REMAKE-GIRI, BAHUT HUI, THAK GAYI HAI ABB JANTA!! (LUKA CHUPPI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, White Noise Studios, Abhijit Vaghani, Tony Kakkar, Goldboy, Dilip Sen, Sameer Sen, Gurmeet Singh & Bob
♪ Lyrics by: White Noise Studios, Anand Bakshi, Nirmaan, Tony Kakkar, Mellow D, Harmanjit, Kunaal Vermaa & Raja
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd February 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 1st March 2019

Luka Chuppi Album Cover

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Luka Chuppi is a Bollywood film starring Kriti Sanon, Kartik Aaryan, Pankaj Tripathi, Aparshakti Khurrana, and Vinay Pathak. The film is the directorial debut of Laxman Utekar, and is produced by Dinesh Vijan. The film is a social comedy revolving around a couple who decide to enter a live-in relationship, and the problems they face from their relatives and the society in general. The music from Maddock’s productions has usually been good, though there was a slight dip in the quality of the music in Sachin-Jigar’s album to ‘Stree’. Well, here, the music is credited to multiple composers, including Sachin-Jigar’s Artists & Repertoire venture White Noise Productions, last heard in ‘Laaj Sharam’ (Veere Di Wedding), Abhijit Vaghani, and the lead ‘composer’ (read remake artist) Tanishk Bagchi. I just call him the lead remake artist, because the other two composers, too, have presented recreations, and coupled with Bagchi’s three remakes, that makes this album full of remakes. So basically, my review is going to be like a race where remakes are pitted against each other: knowing fully well that they have almost zero chance to cross the finish line.


Right from the beginning of the opening track of the album, Poster Lagwa Do, the Sachin-Jigar vibes hit you square in the face. The beats, distinctively similar to those of ‘Johny Johny’ (Entertainment) give away that this song has been worked upon by Sachin-Jigar’s A&R company, White Noise Productions (though i suspect it has been ghost programmed by the duo themselves, because of their close association to Dinesh Vijan). Anyway, the song, which is a remake of Dilip-Sameer’s ‘Yeh Khabar Chapwa Do Akhbaar Mein’ (Aflatoon), rides on the success of ‘Simmba’s ‘Aankh Marey’, in that the makers rope in Mika Singh to do the honours with the male vocals. Well, it doesn’t work half as well as it did in the former song, and another reason for that may be because the female singer there was a more effervescent Neha Kakkar as opposed to an amateur-sounding Sunanda Sharma here. One of the singers who I’d actually like to see the female portions of the song to have been sung by, though, is Nikhita Gandhi, who is instead relegated to an embarrassing two lines of rap that are easy to miss! The composition, though kept intact, gets new lyrics for the antara, and the lyrics have been credited to White Noise Studios too — I wish Sachin-Jigar would follow Pritam’s JAM8 when it comes to crediting individual artists (though their lack of individual credits just makes me believe stronger in my theory that they are the men behind all the music credited to White Noise and just don’t want to be named because of the album being a multicomposers album!) That said, the song is levels below any previous Sachin-Jigar presentation; the beats are dated, there’s no originality or innovativeness in the programming and the song ultimately lacks appeal and repeat value.
The other ‘guest’ composer, Abhijit Vaghani, presents his take on Akhil’s song ‘Khaab’, originally composed by Bob. Duniyaa is a pleasant recreation of the already present original romantic song, with completely different lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, replacing Raja’s lyrics from the original. The new lyrics are sweet, and the new composition for the antara too, is appreciated. Akhil has been roped in to sing this version as well, which is a good choice, as the singer of the original also gets his Bollywood break in the bargain. Dhvani Bhanushali sings the female portions alongside him, and does quite a good job too; she sounds much better in low notes here (though clearly autotuned), than she does in high notes in songs like the recently released T-Series pop single ‘Main Teri Hoon’ by Sachin-Jigar. The flute is quite melodious, and is one of the features taken from the original. Thankfully, the beats of the original, which were quite passable, have been changed and made to sound a bit more melodious, with guitars and strings accompanying the composition.
Tanishk Bagchi, who ‘composes’, or ‘recreates’ the next three songs of the album, starts off with Coca Cola, a funky and more glitzy touch to the original by Tony Kakkar. Of course, Neha Kakkar gets to pitch in, and while her brother’s original composition’s tempo is cranked up quite considerably, she gets to sing a new antara, which seems to end as soon as it starts. Again, the choice of retaining the original singer’s voice is a commendable move. Tanishk’s programming saves the song; it’s uptempo beat and strings make it a fun one-time listen — unfortunately, it is not so fun that I would press the repeat button. There is that infectious digital beat that starts the song off though, and it thankfully plays for quite some times for those who loved it. To Tony Kakkar’s original lyrics are added some new lines by Mellow D — the lines sung by Neha Kakkar and the rap by Young Desi. Obviously enough, this is going to be the next club anthem though, for lack of anything better these days.
Tanishk goes on to present another love song, named Photo, this one being a remake of Karan Sehmbi’s ‘Photo’, composed by Gold Boy. Again, the singer is retained, and again, I commend that decision. Tanishk’s beats are really basic though, and provide nothing new to the original song — which was already sufficiently catchy if this was supposed to be catchier. The flute is a nice attraction, but the original had guitars, which I am missing here. The short length of the song keeps it thankfully not boring, but the repetitive composition by Gold Boy would not have been so pleasant if it had gone on for longer. The singer Karan Sehmbi has a nice folksy texture to his voice, which explains why T-Series backed him for a pop single, and agreed to let him sing its remake, which wasn’t the case three years ago when ‘Soch Na Sake’ (Airlift) was sung by Arijit Singh. Nirmaan’s lyrics are cute, with the lyricist also throwing in a clever self-reference in the second verse. A melodious song, but loses appeal because of the digital beats, which makes it sound more like a pop song than a film song.
The last song, Tu Laung Main Elaachi, a remake of ‘Laung Laachi’s title track by Gurmeet Singh, is probably my least favourite of the album. And there are quite a few reasons for that. First of all, a really sweet Punjabi song sung by a really good Punjabi singer, Mannat Noor, has been redubbed by Tulsi Kumar — the first bad choice. Second, the beats have been degraded in sound; there is no freshness in the song as one should expect from a recreation. It sounds like the song has just been recreated for the sake of doing so. The chorus singers at the beginning and the end are nothing short of irritating! The bass has been increased in the recreation, though, it seems, and wow, I’m sure that required a lot of effort! :/


Luka Chuppi is the result of the remake trend in Bollywood going far overboard. I am not sure how the makers always come up with stupid reasons to justify their including remakes in their albums, but I’m sure nothing can justify completely avoiding original music in your album! Atleast for the sake of art, and music in general, if they would have planned out the music of this album less hastily, maybe it would have been better. And it isn’t like these remakes are great, either! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 8 + 7 + 6 + 5 = 32

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Duniyaa > Coca Cola > Photo = Poster Lagwa Do > Tu Laung Main Elaachi

Which is your favourite song from Luka Chuppi? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A HAPPY WEDDING OF PUNJABI AND ELECTRONIC MUSIC!! (VEERE DI WEDDING – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Shashwat Sachdev, Vishal Mishra, Qaran Mehta & White Noise
♪ Lyrics by: Anvita Dutt, Raj Shekhar, Shellee, Shashwat Sachdev, Gaurav Solanki, Qaran Mehta, Rupin Pahwa, Badshah & White Noise
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 8th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 1st June 2018

Veere Di Wedding Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Veere Di Wedding is a Bollywood coming-of-age film revolving around four friends played by Kareena Kapoor Khan, Sonam K. Ahuja, Swara Bhasker and Shikha Talsania. The film is directed by Shashanka Ghosh and produced by Ekta Kapoor, Shobha Kapoor, Anil Kapoor and Rhea Kapoor. Now, the film has been creating buzz right from its trailer release, and the music which has become a rage across the nation already (not all songs but a select few) has been composed by composers including Shashwat Sachdev, Vishal Mishra, Qaran Mehta and White Noise. Shashwat and Vishal are two young talents that haven’t yet disappointed with whatever they’ve composed. On the other hand, Qaran, who has been assisting music directors like Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Pritam for quite some time now, gets to make his composing debut with this film, and White Noise is actually Sachin-Jigar’s Artists & Repertoire venture like Pritam’s JAM8. So there is reason enough to believe this will be an enjoyable multicomposer album.


The lead composer, Shashwat Sachdev, actually has four songs in the album, which is half the number of original songs there are in the album, so let’s start with his songs. 😁
Pappi Le Loon, the album opener on all the streaming websites as well, is a fun-filled, catchy number, where, surprisingly, the vocals arrangements outdo the composition! You can even say there is almost nothing by way of composition; the entire stress is laid on the way the sound interacts with the booming vocals by Sunidhi Chauhan. Shashwat’s electronic music is impressive too, and as such, he didn’t need a strong tune, to make this song any better! Everything has been done by the entertaining vocals and arrangements. The Punjabi-flavoured portions nicely marry the electronic sound and make this song one to look forward to in the album — one of the main attractions in the album, I would say. And when has Sunidhi Chauhan ever underperformed? And Shellee’s lyrics are suitably quirky and fun.
In another Punjab-meets-electronic music fusion, Sachdev serves a folk song in modern packaging, quite the same way he did ‘Naughty Billo’ back in ‘Phillauri’, where he turned the folk song ‘Jhooth Boliya’ into a trippy hip-hop number. Here he gets to remake ‘Bhangra Ta Sajda’ into an EDM-Punjabi music fusion track named Bhangra Ta Sajda (No One Gives A Damn!). The song itself is really entertaining; it has everything you’d require to groove at a wedding, and out of one too — trippy EDM, entertaining dhols, and a nice touch of sarangi, something Shashwat seems to love hiding in each of his upbeat songs. Romy delivers an amazing performance, and Neha Kakkar delivers one which made me like her voice in a song after a long, long time. The initial retro-ish portion of the song has been done well, and Gaurav Solanki’s lyrics are just quirky fun. (I have a feeling I’ll be saying this about every song in the album)
Shashwat’s best comes with Bass Gira De Raja, where he composes, writes and sings the song! The song is standard Shashwat quirky fusion; the composition instantly has you hooked,and the lyrics actually had me smiling at certain points. The man sings amazingly too, and once the bass drops, the song becomes much more interesting than it was when it started. The way Sachdev plays and experiments with different sounds is what makes me look forward to his composing for many more films in the future. In ‘Phillauri’ he got to do a completely traditional Punjabi sound, and the fact that he is doing such experimental stuff here, showcases his versatility and talent!
His weakest song, and probably the weakest song of the album, Aa Jao Na, comes next, with its repetitive tune that is actually the typical Arijit melody. Even though it reaches a peak at one point, it just goes back to same droning nature over and over again — which gets really boring after a point. What’s more, composer Shashwat Sachdev doesn’t even give us much to chew on as Arijit belts out the repetitive tune — just digital beats and very few piano notes, which don’t really fill in the gaps well. Anyway, I know this song is going to be the biggest and most popular, so whatever I just wrote might just not matter.
The composer with the next largest number of songs is yet another upcoming talent Vishal Mishra, who still has me stunned by his amazing two songs in ‘Qarib Qarib Singlle’ last year. His part of the album starts with the song that everyone loved right from the trailer, Veere, which can best be described as the movie’s theme song. He takes the friendship theme of the film, and constructs such a positive composition using that idea, it’s quite surprising this song didn’t come from a Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy or a Pritam! It totally belongs to the rom-com age of Bollywood when they made happy songs like this for movies like ‘Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu’, ‘Anjaana Anjaani’, etc. The hookline has the listener in a trance the first time it plays, and keeps entrancing the listeners everytime it plays! To break the trance though, unfortunately, there are some elements that the song could’ve done without. First of all, the too-many-to-keep-track-of female singers! If you ask me, Aditi Singh Sharma was the only one who should have sung the female part, because I can unfortunately make out Iulia Vantur over there, and unfortunately, she starts the unfortunate female portion. How unfortunate. But happily, things are better in the second antara, where Vishal Mishra comes back to take things under control, and the female chorus here sounds amazing. He’s the second composer on the album now, who sings just as well as he composes! Wow! We have a cool future for Bollywood music! 🙂 Also, Anvita Dutt’s lyrics make for a really enjoyable friendship anthem, so that middle portion can easily be ignored!
Vishal Mishra sings his next song Dagmag Dagmag along with Payal Dev, who sounds like a less hyperactive version of Neha Kakkar. Anyway, the song could be easily mistaken for an Amit Trivedi song, with that amazingly catchy digital beat, and quirky tune. The hookline, which sounds the cheesiest the first time, really sets in with the passage of time (the number of times you listen to the song) and doesn’t sound as cheesy later on. The arrangements are mostly digital, as mentioned above, and that’s mainly where it resembles the Trivedi sound. Both the singers do an amazing job and seem to have had a fun time singing this track.
Qaran Mehta’s Tareefan, is an insanely catchy and addictive club track, Badshah sounding like he has never sounded before! Qaran’s programming is the main reason the song sounds so fresh, and that addictive hookline, and the loop that goes on behind it in the song, I can’t stop praising the song; it’s like a guilty pleasure listen of mine. 😂 The flak the song has been receiving is just so unjustified — how can you hate a song if you hate its music video? This song will probably remain the catchiest club song of 2018 for me, and even that cringeworthy rap of Badshah’s takes getting used to, but you end up ignoring that by the time you’re addicted to the song. Qaran, hor das kinni tareefan chaidi ae tenu?
The song appears in two more versions, one being a Remix By Dj Notorious, which is also quite addictive (as if the original song wasn’t sounding like a remix itself) and so it sounds like another version of the song, had DJ Notorious programmed it instead of Qaran himself. The Reprise Version acquaints us with a promising new singer, Lisa Mishra, whose voice seems weird on the song at first, but then it starts sounding better and better than that. The unplugged version required such a calm and soothing rendition, because the composition, which is quite strong, makes sure that it can stay fresh in any form, be it a club song, or a soothing number like this reprise.
As for the last song of the album, Laaj Sharam by Sachin-Jigar’s A&R venture White Noise, the song is also quite weak as compared to the rest of the album. Something seems off in White Noise’s fusion of Punjabi and electronic music, but the vocalists Divya Kumar and Jasleen Royal save the song with their entertaining rendition. Jasleen’s voice gets a makeover; she puts on a husky voice here, and I wish she uses this voice in more of her own compositions from now on; of course, when and if the need arises. The hookline for this song sounds unnecessarily repetitive, but the dhols do the job in pulling you through that. Enbee’s rap is passable, and it’s not like it ends soon, and the composers don’t add any entertaining music in the background during that either! Overall, this ends up as the second weakest song on the album for me.


A ten song album, this really delivers what was promised in such a huge scale wedding flick about friendship. The soundtrack has variety, and after listening to it so many times, I can say it has the potential to live even after the movie is watched and forgotten by everyone.The biggest achievement this soundtrack has made, is that, though it has multiple composers, they all have one set aim which they all succeed in — to make Punjabi music marry electronic music!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7.5 + 6.5 + 9 + 8.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 7 = 77

Album Percentage: 77%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Just Listen to them all in the order given on Saavn. 😂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 20 (from previous albums) + 01 = 21

Which is your favourite song from Veere Di Wedding? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

5 SONGS THAT SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN REMADE!! (MUSICAL LIST #1)

So today marks the start of a new section in the blog — The “LISTS” Section, where I’ll be listing songs based on one particular theme, depending on what theme I’m feeling like listing songs about. :p

What better way to start this section off, than doing it in collaboration with one of my close blogger friends, Jemma Rajyaguru from the Girl At The Piano blog! Her blog is full of random musical thoughts, lists of songs, throwbacks to the Golden Era of Bollywood music, and new releases by new and upcoming artists!

Today, we will both be listing five songs each, which we wish would never have been remade! And yes, after reading my list, be sure to read Jemma’s, as her song choices are just as exciting, if not more exciting, than mine!! Correction: they definitely are more exciting!😁 So let’s get started with my five songs so you can check her list out! 🙂 If you want to check it out now though, here it is!

P.S.: I believe no song should be remade, but these are the ones where I just don’t agree with the remake!

P.P.S: These are in no particular order; it isn’t a Top5 list 🙂


1. Mere Rashke Qamar (Pop Song by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan)

• Original Song Details:

Music by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by Ustad Qamar Jalalvi, Sung by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, First Performed in 1988, Music Label: Hi-Tech Music

• Remake Details:

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by Fana Buland Shehri & Manoj Muntashir, Sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Tulsi Kumar, Used in 2017 Bollywood film ‘Baadshaho’, Music Label: T-Series

One would think that nephew Rahat Fateh Ali Khan would object to mauling his uncle’s gem of a qawwali, but instead, he helps maul it even more, with loud and screechy vocals that would even make the laziest person cringe. Tanishk Bagchi’s constant mandolin hook doesn’t help when it keeps repeating itself all the time amidst the din of Rahat and the backing vocalists shouting.


2. Dum Maaro Dum (Hare Rama Hare Krishna; 1971)

• Original Song Details

Music by R.D. Burman, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Asha Bhosle, for the 1971 Bollywood film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’, Music Label: Saregama

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Pritam Chakraborty, New Lyrics by Jaideep Sahni, Sung by Anushka Manchanda, for the 2011 Bollywood film ‘Dum Maaro Dum’, Music Label: T-Series

One of the party songs I doubt Pritam is proud of making, ‘Dum Maaro Dum’ stands high as a song that ruined the original for me big time. Yes, a lot of cool stuff is going on in the music, but the major letdown is Anushka Manchanda’s vocals, where they create a mess of what Asha Bhosle ji and R.D. Burman actually created in the 70s. And don’t even ask me about the rap.


3. Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast (Mohra; 1994)

• Original Song Details

Music by Viju Shah, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Udit Narayan & Kavita Krishnamurthy, for the 1994 Bollywood film ‘Mohra’, Music Label: Venus Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, New Lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed, Sung by Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, for the 2017 Bollywood film ‘Machine’, Music Label: T-Series

Probably the best remake on the list, but again, Tanishk stuck to his mandolin template here, where he kept repeating the hook of the song on mandolin, and though Neha Kakkar sounds passable, Udit Narayan seems to be the saving grace of the song, sounding younger than ever. The awkward dubstep mid way through the song is just *awkward*!


4. Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas (Blackmail; 1973)

• Original Song Details

Music by Kalyanji-Anandji, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan, Sung by Kishore Kumar, for the 1973 Bollywood film ‘Blackmail’, Music Label: Universal Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan retained, Sung by Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neumann Pinto, for the 2016 Bollywood film ‘Wajah Tum Ho’, Music Label: T-Series

Arijit himself wasn’t happy with the way Abhijit Vaghani programmed his voice in this one; and I can’t help but agree! How would you like it if you got to remake a song by the legendary Kishore Kumar, and get your voice all destroyed by electronic touches? To complement Arijit’s bad voice, we had Tulsi Kumar, who surprisingly sounded better!


5. Waqt Ne Kiya Kya Haseen Sitam (Kaagaz Ke Phool; 1959)

• Original Song Details

Music by S.D. Burman, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi, Sung by Geeta Dutt, for the 1959 Bollywood film ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’, Music Label: Saregama-HMV

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Rohan-Vinayak, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi retained, Sung by Amitabh Bachchan, for the 2018 Bollywood film ‘102 Not Out’, Music Label: Saregama

The most recent remake on the list. One would think Amitabh Bachchan ji would be a bit more sensitive when singing old classics as these, but sadly, he drones the song out in such a way, that you wonder “Waqt ne Kiya, kya Haseen sitam”. Rohan-Vinayak literally do nothing but stand and watch as they treat the listeners to almost six minutes of that torture without any enjoyable music in the background either!!


Well, all in all, I feel recreations were fine until they started to be blown out of proportion and being forced into every single album that Bollywood produced. Thanks to Jemma for giving me the mauka and dastoor to vent out my feelings about remakes; I hope you guys enjoyed our collaboration, and please make sure to check out Jemma’s list (it’s amazing)!

Thanks for reading, and stay tuned for more such lists about varied topics! 😁

A WEDDING TO DREAD!! (VEEREY KI WEDDING – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Farzan Faaiz, Jaidev Kumar, Ashok Punjabi & Meet Bros.
♪ Lyrics by: Chandan Bakshi, Deepak Noor, Devendra Kafir, Ramkesh Jiwanpurwala, Kumaar & Faaiz Anwar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 27th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 2nd March 2018

Veerey Ki Wedding Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Veerey Ki Wedding is a Bollywood comedy film starring Pulkit Samrat, Kriti Kharbanda and Jimmy Shergill. The film is directed by Asshu Trikha and produced by Rajat Bakshi and Parmod Gomber. The film’s music album contains music by Farzan Faaiz, Jaidev Kumar, Meet Bros and Ashok Punjabi. Let’s dive right in, I have no expectations as such from this album..!


So the album doesn’t start out as bad as expected; Mind Blowing, though suffering from an extreme case of Mika-ate-the-words-again syndrome, has an enjoyable South-flavoured rhythm by (newcomer?) Farzan Faaiz, with the ‘Chinta Ta Chita’ (Rowdy Rathore) rhythm being used for propelling the song further into the masses’ hearts. The backing chorus sounds so bad, it’s actually good. The typical horns are there too, so everything you need in a generic kuthu song is there — I just wish the lyrics (by two people.. quite talented, it seems, writing lines like “Maana Milky Milky Badi Hai Teri Kalaai“.) and singer were different!
Farzan’s other song Na Kasoor is a staid melody that isn’t bad, but isn’t good either. It’s more like an “Oh, it’s over already? When did it start?” song. While he borrowed the rhythm from “‘Chinta Ta Chita” for his first song, Farzan tries to make this one sound like “Jashn-E-Bahaara” (Jodhaa Akbar), and to that effect even ropes in Javed Ali for the vocals, and jingles bells in the background. Sadly, it turns out to be a disaster because he insists on including sounds like breaking of glass and other “modern” sounds. It’s just a mishmash of sounds that don’t go together. It’s like eating fish with tomato ketchup. (No offence if you do.)
Jaidev Kumar’s Hatt Ja Tau, a convenient remake of the Haryanvi folk song of the same name, is much more enjoyable, mostly due to Sunidhi’s powerhouse vocals. The musical arrangements sound fresh here, but Devendra Kafir writes lyrics that would make you blush. The composition too, being so happy-go-lucky, helps to make you ignore the lyrics, and Jaidev’s cheerful arrangements are fun too.
Another bad song on the album is given by Meet Bros. Talli Tonight, from the name itself you can tell that the song is doomed. Somebody called Deep Money (forgive me if he’s some sensation) sings the song very uniterestedly, while Neha Kakkar sings in a manner I’ve never heard her sing in — utterly bored and sleepy! The wannabe beats do not make you want to get up and groove, rather they would make you skip the song. Meet Bros’ rap is just cringeworthy. Or was that Deep Money?
The best song of the album, only because the others are so cringeworthy, is Ashok Punjabi’s Veerey Ki Wedding, which is essentially a 90s wedding song, that was destined to release in 2018. Navraj Hans provides the necessary spunk to the song, and the arrangements (dholaks, harmonium, tumbi) help make it fun and enjoyable. The ladies’ chorus led by Saloni Thakkar is also enjoyable. The backing vocalists though, sing so high pitched, as if they’re in some 90s song.


Some composers picked up from the middle of nowhere make this a wedding you should be dreading!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 5.5 + 7 + 5 + 7 = 30.5

Album Percentage: 61%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Veerey Ki Wedding = Hatt Ja Tau > Mind Blowing > Na Kasoor > Talli Tonight

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 13 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Veerey Ki wedding) = 14

SAME STORY ∞!! (HATE STORY IV – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Mithoon, Baman-Chand, Tony Kakkar & Himesh Reshammiya
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar, Rashmi-Virag, Sanjay Gupta, Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 23rd February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 9th March 2018

Hate Story IV Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Hate Story IV Is a Bollywood thriller (cough cough, ahem ahem) starring Urvashi Rautela, Karan Wahi, Vivan Bhatena and Ihana Dhillon, directed by Vishaal Pandya, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Vivek Bhatnagar. The film has music by Tanishk Bagchi, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Mithoon, Tony Kakkar and Baman-Chand. Now all of these composers have been working with T-Series for quite some time, but that doesn’t mean I expect too much from the album! The reason being that the ‘Hate Story’ franchise has never been strong on music, no matter how popular it has been.


Tanishk Bagchi’s remake spree which seems to be inexorable, continues just as strongly as it had started off. I can’t even remember when it started. ‘Humma’? ‘Tamma’? Who knows. But now he gets to Himesh Reshammiya’s bank of songs. The producers browse for a moment through Himesh’s repertoire, and finally pick out two of his songs, for Tanishk to recreate. Tanishk, reluctantly, complies. One of the recreations has backfired terribly — Aashiq Banaya Aapne ends up being a lazy club number, in which Neha Kakkar lazes around as if she’s reciting a poem instead of singing a song. Tanishk’s too loud programming stuns the ears, and the way he uses Himesh’s voice is terrible. Tanishk never does a remake without having Tapas Roy play the hook of the song on a mandolin or some other ethnic string instrument, and he does that here too, just increasing the heard-before-ness of the song. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are almost the only worthwhile stuff in the song. The second one, Naam Hai Mera, at least has good vocals and music, and if you forget that the essence and beauty of the original song, which was soulful, has been demolished, you will like it. Neeti’s powerful voice luckily propels this one to where it is, and Tanishk’s EDM is refreshing. It is the lyrics here, that spoil the song.
Moving on to the original numbers, Arko’s Boond Boond is the best of the lot, with a nice Latino vibe to it, but it is not all that innovative either. It sounds like Arko was trying to recreate the type of songs Bollywood made in 2006-2008, when we were obsessed with Latin American music. Jubin’s voice doesn’t suit the song a lot, but Neeti saves the day (again), while the lyricists Manoj Muntashir and Sanjay Gupta (the filmmaker??) have nothing much to do except search through old Bollywood songs and put together all the clichéd phrases they could find.
Mithoon’s first song of the year is highly disappointing — Tum Mere Ho tries to be a ‘Sanam Re’-esque love song, but ends up being sleazy and lazy. The vocalists Jubin and Amrita Singh only increase the laziness with their lazy voices, making me too lazy to write a review for the song. The only good thing here, are the percussions in the interlude. That’s a nice touch.
If that song was lazy, wait till you hear Mohabbat Nasha Hai, a typical Tony Kakkar cry-fest. But though his previous cry fests like ‘Khuda Bhi’ (Ek Paheli Leela) and ‘Mile Ho Tum Humko’ (Fever) have been quite good, this one, being a mishmash of all of them, and with the same boring beats, is just plain boring. In one of the versions, I can at least listen to Neha Kakkar when her part comes (she sings better here than she sang ‘Aashiq Banaya Aapne’), but in the Male Version I don’t even have that liberty. Oh well.
The other best song of the album, at par with Arko’s song, happens to be Baman-Chand’s Bhatt-ish melody Badnaamiyan. The Male Version by Armaan Malik fares much better, and that’s the one that is the best of the album. Armaan’s voice suits the romantic composition, and Baman-Chand’s arrangements are great, though heard before, especially the electronic tabla. Sukriti Kakar doesn’t do too well in the Female Version, and even the arrangements don’t support her, being the usual boring arrangements used for such songs.


With the fourth instalment in this series (fifth if you count ‘Wajah Tum Ho’), it is evident that T-Series, who seem to have been making the films only for the music, might stop making the films soon, because the music is certainly going down…!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5.5 + 6 + 7.5 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 + 7.5 + 6 = 47

Album Percentage: 58.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Boond Boond = Badnaamiyan > Naam Hai Mera = Badnaamiyan (Female) > Aashiq Banaaya Aapne > Mohabbat Nasha Hai = Tum Mere Ho > Mohabbat Nasha Hai (Solo)

 

Which is your favourite song from Hate Story IV? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

YO YO KE COMEBACK KI SEETI!! (SONU KE TITU KI SWEETY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Yo Yo Honey Singh, Rochak Kohli, Amaal Mallik, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Saurabh-Vaibhav & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Yo Yo Honey Singh, Singhsta, Oye Sheraa, Kumaar, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa, Swapnil Tiwari & Sham Balkar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd February 2018

Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety is a Bollywood comedy film starring Kartik Aaryan, Sunny Singh and Nushrat Bharucha in lead roles. The film is directed by Luv Ranjan, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Luv Ranjan and Ankur Garg. The film’s “success” (by which I only mean box office success) can be attributed to the hit music the album featured, by artists like Yo Yo Honey Singh (who is back after a long break), Rochak Kohli, Amaal Mallik, Zack Knight, Guru Randhawa and debutants Saurabh-Vaibhav. Let’s jump right into my review because there’s not much to say, three weeks after the film released! 😂


Yo Yo Honey Singh, after an I-don’t-know-how-long hiatus returns to Bollywood, with this album. What a surprise T-Series gives him only remakes to handle. And surprisingly, he too, handles them with care! Dil Chori, remake of Anand Raaj Anand composed and Hans Raj Hans sung pop single ‘Dil Chori Sada Ho Gaya’, becomes a catchy party number, and since the original song itself featured the words nasha and talli, Honey Singh needs no extra efforts in structuring his rap all around daaru. But the digital dhol rhythm really makes it lively. The female vocalist Simar Kaur also does well in a Kaala Doreya-esque cameo. It took a long time to grow on me though. His other song Chhote Chhote Peg is a remake of Anand Raaj Anand composed, Hans Raj Hans sung Bollywood Song ‘Tote Tote’ (Bichchoo), and this song too, sounds better than the original, if not good. The song is an ugly mishmash of a weird Neha Kakkar line that doesn’t match at all with the hook of the old song, though Navraj Hans sings the new hook better than his father had in the old song. Also, these lyrics fit into the tune more than “Tote Tote Ho Gaya Dil Tote Tote Ho Gaya“. 😆 Bt that doesn’t mean the lyrics themselves are exceptional — they’re quite the opposite. And they’re by people who call themselves weird names like Oye Sheraa and Singhsta. Again, Honey Singh steals the show with arrangements only. The trap music is catchy, as are the other techno sounds used. I can’t really say either of his songs are bad as such, but they’re just not good either.
Amaal Mallik returns with another ‘Sooraj Dooba Hai’ but this time it has tropical house vibes. Also this time the “Sooraj Dooba Hai” actually happens Subah Subah. 😂 Arijit doesn’t sound as fresh as he sounded in ‘Sooraj Dooba Hai’, probably because he sang so many such songs after that. And Prakriti sounds functional, but then nobody else could’ve sung her parts better, either. Overall, a good song, but could have been better.
The next song is by a composer who is quite on the rise these days, Guru Randhawa, being helped by T-Series to get his songs into any movie where there’s the scope of a clubbish number with Punjabi lyrics. Of course, ‘Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety’ was the obvious film that his song Kaun Nachdi was made for. The Punjabi sound is merged well with the electronic sound, giving it a fresh and enjoyable groove. The surprise element here is Neeti Mohan, getting back to back songs, where she aces her portions with amazing vocals. Her high-pitched voice sounds so good! And Guru himself sings and writes the song entertainingly, befitting to the movie’s theme.
Rochak Kohli, another composer who seems to be getting a lot of movies one after the other, but still hasn’t done a complete album (at least as far as I can recall), enters the album next, with two songs that are quite templatised with respect to the sound they carry. Lakk Mera Hit is a typical Punjabi ladies’ sangeet number, with Sukriti Kakar not doing her best behind the mic, but Rochak’s arrangements are entertaining, even though they have nothing new in them. The composition is such a heard-before one, it is hard to like it, especially in 2018.
Tera Yaar Hoon Main fares better, the melancholia channeled this time not for a breakup between lovers, but for a rift between best friends. The lyrics here (Kumaar) are the best lyrics of any song on the album, obviously, and Arijit delivers yet another beautiful rendition. The composition, though again not very fresh, does create an impact with its stretched notes and abrupt hookline. The Punjabi intermission towards the end was unexpected, but amazing. The arrangements are soulful, with great use of guitar and piano.
The seemingly debutant duo Saurabh-Vaibhav come up with a song tailor-made for Mika, Sweety Slowly Slowly, but I must say, the song itself isn’t bad. Though Mika, as is his habit, eats up half of each word in the lyrics, the entertaining composition coupled with the nice groovy beats makes for an entertaining but situational listen! I don’t understand why Mika drops the “z” from “badtameez“, the “se” from “Please” and so on, in the antara, though!
Probably the grooviest of the groovy numbers is what I’ve saved for the end — Bom Diggy Diggy. Now, this isn’t the kind of song I usually like. But I’ve got to admit, Zack Knight has churned up something really catchy here! Sounding a lot like those English pop songs until the Punjabi/Rajasthani interruption in the middle, the song really holds your attention from the initial harmonium portion. Of course, T-Series must’ve had to buy rights to Zack Knight’s single from 2017 ‘Bom Diggy’, but it has turned out to be worth the deal. Jasmin Walia’s voice is cute, despite the numerous mispronunciations.


Overall, this is an album full of club numbers, each one different from the rest, but it is the soulful song that stands out of the bunch of club songs, and a well-made club song adapted from a pop song by an independent artist, steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7 + 6 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 7 + 8.5 + 7 + 8.5 = 59.5

Album Percentage: 74.38%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Yaar Hoon Main = Bom Diggy Diggy > Subah Subah = Kaun Nachdi > Sweety Slowly Slowly = Dil Chori = Lakk Mera Hit > Chhote Chhote Peg

 

Which is your favourite song from Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 02 (from previous albums) + 03 (from Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety) = 05

OCTOBER 2017 ROUND-UP (CHEF, TU HAI MERA SUNDAY, RANCHI DIARIES, GOLMAAL AGAIN, JIA AUR JIA — Mini Music Reviews) + Important Announcement!!


The Important Announcement

Due to the scarcity of time, from now on, I will sum up the entire month’s reviews in a set of two articles each month, one usually around the 15th of the month and the other towards the end. Of course, certain albums that I feel need a separate post (either because they might have many songs, or be spectacular albums, or even if the movies are highly awaited ones) I will do so for those albums. I will reveal the chosen album for this month — it’ll be “Secret Superstar” — I don’t guarantee it’ll be rated very high, but because of the buzz surrounding it, it requires a separate post, I feel! Meanwhile, the usual monthly awards posts will sum everything up once again at the end of every month in the form of awards. I really hope this format helps me balance my schedule! And I can’t wait to return to my normal long posts — till then enjoy your luck of getting to read short reviews from my side!!


October 2017 Round-Up

So this post will cover the reviews for the all but two of October releases that have already released — ‘Chef’ by Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik, ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’ by Amartya Rahut (Bobo), ‘Ranchi Diaries’ by Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran, ‘Golmaal Again’ by Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George-DJ Chetas & Abhishek Arora, and ‘Jia Aur Jia’ by Sachin Gupta, Nisschal Zaveri & Sameer Nichani. There will be separate reviews for ‘Secret Superstar’ and ‘Rukh’, both by Amit Trivedi.



♦ A Delectable Treat For The Ears: CHEF Music Review

♪ Music by: Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik
♪ Lyrics by: Ankur Tewari & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to ‘Tere Mere’: Saavn
Buy ‘Tere Mere’: iTunes


Raghu Dixit starts off the album with Shugal Laga Le, a song having a heavy folk influence from Kerala. The backing vocalists provide that freshness associated with Kerala, and Raghu’s characteristic voice makes it all the more intriguing to listen to. In his arrangements too, he adds a dash of everything, and especially those percussions are mind blowing, along with the banjo. Ankur’s lyrics made me acquainted with a new phrase “Shugal Laga Le” meaning “find a hobby, or find something to do”. The next song by him is also reliant on folk music, this time Celtic/Irish. Banjaara is steeped heavily on the beautiful flutes that characterise Irish music, with amazing percussion and backing vocals yet again. Vishal Dadlani does great justice to the sing with those power-packed vocals. The song is one of those many motivational songs that Vishal gets to sing in Bollywood, except that this time, it has a whole new style to it. The mellow Darmiyaan, exudes a positivity in spite of the fact that it is a sad song — mostly because of Raghu’s ebullience. A splendid guitar backdrop makes it simple and sweet, and Raghu’s diction has to be lauded. Raghu takes forth the melancholia in a more Bollywood-ish way in Khoya Khoya, which I rank as the best of the album — underrated Shahid Mallya taking charge of the vocals in a very beautiful way, and Dixit’s composition has that old-world-charm to it. The sarangi is quite impressive here! The alternative rock set up will make this one loveable to many! Raghu’s last song on the album is the effervescent Tan Tan, rendered with spunk by Nikhita Gandhi, the only female vocalist on the album. In her texture, she gives off vibes of Shalmali and Shefali. Guest composer Amaal Mallik, whose song Tere Mere was also removed from the album later, produces a song you can immediately tell is by him. That doesn’t make its richness diluted, though — it’s still wonderful, with the nice dholak rhythm accompanying Armaan Malik’s beautiful voice. Also, Rashmi-Virag’s lyrics are amazing!
All in all, Chef is one of the best albums of the year in that it is a clever mix of melancholia, inspiration and romance. Raghu Dixit must sign more and more Bollywood films — I firmly believe that this is his best Bollywood album yet!

Total Points Scored by This Album (in the order mentioned in the review): 4 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 88.3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Banjaara = Khoya Khoya > Tan Tan > Tere Mere = Shugal Laga Le = Darmiyaan



♦ A Perfect Sunday Album: TU HAI MERA SUNDAY Music Review

♪ Music by: Amartya Rahut
♪ Lyrics by: Milind Dhaimade
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 29th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of Arijit’s two songs, the classically-steeped sad song Dhundlo Tum fares better, with an addictive strings orchestra accompanying it, and it quickly steers away from the Bhatt-ish genre that it starts off with. Had that continued, it wouldn’t have been half as good. The digital Sitar is beautiful. His other song, Thodi Si Jagah, is also classical-based for some initial parts, before it turns into an upbeat number that loses itself halfway through the song. The rock backdrop ofthe hook line couldn’t have been more clichéd. Arijit’s vocal prowess is clearly showcased in the song though. It is Amartya’s violin solo that impresses though, with its distinct classical tune. The title song, Tu Hai Mera Sunday, takes a pleasant Christmassy turn, with soft jazz making your ears happy. Shalmali renders it with a familiarity that makes you feel amazing. The brass portions have been done really well here, as are the drums. The clarinet and piano is wonderful too. It is nothing more than the lyrics that make it sound even more personal though. Ash King’s Yeh Mera Man is a pleasant departure from his previous song ‘Bandook Meri Laila’ (A Gentleman) and brings him back to his comfort zone. Again, a jazzy tune gives the song a kind of spring, and that whistle portion is so pleasantly surprising and charming, it is hard to dislike. The guitars are impressive here. Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai, a clubbish number sung by Nandini Srikar, is probably the weakest of the album, where the tune and the arrangement are just mismatched; the hookline sounds like this song was pitched for the situation of ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ (Don) before ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ was finalised.
Amartya’s best album to date provides us with a nice mix of classical music, jazz music and a banal club number! This album will go highly underrated and unnoticed though!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album (in order mentioned in the review): 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dhundhlo Tum > Thodi Si Jagah = Tu Hai Mera Sunday > Yeh Mera Man > Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai



♦ Uninteresting Diaries: RANCHI DIARIES Music Review

♪ Music by: Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran
♪ Lyrics by: Nickk, Manoj Muntashir, Tony Kakkar & Sattwik Mohanty
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 13th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Some newcomer Nickk is — he has just been made to make another ‘Baby Doll’, now that Meet Bros. just be refusing to do it. However, Fashion Queen has something in addition to the usual ‘Baby Doll’ sequels — an Arabic strings backdrop that just helps it as much as a car can help you fly. The new singer Raahi seems disillusioned with the ideals that it is okay to sing like Kanika Kapoor if you aren’t her. The composer’s rap is dumb. Helicopter‘s lyricist and composer Tony Kakkar uses the word ‘helicopter’ as a metaphor for ‘getting high’. 😶 Siblings Tony and Neha render it with as much mediocrity as they can muster. I can’t believe Tony is the same guy behind ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D) and ‘Khuda Bhi’ (Ek Paheli Leela), but then he has made ‘Ek Do Teen Chaar’ (Ek Paheli Leela) and ‘Do Peg Maar’ (One Night Stand). Jeet Gannguli’s Thoda Aur is the composer’s usual pathos-filled romantic number — you would think that after a year-long break, he would return with something pleasant. But it is the same old Arijit-Palak love story. And the irony is that this song sounds like ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D). So did Tony help him here instead of making his own song better? 😏 The last song is a banal Mika solo Godfather, composed by Pritam’s former assistants Bobby-Imran, which I couldn’t even finish once when I started to listen to it.
This is a Hodge-podge of the worst songs from the weirdest mix of composers ever.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2 + 1.5 + 3 + 0.5 = 7

Album Percentage: 35%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thoda Aur > Fashion Queen > Helicopter > Godfather



♦ Amaal Ka Kamaal (Again): GOLMAAL AGAIN Music Review

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George, DJ Chetas, Abhishek Arora, Anu Malik & Raamlaxman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar & Rahat Indori
♪ Music Label: T-Series [“Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 6th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 20th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate”: Saavn


The album to the much-awaited fourth instalment to the ‘Golmaal’ series starts with the Title Track, where South film composer Thaman S. is called in just to do that clichéd Kuthu rhythm we are all bored of. Brijesh Shandilya does well as the lead male singer, but Aditi Singh Sharma sounds utterly replaceable. She gets another song, Itna Sannata Kyun Hai, composed by Lijo George and DJ Chetas, where her part towers over her male co-singer Amit Mishra’s parts. The hookline is like a desperate scream in our ears, to make noise. The EDM after the hookline is so bad, I can’t describe it. Amaal Mallik, lead composer, gets two songs, where one is obviously a 90s remake. ‘Neend Churayi Meri’ (Ishq) is the privileged song, named by the company as Maine Tujhko Dekha. The song’s best part is that Neeraj Sridhar returns after a long time to sing a song that is tailor-made for his song. Sukriti Kakar complements him well, but the song is better as an individual song than it is as a remake. Had the hookline been original, it would have been amazing! Amaal’s second song happens to be the album’s best — Hum Nahi Sudhrenge gives those rays of positivity like ‘Apna Har Din’ did in ‘Golmaal 3’. Though the song is similar to Amaal’s other EDM numbers like “Sooraj Dooba Hai”, “Buddhu Sa Mann” and “Zindagi Aa Raha Hoon Main”, it works well because of its positivity and Armaan yet again sings charmingly! What Saregama holds of the album is an unplugged, slow-paced version of ‘Maine Pyaar Kiya’s Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate, sung very simply by Nikhil D’Souza and Anushka Manchanda, and arranged soothingly by Abhishek Arora (of Abhishek-Akshay) and Samyuktha Narendran. It doesn’t work too much though, in spite of not changing much from the old song.
The worst Golmaal album is held up solely by Amaal’s songs (or song).


Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 = 16

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hum Nahi Sudhrenge > Maine Tujhko Dekha = Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate > Itna Sannata Kyun Hai = Golmaal Again (Title Track)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 35 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Golmaal Again) = 37


♦ Nisschal O Nisschal, Aur Compose Karo! : JIA AUR JIA Music Review

♪ Music by: Nisschal Zaveri, Sachin Gupta, Sameer Nichani & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Mudassar Aziz, Raqueeb Alam, Vachaspati Mishra & Hasrat Jaipuri
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company [“Jia O Jia Reprise” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 17th October 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Jia O Jia Reprise”: Saavn


The songs by Sachin Gupta start off the album, and though they do not impress you immediately, you do get attuned to them on hearing them for a couple of times. Na Shukre is a wild rock song about carefree girls, and Smita Malhotra makes a rocking debut with her vocals in this, the rock guitars played wonderfully. Shivani Bhayana’s Naach Basanti, on the other hand, is a bit too rowdy to go with its amazing club arrangements, but apparently by the lyrics, it is supposed to be some sort of an ode to “Sholay”. Many of the small additions by Gupta in this song happen to catch your attention, like the techno sounds at the beginning, and the folksy portion at the end.
The newcomer composer, Nisschal Zaveri, steps in for the rest of the songs (with lyrics) and I must say, he does quite an amazing job in his first album itself. His lullaby-ish, classical-based Na Jaa appears in two versions, one in Asees Kaur’s voice, with a stark resemblance to her singing in ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Dobaara), while the other is in Nandini Srikar’s voice. Obviously, Nandini’s version wins my heart because of her seasoned voice and more classically inclined singing. The Tabla in this song has to be mentioned, as do the strings, guitars and mandolin. The arrangements overpower the voice of Asees in her version, another drawback of that version. Nandini’s version has everything that the music buff longs for in a good song.
Zaveri’s other song, released by Saregama, is a reprise of Shankar-Jaikishan-Mohd. Rafi classic Jia O Jia, and is an apt remake of the song, with an upbeat clubbish sound, one of the freshest remakes I’ve heard this year. The song feels like a splash of water on your face — despite being a remake, Zaveri uses his creativity to make it a bit unconventional, without being bogged down by the thought of what’s popular these days. The synth has been used amazingly, and the backing chorus singing “Jia O” after every hook is just sweet! Jyotica sounds amazing in this song, the least she has sounded like Neha Kakkar ever! But Rashid Ali, being heard after a long time, falls flat due to the excessive programming done to his voice. The Latino turn of sound midway into the song takes time to get used to, but is awesome!
The background score composer for the film, Sameer Nichani, gets one of his instrumental pieces added to the album, and it is called Jia Aur Jia Theme, and is heavy on Spanish guitars, played in a very sensuous way. It is extremely short at one and a half minute, but soothes your senses for all its worth.
A hidden gem of an album, wherein we find a new composer who must get many, many more songs in Bollywood!! Zaveri scores higher than Gupta here.


 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 23.5

Album Percentage: 78.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Na Jaa By Nandini > Jia O Jia Reprise = Na Jaa = Jia Aur Jia Theme > Na Shukre > Naach Basanti

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 37 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Jia Aur Jia) = 38


I hope that wasn’t too long (though I know it was) but this is what I’m going to have to do until I am a bit more free. I personally liked this method of reviewing and don’t mind continuing it forever too! So maybe, just maybe, you might get the “Secret Superstar” and “Rukh” reviews in this format too, but in separate posts and not clubbed together! Lets see! Till then, enjoy music! 😉