JAB IMTIAZ MET PRITAM — AGAIN!! (JAB HARRY MET SEJAL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty, Diplo (Thomas Wesley Pentz) & Rocky Wellstack
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil
♪ Music Label: Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 3rd August 2017, 10:30 pm
♪ Movie Released On: 4th August 2017

Jab Harry Met Sejal Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Jab Harry Met Sejal is a Bollywood rom-com film, starring Anushka Sharma and Shah Rukh Khan, directed by Imtiaz Ali, and produced by Gauri Khan. The film is about two strangers who meet in Europe, and try to find the engagement ring of Sejal (Sharma’s character). Obviously, as is the main theme in an Imtiaz film, they discover themselves through the journey. I think even more exciting than the movie itself, is the music. Imtiaz has said in many interviews that he enjoyed doing the music of this film, and that’s showing in the final outcome. The film is a musical (not full-fledged like ‘Jagga Jasoos’) and has 13 songs, by Pritam, who was Imtiaz’s go-to music composer before Rahman. With this film, they reunite, and after ‘Jab We Met’ and ‘Love Aaj Kal’, two super-hit soundtracks by both of them, this is their third collaboration! Expecting just as much variety in this album, and also expecting the elements of whatever Imtiaz has picked up from Rahman while doing the music of those films (namely ‘Rockstar’, ‘Tamasha’ and ‘Highway’)! So I hope this album will be like a blend of Pritamish Imtiaz and Rahmanish Imtiaz! Plunging into the album very positively, hoping it will astound me!!

P.S. Thanks to my friend Chiranjeev Gorur for acquiring and sharing the full musician credits to the album! 🙂


1. Radha

Singers ~ Sunidhi Chauhan & Shahid Mallya

“Main bani teri Radha, maine sakhiyon se, ankhiyon mein rakhna hai tujhko piya, thoda zyaada zyaada!
Main bani teri Radha, tuney sapnon tadapnon mein rakhna hai mujhko piya thoda zyaada zyaada!
Main bani teri Radha!”

Pritam starts off the album with an amazingly energetic song that makes you want to dance right along to its tune, right away. Now I know everyone has heard this song many times by now, and it’s a huge hit across the nation. It is essentially a Punjabi folk-plus-EDM fusion track, and the way Pritam employs these genres, is spellbinding. The composition itself follows a very desi compositional format, in that it appeals to us Bollywood music listeners right away with its inherent catchiness and energetic vibe. The hook, especially, leads the song, as it should. But it is the mesmerizing antara that was the best part for me. Pritam gives it this rapid tune that you are only able to sing after repeated listening, and that’s how it grows on you eventually. A very amazing Punjabi flavour has been given to the Punjabi portions sung by the male singer. The high pitch might bother some, but it is way more comfortable than listening to a high pitch song by Arijit Singh like the recent ‘Ik Vaari Aa’ (Raabta). And if the first antara takes you by surprise, the second antara, which just released with the album version of the song, is pure bliss. The harmony between the two singers is blissful! The arrangements follow suit and Pritam fuses folk and EDM, like I mentioned above. The flute and khartal (which is a Rajasthan folk instrument, but apparently being used in a Punjabi song) open the song in a very light-hearted and feel-good way. Throughout the mukhda, it’s the flute and khartals that play. Until Pritam introduces the mandatory dhol (Sukanto Singha & Sunny M.R.) in the hookline, you won’t be able to even tell that the song is a Punjab-based song. (Because even the lyrics aren’t proper Punjabi; they’re kind of like a mix between Punjabi and Hindi). Another awesome folksy instance in the song is the second interlude where the sarangi is played, and muffled by the programming! The EDM programming by Sunny MR, and Rohan Chatham’s vocal cuts during the “Raa-aa-aa-aaa” portion, serves for a wonderful catchy hook, which would definitely make people hit the repeat button! The coexistence of the dhols and EDM sounds so good. The vocals are a class apart. Pritam reverts to a singer that used to sing many songs for him back in the day, Sunidhi. This is her first song for Pritam after ‘Dhoom 3’, and we know how much Pritam’s music has boosted after that! She sings it so mellifluously, you don’t even realise the rapidity of the tune. Especially the antara, for which she should get standing ovations from all of us listeners! Shahid is top-notch too, his heavy Punjabi accent reflecting through his singing and making the folksy portions of the song what they are. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are cute too, but there’s a certain Panipat line that had me surprised and worried and disappointed at the same time! 😂 It doesn’t even fit with the rest of the song! Anyway, overall he has written a cute little romantic song. Pritam’s experimentations almost never fail, do they?
Rating: 5/5

 

2. Beech Beech Mein

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Shalmali Kholgade & Shefali Alvares, Backing Vocals ~ Arjun Chandy & Akashdeep Sengupta

“Hai safar mein zameen, chal raha aasmaan,
Dono ki jo kahaani, ho ki na ho bayaan,
Begaani jagah mein nadaani, karein na, karein toh kahaan?
Jal dheeme, yeh pal dheeme, kyun hai jalte hua?”

The next song on the album falls under a genre that I feel Pritam always aces. A club song. However, this time it is different. The club song isn’t the normal Pritam club you would expect, with heavy EDM and Benny Dayal. Instead, it has a completely retro feel to it, and has been composed as a retro funk song! I can’t remember the last time Pritam composed a retro funk number, because it’s always EDM when he does club songs. So this seems like a very new thing from him. The composition is instantly catchy, and the unconventionality of it all makes it even more appealing! It starts with a very insanely catchy vocal loop repeating the name of the song over and over again, and it is from there that your interest increases. The mukhda (which is the hookline too), is cool, and so is the ‘Shola Shola..’ line! The hook repeats many times throughout the song, but it doesn’t sound repetitive. The crux of the song’s composition lies in the antara, though, where Pritam makes a disco song, melodious! And the cross line which it takes to get back to the refrain, is extra cool!! That’s that about the composition. But it is the arrangements, as always, that really suck you into the song. A groovy guitar (Warren Mendonsa & Ernest Tibbs) riff starts the song off, behind the “beech beech mein” repetitions. The fun arrives, however, only when the drums enter, because they’re so amazing! The drums in this song are really some of the best drums I’ve heard (in non-rock songs) this year! The brass instruments (Trombone by Andrew Lippman, Trumpet & Flugelhorn by Ludo Louis) do their thing by fascinating us in the interludes, and in the antara, they have a really special role to play, when things get a bit melodious. Their harmony is just so enchanting. So now you get why the song can be called retro! 😀 For the vocals, Pritam uses his go-to female singers for club songs, Shalmali and Shefali, both. Of course the male portions are by Arijit. All three sing well; Arijit leads the way while each of the female singers are relegated to the background except for one or two lines. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are fun. A song that should change the way we think about club songs in Bollywood!
Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Safar

Singer ~ Arijit Singh

“Iss yaqeen se main yahaan hoon,
Ki zamaana ye bhala hai, Aur jo raah mein mila hai,
Thodi door jo chala hai, Woh bhi aadmi bhala hai,
Pata tha, zara bas khafa tha!
Woh bhatka sa rahi, mere gaanv ka hi,
Woh rasta puraana jise yaad aana,
Zaroori tha lekin, jo roya mere bin,
Woh ek mera ghar tha,
Puraana sa darr tha,
Magar ab main na apne ghar ka raha…
Safar ka hi tha main, Safar ka raha!!!”

Imtiaz’s favourite theme, travel, makes itself prominent right from the title of the next song, and all throughout it as well. The song is titled ‘Safar’ (meaning Journey), and it is a journey in itself for music lovers. Pritam’s composition is a slow and lilting composition that grows on you slowly surely. The mukhda is very beautiful and soulful, and sets off the song on a very jazzy and slow rhythm that is magically appealing. The hook is simple but sweet, and effective in the song. The antara is an amazing high-pitched portion where Pritam’s lines flow into each other so seamlessly, you can’t tell where one ends and the other starts! Towards the end, there’s almost a half-minute musical portion, where I feel Pritam could have added a small conclusion stanza, like he usually does in songs. The arrangements are very beautiful and impressive, with a very urban touch — acoustic and electric guitars (Arijit Singh & Aditya Benia), being the main instrumentation! The guitar riffs are wonderful throughout the song. Arijit’s vocals are very raw and rustic, with the gritty texture standing out very prominently; it actually gives the song a wonderful travel-esque feel. The places where his voice cracks, are actually some of the most brilliant parts of the song! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are high on food for thought, and each and every line makes you think, connect and relate! The whole song is like a story that is being told about the character’s change of lifestyle. An unconventional song, which won’t be loved by one and all, but should be loved by the music lovers!
Rating: 5/5

 

4. Butterfly

Singers ~ Dev Negi, Jyoti Nooran, Sultana Nooran, Sunidhi Chauhan & Aman Trikha, Backing Vocals ~ Laddi Dhaliwal, Jelly Manjitpuri, Neetu Bhalla, Babita, Asa Singh, Amit, Tushar, Akashdeep, Abhishek, Manoj, Shubham

“Mujhmein ishq ya ishq mein hoon main,
Hua mujhe ehsaas re,
Khel raha hoon saath yaar ke,
Main khwaabon ki taash re,
Tu hi usko khoj raha hai, ae dil mere, yeh na soch,
Woh bhi tujhko dhoondh raha hai jiski tujhe talaash re!!”

This song starts right off with the boisterous Punjabi-ness that an Imtiaz Ali-Pritam combo always consists of. The song is a happy-go-lucky and cute Bhangra tune that really has you dancing to it right away. Pritam’s composition is very earthy and raw, and not superficial and hollow like most other Punjabi songs that release these days. The mukhda especially, starts the song off very beautifully, and you can imagine a village romance getting conjured before your eyes. The hook is the cutest part of the song, but catchy too. In the antara, things go haywire though, and you take time to understand the tune of those lines soon. The tune fluctuates so much, that it is quite difficult to grasp. However, both the parts of the Nooran Sisters, have been composed wonderfully, the one at the beginning, and the one that concludes the song on a very nice note. Both parts are heavy on the earthiness quotient and transport you to the fields of Punjab, with its melodious composition. The arrangements are the run-of-the-mill 2006-2009 era Pritam Punjabi arrangements, with loud dhols (Naseeb Singh), effervescent tumbi (Jelly Manjitpuri), a folksy alghoza (Gurpreet Singh) and of course, a nice technical production. The vocals are energetic, and Dev Negi as the forerunner makes things easier for the audience by not singing too loud, and keeping a gentle yet steady voice constant. Sunidhi disappoints, singing in such a high pitch that I can’t fathom. Nooran Sisters are the stars of the song, starting and ending it with a bang. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are quite staid for the majority of the song, but again, the Nooran portions have been written very well, with the “Woh Bhi Tujhko Dhoondh Raha Hai Jiski Tujhe Talaash Re” line translating the film’s tagline ‘What you seek is seeking you’, very efficiently. A fun and cute Punjabi song, but falls flat in places where it tries to do too much.
Rating: 4/5

 

5. Hawayein / Hawayein (Film Version)

Singer ~ Arijit Singh

“Banaati hai jo tu, woh yaadein jaane sang mere kab tak chale,
Inhi mein toh meri, subah bhi dhale, shaamein dhalein, mausam dhale!
Khayalon ka safar, tu jaane tere hone se hi aabaad hai,
Hawayein haq mein, wohi hai aate jaate jo tera naam le,
Deti hai jo sadaayein, hawayein, hawayein,
Na jaane kya bataaye, hawayein, hawayein,
Le jaaye tujhe kahaan, hawayein, hawayein,
Le jaaye mujhe kahaan, hawayein, hawayein,
Le jaaye jaane kahaan, na mujhko khabar, na tujhko pata!”

The next song took my breath away, the first time I listened to it. It is just so marvellous and so ideal and so dreamy. It is the ideal romantic song. A trademark Pritam tune, with the trademark Pritam guitars and Sufi template, and the legendary Arijit Singh singing it. What more can you ask for, to obtain a wholesome and pleasant romantic song? Well, I know, I can’t ask for anything more! The composition by Pritam is utterly fascinating, and hooks you right from the first listen. The mukhda starts off quite slowly, but as soon as the hookline plays, you know that the song is one of the best songs of the year! The hookline is something that conforms to every Bollywood music lover’s music sensibilities! There are two antaras; one with a new tune, which is beautiful too, and one with the same tune as the mukhda. The first antara has a wonderful line that goes on and on, and merges with the hookline so seamlessly. The part where the backing vocalists go “Hawayein, Hawayein” has been structured and placed so beautifully. It reminded me of ‘Daayre’ (Dilwale). Overall, Pritam’s composition here is so much close to his usual style of composition, but still so lilting and dreamy! The vocals by Arijit are top-notch, and he repeats the magic of many previous Pritam-Arijit collabs, in one song. The vocals have shades of ‘Gerua’, ‘Channa Mereya’, ‘Daayre’ and ‘Saware’, and it just helps you love the song even more. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are soothing too, and so poetic! Read out as a poem too, they will be just as impactful. In fact here, Pritam’s strong tune is overbearing. The song appears in two versions — an original, and a film version. Both have splendid arrangements. The first version sticks to Pritam’s trademark arrangement style, with the guitars strongly dominating the arrangements. The Acoustic guitars (Roland Fernandes) are relegated to the background as the electric guitars (also by Fernandes), do that wonderful neverending loop thing that they love to do in Pritam songs! 😄 The ethnic strings (Tapas Roy) provide an amazing first interlude that brings in the earthiness into the beautiful composition. Increasing the Indian-ness of the song, is the nice Sufi template employed in the hook portions, with the Duff and tablas sounding very appealing. The film version has a slightly more haunting arrangement, and sounds straight out of Coke Studio, with a beautiful Hang drum (Sunny MR), and ethnic strings (Tapas Roy) setting up a wonderfully haunting sound that sounds least like it is by Pritam. The Pritamish tune and the haunting Rahmanish arrangements really complement each other, though I never thought they could! A nice and charming wind instrument keeps playing throughout the song, and the guitars (Roland Fernandes) are amazing. All in all, both versions of this song are just as beautiful!!
Rating: 5/5 for Original, 5/5 for Film Version

 

6. Parinda / Parinda (Search)

Singers ~ Pardeep Singh Sran / Tochi Raina & Nikhil D’Souza

“Ikk pardesi, oh yaar banaya,
Main usnu dil de takht bithaya,
O seene de naal usnu laaya,
O apne dil da haal sunaaya,
O maar udaari kithe nikal gaya,
Maar udaari kithe nikal gaya,
Kade bigad gaya, kade machal gaya,
Kade nikal gaya ni hun taan,
Dhoondhan nain bichaare, ni aaj parinda maahi!”

Pritam ups the ante with the next song, a pulsating rock song that is really foot tapping. The composition is a nice, folksy, Punjabi-flavoured composition, that immediately grows on you. The hookline in particular is just beautiful, what with the amazing high notes. The mukhda and antara both have the same tune, and I love the fluctuations in the tune. The arrangements are high-octane rock arrangements, and it is probably the first time in a long time that I’ve enjoyed rock so much, in the first go! The drums by Alan Hertz are very, very exciting, and of course the guitars (Electric and Acoustic by Josh Smith & Nyzel D’Lima; Bass Guitars by Ernest Tibbs) complement the drums very well, as they always do! The lyrics by Kamil are completely in Punjabi, but very interesting, and I loved them. The two versions of the song only differ much in their vocals. Pardeep Sran in the first version oozes the Punjabi energy that should accompany such a high-energy song, and does an electrifying job! Tochi Raina, however, in the second version, brings a more toned-down version of the same, but still, it isn’t low in energy at all! Nikhil D’Souza has an English portion in this version, which sounds AMAZING! It also has an extra stanza at the end, which has a very energetic composition. Both these singers have worked with Pritam many times in the past, but this song marks them working with him after a long, long time, so I’m very happy!! The backing chorus in both versions is spot-on! Kamil’s lyrics actually contradict the upbeat nature of the song, and give a hint of emotion — the song is actually much more meaningful than it seems! A rock song that shows how fusion between Punjabi folk and Rock should be done!
Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original, 5/5 for the Second Version

 

7. Ghar

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Mohit Chauhan

“Khaali hai jo tere bina, main woh ghar hoon tera,
Ghoome phire, tu chaahe sab shehar, tu hai mera!”

The next song is what Pritam is all about. This is why people love his music so much. These kind of songs is why he has become so popular. It is a very soothing and calm, semi-classical kind of song, that depends solely on acoustics to propel it. The composition kind of resembles that of Pritam’s own ‘Tu Jaane Na’ (Ajab Prem Ki Ghazab Kahani) and ‘Daayre’ (Dilwale) and even the recent ‘Main Agar’ (Tubelight). The hook is what makes you get sucked into the song right away; it sounds so pleasing, that you just get lost in it. The first antara is the peak of the song, and the second one by Mohit is no less. The arrangements are very soothing too, with a lounge-ish treatment, complete with amazing electric and acoustic guitars (Warren Mendonsa) which give off the trademark Pritam touch, and a wonderful tabla (Jeetu Shankar) to complement that. The vocals are just too impressive. I think this is Nikhita’s career best, and after two hit songs from Pritam albums, she finally gets a huge portion in a mind blowing song! The way she introduces variations in the same line each time, shows her versatility, and hints at her classical training, if she has had any! Mohit, again, with Pritam after a long time (maybe because of the Imtiaz connection), does spectacularly in his high-pitched portions. Irshad’s lyrics are amazing, romantic lyrics with a thought-provoking concept. A soothing lounge-ish song that manages to touch your soul! The best of the album till now!
Rating: 5/5

 

8. Yaadon Mein

Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi, Mohammed Irfan & Cuca Roseta, Portuguese Lyrics by ~ Mario Pacheco

“Yaadon mein, jalte rehna, hai tera mera,
Yaadon mein, jalte rehne ko, miley hain kya?
Yaadon mein jeena toh sabse badi sazaa lagey,
Yaadon se, jaana ki faasley hain kya!”

A strong Latino vibe hits you right from the beginning of this next song, which happens to be a kind of Portuguese folk song kind of musical genre called “Fado”, and you get sucked in right away. The composition starts with a melancholic portion that sounds very similar to many Spanish/Portuguese folk songs we have come across in pop culture and other sources. And what a wonderful feeling it gives, to actually see a song like this being made for a Bollywood movie. Usually, whenever European or Portuguese styled music is used in Bollywood, it is for those dance numbers a la ‘Senorita’ (Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara), ‘Hawaa Hawaa’ (Rockstar), ‘Udi’ (Guzaarish), and though these were beautiful, too, the unexplored and soothing side of that compositional style really comes across beautifully here, and it sounds oh-so-operatic and chilling! The composition is beautiful, though it is mostly the hook repeating most of the time, but those variations in the hook just kill you then and there. The antaras are nice, especially the female one, and the Portuguese portion by Roseta is wonderful as well. That’s that for the composition. The arrangements by Pritam go beyond what Bollywood has tried in Portuguese music thus far, and goes to a more spine-chilling mixture of the traditional Portuguese guitars (by local guitarist Mario Pacheco) and Pritam’s wonderful strings. The beats get very Pritam-ish in Mohd. Irfan’s antara, but it is a refreshing turn of events. The Portuguese guitar obviously keeps us entertained throughout the songs, and instances of harmonicas are heard as well. The vocals are spot-on. Jonita starts off with a booming introduction, which I would never have believed was sung by her, if it weren’t for the credits! She has changed her voice so beautifully, to make it actually sound like a Portuguese singer. Sure enough, the actual Portuguese singer, Cuca Roseta, sounds very similar to Jonita, but gets a way smaller portion than her. Irfan does well in his parts, in what is also his first song for Pritam too! However, somehow, I felt a lack of connect during his part. The ladies bring that connect back. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are heart-wrenching. Mario Pacheco, the guitarist, has written the Portuguese lyrics. All in all, a wonderful song that mixes up the pathos of a typical Bollywood song, and the richness of Portuguese folk.
Rating: 4.5/5

 

9. Raula

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh & Neeti Mohan

“Aankhon ne khwaabon pe aise hai aitbaar kiya,
Jaise do anjaanon ne khulke ho pyaar kiya,
Hota tha pehle jo door kabhi,
Abb woh mujhe paas lage,
Jaane kyun achha sa lagey,
Dil ne jo iss baar kiya!”

A very trademark Pritam feel-good vibe sets in as the next song rolls in, after that poignant melody. This is another song to go with Shah Rukh’s Punjabi character in the movie — a fun and upbeat Punjabi wedding song. The composition is one of the cutest I’ve heard this year, and instantly has you hooked. The hookline itself is so cute, that everything starts sounding beautiful due to it. The first antara, is something straight out of a 90s Bollywood album, with a noticeable Jatin-Lalit vibe. The bridge from the first antara to the hook is kind of bumpy, but things are great from there. Neeti has the second antara all to herself, and it is pure bliss. Pritam composed that one in trademark 90s Rahman style, and I can’t believe it is by Pritam; the variations in tune sound like the Rahman of the 90s has composed it! It was a pleasant surprise to see Pritam in that form. The vocalists have fun themselves and transmit the energy and boisterous nature of the song to us through the earphones. Diljit is clearly having the time of his life, and his additions like “chak de phatte naap de killi“, are so fun to listen to. Neeti sounds amazing, especially in her solo portion. The arrangements are fun as well, and in a traditional Imtiaz Ali pattern, they are high on dhols, and very interestingly, also have beautiful brass instruments interjecting, with a trademark Laxmikant-Pyarelal vibe. Flamenco Guitars (Josete Ordoñez) are audible in the second interlude. The dhadd and Plucked instruments (Tapas Roy) in Neeti’s solo portion, are so cute! The repetition of the hookline’s tune on those plucked instruments is too cute as well! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are again, high on the fun quotient, and quirky as well, Especially with those “sangya” (noun), “visheshan” (adjective) and “sarvanaam” (pronoun) additions in Neeti’s parts. One of the most catchy Punjabi songs I’ve heard after ‘Nachde Ne Saare’ (Baar Baar Dekho).
Rating: 4.5/5

 

10. Jee Ve Sohaneya

Singers ~ Jyoti Nooran & Sultana Nooran, Music and A Portion of the Lyrics Traditional

“Kabhi kabhaar sandesa de de, Kya hai tera haal,
Rut pardesi rakhti hogi, shaayad tera khayaal,
Yahaan tere bin patjhad sa hai, har ek mausam hi..
Jee ve sohneya jee, chaahe kisi ka hokar ji!
Maana ke tu ab nahi mera, kabhi tha mera bhi!!”

The singers who enhanced ‘Butterfly’ manifold, Nooran Sisters, get a song all to themselves now, and coincidentally, the song is a built-up on their portion in that song. They sang “Jee Ve Sohneya Jee..”, in that song; here, the rest of the lines follow to make an entire song. The composition is traditional, but Pritam enhances it with his trademark Electric guitars (Roland Fernandes) and digital beats. That’s pretty much all for the arrangements. The stars of the song are actually its lyrics. Irshad Kamil takes the traditional lyrics as a basis to weave a poetic song that is about the relatives of a person who has gone and settled in a foreign land, pleading for him to come back. The lyrics just tug at your heartstrings and remind you of the iconic ‘Ghar Aaja Pardesi’ (Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge), which was also sung in an earthy manner. This song has increased the earthiness and rustic nature a lot, by having Nooran Sisters sing it. Their amazing voices really bring out the song’s essence even better! A song whose lyrics and vocals are what will help it to make its way into the hearts of everyone who listens to it!
Rating: 5/5

 

11. Phurrr (Film Version)

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan & Tushar Joshi, All Hindi Melodic Compositions by ~ Pritam, Music Programming by ~ Diplo & Rocky Wellstack

NOTE: There was another version of this song which Sony Music released a day before the album. That one was a mix by Diplo, which was terrible compared to the ‘Film Version’. You can listen to it HERE. The one included in the album is actually Pritam’s mix, with Diplo’s drop used from the remix of ‘Agony’ by Pinchers.

“Teri hasrat ho, ya ibaadat ho,
Tujhko paana hai, jo bhi soorat ho,
Har taraf sach mein, sach ki chaahat ho,
Lafz na ho pyaar, balki aadat ho!”

The album finally sheds itself of all the folksiness it had built up for itself (almost every song had some Indian-ness to it) and goes outright Western for this finale. The only thing in this song that is remotely and typically ‘Indian’ is how they say “Phurrrrrrr” to signify a bird’s flying. The song is actually very cool and it is an effort that should be appreciated! The composition is by Pritam, and half of the production by Pritam’s team, and the rest by Diplo. The composition itself is very paltry, but still sounds amazing with the whole Western treatment. It is trippy, no doubt. I mean, if people can withstand trash like “Swalla”, they can go through this without flinching! The drop by Diplo suits here very well, and sounds like it was always meant to be for this song. The entire digital treatment is something Pritam rarely does; he usually takes the help of guitars and live instruments, but it actually turned out pretty good. I loved those electronic tablas sounds. And the programming between 2:02 to 2:24 in the song, is just rad! I would like to appreciate the idea of a collaboration too, however good or bad it has turned out. You like the drop of some song, you contact that person and get him on board — that’s the professional way of doing things! A round of applause for Pritam and Imtiaz here! The vocals are good too. Mohit Chauhan is back for the second time in one album, and he renders the fun song with a swag that is unmatched. Tushar Joshi, Pritam’s new blue-eyed boy, does well too! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are very conveniently sidelined in the song, thanks to all that’s going on. If one were to still make a conscious effort to listen to them though, he wouldn’t find any hidden gem. A song that isn’t really enough to start a new collaboration wave in Bollywood, but will be remembered for its braveness.
Rating: 4/5


Jab Harry Met Sejal, no matter how late the album released, no matter how badly the film tanked, no matter how much Imtiaz disappointed everyone with the film, no matter how many people actually liked it, and no matter how late this review is going up, is really an album that should be applauded first of all, solely for the makers’ interest in creating an album that’ll cater to music lovers and music listeners. The amazing mix of world music and Punjabi music in this album, is spellbinding. It is such an excitement to listen to the album again and again, because every time, something new that we didn’t get before, pops up. The album also marks Pritam and Imtiaz’s reunion after eight years, and evidently, both Imtiaz and Pritam have evolved over the years. The knowledge Imtiaz got from Rahman’s style of work, has reflected in the album, and the sound that Pritam has developed for himself over the 2013-2017 phase of his career, also shows in the album. It is probably only “Butterfly” that smells of old Pritam and old Imtiaz. But in conclusion, I’m happy that Imtiaz met Pritam (Again)!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 + 4.5 + 5 + 4 = 61

Album Percentage: 93.84% {Making it surpass ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ and making it secure the top rank now!! 🎉🎉🎉}

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: From Track 1 to Track 13 nonstop 🙂

 

 

Which is your favourite song from Jab Harry Met Sejal? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A LIPSTICK WITH SHADES OF WOMEN EMPOWERMENT!! (LIPSTICK UNDER MY BURKHA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Zebunnisa Bangash (Zeb)
♪ Lyrics by: Anvita Dutt
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 14th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st July 2017

Lipstick Under My Burkha Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Lipstick Under My Burkha is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Konkona Sen Sharma, Ratna Pathak Shah, Aahana Kumra, Plabita Borthakur, Sushant Singh, Vikrant Massey, Shashank Arora and Vaibhav Tatwavaadi. The film has been directed by Alankrita Srivastava, and produced by Prakash Jha. I don’t think it is necessary to introduce the film to you; you’ve probably heard  lot about it, thanks to our beloved Mr. Nihalani. Without further ado, I’ll veer towards the music. The simple and short three-song album is composed by Zebunnisa Bangash (Zeb), who we have all heard singing many times before in Bollywood. But this is (I believe) her composing debut in Bollywood. So let’s give it up for her, and see what she has to offer in this women-uplifting soundtrack!


1. Jigi Jigi

Singer ~ Malini Awasthi

A ladies sangeet kind of song starts off the album, but of course, it has apt folksy vibes, considering that Zeb Bangash has composed it. It is actually an adaptation of a folk song by Haji Saifuddin, which Zeb had performed at the Sandaraa music concert in New York in 2015, a concert that was fronted by Zeb along with Brooklyn’s clarinet virtuoso Michael Winograd, which was a musical collaboration exploring a vast repertoire of South Asian musical traditions blended with the sounds and sensibilities of Eastern Europe, the Balkans and New York, according to the YouTube video that Michael Winograd has posted of this song. The Balkan flavour still appears prominent in Zeb’s Bollywood recreation of the song, but all the musician credits have changed, that is, she’s reworked the arrangements. First of all, the composition is a raunchy and catchy one, kind of like the songs from earlier this year’s ‘Anaarkali of Aarah’. The ‘Jigi Jigi’ hook seems like gibberish, or it could be something in Afghani, who knows, but it is catchy nevertheless. The composition traverses the sinister line of notes, and in befitting in such a strong film, which Anvita Dutt makes clear through her lyrics. What impresses me even more are the arrangements. The wonderful folksy sound that the rabaab (Siddiq Sameer), dholaks (Sharafat) and harmonium (Ankur Mukherjee) collectively exude, makes the song sound even more raunchy. The tambourine (Sharafat) gives a very unconventional rhythm throughout the song. There is a brief brass band (Shyam Raj & Friends) interlude that sounds like the only Bollywoodish cliché in the song, besides the harmonium, but still sounds great. The simple dholak-led rhythm is wonderful though. Malini is her usual folksy and raunchy self, and delivers the song with zest and zeal. A nice and folksy start to the album!!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Ishquiya

Singer ~ Neeti Mohan

The next song in the album happens to be the only song which hasn’t been adapted from any other song like both of the other songs on the album. It takes the form of a retro, disco funk kind of song, a genre which really has seemed to have taken off quite abruptly in the past month or so, what with “Munna Michael” trying, and ‘Beech Beech Mein’ (Jab Harry Met Sejal) succeeding. This one is sung solely by Neeti Mohan, and that makes it all the more interesting somehow. Zeb’s arrangement is really sprightly, and light and frothy, something that instantly lightens up the ambience and mood. The composition is a lilting one, but perfect for the electrifying  music. There are crescendo notes all over the composition, and they make the song sound all the better, not making it he everyday retro funk song. Zeb makes the antara a bit more mysterious and suspense-holding, and sensuous. The drums and disco sounds have been done perfectly. You can’t really ask for a better done track. The backing vocalists help increase the intriguing feel of the song. The trumpets, guitars and occasional strings (what a surprise!) are amazing. The amazing arrangements are complemented very well by Neeti’s whispery voice, and she sets free of all inhibitions to render a no-holds-barred performance. Anvita Dutt’s lyrics seem situational, but they are functional nonetheless. A nice throwback to the REAL disco era, and not the Bappi Lahiri disco era!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Le Li Jaan

Singer ~ Zebunnisa Bangash

For the finishing act, Zeb reprises yet another of her previous performances, this time, ‘Laili Jaan’ which she had sung at Coke Studio. The song was itself an adaptation of an Afghani folk song, and this one has the same composition, decorated with Hindi lyrics. The way it starts, you are instantly thrown back to the 1940s-1950s, the Charlie Chaplin era. And that effect is produced by Michael Winograd’s amazing clarinet. But Zeb retains the Afghani flavour by employing a wonderful rabaab (Siddiq Sameer) and accordion (Patrick Ferrel), making it sound a lot like the Balkan style of music, something that is so underdone and awfully underrated in Bollywood! More wonderful guitars and ethnic strings (Ankur Mukherjee), coupled with the drums (Kami Paul), throw in a modern touch. The composition itself is a sugar-coated raunchy one, exuding the folk feel as no other song ever did. It kind of reminds me of a couple of Vishal Bhardwaj’s songs from ‘Saat Khoon Maaf’. The hookline literally takes away your life, as Zeb sings “Le li le li le li jaan”, which means “You took my life!” 😍 The antaras are beautifully composed, reminding one of the wonderful 50s, when even Bollywood was heavily influenced by this kind of music, and it reflected in O.P. Nayyar’s music very highly. The treatment given to the song too, is highly unconventional, but it really wins your heart by the time it is over! Another clarinet portion ends the song on a bright and lively note for us. Anvita’s lyrics are cute and simple! A song that should serve as an example of how Balkan music must be done in Bollywood!

Rating: 4.5/5


Lipstick Under My Burkha is a short and sweet folk-oriented album that we hardly get to hear these days in Bollywood. Getting on board a composer from Pakistan herself was a great move, in order to get that folksy touch. The variety in the album is still so ranged, even though two out of three songs sprout from the same folk music. A disco funk song stands out among these folk songs as well, and all of them are unconventional in their approach. What’s most important, all the songs have been sung by women, and composed by a woman, which is so apt for the film. So the album is like a lipstick with different shades of women empowerment!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 4.5 = 12.5

Album Percentage: 83.34%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Le Li Jaan > Ishquiya = Jigi Jigi

 

Which is your favourite song from Lipstick Under My Burkha? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MUBARAKAN! A FLOP ALBUM HAS BEEN BORN! (MUBARAKAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Hassan Jahangir, Amaal Mallik, Rishi Rich, Yash Anand & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Badshah & Hassan Jahangir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th July 2017

Mubarakan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mubarakan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy of errors starring Arjun Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor, Anil Kapoor, Ileana D’Cruz, Athiya Shetty and Ratna Pathak Shah in the lead roles. The film is directed by the only director in Bollywood who still insists on doing comedies with a cast larger than a herd of cows, Anees Bazmee and produced by Ashwin Varde, Murad Khetani and Balwinder Singh Janjua. The film’s plot consists of such never-before-tried aspects like — double roles, a love quadrangle, a huge Punjabi family and Punjabi dance numbers. It is going to redefine Bollywood, I’m sure of it. 😏 If you didn’t get that sarcasm, moving on. The music is by T-Series, and that means multiple composers. Thankfully, one name out of the three composers, is a relief, it being the name of Amaal Mallik, the young composer proving his mettle out there. He gets two, upbeat dance tracks, so I hope those are catchy! The next two composers are Gourov-Roshin, returning after treating us to a small break from their remakes, and sadly they have three songs, and Rishi Rich with Yash Anand, who have composed the title song of the film. Let’s just get this over with, eh?


1. The Goggle Song

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam, Armaan Malik, Neeti Mohan, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A wedding song to start the album, this one is an enjoyable tune from Amaal. Not the best he can do for sure, but it still makes you groove to the beat. The beat itself is infectious, with the composer adding quirky sound effects making it sound better. The ensemble of singers does really well for a wedding song, and for once, Tulsi sounds better than Neeti. The lyrics are mediocre, but hilarious at times. A good wedding track, but not very innovative.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Mubarakan (Title Track)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Juggy D, Sukriti Kakar & Badshah, Music by ~ Rishi Rich & Yash Anand, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Badshah, Yamma Yamma Credits: Music by ~ R.D. Burman

“This is the Rishi Rich beat.” The song starts with this obvious statement, and an unexpected incorporation of some portions ‘Yamma Yamma’ (Shaan). The actual composition falls flat, but it is saved by R.D. Burman’s old song, which plays throughout, and its addition was quite creative. Vocals are horrible. Lyrics are horrible. Rap is horrible. Arrangements are not so horrible. (Mostly, it is the awesome oud from the old song). In short, a horrible song, but for the arrangements and the old song’s portions.
P.S. I wouldn’t call this a Remake as such.
Rating: 2.5/5 (0.5 bonus for using that old song wisely)

 

3. Jatt Jaguar

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Navraj Hans & Apeksha Dandekar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another typical Punjabi song, the Punjabi flavour accentuated even more by a mediocre composition that barely manages to grasp your attention, except at the hook. Even Vishal doesn’t sound as energetic as always, but Navraj does. Lyrics are typical. Arrangements are typical, but there are traces Amaal’s digital quirks. At many places the tune seems like some old song I can’t recall! 😥 Not the best Amaal can do.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Haathon Mein Thhe Haath

Singers ~ Papon, Altamash Faridi, Aditi Singh Sharma & Arpita Mukherjee, Backing Vocals by ~ Rinku Giri, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A typical Pakistani pop-esque song follows, and it immediately strikes me as Papon’s worst song after a long, long time. The composition is staid and clichéd, his vocals do not help at all. Aditi sounds over stylish as usual. Those typical digital beats add to the melancholia. Backing vocalists add to the staleness, especially the Sufi one. Lyrics are something you won’t even notice. A song that clearly doesn’t know where it belongs.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Hawa Hawa

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Prakriti Kakar, Original Composition by ~ Hassan Jahangir, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The hit Pakistani pop song remade, with a typppppical kuthu beat and rhythm! Mika singing increases the headache, and the new composition is just unbearable. The hookline is good, but the other parts fall flat. The female vocals by Prakriti sound good though. Lyrics belong to a Sajid-Wajid soundtrack. Why????
Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

Singers ~ Rinku Giri & Puja Basnet, Original Composition Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another Punjabi folksy song ends the album, this time a mélange of two Punjabi folk songs, ‘Kala Doriya’ and ‘Baari Barsi’. The composition doesn’t hook you at all; in fact it sounds like ‘Jatt Jaguar Part 2’. The new singer Rinku Giri is the typical Punjabi male singer affair, he sounds like Diljit Dosanjh. Arrangements are “louder louder”. Lyrics are typical. A song that relies on folk songs to propel it, but fails.
Rating: 2/5


Mubarakan is yet another feather in Bollywood’s cap of Punjabi albums. All of the songs are very staid, heard-before ones, that don’t really help generate any interest. Amaal does okayish in one song, but showcases his quirk in the other. The others perform subpar, with the exception of Rishi Rich, who has made quite a catchy song. But even with its catchiness I couldn’t rate it higher than 2.5. So, for anyone counting, Mubarakan! Another flop album has been born! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 51.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: The Goggle Song > Mubarakan = Jatt Jaguar = Haathon Mein Thhe Haath = Hawa Hawa > Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 20

 

Which is your favourite song from Mubarakan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MULTICOMPOSERS GIVE A HUGE, BUT NANHA-MUNNA ALBUM!! (MUNNA MICHAEL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Danish Sabri, Sabbir Khan & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st July 2017

Munna Michael Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Munna Michael is an upcoming Bollywood dance/action film starring Tiger Shroff, Nidhhi Agerwal and Nawazuddin Siddiqui in central roles. The film is directed by Sabbir Khan, and produced by Viki Rajani and Eros International. The film revolves around a dance competition, in which a vagabond played by Shroff decides to participate, until he is entangled into teaching the local villain how to dance, and they both fall in love with the same girl. So, the typical *yaaaaaawwwwwwwnnn* Bollywood plot. The music is by multiple composers, featuring songs by Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu. I’m not excited about anybody’s song particularly, except maybe Tanishk’s solo song and Tanishk’s song with his ex-co-composer Vayu, who he partnered up with again for this song after 2015’s smashing debut for them, ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), so let’s just see what the album is about and we might just get surprised!


1. Main Hoon

Singer ~ Siddharth Mahadevan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is a tribute to Michael Jackson, since the film is a dance film and the main character is probably an MJ fan, if we can deduce anything from his name. Tanishk’s composition is bland. Hookline is oddly-placed, but the Antara has a bearable tune. Arrangement and mixing are chaotic, as if Tanishk was adamant on using all techno sounds there are. The impactful vocals dont help either. Lyrics worth avoiding. When an oddly placed hook spoils almost the entire song!

Rating: 2/5

 

2. Ding Dang

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Antara Mitra, Rap by ~ Parry G, Shivi & Danish Sabri, Music by ~ Javed-Mohsin, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri & Sabbir Khan

A tribute to Jackie Shroff (atleast lyrically). The generic composition leaves you unflinched. Typical tapori arrangements with random backing vocals of “Aah-aah”. Both vocalists fail to make the song better, and the rappers fail miserably. Lyrics are cheap, trying-to-be-funny but failing miserably again. The hook lyrics make you go, “Sorry, what???” Ding dung?

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Pyar Ho

Singers ~ Vishal Mishra & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A very soothing romantic composition but quite heard-before, and the arrangements too remind of some songs heard in the past. The strings, guitars and digital arrangement still win your heart, though. The composer himself has sung as if he wanted Arijit to have sung it and Arijit would have been apt. Sunidhi is her usual perfect self while Neeti Mohan seems to have done backing vocals, but hasn’t been credited! Lyrics are very staid and nothing new. Best of the album but nothing creative.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Swag

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya & Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

A very situational song for a performance of Nawazuddin’s character. And they have tried to make it sound so-called “cool”, but it doesn’t work much. That instrumental loop that keeps repeating throughout the song is catchy, and the digital beats are cool, but sound very similar to an English song that I can’t recall. Brijesh’s vocals are the fun part of the song, but Pranay’s interruptions could have been avoided. Lyrics are bad, again. Except for Brijesh and that instrumental loop, a forgettable song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Beparwah

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Nandini Deb, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is one of Gourov-Roshin’s rare songs that are not recreations, and surprisingly, it starts off quite promisingly, in a retro-sounding prelude. The composition is still good, but a duration of six minutes is way too far-fetched, because the song is also very repetitive, and after one antara the song gets too boring. Arrangements are the same techno sounds that featured in the other songs, and many times in the past too. A rock interlude somewhere in the middle makes your ears bleed. Siddharth Basrur does a good job, but his cosinger, Nandini Deb, doesn’t impress. Again, lyrics are unimpressive. It is a song Hrithik Roshan should have got in 1999. 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Shake Karaan

Singers ~ Kanika Kapoor & Meet Bros., Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

I see the credits for this song.. and I prepare myself for another ‘Baby Doll’. And sure enough, those pop sounds and ladies shrieking feature in this song. I admit that the composition is catchy but not as much as previous Meet Bros-Kanika songs. The sound is a welcome change from the overpowering disco theme of the rest of the songs. Kanika’s voice is enjoyable as always. Lyrics continue to be the sloppiest they can be! A welcome change from the overbearing techno sounds of the album, but not innovative at all! 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

7. Feel The Rhythm

Singer ~ Rahul Pandey, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Pranay M. Rijia & Sabbir Khan

Pranay’s next song is actually quite impressive. The composition is a perfect example of a catchy MJ-ish tune, complete with glitzy arrangements that Pranay aces. The techno sounds here and the techno sounds in the other songs differ so much in the freshness quotient. This one is on the lines of ‘Iss Tarah’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) and that’s how it impressed me. Rahul Pandey sings a bit like Yash Narvekar and Benny Dayal, and sings impressively too. Again, the lyrics are the usual. A nice and fresh-sounding dance song!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

8. Beat It Bijuriya

Singers ~ Asees Kaur & Renesa Baadchi, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

Tanishk-Vayu return after two years (‘Banno’; ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’) with another folksy song, this time with a techno twist, obviously. The song has a very superficial tune, and hard to grip. Also it sounds inspired from Tanishk’s own ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ Title track. The arrangements match those of their first song; folksy harmonium, dhols and other techno sounds make for an entertaining listen. There’s an amazing fiddle interlude. Asees sings like never before, with a grunge in her voice in the hookline. The lyrics are a kind of funny Hinglish that I couldn’t grasp at once. Entertaining but limitedly.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

9. Pyar Ho (Redux)

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Sunidhi sings this Redux of ‘Pyar Ho’ solo. It has a melancholic arrangement, with those slow and mellow piano notes, that gets quite boring to hear after some time. The strings are good enough though. Sunidhi’s solo rendition though, is a treat to the ears. The composition is the same, and the lyrics have been tweaked to make it sound sad. Not something I’d like to listen to often.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

10. Swag (Rebirth)

Singer ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

‘Swag’ had apparently died while the rest of the songs were playing, so its ‘Rebirth’ appears now. Now, whatever little elements ‘Swag’ had going for it, are all removed in this Rebirth. It has even been stripped of all melody (whatever little it had) and now sounds like a funky instrumental that makes you cringe because of the way Pranay chants those lines creepily. The arrangements are fresh here, but there’s nothing like a good tune or good vocals to accompany it. So that’s a wasted opportunity. I prefer the song in its last life.

Rating: 1.5/5


Munna Michael sounds like a very badly done ‘ABCD’ album. Then again, if ‘ABCD’ would’ve had such music, we wouldn’t have had a sequel. The overdose of (badly done) techno music really sounds useless. One song gets it right, but no others impress. When you can groove to only one song in a dance film’s album, the album’s got problems. Also, when a director or producer asks for “Give me one Kanika song, one tribute to Jackie Shroff, one to Michael Jackson, one funky Hinglish song, many wannabe retro songs”, the results are bound to be bad. ‘Munna’ is a name usually used for small kids. So may I say that these Munna Multicomposers failed miserably? 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 1.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pyar Ho = Feel The Rhythm > Swag = Beparwah = Shake Karaan = Beat It Bijuriya = Pyar Ho (Redux) > Main Hoon = Ding Dang > Swag (Rebirth)

 

Which is your favourite song from Munna Michael? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

JOLLY GOOD ALBUM!! (JOLLY LL.B 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Manj Musik, Nilesh Patel, Chirantan Bhatt, Meet Bros. & Vishal Khurana
♪ Lyrics by: Manj Musik, Raftaar, Junaid Wasi, Shabbir Ahmed & Earl Edgar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 10th February 2017

Jolly LL.B 2 Album Cover

Jolly LL.B 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Jolly LL.B 2 is an upcoming comedy courtroom drama starring Akshay Kumar, Annu Kapoor, Saurabh Shukla and Huma Qureshi in prominent roles. The film has been directed by Subhash Kapoor, who earlier directed ‘Phas Gaye Re Obama’, ‘Jolly LLB’ and ‘Guddu Rangeela’, and produced by Fox Star Studios. The film revolves around the story of a small-time lawyer Jagdishwar Mishra a.k.a. Jolly, who earns a living by fighting small cases. In his desires to become a full-fledged lawyer though, Jolly ends up committing a mistake that could just as well destroy his career as a lawyer. The film deals with how Jolly gets himself out of this predicament. The film is the sequel to 2013 sleeper hit ‘Jolly LLB’. While the earlier film had a music album which can hardly be counted as one of Krsna’s best works, or even good works, as it was as middling a fare as your everyday T-Series multicomposer album, the sequel has an album which is just that — your everyday T-Series multicomposer album. And as it almost always is, there is one song composed by one team of composers. Manj Musik, who has the full support of Akshay Kumar now, what with him composing for Akshay in ‘Gabbar is Back’ and ‘Singh is Bliing’ in 2015, gets the first song. Helping him is Nilesh Patel, who has been credited as “Co-Composer”! Expectations are not too high but not zero either, as he has given good songs in the past, but just messed up a couple of times, thus earning my anger. Next up is Chirrantan Bhatt, another composer whose Bollywood career is strongly backed by Akshay. He gave hits for Akshay in both ‘Boss’ (2013) and in ‘Gabbar is Back’ (2015). This time too, he is back to perhaps give yet another path breaking romantic song. Meet Bros. feature as the third composers on board, and their association with Akshay has started long ago in 2012 when they scored the beautiful ‘Mere Nishaan’ in ‘OMG – Oh My God!’ After that, they went on to score for Akshay in so many films like ‘Boss’ (2013), ‘Baby’ (2015) and ‘Singh is Bliing’ (2015). But that was when Anjjan too was a part of the team. After the split with Anjjan, this is Meet Bros’ first song for Akshay; hopefully, it is just as good. And lastly is one-album old, Vishal Khurana who debuted last February with the stellar album to ‘Neerja’. Thankful that he has got another project finally, (after like ages!) I hope he takes good advantage of it and gives a great song. So let’s see what this multicomposer assortment has in store for us! Because Akshay Kumar and multicomposer have this very nice relationship which more often than always, impresses me! (Take any of the albums mentioned above for example!)


1. Go Pagal

Singers ~ Raftaar & Nindy Kaur, Additional Vocals ~ Girish Nakod & Manj Musik, Music by ~ Manj Musik, Co-composed by ~ Nilesh Patel, Lyrics by ~ Raftaar & Manj Musik

(I didn’t find any lyrics worth mentioning here!)

The album starts with the song I was least excited to hear — a Holi song titled ‘Go Pagal’. Okay, so Manj Musik has given some pretty good songs in the past, but only sticking to one kind of songs — fast, update rap songs (with the exception of the awesome ‘Aaja Mahi’ from ‘Singh Is Bliing’) As such, all his songs sound almost the same and you can really predict what’s going to come next in each song. This song too falls into the same category, but it goes a bit too overboard with the craziness. The composition is a typical Manj composition, though there are some nice folksy lines in the middle, (‘Bheegi bheegi lage lovely lovely…‘) which I suspect are composed by the co-composer Nilesh Patel. Anyway, the composition is quite all round the place and it is kind of hard to grasp on to. And that hookline is just yuck! I was fine till it played. It was such an abrupt end to the flow of the song, that it spoiled all the fun, or whatever fun was there. Also, it is quite similar in sructure to ‘Let’s Nacho’ (Kapoor & Sons) where they ‘say’ the hookline, not sing it, and then some weird tune plays in some very annoyingly high digitized pitch. And what’s worse, the person who says ‘Go Pagal’ here (That’d be Raftaar, I guess) sounds like he’s burping it. It sounds eww. In some places, the composition resembles ‘Tamanche Pe Disco’ (Bullett Raja). The arrangements are very mediocre, though that nice rapid dholak beat is something for which I would listen to the song over and over again, despite everything. And that chipmunk voice that says ‘Goli Re’ in the mukhda is just so cute! Every other thing regarding arrangements is strictly banal. It sounds like it has been thrown out of 2013 and should’ve been in ‘Jolly LLB’, but it forecasted that Akshay Kumar would star in the sequel, which is why it is here for us to get troubled by it. The vocals sound like robots have done it. Raftaar tries to sing charmingly, but how can he? He has to carry the entire song on his shoulders, and though he does quite well, it just sounds very monotonous. And Nindy Kaur in her part initially sounds as if she’s so shy, she can’t sing at all. (She’s trying to sound naughty, but it sounds shy…) Her voice sounds as robotic as ever. The lyrics (Raftaar and Manj) are as banal as possible. A Holi song has never been so trashily written in the history of Bollywood, I guess. Okay, maybe ‘Ang Se Ang Lagana’ from ‘Darr’ is an exception, but in recent times they’ve all been very well-written and fun. Though the makers might think this is fun too, it isn’t. A mediocre start to the album, and a disappointment from Manj and his team.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Bawara Mann

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan, Aalap by ~ Rheek Chakraborty, Music by ~ Chirrantan Bhatt, Lyrics by ~ Junaid Wasi

“Bawra Mann raah taake tarse re, Naina bhi malhar banke barse re!
Aadhe se, adhoore se, bin tere hum huye, feeka lagey, mujhko saara jahaan!”

– Junaid Wasi

Chirrantan Bhatt, another composer that Akshay Kumar seems to be backing these days, enters the soundtrack, with his song. Usually, the composer impresses us with nice Bhatt-ish melodies. This time though, he follows the path of one of his earlier songs, ‘Coffee Peetey Peetey’ from ‘Gabbar Is Back’, and presents a breezy, feel-good melody that could not have sounded better. Previously, ‘Coffee Peetey Peetey’ was my favourite song by him, but now I have to say, that it is this one. The composition is, as I said before, very breezy and happy-go-lucky. And I just love it when such songs come out. The mukhda starts off right away with the hookline, a wonderful tune with a light touch to it. It’s as if Chirrantan is saying, “Want to cut down on fat in your musical diet? Well then, listen to this song, with 80% less musical fat than other songs out there!” The antara goes into a nice and soothing low scale, as opposed to the cute high pitch of the mukhda. The composition kind of reminded me of Pritam’s ‘I’m Sorry Par Tumse Pyaar Ho Gaya’ (Shaadi Ke Side/Effects), in that it is a toned down version of the peppy and breezy composition of that song. Arrangements are fantastic, with the ukulele (Shomu Seal) and guitars (Shomu Seal & Sanjoy Das) really winning your heart by the end of the song, and giving the song its quirkiness. Piano notes occasionally bring the sobriety to the song, while wonderrrrrrful harmonicas throughout the song provide that heavenly touch, accompanied by a wonderful vocal choir. The vocals by both singers are fabulous as well. Jubin, who has already sung so many songs this year, ranging from mediocre to beautiful, has emerged as the superstar of the beginning of the year with another fantabulous rendition from his side. Neeti, on the other hand, only strengthens her charming image by singing the second antara, with as much expertise as possible. Her characteristic feathery voice elevates her portions to other levels. Junaid Wasi, who returns to writing lyrics after like four-and-a-half years (His last was in Chirrantan Bhatt’s album ‘1920: Evil Returns’) writes a splendid poetry-like piece. Hindustani classical terminology meets modern romance in his writing, and it actually proves to be a nice and pleasant fusion. This is where the album starts, in my opinion!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Jolly Good Fellow

Singers ~ Meet Brothers, Additional Vocals by ~ Purnima Solanki, Sanchita Sakat, Rap by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, English Rap by ~ Earl Edgar, Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, English Rap Written by ~ Earl Edgar

“Hello, how are you, mera Naam hai Jolly,
Manaane jashn nikli yaaron ki toli..
Bada colourful sa swag hai mera…
Karun jab use apni meethi si boli..
Nature mera hai cool, baaton mein banadoon fool,
Gopiyan bhi line mein hai karte Hi hello!
He’s a Jolly Good Fellow, He’s a Jolly Good Fellow,
Jai kanhaiyalaal ki, bolte chalo!”

– Shabbir Ahmed

What made me freak out even before starting the song was that the folk song ‘He’s A Jolly Good Fellow’ had been recreated! I mean if Bollywood can’t handle its own classics’ recreations, how will a British song be recreated well enough!! But then, the first note of the song played and all my worst doubts disappeared into thin air. The song starts with this uber-cool, smooth flute portion, played to the tune of the nursery rhyme! And from that moment on, you are hooked completely! The Meet Bros. have done an appreciable job in successfully recreating a Western song to suit the Indian music standards. A suitable “Chinta Ta Chita Chita” (Rowdy Rathore) based rhythm makes its way into the song and surprisingly provides an apt background beat for the English folk song. Of course, the duo has added their own composition for the mukhda and antara, and I can’t really say it is bad! The mukhda starts off the song well, showcasing the main character of the movie as a very sacrosanct person, and I must say, the tune is quite sanctimonious-sounding too. I mean, in Janmashtami, you will hear such tunes everywhere in India. The sound effects included by the duo are probably the most enjoyable I’ve heard in recent times. Yes, the sound of the song is very generic and heard-before. But I don’t really have any qualms in liking something that is likeable even though it has been heard before. The arrangements are booming and fun, with the aforementioned beats really infusing a lot of fun into the song. Different instruments, and especially the flute that plays occasionally, sound awesome. Whistles and the like make for nice “roadside attractions”. The vocals are good too,and the Meet Brothers sound at ease rendering the spunky song. The female backing vocalists provide nice entertainment with their cute inputs. Meanwhile the two rappers, (Shabbir Ahmed in Hindi and Earl Edgar in English) do not fare as well, with their commonplace rap. Shabbir, rapping to his own words, sounds confused. You can barely hear what he is saying. That being said, his lyrics are quite decent! It is a perfect character introduction song, and the incorporation of the “Jolly Good Fellow” phrase followed by “jai Kanhaiya laal ki, bolte chalo” is so interesting! It is a theme song that is quite entertaining. Might be irritating for some, but interesting for most!

Rating: 3/5

 

4. O Re Rangreza (Qawaali)

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Murtuza Mustafa & Qadir Mustafa, Music by ~ Vishal Khurana, Lyrics by ~ Junaid Wasi

{I do not know why T-Series is always so adamant on writing “Qawaali” in the title of their songs! I think this is like the third time they’ve done this, and once, the song wasn’t even a Qawwali! I think we are quite competent to make out whether a song is a Qawwali or not, and if they want to continue this, I advise them to write in brackets stuff like “Romantic Song” or “Dumb Party Song” too, why only Qawwali?}

“Rooh ne arzi lagaayi hai, Sahi kadam chala maula,
Mann ko ainth ke baati kar, tera charaag jala maula!”

– Junaid Wasi

Bollywood hasn’t churned out a single satisfying Qawwali as far as I can remember, after Tanishk Bagchi’s splendid rock-qawwali ‘Allah Hu Allah’s (Sarbjit). Now here comes another proper Qawwali, by which I mean a Qawwali without any unnecessary Bollywood elements. The young and talented composer Vishal Khurana (‘Neerja’ fame) has been roped in to compose this Qawwali, and going by the innovative work he did in ‘Neerja’, I was expecting a very, very impressive Qawwali. Unfortunately, I got quite a regular and ordinary one. The composition is good, and suits the situation (one of those situations that often arrive in Bollywood films where the protagonist has lost all hopes and has to leave it all up to God, and then a Qawwali or Bhajan plays) but goes awfully slow. It is not something that one would find themselves listening to too much. Because of these drawbacks, I expect the song to gain momentum only after the movie released, but the prospects of that are less too, because Qawwali isn’t a genre that finds many takers in today’s world. (Though I get fascinated and mesmerized by a good one, when it comes!) Anyway, that’s that in the composition. The “Mushkil kusha o re noor-e-khuda…” hook, though, is very beautifully composed, as are the antaras, slow speed notwithstanding. The arrangements follow a mesmerizing Roopak taal, with the tablas sounding spectacular, as does the Bulbultarang or Indian banjo. Vocals, thankfully, help the listener ignore the slow pace of the song, as Sukhwinder pours  his entire soul into the rendition, sounding very soulful in the process. Supported ably by the Mustafa brothers, he provides a nice, relaxing ambience with his voice. However, the main reason I would listen to this song again, even before the movie releases, is the spectacular writing by Junaid Wasi. He impressed in the romantic song and now impresses in a spiritual one as well. The line I’ve “showcased” is just one of the portions out of the many splendid lines in the song. A déjà-vu inducing Qawwali as far as the composition and arrangements go, but vocals and lyrics make this one an exemplary piece of art.

Rating: 4/5


Jolly LL.B 2 turns out to be quite a good album, if you judge it as a multicomposer album, which it is. Akshay Kumar almost always impresses whenever his music albums are scored by multiple composers. (Glaring exception being ‘Housefull 3′) The six individuals (counting Nilesh Patel and two Meet Brothers) come together to make an album that is definitely not perfect, but functional as a feel-good (or shall I say feel-jolly?) album, that will propagate the buzz of the movie before release. Yes, Manj and Meet Brothers’ songs could’ve been better, but they are still partially enjoyable. And I must say, this album is better than the album by Krsna to the first instalment of the franchise! A jolly jolly album! 😛

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 5 + 3 + 4 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 72.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bawara Mann > O Re Rangreza (Qawaali) > Jolly Good Fellow > Go Pagal

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 04 (from previous albums) + 00 = 04

 

Which is your favourite song from Jolly LL.B 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

NOT JUST ‘OK’, BUT FANTASTIC! (OK JAANU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman, Tanishk Bagchi & Badshah
♪ Lyrics by: Gulzar, Hard Kaur, Navneet Virk, Aaryan Dinesh Kanagaratnam, Kaly, Mehboob & Badshah
♪ Music Label: Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 4th January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 13th January 2017

Ok Jaanu Album Cover

Ok Jaanu Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Ok Jaanu is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com / drama, starring Shraddha Kapoor, Aditya Roy Kapur, Naseeruddin Shah and Leela Samson. The movie has been directed by Shaad Ali, and produced by Mani Ratnam, Karan Johar, Apoorva Mehta and Hiroo Yash Johar. The movie is a remake of Tamil film ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’ directed by Mani Ratnam, and like ‘Saathiya’ (which was a remake of Ratnam’s ‘Alaipayuthey’) Shaad Ali has taken it upon himself to successfully tell the story to the Hindi audience. The music of the film has been composed by A.R. Rahman, and it is primarily a dubed version of the ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’ soundtrack minus a few tracks and plus some new songs to fill in their places. Young talent Tanishk Bagchi, along with Badshah, has recreated one of Rahman’s own 90s hits, ‘Hamma Hamma’ (Bombay) for the film. Skeptical as I am about this, I really hope that the makers have made a good decision about that. Rahman last composed ‘Mohenjo Daro’s Album, which, as good as it was, was a bit underwhelming. Also, the last time he could oosed for a rom-com like this in Bollywood was ‘Tamasha’ and before that ‘Lekar Hum Deewana Dil’, both of which were awesome. I have heard the Tamil album when it released in 2015 itself, and it was good, but I didn’t really hear it much afterwards, because of the language. I just hope the dubbing has been done good!! Rahman has used 5 tracks from that album, and composed two new songs, and then Tanishk-Badshah’s one song, make this album an eight-song album! Just right!

{The names of the original Tamil songs from the Tamil album have been written below the respective song’s name}


1. OK Jaanu

(‘Mental Manadhil’ from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’)

Singers ~ A.R. Rahman & Srinidhi Venkatesh, Music by ~ A.R. Rahman, Lyrics by ~ Gulzar

“Dheere dheere zara dum le naa,
Pyaar se jo mile gham le naa,
Dil pe zara woh kam le naa,
Ok jaanu, tu dhin dhin na! Hey!”

– Gulzar

One of my favourites from the Tamil album, ‘Mental Manadhil’ gets redone as the title track of this movie, and I cant tell you how happy that made me! 😀 The song is a wonderful mocktail of techno sounds from Rahman, something that will drive you crazy, in a positive way. The composition is something that instantly grabs you and needs no time to invade your mind. It starts off with a nice ‘Jaanuuuu’ (and I know that sounds a bit cheap compared to the awesome ‘Lailaaaa’ from the Tamil song) and then transcends into an entrancing, but catchy tune that gets you grooving right away. The tune has been tweaked a bit from the original Tamil tune, which had this jumpy feel to it, especially in the “Mana mana mana” parts, which have been strung together to make a continuous tune in this version. However, after a couple of listens, this starts incorporating itself in your brain. (Read: my brain, and others who care about listening to music that isn’t in either their mother tongue, their national language or English) So I’m probably one in a ten-thousand people in North India who have heard the Tamil album. Yay me. Anyway. The antara is as catchy as the song is, and acts as a nice filler. Most of the song is composed on the same lines that constitute the mukhda, and I don’t know how many times the hook repeats. But it never gets boring! The arrangements are what make it more interesting than anything else does. That techno backdrop really makes the song sound pacy and makes it an apt song for a ‘carefree-and-youthful-couple-roaming-the-streets-of-Mumbai-on-a-motorbike-as-if-there’s-no-tomorrow’ situation. The interesting sounds that Rahman throws at you over the three-and-a-half-minute time span of the song, is enough to make you trip over the song. Especially that loop at the beginning!! The beats are so trippy, that it’s hard to explain in words. What does play a bit of a spoilsport in the song, are two things. First of all, Rahman’s vocals. I know they have a different kind of twang to them, and nobody else could have sung it like that, but some of the words have been mailed by his diction. (“Badi na tu kisi se” sounds like “Baaadiii na tuksi se”!) Srinidhi replaces Jonita from the original, to no actual effect — Jonita sounded much (!!!) better. (Which reminds me, there’s no female version!! The female version of ‘Mental Manadhil’ was awesome!!! Jonita’s nuances were to die for!) Also, Srinidhi has only one line that comes like two times in the whole song. The second spoilsport is (surprisingly!) Gulzar’s lyrics. The words in the antara (‘aayu-vaayu’, ‘mangal-dangal’) have merely been penned down to make them rhyme. And who addresses their friend as ‘kanya’? The lyrics were a big letdown, especially after Gulzar wrote the spectacular lyrics to ‘Mirzya’! I would’ve thought he would dub better! Nevertheless, a major portion of this song is awesome, as the tune and music is what matters the most. Some damage done by the lyrics can be overlooked by listeners.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Enna Sona

(Newly composed song, replacement for ‘Aye Sinamika’ from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’)

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ A.R. Rahman, Lyrics by ~ Gulzar

“Kol hove te sekh lagda ae,
Door jaave te dil jalda ae,
Kedi agg naal, rab ne banaaya,
Rab ne banaaya, rab ne banaaya!
Enna sona kyun rab ne banaaya?”

– Gulzar

Next up, we get a fresh song, by which I mean that it isn’t a song from the Tamil album. And I must say, how thankful I am that ‘Aye Sinamika’ was dropped! 😛 I say this because what Rahman has produced in the bargain proves to be a spectacularly dulcet romantic ballad, that you just start loving instantly. Though I didn’t at first. Here’s my journey to liking this song: After 1st listen, “This is by A.R. Rahman?? Are you sure it isn’t Pritam..? I mean, there’s guitars, there’s Arijit…”. After close speculation in the second listen, “No. That flute in the first interlude is signature Rahman.. so it has to be Rahman. But what has he composed? A Pritam song!”. After 3rd listen, “Rahman!! Aaye ho kis bagiya se… Tummmm! 😍😍😍” And then I fell in love with the song. What can be better than a Punjabi love song, composed by Rahman and written by Gulzar? The composition is a verrrryy down-to-earth composition; so much so that the majority of its duration is taken up by that hookline that keeps on repeating, but never sounds repetitive! The antara with it’s inexplicably beautiful high notes just steals your heart away. (You’ll get it back he next time a beautiful Arijit song comes out. Don’t register any F.I.R. or anything and land yourself into trouble.) That leads us to the vocals. Arijit’s soothing voice is an excellent proof that he really is the only one out there these days who has the power to sing any type of song, but especially rocks it in the romantic song genre every single time. The arrangements are divinely soulful. PMK Naveen Kumar with his flute, impressed like always, and Keba Jeremiah on the guitars is exceptional. The flute and guitar in the first and second interludes respectively sound utterly charismatic! When the flute plays the hookline’s tune behind Arijit’s voice, a smile mischievously appeared on my face. (It was no use telling it to go away or grounding it.) Gulzar’s lyrics here, were a good exchange for the losses incurred in the first song, because they’re double beautiful. Though there are (and I counted) only 14 lines in the song, (Hey! It’s a sonnet!) each line has its own beauty. “Taap lagge na tatti Chandni da, saari ratti main os chhidkavan, kinne dardaan naal rabb ne banaaya” is the entire second antara, and the first is up there… Both are so marvellous! Enna Sona (gaana) kyun Rahman ne banaaya?

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Jee Lein

(‘Theera Ulaa’ from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’)

Singers ~ Arjun Chandy, Neeti Mohan & Savithri R. Prithvi, Music by ~ A.R. Rahman, Lyrics by ~ Gulzar

“Bichhad bhi gaye, toh bhi kya hai,
Tera dard toh saath hoga,
Gar aa gaye aansu, toh kya, mera chehra
Toh yaad hoga, toh yaad hoga…”

– Gulzar

Now this is another song that has been dubbed from its Tamil counterpart, from the original Tamil album. And I must say, it has been remade quite well! Let me remind you that the man behind this is A.R. Rahman, and so a Kollywood to Bollywood transition isn’t going to be as straightforward as it seems! And sure enough, the man has introduced some significant changes in the song, which we’ll come to later on. Firstly, the composition. The composition is a dreamy, anthem-like tune for the most part, until a nice and soothing interjection in the form of a female portion comes (Which is that significant change I was talking about, because it was a Carnatic piece in the Tamil song) and brings the melancholia into the song. Upbeat for the most part as the rest of the song is, this part very wonderfully and seamlessly brings a nice and emotional touch to the song — something Rahman is an expert at. The rest of the song is mostly the same time repeating again and again, but it doesn’t sound boring (except a bit when you hear it for the first time). It all has a very harmonic sound to it. The arrangements just elevate this entrancing feeling. Nice beats go with the chorus part, making the song upbeat in the right concentration. The occasional veena strums really reach out to your heart. (Which has been stolen by ‘Enna Sona’, don’t forget!) The melodious female portion in the middle has the upbeat beat toned a bit down, but the tune of that part definitely overrides the beats. And the seamless transition from that part, back to the chorus part, is awesome! Vocals are amazing, and I would like to have a list of everyone who was on the chorus! Arjun Chandy is clearly on there, and I can hear Neeti’s feathery voice, I the background. But Neeti has the aforementioned female portion to her credit, which is definitely the best part of the song, and she has rendered with her magic touch. Gulzar’s lyrics are wonderful. Especially in the same female portion that’s definitely going to be on my tongue and in my mind for a long time! Different and lovable, but might take some time to grow on you!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

4. Kaara Fankaara

(‘Kaara Attakkaara’ from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’)

Singers ~ Paroma Das Gupta, Shashaa Tirupati, Hard Kaur, Aaryan Dinesh Kanagaratnam, Kaly & Ashima Mahajan, Music by ~ A.R. Rahman, Lyrics by ~ Hard Kaur, Navneet Virk, Aaryan Dinesh Kanagaratnam & Kaly

“Kaara fankaara kab aaye re, kaara fankaara tarsaaye re” 🙉

– Whichever one of them wrote it

In a film targeted towards the youth, how can there not be a youthful number? The next song is just that. The song is a mishmash of sounds that are supposed to attract the youth. And it succeeds to quite an extent. The main composition is only during the hookline, the title of the song. I’m not sure if it even means anything, but the tune is likable. The composer has tried his best to make the song sound like many of his earlier such songs, and it does, but you can’t help but lose the link somewhere in the middle. The rap is amazingly rapid-going, and better than Badshah and Raftaar for sure, but I’m not sure the public is going to lap this rap up like they do for Raftaar and Badshah! Nevertheless, Kaly (How do I know it’s him? He says it in the song.. see if you can find it!) delivers it perfectly, so that it sounds rad. The ‘nama nama nama neiiii’ gets a bit repetitive after some time, and the song is almost 6 minutes long, so keep your seatbelts on! The vocals by so many people make it sound like a very hastily put-together song trying to sound unconventional. And unconventional it sounds, but doesn’t work! Hard Kaur, after a long time in some big Bollywood song, gets drowned amidst Shashaa’s ‘kaara fankaara kab aaye re, kaara fankaara tarsaaye re’ and Kaly’s English rap. Also, she isn’t recognizable thanks to programming. One thing I really loved is hat quirky nadaswaram like thing that plays when Kaly raps, somewhere in the initial two minutes of the song. The digital beats are commendable, but not commercially viable, especially not in Bollywood. The lyrics to the rap are good, but the hookline makes no sense. It is also the only song (except ‘The Humma Song’), that hasn’t been written by Gulzar. A good attempt at making a youthful rap number, but I wouldn’t recommend this, as it is quite heavy to the ears.

Rating: 3/5

 

5. Saajan Aayo Re

(‘Naane Varugiraen’ from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’)

Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Nakash Aziz, Music by ~ A.R. Rahman, Lyrics by ~ Gulzar

“Saajan aayo re, saavan laayo re,
Main poori bheegi re, Mann behkaayo re”

– Gulzar

Now comes the Rahman I was waiting for! Also, the song I was waiting for. My favourite song from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’, ‘Naane Varugiraen’ gets remade in Hindi as ‘Saajan Aayo Re’, and rendered by one of the most promising female singers of this generation, Jonita Gandhi. Of course, Shashaa sung this song in Tamil, and did a great job too. But with Rahman, it can never be anything simple… He has to put in challenges here and there, and so he ropes in Jonita, though Shashaa could’ve very well done it too! Anyway, more on the vocals later! The composition starts off with a wonderful free-flowing introductory stanza, which reminds me of Kathak songs like ‘Pyaar Kiya Toh Darna Kya’ (Mughal-e-Azam). The wonderful classical tune is just so bewitching! And what follows, is a classic example of why Rahman is such a master at classical songs. The nuances in the composition, especially at the word “saajan” are top-class! And the tune that follows is definitely one of the most beautifully haunting tunes I’ve heard since a long time. The interruptions by Nakash have been composed beautifully, too. The arrangements are heaven on earth. When the harp plays, when Jonita first starts the hookline, you get goosebumps, that might just stay till the whole song is over. And that wonderful percussion that follows…! The strings are exceptional, and techno music plays a big role in making the song sound unconventional for a classical melody. The vocals by Jonita surely make up her most wholesome perfromance out of all. Last year, Pritam gave her many songs, but this is not even similar to any of those. Jonita, for the first time, has taken up a classical song to sing, and she aces it with perfection! The way she sings the “Naa dir dinna tom tana na” reminded me of Shreya Ghoshal singing ‘Silsila Ye Chaahat Ka’ (Devdas) for some reason. She has really sung that part beautifully. Nakash, too, complements her very well! Gulzar’s lyrics suit the classical theme very well. An exceptional melody! Classical to the core, but modernized with some nice touches in the arrangements! Signature Rahman!

Rating: 5/5

 

6. Maula Wa Sallim

(‘Maula Wa Sallim’ from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’)

Singer ~ A.R. Ameen, Music by ~ Traditional, Lyrics ~ Traditional

Next up comes the traditional Arabic track that was in the Tamil album, as it is. There was no need to dub this one; it was Arabic and stays Arabic. And it’s traditional. The song is a simplistic but ethereal prayer song, sung by A.R. Rahman’s son, A.R. Ameen. The boy carries out the song with a nice aura of spirituality around his cute voice (goosebumps when he sings “Habib-allah, rasul-allah”), but it is very obviously autotuned. Rahman’s programming on his voice sounds good, when towards the end, he triples and quadruples his voice track, giving it a very nice echo effect. The song is a perfect night time song, sublime as it is. Rahman’s own voice can be heard humming in the background, and I just love it when he hums in the backgrounds of his songs. There’s not much more to say about this one, except that it should be given a chance, before being dismissed as boring.

Rating: 4/5

 

7. Sunn Bhavara

(Newly composed song, replacement for ‘Malargal Kaetten’ from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’)

Singer ~ Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ A.R. Rahman, Lyrics by ~ Gulzar

“Roshan roshan bhor dikhaye, roshan roshan bhor dikhaye,
Prem ki paalki laaye, laaye, prem ki paalki laaye,
Udann khatole pe aaye bhavara, Kartab kar dikhlaye bhavara,
Sunn sunn bhavara, kaisi baatein banaaye!”

– Gulzar

This song’s counterpart in the Tamil movie, was a Carnatic classical piece, and the makers must’ve thought (and rightly so) that Carnatic music won’t have much takers in Bollywood, and so they intelligently replaced it with a wonderful Hindustani classical piece, taking the style of a nazm. Rahman’s composition is a very soothing one, the mukhda giving the most pleasant goosebumps ever imaginable. The antara is just a wonderful continuation of where the mukhda left off. The classical composition is just as heavenly as the one for ‘Saajan Aayo Re’, but this time, very pleasantly soothing instead of haunting. The composition reminded me of ‘Saathiya’s ‘Naina Milaike’. The arrangements are divine, with the tablas taking centre-stage. It actually reminded me of the beautiful nazm from ‘Haider’, ‘Aaj Ke Naam’. The tanpura at the beginning, gives a nice launchpad to the tablas. Listen for the transition from the tanpura to the tablas. Shashaa’s rendition of the classical composition is as soothing as the composition itself. Her magical voice makes the song sound all the better. This song is four and a half minutes of bliss that can’t be replaced by anything else. Finally, Gulzar’s lyrics are awesome! As always (except the title song 😛 but I think we’ve forgotten and forgiven that already!) A short review because I can’t really explain more about it! It’s too divine! Soothing!

Rating: 5/5

 

8. The Humma Song

(Remake of ‘Hamma Hamma’ from ‘Bombay’, replacement for ‘Parandhu Sellaa Vaa’ from ‘O Kadhal Kanmani’)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Shashaa Tirupati, Rap Written & Performed by ~ Badshah, Original Composition by ~ A.R. Rahman, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi & Badshah, Lyrics by ~ Mehboob

“Ek ho gaye hum aur tum, toh udd gayi neendein re,
Aur khanki Paayal masti mein, do kangan khanke re!”

– Mehboob

The finale to the album takes the form of a remake to a classic Rahman dance track. The song that created waves in the 90s when it released, probably the first dubbed song to do so, ‘Hamma Hamma’ from ‘Bombay’ has been recreated by Tanishk Bagchi and Badshah. The original composition and lyrics have been left as it is. The only changes made are the singers, the arrangements of course, and that a rap portion is added (Badshah is there, so what else can you expect?) Anyway, the new programming by Tanishk and Badshah gives the song more of a lounge feel, and where the vocals in the original were raw, here they have been toned to perfection, as in, auto-tuned and polished, so as to make them sound sensuous. The remake is good when you look at it, as it serves as a nice and enjoyable song perfect for the situation. (I didn’t want to be stating that I actually wanted ‘Parandhu Sellaa Vaa’ remade, as I had loved it a lot, but yeah, I’ll not say that) The tempo has been slowed down, in order to make it more of a romantic track than a dance track, and the vocals actually sound good, if not better. (Not that I loved Remo Fernandes’ original vocals either..) Jubin takes over most of the song, while Shashaa complements him well, and the occasional ‘Hamma hamma hamma’ whispers are awesome. The arrangements have more of a club sound to them, but that signature tune has been retained and used gratuitously. The sounds have gone under a lot of treatment, but emerge as good as the old one. The Rap in the middle plays the spoilsport, and it’s like Badshah is trying to say, “Look, I featured on a Rahman album.” Our answer is, “Good. Now feature in a Rahman song!” The nadaswaram part at the end is just whacky! Of course, it was here in the original. It is insane, and ends the song on an offbeat note. Remade quite well, but could’ve done with another stanza instead of the rap.

Rating: 4/5


OK Jaanu actually turned out to be quite an ear-friendly album. I wasnt expecting it as I was thinking about the repercussions of making those Tamil songs into Hindi. However, after hearing it, I feel that part went down really well. Even the bonus song by Tanishk doesn’t take away anything from the album. Rahman uses his innate intelligence to cleverly tweak some parts of the songs that he thought wouldn’t suit in Bollywood, and the results can be seen! The only song that underperforms is ‘Kaara Fankaara’, which I don’t think I’ll be hearing much. But the others are fabulous. The second album of 2017, turns out to be worth listening on repeat!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 3 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 4 = 34.5

Album Percentage: 86.25%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Saajan Aayo Re > Enna Sona > Sunn Bhavara > Jee Lein > OK Jaanu > The Humma Song > Maula Wa Sallim > Kaara Fankaara

 

Remake Counter
Number of Remakes: 02 (from ‘Kaabil’) + 01 = 03 (Dubs not counted)

 

Which is your favourite song from OK Jaanu? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MULTICOMPOSERS KE BIN… (TUM BIN 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ankit Tiwari & Nikhil-Vinay
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Shakeel Azmi, Faaiz Anwar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Raool
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th November 2016

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Tum Bin 2 is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama, starring Neha Sharma, Aditya Seal and Ashim Gulati. The movie has been directed by director of the first instalment (Wow, that’s like an achievement for T-Series, to have the same director direct the sequel, even though the sequel is releasing like 15 years after the first movie!) Anubhav Sinha, who was trying his luck at other things like thrillers (‘Dus’, ‘Tathastu’ and ‘Cash’), sci-fi (‘Ra.One’) and also a social drama (‘Gulaab Gang’) and faring quite well at these genres too, until he came back to his first genre, romance, with this film! The movie has been produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Anubhav Sinha. The movie is another addition to the many quasi-sequels that T-Series has been churning out over the past three to four years, and, since T-Series is producing the film, we can expect a good soundtrack for this movie too! The music for the first film had been given by duo Nikhil-Vinay, and as was expected, a song ‘Koi Fariyaad’ has been remade for the sequel. The original soundtrack, as well as the remake, have been done by Ankit Tiwari, who gets his next solo album after exactly one year (Last was ‘Yaara Silly Silly’ last November). Hopefully, he gets out of his typicality, and seeing that he has given some quite different songs this year, I’m sure he’ll make that happen too. So, without further ado, let’s see how good this album is!


1. Teri Fariyad / Teri Fariyad (Extended Version)
Singers ~ Late Jagjit Singh & Rekha Bhardwaj (Both Versions), Original Composition by ~ Nikhil-Vinay, Music Recreated by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Original Lyrics by ~ Faaiz Anwar, New Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

The first song on the album, is a rework of the iconic ghazal from the first film, ‘Koi Fariyaad’. The name of the song and hence, its hookline has been changed from ‘Koi Fariyad’ to ‘Teri Fariyad’. Nikhil-Vinay, the composers of the original song, have done a marvelous job composing it, and I must say, Ankit Tiwari has recreated it beautifully. The song appears in two versions on the album, out of which the normal version is just a cropped part of the ten-and-a-half-minute long “Extended Version”, so I’ll just speak about the Extended Version. The song’s mukhda is an original composition by Ankit Tiwari, and it fits beautifully with the hookline that the composers of the original song had made. And whenever that happens in remakes, you know that the recreator has done half of his job right. The antaras too, start off with a new, utterly fabulous tune, which later connects seamlessly with the other half of the antara of the original song. The song has as many as five antaras, but (surprisingly) you don’t get bored at all throughout the song. Ankit’s arrangements are heavenly. The song starts off with the wonderful sound of the Kanoon, a Turkish/Arabic instrument that sounds oh-so-heavenly. As soon as the guitar tune (Guitars played by Rhythm Shaw) takes over though, the heavenliness just magnifies manifold. The sounds of the clarinet and saaz grace the song throughout, and help to male it sound more rustic and not too boring, either. The guitars play wonderful rhythms throughout the song, not to mention the beats taken care of by finger snapping sounds. And the interludes, are pure bliss! The clarinet seems to be the common instrument in all of them. The third interlude has the sweetest clarinet solo I’ve ever heard, which later simmers down to a very slow, and calmingly haunting musical piece led by the clarinet, and held up by finger snaps, and later joined into by a heavenly chorus. The fourth one has more going on in terms of guitars that help elevate the bliss that the clarinets provide. The kanoon once again makes an appearance in the fourth interlude, and touches your heart. The fifth interlude, which is what plays after the mukhda in the cut version of the song (the one they’ll probably use for radio promotions), is yet another beautifully arranged one, with the clarinet starting off yet again, only to give way to a calm and soothing church-like female chorus with bells jingling t keep the beat, and another wonderful kanoon piece. Strings throughout the song make it a ravishing listening experience. Vocals are top-notch, with Rekha Bhardwaj joining to add the newly composed female portions to the song, and executing them brilliantly, in her pleasantly high-pitched voice. The Great, Late Jagjit Singh’s portions, have been retained from the original song, and the cut-paste work has been done extremely diligently by Ankit Tiwari. I applaud him for choosing the right parts to retain from the old song and connecting with his composition. Also, I appreciate that for once, the makers have let the old voice be retained — they finally understood that nobody else can render such timeless classics. After ‘Hungama Ho Gaya’ (Queen) this is a pleasant surprise that the original singer’s voice has been retained (that too, by T-Series!) The lyrics are such that I can’t really say anything about them, can I? The new ones by Shakeel Azmi kind of suffer amidst the original poetry by Faaiz Anway, but it turns out to be a nice piece as a whole. Long song, long review! 😀 Beautiful recreation, and an apt start to the album! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Ishq Mubarak
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals ~ Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra & Anas Ahmad, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit’s first completely original composition makes its way into the soundtrack after the mammoth of an opening song. The song is a wonderful Sufi love song, composed on the lines of the usual Ankit Tiwari template, but still striking a chord with listeners anyway. The composition starts off with a mukhda that screams Ankit Tiwari right away, because of all of its melancholia and sleepy notes. Thanks to the dreamy hookline that very gentlemanly comes to its rescue, though, the song just goes uphill from there onwards. The hookline has a very catchy Qawwali/Sufi feel to it, and you instantly develop a liking for it, in the bargain, forgiving everything that was wrong with the mukhda. The title of the song actually comes along in the interludes, where the backing vocalists nicely give it its own place in the song, without making it too obvious that this is the title of the song. The antaras, quite unlike the mukhda, are better behaved children of the composer, as they get all their notes right, aiming straight at your heart and mind, where they get stuck. The antara also has a very distinct Rahman-ish feel to it, which makes it sound all the more beautiful. The arrangements are elegant to the core. The shehnaai starts off the song with a very graceful sound, while the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) sound awesome trying to be sitars. The Dholaks and Tablas (Raju Sardar, Sanjeev Sen, Musharaf Khan, Hafiz Khan, Manoj Bhati, Yusuf Khan) give the song a nice and grand feel to it, and they sound astounding in the dreamy hookline. The shehnaai continues to awe you in the second interlude, while an awesome sargam by the backing vocalists and harmonium embellish the first interlude. The harmonium (Firoz Khan) really becomes the essence of the song by the end of it. Vocals by Arijit Singh were frankly not required. The song ultimately sounds like an Ankit Tiwari song, and just to mitigate that feeling, if Ankit has employed Arijit to sing this one, it really didn’t help, as I keep imagining Ankit anyway when the song plays. Notwithstanding, Arijit carries the dreamy composition with finesse. The smile on his face can be heard through his voice in some places. And that is just so pleasant to hear every time!! Backing vocalists Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra and Anas Ahmad, do an extremely good job, and half of the beauty of the whole song, would be credited to them, since the’ve done their job so well!  Lyrics by Manoj Muntashir, I really enjoyed, maybe not so much because they’re nicely written and stimulate my brain to decipher their metaphors, but because they’re just cute and I simply liked them! HEAVENLY! Ankit scores with the very first original composition! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Dekh Lena
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Tulsi Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

The next song of the album starts off with a very feel-good tune, slightly reminiscent of Ankit Tiwari’s song ‘Behki’ from his last solo album ‘Yaara Silly Silly’. The starting tune does refresh you, and gives a good indication of what’s to be found in the song. The composition is hummable and also breezy and feel-good, though I couldn’t help but notice how very ordinary it was. The mukhda starts off in a way that makes you think, “Okay, so it’s playing.. Let it play”, and you keep waiting for the point when the music will make you drop your jaw in awe, but that never comes, sadly. The hookline fares better in that it at least gives a tune that get stuck in your head, though again, very run-of-the-mill and 90s. The antara has been composed in a more matured way that fares better than both the mukhda and the hook, but more on why it doesn’t work later. The arrangements rely on the tabla and dholak beats (Sanjeev Sen) to accentuate the romance in it, which just ends up sounding sappy. The guitars are very ordinary, but functional, and surprisingly, three people (Rhythm Shaw, Pawan Rasailly and Roland Fernandes) are behind them. The flute (Naveen Kumar) too, fails to raise eyebrows, sadly. Vocals by Arijit and Tulsi male for a good romantic song, but they don’t really match. First of all, Ankit seems to have composed the entire song under some order by the makers of the film, that it has to sound like ‘Hum Mar Jayenge’ (Aashiqui 2), and so, those two singers seem to have been forcefully fitted into this song. I mean, the song is tailor-made for Arijit, but also sounds like a song recorded in the 90s from which Sonu Nigam was kicked out of, under the decree that “times have changed”. Arijit renders it nicely though. Tulsi comes in the antaras, with a horribly high-pitched rendition of the matured tune, destroying its essence completely. It sounds nice initially, but the feeling lessens gradually. By the time she reaches the end of her lines, the notes reach some pitch that nobody has ever heard yet! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics too, fail to satisfy, and struggle with their ordinariness. A song that is killed under the weight of the word ‘ORDINARY’. Also, too sugary for me!

 

4. Tum Bin
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Quite late into the album, comes the title track, sung by the composer himself. (Also the only song he sung in the whole album, so hats off to his self-control!) The song is not a remake of the title song of ‘Tum Bin’, which was already remade earlier this year by Jeet Gannguli, in ‘Sanam Re’. Rather, this one is an original composition by Ankit, and I must say, it is very grand. The only problem is in the complexity of the composition. Ankit seems to have gone overboard in making the song sound Rahman-ish, and adds many twists and turns in the composition, making it very hard to catch hold of, let alone find it catchy. The mukhda arrives after a prelude of piano and strings, that hooks you instantly. The composition of the mukhda is yet another sleepy one, but at least it has you wondering “what next?” The hookline too, fares well, with a pleasantly melancholic tune that doesn’t bore, except for when Ankit characteristically stretches the words out for like a gazillion seconds. The antaras are where the turmoil is created; an overtly convoluted tune doesn’t really help in a song that is already so melancholic. The tune did remind me of that awesome song ‘Do Pal’ from ‘Veer-Zaara’, however, and that provided a bit of respite through the tedious composition. Special mentiom to the point where the interludes meet the antaras though, such a wonderful transition, even though it is so abrupt. The magic of the song, completely lies in a different section of the song, which is, the arrangements. Ankit has provided a very ravishing strings orchestra (Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra, conducted by Oleg Kondratenko) along with the laidback tune, and that makes the listening experience all the more exquisite. The strings reminded me of so many timeless Bollywood songs, like the one from ‘Veer-Zaara’ which I mentioned above. They help to propel the listener through the song, and it is the strings, that make for at least a couple of listens to the song before you dismiss it completely. Piano too, has been played very beautifully throughout the song. Songs like ‘Tere Liye’ (Sanam Re; Mithoon) and ‘Junooniyat Hai Yehi’ (Junooniyat; Meet Bros. Anjjan) which released earlier this year, created this whole melancholic-yet-grand experience better than this song here, because the composition was a bit more ear-friendly. This song reeks especially the former song I mentioned, because that one too, was sung by Ankit, though composed by Mithoon. The vocals by Ankit surprisingly didn’t get to my nerves here, and I sat patiently through the song. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are easy to just ignore, but even if you hear them, they are pleasant. A ravishing orchestral arrangement makes this song worth a couple of listens, but the complexity in its composition reduces its playlist lifetime drastically.

 

5. Masta
Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani & Neeti Mohan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

After all that melancholia and romance, Ankit Tiwari decides to bring some fun and frolic into this album. And just as well as he does with the emotional and romantic part of the album, he does with the fun part. The composition is an upbeat, breezy one, that instantly hooks you to its lovely and lovable tune. The composer has left no stone unturned to bring every fun element into the song — right from a very catchy and upbeat tune, to an unmatchable rendition by Vishal Dadlani. The mukhda is a nice and fresh line, which, though abruptly, but nicely drives the listener into the fun song. The hookline blends in with the mukhda, and it is quite nice for a line that consists of only one word. The first antara treads on more mellifluous and subtle territory, with Neeti executing it brilliantly, with her bright and fresh voice that never seems to run out of magic. The second one, however, is yet another place where Vishal displays his energy. The  arrangements have a nice countryside feel to them, with the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) stealing the show with their breeziness, while the strings, with strong, fervent strokes, intensify the European-ness of the arrangements. The mandolin (Jatantilal Gosher) wonderfully supports the composition with its playful nature. The drums (programmed by Bitopan Phukan) provide the nice upbeat tempo to the song. During Neeti’s antara, acoustic guitars (Jatantilal Gosher) give a pleasant quality to the music. Interludes are splendid, with the second taking one by surprise at the wonderful Irish jig that it breaks into, complete with the claps and what I think is the keyboard playing in a strings sound. Towards the end, a wonderful bagpipe ends the song on a wonderful note, amidst Vishal’s energetic vocals. Which reminds me of Vishal’s flawless performance on this track. His indefatigable singing really takes me aback every single time. Neeti’s feathery voice leads the first antara beautifully. Her rendition here is another reminder to what a lovely singer she is, and how badly her voice is utilized sometimes.  (Ahem, song-that-cannot-be-named from ‘Housefull 3’) Manoj Muntashir has written a nice song about being carefree, and all-in-all the words are a pleasure to hear. A fun and peppy track that really changes my views about Ankit Tiwari’s potential. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Dil Nawaziyaan
Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Payal Dev, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The next song takes the freshness quotient of the album to an even higher level. The song is a nice love ballad that fuses two beautiful genres — classical and contemporary. Ankit’s tune is another one that instantly hooks you because of its fresh sound. The mukhda starts the song off on a fresh note, surrounded and propelled by wonderful guitars. The mukhda has two parts, one sung by each singer. When the hookline arrives, it sounds pleasant to the ears, but it isn’t till Payal’s Hindustani classical part comes and blows your mind away, that you start thinking that the song is really magical. That part is something that boosts the song to some uncharted territory, and it is from then that you start to listen more intently. Ankit has composed that part very soulfully, and Payal has rendered with the most classical quoted voice I can imagine. In short, everything falls into its own place PERFECTLY. After that, Arko comes with another surprise package. He comes and sings an English stanza, which is so beautiful because of its simplicity. The composition is beautiful as well. What’s weird is that, though the song is composed by Ankit, and Arko has but sung it, I kept feeling that the composition has some Arko touches to it. Kudos to Ankit, not only for bringing that Arko flavour into the song, but also roping him in to sing it. 🙂 The arrangements are pure bliss. While most of the song is propped on a quite typical acoustic guitar riff background, the guitars (Rhythm Shaw) bring the freshness to the song, and that’s half the reason the song sounds so magical. However, in the short classical respite we get that is led by Payal Dev, pure Lucknowi baithak styled tablas (Sanjeev Sen) take over and just make things more intriguing than the rest of the song. These tablas also come towards the end of the song to conclude it on a beautiful and refreshing note. The vocals are awesome. Both Arko & Payal sing their parts wonderfully, Payal sounding a lot better than all her other performances (except the very mystical one in ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Doongi’ from ‘Bajirao Mastani’) and Arko sounding better than he does in most of his own songs too! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are nice and pleasant again, while Arko’s English ones are just as refreshing, and gelling well with the Hindi words. A great fusion becomes the center of attraction in this song, due to which the magic of everything else seems less, but it definitely is magical!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. Jaeger Bomb
Singers ~ Harshi Mad, DJ Bravo & Ankit Tiwari, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Raool

It looks like Ankit isn’t yet finished with the fun and wildness, because, looking at the mere title of the next and last song on the album, I can tell that the mandatory club song is not yet over. The composition of this one clearly shows that Yo Yo Honey Singh was in rehab, Badshah had prior commitments to look to, and Millind Gaba was irritated that nobody liked his music, when this sing was in the making. In the absence of these three, Ankit had to muster up enough courage and stoop down to those standards in order to make such a composition. As is evident from the result, he succeeded in imitating them. 😀 This song seems like some tribute to them, with a slightly more monotonous beat. (I thought that nothing could get more monotonous than Yo Yo’s ‘Aao Raja’ from ‘Gabbar Is Back’!!) Anyway, the song starts with yet another ruined nursery rhyme. This time, ‘Humpty Dumpty’ gets even more cracks, thanks to the song. The rhyme has been placed on a nice jazzy tempo, but sung by Harshi Mad in such a way that kids should strictly not listen to it! Or else, next time they picture Humpty Dumpty, he would be sunbathing at a beach and drinking lemonade…maybe! Jokes apart, Harshi Mad renders the rhyme spunkily, since it was supposed to be that way. After that, the EDM starts and there onwards, there is very less of a tune. Harshi gets some nice portions to sing, which are composed in a very jazzy way. And Ankit shoves in another one of his typical tunes, even into a club song! DJ Bravo’s portions are proof that they were inserted as a merepublicity stunt, because nothing he says can be made out.. Maybe because he’s singing in Hindi.. Or what is supposed to be Hindi. The arrangements are mostly EDM, with some nice jazzy portions in occasional places. Manoj’s Hindi lyrics are the usual Hindi cabaret style lyrics in Harshi’s parts, while the usual Ankit sobbiness in Ankit’s part. The English portions by Raool are barely audible, so I don’t know about them. The grand finale turns out to be the worst song on the album. A bad attempt at making a club song that will accommodate Ankit Tiwari’s sobs and yawns, DJ Bravo’s spunk, Harshi’s debutant-ness, and Humpty Dumpty!


Tum Bin 2 really turns out to be quite a good album. Ankit Tiwari gets a whole album to compose to his credit, not for the first time, but he still makes good use of the opportunity. The album is surprisingly full of variety, with songs ranging from a nice Sufi love song, to a melancholic and grandly orchestrated title track, to a club song that barely works, to a fun-filled peppy number and many more. The ones that will stand out and be lapped up by the masses, are definitely the first two tracks of the album. The remake has been done indescribably well, while ‘Ishq Mubarak’ will connect with the masses a lot. The rest seem like tracks with a more situational effect, but which will be liked by the niche music lovers anyhow, especially ‘Masta’ and ‘Dil Nawaziyaan’. And ‘Jaeger Bomb’ stands out in that it will find it difficult to find takers. Though not matching the greatness of Nikhil-Vinay’s soundtrack to the first film, Ankit does a nice job with this quasi-sequel, proving that the multicomposer theory is wrong, once again. An album that does good WITHOUT having multiple composers.

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Fariyad (Extended Version) > Dil Nawaziyaan > Ishq Mubarak > Masta > Teri Fariyad > Tum Bin > Dekh Lena > Jaeger Bomb

 

Which is your favourite song from Tum Bin 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂