DAAS DEV – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sandesh Shandilya, Vipin Patwa, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Anupama Raag & Shamir Tandon
♪ Lyrics by: Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Deepak Ramola, Dr. Sagar, Bulleh Shah, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Munir Niazi, Gaurav Solanki & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 27th April 2018

Daas Dev Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Daas Dev is a Bollywood political thriller starring Rahul Bhat, Aditi Rao Hydari and Richa Chadha in lead roles. The film is directed by Sudhir Mishra, and produced by Saptarishi Cinevision. The film has tanked as Such it Mishra’s weakest film, but we concern ourselves with the music, and let me tell you, this album is probably the dark horse album of the year! The music is composed by Sandesh Shandilya, Vipin Patwa, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Anupama Raag and Shamir Tandon. Read on to find out why I call it the dark horse album of the year so far! 🙂


Sandesh Shandilya and Vipin Patwa are the lead composers for the film: both have two songs each while the other three composers present us with one song each. Let’s start with Vipin Patwa’s portion of the album, since he hasn’t been active for so long!
Sehmi Hai Dhadkan is a melancholic but intense romantic song, that really works opposite to how these songs usually work with me. I actually liked the song. The tune is gripping, the instrumentation deep and likeable, and Atif’s vocals strong. The cello and piano work together against the digital beats, and Vipin’s composition is really captivating, especially with the hook, and the line before it, where Atif performs an impeccable aalaap. Dr. Sagar’s lyrics are good, but run of the mill. Vipin’s other song, Tain To Uttey, is a nice reimagination of Bulleh Shah’s verse, set against an electrifying folksy-rock fusion. Javed Bashir performs in a way that equals his rendition of ‘Piya Tu Kaahe Rootha Re’ (Kahaani), and he sounds amazing in those aalaaps, and in the hookline, when the composer brings in amazing rock elements accompanied by nice classical music elements. The interlude with Javed’s SARGAM is unforgettable.
Sandesh Shandilya though, takes the album to a different plane, with clever folk-techno fusion in both his songs. The relatively weaker (in no means a bad song), Raat Youn Dil Mein Teri, is a sensual romantic song sung by Papon and newcomer Shraddha Mishra. Two of Faiz Ahmed Faiz’s poems get amalgamated into this song, where Papon delivers an amazing performance as always, and even newcomer Mishra supports him and does her part beautifully with her distinct voice. The composition stands out as sensuous and experimental, while the techno sounds give it an even more intense lounge-ish sound. It reminds me of ‘Behroopia’ (Bombay Velvet) with its soundscape. The composition of the antara is mind blowing and tough to not love!
Sandesh’s other song, my personal favourite of the album because of its quirkiness and happy-go-lucky sound, is Challa Chaap Chunariya. The composition is essentially that of a folksy dance song, and it gets really catchy in the hookline and the cross line before it, and even more captivating with Rekha Bhardwaj’s stylish vocals. But the real magic here is the fusion by Shandilya. It’s so surprising this is the same Shandilya who made songs like ‘Suraj Hua Maddham’ (Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham) and ‘Aaoge Jab Tum’ (Jab We Met) in the 2000s, but now he has reinvented his style so drastically! The sarangi pairs beautifully with the psychedelic sounds, and the quirky programming makes it even more addictive.
Arko Pravo Mukherjee also breaks out of his spree of composing sugary sweet romantic songs, to create a nice rock ballad. Rangdaari has all the elements of a catchy rock song. Navraj Hans gets a short prelude in Punjabi, that we wish lasted longer, or featured once more in the song, until Arko takes the mic and sings his addictive composition. The arrangements are just like any rock song you’d hear, but nevertheless, very likeable. The hookline has a catchy composition as well; I just wish some more established singer had sung it. The guitars in the interludes are amazing, and so are the romantic lyrics by Arko Pravo Mukherjee.
Debutante composer Anupama Raag presents Azaad Kar, a song composed on that oh-so-heart-warming seven beat rhythm that is so prevalent in Bollywood, mainly for sad songs. The Indian tune is beautiful, as are the arrangements, with one digital plucked instrument playing throughout, coupled with jingle bells and tablas later on. The choice of Swanand Kirkire for singing it is really perfect; kudos to Anupama for remembering him. Gaurav Solanki’s lyrics are good too.
The weakest song of the album comes from Shamir Tandon; he composes a very heavy pathos-filled rock song, Marne Ka Shauk, that does not connect at all, with cringeworthy vocals (surprisingly by Papon and not so surprisingly by Krishna Beura) and very cringeworthy lyrics (as expected from Sameer Anjaan by now). It’s probably what the Devdas in this retelling sings when he starts drinking. 😂


All in all, this album turns out to be a surprisingly great album from multiple composers, but each pitch in to do their best, as per the script of the movie.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 + 7.5 + 8 + 5.5 = 54

Album Percentage: 77.14%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Challa Chaap Chunariya > Raat Youn Dil Mein Teri >
Azaad Kar = Tain To Uttey > Sehmi Hai Dhadkan = Rangdaari > Marne Ka Shauk

Which is your favourite song from Daas Dev? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A WEDDING TO DREAD!! (VEEREY KI WEDDING – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Farzan Faaiz, Jaidev Kumar, Ashok Punjabi & Meet Bros.
♪ Lyrics by: Chandan Bakshi, Deepak Noor, Devendra Kafir, Ramkesh Jiwanpurwala, Kumaar & Faaiz Anwar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 27th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 2nd March 2018

Veerey Ki Wedding Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Veerey Ki Wedding is a Bollywood comedy film starring Pulkit Samrat, Kriti Kharbanda and Jimmy Shergill. The film is directed by Asshu Trikha and produced by Rajat Bakshi and Parmod Gomber. The film’s music album contains music by Farzan Faaiz, Jaidev Kumar, Meet Bros and Ashok Punjabi. Let’s dive right in, I have no expectations as such from this album..!


So the album doesn’t start out as bad as expected; Mind Blowing, though suffering from an extreme case of Mika-ate-the-words-again syndrome, has an enjoyable South-flavoured rhythm by (newcomer?) Farzan Faaiz, with the ‘Chinta Ta Chita’ (Rowdy Rathore) rhythm being used for propelling the song further into the masses’ hearts. The backing chorus sounds so bad, it’s actually good. The typical horns are there too, so everything you need in a generic kuthu song is there — I just wish the lyrics (by two people.. quite talented, it seems, writing lines like “Maana Milky Milky Badi Hai Teri Kalaai“.) and singer were different!
Farzan’s other song Na Kasoor is a staid melody that isn’t bad, but isn’t good either. It’s more like an “Oh, it’s over already? When did it start?” song. While he borrowed the rhythm from “‘Chinta Ta Chita” for his first song, Farzan tries to make this one sound like “Jashn-E-Bahaara” (Jodhaa Akbar), and to that effect even ropes in Javed Ali for the vocals, and jingles bells in the background. Sadly, it turns out to be a disaster because he insists on including sounds like breaking of glass and other “modern” sounds. It’s just a mishmash of sounds that don’t go together. It’s like eating fish with tomato ketchup. (No offence if you do.)
Jaidev Kumar’s Hatt Ja Tau, a convenient remake of the Haryanvi folk song of the same name, is much more enjoyable, mostly due to Sunidhi’s powerhouse vocals. The musical arrangements sound fresh here, but Devendra Kafir writes lyrics that would make you blush. The composition too, being so happy-go-lucky, helps to make you ignore the lyrics, and Jaidev’s cheerful arrangements are fun too.
Another bad song on the album is given by Meet Bros. Talli Tonight, from the name itself you can tell that the song is doomed. Somebody called Deep Money (forgive me if he’s some sensation) sings the song very uniterestedly, while Neha Kakkar sings in a manner I’ve never heard her sing in — utterly bored and sleepy! The wannabe beats do not make you want to get up and groove, rather they would make you skip the song. Meet Bros’ rap is just cringeworthy. Or was that Deep Money?
The best song of the album, only because the others are so cringeworthy, is Ashok Punjabi’s Veerey Ki Wedding, which is essentially a 90s wedding song, that was destined to release in 2018. Navraj Hans provides the necessary spunk to the song, and the arrangements (dholaks, harmonium, tumbi) help make it fun and enjoyable. The ladies’ chorus led by Saloni Thakkar is also enjoyable. The backing vocalists though, sing so high pitched, as if they’re in some 90s song.


Some composers picked up from the middle of nowhere make this a wedding you should be dreading!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 5.5 + 7 + 5 + 7 = 30.5

Album Percentage: 61%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Veerey Ki Wedding = Hatt Ja Tau > Mind Blowing > Na Kasoor > Talli Tonight

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 13 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Veerey Ki wedding) = 14

COMPLETELY REBELLIOUS!! (BAAGHI 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sandeep Shirodkar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Mithoon, Gourov-Roshin, Pranay M. Rijia, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Panjabi MC
♪ Lyrics by: Ginny Diwan, Javed Akhtar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Sayeed Quadri, Kumaar & Channi Khannewala
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 30th March 2018

Baaghi 2 Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baaghi 2 is a Bollywood action film (read comedy) starring Tiger Shroff, Disha Patani, Manoj Bajpayee, Prateik Babbar, Darshan Kumar, Randeep Hooda and Deepak Dobriyal in crucial roles. The film is directed by popular dance choreographer Ahmed Khan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. If you remember, the first film (which I hated) had a quite likeable album, by Meet Bros., Amaal Mallik and Manj Musik. A “bonus” song by Pranay Rijia was released later. For this album, the music composers of the first film are completely forgotten, and except for Pranaay, they have all been replaced, by Sandeep Shirodkar, Gourov-Roshin, Arko Pravo Mukherjee and Mithoon. Now, I basically know that there will be a horde of remakes in this album, just by looking at the composers’ names — Sandeep Shirodkar and Gourov-Roshin have basically just created almost only remakes ever since they debuted. Arko and Mithoon’s songs do pique my interest, but nothing like “Oh, I’m so excited, I’m dying of excitement”.. nothing of that level. Anyway, let’s see just how well this album upholds the reputation (or demolishes it) of its predecessor.


Just because he has two songs, both remakes, Sandeep Shirodkar becomes lead composer for Baaghi 2. (It was Meet Bros. in ‘Baaghi’). His first remake is Mundiyan, a remake of Labh Janjua’s ‘Mundiyan Toh Bachke Rahi’. I must say, though, the song is quite enjoyable. Sandeep gets the Bhangra vibe right, and that’s the most important in such songs. Navraj Hans and Palak Muchhal make for some interesting vocals — especially Palak, who explores such songs once (okay, maybe twice, but not more) in a blue moon. She even raps! Navraj Hans is a vocal powerhouse as it is; there’s no use writing that he’s done well (it was taken for granted that he would). The one place Sandeep does mess up though, is the uncountable vocal breaks, disturbing proceedings many times, slowing down the pace of the song.
He doesn’t fare as well in his second song Ek Do Teen, remake of the song with the same name from ‘Tezaab’. Now, this is a very iconic song, not so much for its composition and music, (which was quite clichéd, if I may say so) than for Madhuri’s iconic moves on the dance floor. But even then, the flak the song is receiving is quite unjustified. Maybe it’s because the dance moves have been slaughtered (they have), or maybe it’s because the remake trend has achieved this abominable level these days. But the song isn’t that bad. Shreya substituting for Alka is a great decision; she sounds okay in the mukhda but amazing in the antaras. At least we haven’t gotten somebody like Neha Kakkar in charge of this song. The music is functional at best, with nothing remarkable in Sandeep’s new arrangements, except the easy-to-miss electric guitar riffs, and the spunky Bappi-ish disco sounds. Also, why does she only count till 20 here! That’s destroying the point of the song! 😂
Mithoon’s Lo Safar is a better result of his composition sung by Jubin Nautiyal, than the last one, which was ‘Tum Mere Ho’ (Hate Story IV). Here, at least, the composition isn’t overly sensuous, and not even trying to be. It is just a humble typical Mithoon melancholic melody, supposed to be a romantic song but playing more like a sad song. Jubin sings it well, and Mithoon’s arrangements consisting of nice guitar riffs, an amazing rap on many drums at the same time, and a serene flute, work wonders. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are just not the kind of lyrics he’s known for. Having written so many beautiful lyrics (especially the amazing ‘Ji Huzoori’ from ‘Ki & Ka’) for Mithoon, this should have been much better.
Gourov-Roshin’s Soniye Dil Nayi is also a remake of some T-Series pop single, whose credits on YouTube are so vague, they don’t credit the original composer, even in the video for the original song! The only good thing about this song, is that it doesn’t let Ankit Tiwari’s lazy voice get too much control over the song, because Shruti Pathak arrives at the right times to save us, with amazing aalaaps. Her portions are amazing, but the composition both of these singers have to sing is lazy, boring, dull and any other negative adjective you can think of. The composers try their best to ape Ankit’s composing style, so that his lines always end with us expecting a “Sunn Raha Hai Na Tu..” or a “Teri galliyan..” to follow. Too much said about this song.
The only composer repeated from ‘Baaghi’ is Pranaay Rijia, whose song ‘Get Ready To Fight’ from ‘Baaghi’ I neither reviewed nor heard (except in the movie) because it released late as a single track. Here he comes back to present Get Ready To Fight Again a song which you should be ready to fight again. That’s about it. I won’t tell you about the horde of singers roped in to sing a worthless song, and I won’t tell you about the actionless arrangements, even though this is probably the background song for when Tiger Shroff is showing off his stunts. This time the song gets a more folksy vocal treatment, thanks to Jatinder Shah’s vocals. Benny Dayal in the original song sounded terrible. (Let’s just put that out there since I hadn’t reviewed that.)
The best song of the album, more out of helplessness, than actually on its merit, is Arko’s O Saathi, a romantic melody sung by Atif Aslam, which fits perfectly into the Arko template of romantic songs. It might be a rehash of ‘Nazm Nazm’ (Bareilly Ki Barfi) and ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ (Rustom), with the exact same duff rhythm, and strings, and everything else, but it nevertheless sticks with you, because it is charming in spite of being heard before. Payal Dev’s humming lends the song a serene quality. The antara of the song is amazing; it follows a really unconventional composition, at least unconventional for Arko’s music. Atif sings it impeccably, especially the “Allah Mujhe” line. The hookline’s tune seemed forcibly stretched to cover about fifteen seconds of runtime each time it plays.. that’s about a minute that could’ve been spent in adding another antara! But I must say, Arko’s lyrics are beautiful, especially the mukhda!


While I still listen to ‘Baaghi’s music album sometimes even now, when I’m bored, I doubt I’ll listen to this album even one month from now. While “‘Baaghi’s album had zero remakes, this has four. While “‘Baaghi’s album was not a ‘BAAGHI’ (rebel) at all, this one totally is!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 4 + 8 =

Album Percentage: 65%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Saathi > Lo Safar = Mundiyan > Ek Do Teen > Soniye Dil Nayi > Get Ready To Fight Again

 

Which is your favourite song from Baaghi 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 04 (from Baaghi 2) = 10

YO YO KE COMEBACK KI SEETI!! (SONU KE TITU KI SWEETY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Yo Yo Honey Singh, Rochak Kohli, Amaal Mallik, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Saurabh-Vaibhav & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Yo Yo Honey Singh, Singhsta, Oye Sheraa, Kumaar, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa, Swapnil Tiwari & Sham Balkar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd February 2018

Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety is a Bollywood comedy film starring Kartik Aaryan, Sunny Singh and Nushrat Bharucha in lead roles. The film is directed by Luv Ranjan, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Luv Ranjan and Ankur Garg. The film’s “success” (by which I only mean box office success) can be attributed to the hit music the album featured, by artists like Yo Yo Honey Singh (who is back after a long break), Rochak Kohli, Amaal Mallik, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa and debutants Saurabh-Vaibhav. Let’s jump right into my review because there’s not much to say, three weeks after the film released! 😂


Yo Yo Honey Singh, after an I-don’t-know-how-long hiatus returns to Bollywood, with this album. What a surprise T-Series gives him only remakes to handle. And surprisingly, he too, handles them with care! Dil Chori, remake of Anand Raaj Anand composed and Hans Raj Hans sung pop single ‘Dil Chori Sada Ho Gaya’, becomes a catchy party number, and since the original song itself featured the words nasha and talli, Honey Singh needs no extra efforts in structuring his rap all around daaru. But the digital dhol rhythm really makes it lively. The female vocalist Simar Kaur also does well in a Kaala Doreya-esque cameo. It took a long time to grow on me though. His other song Chhote Chhote Peg is a remake of Anand Raaj Anand composed, Hans Raj Hans sung Bollywood Song ‘Tote Tote’ (Bichchoo), and this song too, sounds better than the original, if not good. The song is an ugly mishmash of a weird Neha Kakkar line that doesn’t match at all with the hook of the old song, though Navraj Hans sings the new hook better than his father had in the old song. Also, these lyrics fit into the tune more than “Tote Tote Ho Gaya Dil Tote Tote Ho Gaya“. 😆 Bt that doesn’t mean the lyrics themselves are exceptional — they’re quite the opposite. And they’re by people who call themselves weird names like Oye Sheraa and Singhsta. Again, Honey Singh steals the show with arrangements only. The trap music is catchy, as are the other techno sounds used. I can’t really say either of his songs are bad as such, but they’re just not good either.
Amaal Mallik returns with another ‘Sooraj Dooba Hai’ but this time it has tropical house vibes. Also this time the “Sooraj Dooba Hai” actually happens Subah Subah. 😂 Arijit doesn’t sound as fresh as he sounded in ‘Sooraj Dooba Hai’, probably because he sang so many such songs after that. And Prakriti sounds functional, but then nobody else could’ve sung her parts better, either. Overall, a good song, but could have been better.
The next song is by a composer who is quite on the rise these days, Guru Randhawa, being helped by T-Series to get his songs into any movie where there’s the scope of a clubbish number with Punjabi lyrics. Of course, ‘Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety’ was the obvious film that his song Kaun Nachdi was made for. The Punjabi sound is merged well with the electronic sound, giving it a fresh and enjoyable groove. The surprise element here is Neeti Mohan, getting back to back songs, where she aces her portions with amazing vocals. Her high-pitched voice sounds so good! And Guru himself sings and writes the song entertainingly, befitting to the movie’s theme.
Rochak Kohli, another composer who seems to be getting a lot of movies one after the other, but still hasn’t done a complete album (at least as far as I can recall), enters the album next, with two songs that are quite templatised with respect to the sound they carry. Lakk Mera Hit is a typical Punjabi ladies’ sangeet number, with Sukriti Kakar not doing her best behind the mic, but Rochak’s arrangements are entertaining, even though they have nothing new in them. The composition is such a heard-before one, it is hard to like it, especially in 2018.
Tera Yaar Hoon Main fares better, the melancholia channeled this time not for a breakup between lovers, but for a rift between best friends. The lyrics here (Kumaar) are the best lyrics of any song on the album, obviously, and Arijit delivers yet another beautiful rendition. The composition, though again not very fresh, does create an impact with its stretched notes and abrupt hookline. The Punjabi intermission towards the end was unexpected, but amazing. The arrangements are soulful, with great use of guitar and piano.
The seemingly debutant duo Saurabh-Vaibhav come up with a song tailor-made for Mika, Sweety Slowly Slowly, but I must say, the song itself isn’t bad. Though Mika, as is his habit, eats up half of each word in the lyrics, the entertaining composition coupled with the nice groovy beats makes for an entertaining but situational listen! I don’t understand why Mika drops the “z” from “badtameez“, the “se” from “Please” and so on, in the antara, though!
Probably the grooviest of the groovy numbers is what I’ve saved for the end — Bom Diggy Diggy. Now, this isn’t the kind of song I usually like. But I’ve got to admit, Zack Knight has churned up something really catchy here! Sounding a lot like those English pop songs until the Punjabi/Rajasthani interruption in the middle, the song really holds your attention from the initial harmonium portion. Of course, T-Series must’ve had to buy rights to Zack Knight’s single from 2017 ‘Bom Diggy’, but it has turned out to be worth the deal. Jasmin Walia’s voice is cute, despite the numerous mispronunciations.


Overall, this is an album full of club numbers, each one different from the rest, but it is the soulful song that stands out of the bunch of club songs, and a well-made club song adapted from a pop song by an independent artist, steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 6 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 8.5 = 59.5

Album Percentage: 74.38%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Yaar Hoon Main = Bom Diggy Diggy > Subah Subah = Kaun Nachdi > Sweety Slowly Slowly = Dil Chori = Lakk Mera Hit > Chhote Chhote Peg

 

Which is your favourite song from Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 02 (from previous albums) + 03 (from Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety) = 05

MUBARAKAN! A FLOP ALBUM HAS BEEN BORN! (MUBARAKAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Hassan Jahangir, Amaal Mallik, Rishi Rich, Yash Anand & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Badshah & Hassan Jahangir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th July 2017

Mubarakan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mubarakan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy of errors starring Arjun Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor, Anil Kapoor, Ileana D’Cruz, Athiya Shetty and Ratna Pathak Shah in the lead roles. The film is directed by the only director in Bollywood who still insists on doing comedies with a cast larger than a herd of cows, Anees Bazmee and produced by Ashwin Varde, Murad Khetani and Balwinder Singh Janjua. The film’s plot consists of such never-before-tried aspects like — double roles, a love quadrangle, a huge Punjabi family and Punjabi dance numbers. It is going to redefine Bollywood, I’m sure of it. 😏 If you didn’t get that sarcasm, moving on. The music is by T-Series, and that means multiple composers. Thankfully, one name out of the three composers, is a relief, it being the name of Amaal Mallik, the young composer proving his mettle out there. He gets two, upbeat dance tracks, so I hope those are catchy! The next two composers are Gourov-Roshin, returning after treating us to a small break from their remakes, and sadly they have three songs, and Rishi Rich with Yash Anand, who have composed the title song of the film. Let’s just get this over with, eh?


1. The Goggle Song

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam, Armaan Malik, Neeti Mohan, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A wedding song to start the album, this one is an enjoyable tune from Amaal. Not the best he can do for sure, but it still makes you groove to the beat. The beat itself is infectious, with the composer adding quirky sound effects making it sound better. The ensemble of singers does really well for a wedding song, and for once, Tulsi sounds better than Neeti. The lyrics are mediocre, but hilarious at times. A good wedding track, but not very innovative.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Mubarakan (Title Track)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Juggy D, Sukriti Kakar & Badshah, Music by ~ Rishi Rich & Yash Anand, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Badshah, Yamma Yamma Credits: Music by ~ R.D. Burman

“This is the Rishi Rich beat.” The song starts with this obvious statement, and an unexpected incorporation of some portions ‘Yamma Yamma’ (Shaan). The actual composition falls flat, but it is saved by R.D. Burman’s old song, which plays throughout, and its addition was quite creative. Vocals are horrible. Lyrics are horrible. Rap is horrible. Arrangements are not so horrible. (Mostly, it is the awesome oud from the old song). In short, a horrible song, but for the arrangements and the old song’s portions.
P.S. I wouldn’t call this a Remake as such.
Rating: 2.5/5 (0.5 bonus for using that old song wisely)

 

3. Jatt Jaguar

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Navraj Hans & Apeksha Dandekar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another typical Punjabi song, the Punjabi flavour accentuated even more by a mediocre composition that barely manages to grasp your attention, except at the hook. Even Vishal doesn’t sound as energetic as always, but Navraj does. Lyrics are typical. Arrangements are typical, but there are traces Amaal’s digital quirks. At many places the tune seems like some old song I can’t recall! 😥 Not the best Amaal can do.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Haathon Mein Thhe Haath

Singers ~ Papon, Altamash Faridi, Aditi Singh Sharma & Arpita Mukherjee, Backing Vocals by ~ Rinku Giri, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A typical Pakistani pop-esque song follows, and it immediately strikes me as Papon’s worst song after a long, long time. The composition is staid and clichéd, his vocals do not help at all. Aditi sounds over stylish as usual. Those typical digital beats add to the melancholia. Backing vocalists add to the staleness, especially the Sufi one. Lyrics are something you won’t even notice. A song that clearly doesn’t know where it belongs.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Hawa Hawa

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Prakriti Kakar, Original Composition by ~ Hassan Jahangir, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The hit Pakistani pop song remade, with a typppppical kuthu beat and rhythm! Mika singing increases the headache, and the new composition is just unbearable. The hookline is good, but the other parts fall flat. The female vocals by Prakriti sound good though. Lyrics belong to a Sajid-Wajid soundtrack. Why????
Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

Singers ~ Rinku Giri & Puja Basnet, Original Composition Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another Punjabi folksy song ends the album, this time a mélange of two Punjabi folk songs, ‘Kala Doriya’ and ‘Baari Barsi’. The composition doesn’t hook you at all; in fact it sounds like ‘Jatt Jaguar Part 2’. The new singer Rinku Giri is the typical Punjabi male singer affair, he sounds like Diljit Dosanjh. Arrangements are “louder louder”. Lyrics are typical. A song that relies on folk songs to propel it, but fails.
Rating: 2/5


Mubarakan is yet another feather in Bollywood’s cap of Punjabi albums. All of the songs are very staid, heard-before ones, that don’t really help generate any interest. Amaal does okayish in one song, but showcases his quirk in the other. The others perform subpar, with the exception of Rishi Rich, who has made quite a catchy song. But even with its catchiness I couldn’t rate it higher than 2.5. So, for anyone counting, Mubarakan! Another flop album has been born! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 51.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: The Goggle Song > Mubarakan = Jatt Jaguar = Haathon Mein Thhe Haath = Hawa Hawa > Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 20

 

Which is your favourite song from Mubarakan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

LOOK, THEY RELEASED THE BGM!! (SARKAR 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ravi Shankar, Niladri Kumar & Rohan-Vinayak
♪ Lyrics by: Rohit Teotia, Sirasri & Mandar Cholkar
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 2nd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th May 2017

Sarkar 3

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Sarkar 3 is an upcoming Bollywood political crime thriller, starring Amitabh Bachchan, Jackie Shroff, Manoj Bajpayee, Amit Sadh, Rohini Hattangadi and Yami Gautam in crucial roles. The film is directed by Ram Gopal Varma, and produced by Rahul Mittra, Anand Pandit, Gopal Shivram Dalvi, Krishna Choudhary and WeOne. It is the third instalment in the “Sarkar” franchise, and it is the story of a girl who has set out to avenge her father’s death, which she blames “Sarkar” (Bachchan) for. The franchise is not really known for its music; music is like a side business for the franchise (Except the “Govinda” theme), and practically every Ram Gopal Varma film after his collaborations with A.R. Rahman and Sandeep Chowta. If at all any money arises from the sale of the music album, it is well and good for the film. 😂 After having Bapi-Tutul (last heard in ‘Saat Uchakkey’ last year) compose for the first two films, RGV ropes in a Ravi Shankar for this instalment, someone I’ve never heard of, and the only Ravi Shankar I could find in Google is the Indian Classical composer who died in 2012. So I don’t know who exactly this Ravi Shankar is. Along with him are 2016’s amazing finds, found by Ashwiny Iyer Tiwari in “Nil Battey Sannata”, Rohan-Vinayak, and another musician who debuted in 2016 with “Shorgul”, Niladri Kumar. I have substantial expectations from these two, and whatever Ravi Shankar gives will be an added bonus. So here’s the review for “Sarkar 3”!


1. Angry Mix

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mika Singh, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

The album starts with a song that starts with Sukhwinder singing “Sarkaaaaaaarrrrr….”, followed by club beats that were the thing in around 2002-2003. The beginning of the song itself fails to raise eyebrows, and I assure you, none of the rest will surprise you either. The composition is so dated and haphazard, you don’t even know what you’re listening to. Ravi Shankar has tried to co pose it in a chantlike manner, but fails due to the datedness and blandness of the composition. The arrangements are nothing but an overdose of techno music that doesn’t fit in today’s era of techno music. But it suits the crime theme of the film, and that’s pretty much all that it gets right. The vocals are by Sukhwinder Singh and Mika Singh, who are two people that can make boring songs sound slightly better, but here, even they can’t succeed in saving the dead composition. The “Govinda Govinda” chants by Sukhwinder sound blatantly dull. The lyrics are the normal, run-of-the-mill lyrics that usually feature in such tracks. What a bore.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

2. Ganpati Aarti

Singer ~ Amitabh Bachchan, Music by ~ Rohan-Vinayak

Okay, so it’s weird to be reviewing an Aarti, but I will have to judge it only on the basis of vocals and arrangements. This song is basically the Ganpati Aarti, as the name suggests. Rohan-Vinayak, who made a smashing debut last year with “Nil Battey Sannata”, get to helm this one. And I must say, they do it with utmost integrity and respect. The dignity of the Aarti is retained, and nothing is changed except the arrangements, and those too, are very simple and traditional. Claps, bells, Mridangam, manjeeras, strings and other traditional instruments are used to enhance the Maharashtrian feel of the song, and much like any well-arranged devotional song, it gives you goosebumps. Amitabh Bachchan’s deep and resonant voice just complements the wonderful arrangements and gives the Aarti a very respectable touch, which might not have been there, if someone else had sung it. The chorus singers are wonderful, and play an important role in making the song what it is! Your everyday Aarti, treated with utmost care and presented to you with the Maharashtrian flavour intact.

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Gussa

Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

This is the original version of the track that arrived previously as Angry Mix. The track is the same as far as the composition goes. If it isn’t, I was too lazy to make out the difference. To hear that boring and banal composition yet again is a punishment to the ears. What makes this one slightly better than the “Mix”, is the arrangements. Very aptly, they provide a BGM-like quality to the song, the kind of music that would play when you’re watching a thriller and a crucial moment arrives. The brass instruments provide a regal quality to the song, but they get monotonous after a while. Later, a very clichéd sound sets in, with the dholaks and manjeeras, as if a politician’s procession is going through town. Who would want to hear that in a song? Sukhwinder reprises the vocals, and the song actually sounds better without Mika, as Sukhwinder’s voices oozes of command and power. The “govinda govinda” chants are even more pronounced here, and because of the dholak-manjeeras rhythm, it sounds all the more commonplace. A song only apt for being a background piece. 

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Sam Dham

Singers ~ Kailash Kher & Saket Bairoliya, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Teotia

The “Sam Dham Dand Bhed” chants from “Sarkar” return here, coupled with the “Govinda Govinda” chants. And then Kailash Kher comes and sings a strictly lifeless composition that will bore you to infinity. Ravi Shankar’s composition doesn’t deserve to be heard; at the same time, the arrangements are the usual dholak rhythm, with those bells that are supposedly trying to intimidate us with their sound. The brass and strings get sidelined due to the overbearing sound of the dholaks. (They only manage to make you go to sleep, though) Kailash sounds least interested in singing this one. And I am least interested in listening it to it over and over, so I am stopping the review here.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

5. Thamba

Singer ~ Navraj Hans, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Sirasri

This one starts with the famous “Mujhe jo sahi lagta hai…” dialogue in Big B’s voice, and what follows is a formulaic crime song that sounds like so many of those gangster-themed songs of Bollywood that try to showcase gangsters as superheroes, except here, it is a politician and not a gangster. The composition seems to be trying hard to be cool, but succeeds not even one bit. Things are a bit better in the arrangements department, but that’s because Ravi Shankar takes the help of techno sounds, and regal brass tunes to uplift the song. The beats are good but very laidback, and get very monotonous after a point. The electric guitar parts are impressive to an extent, until it gets all weird. The “govinda govinda” chants haven’t been kept out of this song either. And then those random outbursts of “thamba” (Which means “Stop” in Marathi) are so miserable. How boring. Navraj Hans brings in an avatar of his that I have never heard, and after hearing it, I wish I never had! There is a rap somewhere in the middle by someone who is unfortunately uncredited. The lyrics by Sirasri (??) are something that we have heard so many times already. Another epic fail, and it isn’t even funny.

Rating: 0.5/5

 

6. Shakti

Singers ~ Mika Singh, Adarsh Shinde & Saket Bairoliya, Music by ~ Ravi Shankar, Lyrics by ~ Mandar Cholkar

The “Govinda Govinda” chants start off the next song, and then a random shout of “Go! Win! Da!” (Which is “Govinda” horribly pronounced). As soon as Mika starts rambling out the words of this sing, and as soon as the dhols and bells start playing, you roll your eyes and press the “Next” button. At least you can press that. I can’t. I have to review it. The composition is yet another clichéd composition that suits only in a Ram Gopal Varma film. And it is tailor made for Mika Singh. Adarsh Shinde, a singer we hear mostly in the Marathi industry singing folksy numbers, supports him ably, and the best parts in the song are by him, like the aalaaps. The arrangements are the typical fare of dholaks and bells, but I loved the stop-and-play manner in which the dholak is played in the antaras. A song that seems extra long just because all the songs before it sounded just like it. 

Rating: 1/5

 

7. Sarkar Trance

(Instrumental), Music by ~ Niladri Kumar

Niladri Kumar’s instrumental arrives at the very end of the album, as instrumentals usually do. The Zitarist produces a very hodgepodge mix of Sarkar dialogues and techno sounds with this track. And no, the “Govinda govinda” isn’t absent. A minute into the track, it changes from a dull dialogue delivery of Bachchan’s, to a cool, sinister-sounding track, where the synthesiser tune actually does sound deserving of some attention. And then some uncredited lady very sinisterly sings something that sounds like a mantra. The racy nature of the song makes it feel more like a track from an Anurag Kashyap film, than a RGV film. Impressive, but far from excellent.

Rating: 2/5


Sarkar 3 is an album you’d best not listen to. Unless you want to be bombarded by “Govinda govinda” chants. Unless you want to hear all the dialogues and chants that were already heard in ‘Sarkar’ and ‘Sarkar Raj’, again, like revision, to prepare you for the third film. Unless you want to hear songs that sound the exact same and you can’t differentiate one from another. Unless you want to hear a unidimensional soundtrack. Unless you want to just hear dholaks and bells. And finally, unless you want to miss a wonderful Ganpati Aarti sung by the effervescent Bachchan and arranged by the wonderful Rohan-Vinayak. {Hint: Just hear that song, and that’s it}. A movie that could’ve gone without a seven-track music album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 0.5 + 5 + 1 + 0.5 + 0.5 + 1 + 2 = 10.5

Album Percentage: 30% {In case you want to know, Without the Aarti, it  18.33% 😂}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ganpati Aarti > Sarkar Trance > SKIP THE REST!

 

I’m not bothering to make a “What’s Your Favourite Song?” poll.