DUOS GOOD(WAAH), SANDEEP-ANU JUDWAA!! (JUDWAA 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Meet Bros., Sandeep Shirodkar & Anu Malik
♪ Lyrics by: Dev Kohli, Danish Sabri & Sonu Saggu
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 29th September 2017

Judwaa 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Judwaa 2 is an upcoming Bollywood comedy movie, starring Varun Dhawan (x2), Jacqueline Fernandez and Taapsee Pannu. The film is directed by David Dhawan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. The film’s title indicates that it a sequel to 1996’s ‘Judwaa’, because in this era of intolerance, we sadly cannot tolerate a remake which would just make the 90s kids conscious of how old they are that a movie from the 90s is being remade! Anyway, the film looks like a typical David Dhawan film, and that means mindless fun. The music in a David Dhawan film is usually light too, and recently it has been Sajid-Wajid who have been composing for his films, but because it is the latest trend, Dhawan also tries the multicomposer formula for this album. Sajid-Wajid are part of the album; his albums are incomplete without them, but only one song this time. The other two composers are Meet Bros., composing an original track, and Sandeep Shirodkar (a well-known background score composer) gets to remake two songs from Anu Malik’s original album to ‘Judwaa’. Sandeep had scored the BGM for ‘Chashme Baddoor’and ‘Main Tera Hero’ so we know how he got onto this album, and not Tanishk Bagchi, the usual go-to for remakes. So let’s see how good this album is!


1. Chalti Hai Kya Nau Se Barah

Singers ~ Dev Negi & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Anu Malik, Music Recreated by ~ Sandeep Shirodkar, Lyrics by ~ Dev Kohli

Obviously, the makers open the album with the remake of ‘Tan Tana Tan’ and very creatively name it ‘Chalti Hai Kya Nau Se Barah’. Now, the composer who has been roped in for this album, only to do the remakes, Sandeep Shirodkar, has kept most of the song intact. The only aberration he does to old song, is that he cuts out two lines of the antaras, in both antaras. And the song still sounds good. Also, he makes the pace of the song quicker, making it more enjoyable in today’s times. I appreciate how he didn’t add any composition of his own, and though it doesn’t make the song excellent either, at least it doesn’t add any atrocious new sounds to this song. All the iconic pieces from the old song, like the “Tyaun Tyaun” music that begins it, and the female singer repeating the hookline after the male singer, have been retained, and that will increase the song’s nostalgia value, for the 90s kids, who now will realise they’re eighteen-plus year olds. 😄 Also, Sandeep’s sounds are glitzier than Anu’s from the old song, and definitely has a lot more going on, like the amazing electric guitars, synthetic strings and the whole club setting. The singers do justice to the song, and Dev Negi surprises, singing a song I never thought I’d hear him sing. On the other hand, Neha Kakkar’s portions seemed forced into the song, just for the sake of giving Jacqueline and Taapsee something to say. The lyrics by Dev Kohli have been retained completely. A good remake with nothing much tampered with.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Suno Ganpati Bappa Morya

Singer ~ Amit Mishra, Music by ~ Sajid-Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

Since this album is basically an album of remakes interspersed with an equal number of original songs, the first original song appears now. Sajid-Wajid, after that atrocious album ‘Daddy’, return here, with a director who always gets the best out of them. However, I’m not too sure of that after listening to this song. The composition is a good one, with only the hookline sounding contrived. The antara especially has an amazing composition; something Sajid-Wajid should do more! I particularly loved the fast paced line in the antara. Amit Mishra delivers the song with an equal amount of zest, and presents the picture of a naughty Varun Dhawan’s character very well, through his slight gimmicks throughout the song. Sajid-Wajid, as always, though, score with their arrangements. The foreign band Pandora, was an amazing inclusion here in this (supposedly) Ganpati song. The band brings in cool instrumental pieces like that signature trumpet of the song, the amazing percussion that starts the song off, and of course the scintillating Spanish guitars in the antara. An amazing beatboxer performs in the beginning of the song too. Thankfully, this Ganpati song doesn’t get abominated by Sajid-Wajid’s typical dhols, though they do make an entry at the end of the song. The lyrics are unnerving, especially the hook lyrics. But again, what can we expect from a Casanova like Raja? 😂 Not the best David Dhawan has gotten from Sajid-Wajid, but definitely a good song.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Oonchi Hai Building 2.0

Singers ~ Anu Malik & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Anu Malik, Music Recreated by ~ Sandeep Shirodkar, Lyrics by ~ Dev Kohli

I’d like to start by congratulating the makers on naming this remake in an extra-creative way by adding a ‘2.0’ at the end of the song’s name. I’m waiting for Rajinikanth in Shankar’s ‘2.0’ by the way, and these people aren’t helping! Sandeep returns to remake another “gem” from Anu’s original soundtrack for ‘Judwaa’, and sadly, or happily, I don’t know, this one is utterly bad. The original was bad itself, I don’t know how they even thought of remaking it. A cringeworthy replacement of lyrics now makes the female refrain “aaja aaja aaja mere swagger waale raja“, which Neha Kakkar sings so beautifully, “Swagger” sounds like “Sagar”. Anu Malik has clearly redubbed vocals for the song, and it’s not sounding any better. Also, Sandeep adds too many extra noises, that make the song sound yucky. And that extra long, never-ending antara, oh God! I would say SKIP it, but you’re not going to end this year without it falling onto your eardrum in some way or the other.

Rating: 2/5 {I don’t even know why I’m rating it so high so -0.5} = 1.5/5

 

4. Aa Toh Sahi

Singers ~ Meet Bros. & Neha Kakkar, Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap by ~ Roach Killa

The second original song on the album, and the last song on the album, happen to be the same thing. Meet Bros. enter now, with a groovy song following the Tropical House genre, with some delicious EDM to tease our senses. Sadly enough though, along with that, they serve us some of the same old hip-hop stuff that we have been hearing for five years or so. The hookline has been composed nicely, and makes sure that people will get hooked to the song. It is the mukhda that might just prevent the song from growing though. The arrangements sound a lot like those from ‘Nashe Si Chadh Gayi’ (Befikre), and when I checked the music credits, I found out why. Mikey McCleary has programmed the track, and that’s where the amazing international sounding beats came from. The vocals are good enough, and though this is Neha’s third song on the soundtrack, she sounds the best here. Meet Bros, who are pros at imitating Mika, but sounding better than Mika while doing so, do it here too. Roach Killa’s rap is forgettable except that it sounds a lot like Badshah’s ‘Mercy’. Lyrics are middling, using the patriotic “Dil Diya Hai Jaan Bhi Denge” line as a romantic one. 😆 Good, not great. But it definitely had the potential with the amazing beats!

Rating: 3/5


Judwaa 2 is one of the weakest David Dhawan albums, and the reason seems to be that half the album has been made by remaking the songs of ‘Judwaa’. With lack of innovation or creativity, a good album cannot be expected. What ‘Main Tera Hero’, ‘Chashme Baddoor’ had were a) solo composers, and b) original songs. That being said, the duos who made the original songs, Sajid-Wajid and Meet Bros have done well, but Sandeep has done his best to try and make his songs judwaas of Anu’s originals!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 1.5 + 3.5 + 3 = 11.5

Album Percentage: 57.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: ‘Chalti Hai Kya Nau Se Barah = Suno Ganpati Bappa Morya > Aa Toh Sahi > Oonchi Hai Building 2.0

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 33 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 35

 

Which is your favourite song from Judwaa 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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SACHIN-JIGAR STAY GROUNDED!! (BHOOMI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Priya Saraiya, Anvita Dutt, Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 28th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 22nd September 2017

Bhoomi Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Bhoomi is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller starring Sanjay Dutt, Aditi Rao Hydari and Sidhant Gupta in lead roles. The film has been directed by ‘Mary Kom’ and ‘Sarbjit’ fame Omung Kumar, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Sandeep Singh. The film is a revenge saga revolving around a father trying to avenge his daughter, who is a rape victim. Now, this filmmaker Omung Kumar, has been known for making loud and sobby dramatic films, but also, both of his previous films have had amazing music albums as well, featuring in the Music Mastani’s Top 20 Albums of the respective years they released in. While ‘Mary Kom’ featured music by newcomers Shashi-Shivamm, and ‘Sarbjit’ featured a nice mix of T-Series-affiliated artists (Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Jeet Gannguli), and newcomers Shail-Pritesh, this time Omung raises the bar by roping in highly busy composers Sachin-Jigar. Now this is probably the first time I remember seeing the duo compose for a drama like this, so it’ll be something new for them and for us. But expectations are still sky high because of Omung! So let’s see how far above the bhoomi (ground) Sachin-Jigar’s music flies!


1. Trippy Trippy

Singers ~ Neha Kakkar, Benny Dayal, Brijesh Shandilya & Badshah, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Sachin-Jigar’s fifth album of the year starts off with a song I can’t believe they have made!! The song is a club song with a composition that I would expect from someone like Badshah or Yo Yo Honey Singh, and not Sachin-Jigar! The composition is very weird, and not in the good way. It is basically just a typical item song composition, and coming from Sachin-Jigar, that is quite shocking. The male portions especially, are very disappointing. Those are actually the parts that could’ve been the best. Also, the antara is quite similar to their own “Teri Mahima Aprampaar” (Entertainment). The hookline is just Badshah belching out the words in an expressionless tone. Here, it is evident the composers were trying to experiment, just to make the song sound a bit better, but sadly, they couldn’t make those experiments work. For example, the flute and dhols arrangement was clearly done to increase the quirkiness of the song, but it backfires, sadly. The beats too, aren’t addictive or anything — it is just a straightforward song to listen to and forget. The vocals by Neha Kakkar are very disappointing after that amazing rendition of hers in ‘Ghungta’ (Babumoshai Bandookbaaz)! Here she doesn’t even sound half as energetic as she did there! Benny Dayal and Brijesh Shandilya (and of course Badshah) are used very less, and their portions are just repeated over and over. Good, because those parts are very irritating. Also, the ‘Hicky hicky’ sung by Neha is kind of irritating too! The lyrics by Priya Saraiya are the usual fare we get to hear in such songs, and nothing really makes sense. A song that must be a mistake!!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Lag Ja Gale

Singer ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Next up, the composers present a romantic song, very saccharine-sweet, and following a Sufi template to the tee. Again, it is shocking that Sachin-Jigar’s music gets so predictable, but let’s not complain just yet. The composition here is very beautiful, and doesn’t take time to like. The mukhda and antara are especially very beautiful. It is the hook line “tere mere pyaar nu“, that is very predictable and sounds out of place, in an otherwise beautiful song. I can’t remember which, but it sounds an awful lot like a very famous 90s song too. The presence of Rahat almost impeded me from liking the song a lot. His voice has been making songs heavy and inaccessible these days (Like it did for ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ from ‘Baadshaho’), but thankfully, Sachin-Jigar have employed his voice prudently, and not overdone the high pitch or the aalaaps, and it comes out very beautiful. The “Rab Varga” loop gives the song a very unconventionally abrupt start, and it’s one of the best effects of the song. The arrangements by the duo are the trademark Sufi dholaks and tablas, but because of the composition, you bear with it. Also, a wonderful sarangi keeps you engaged throughout the song! The major part of the song also has acoustic guitars, making it a kind of fusion between Sufi and acoustic guitars. Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are very cute, and very simple-sweet. A rare song by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan that will be known for simplicity! I wish there was some innovation though, as it has turned out very predictable!

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Will You Marry Me

Singers ~ Jonita Gandhi & Divya Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Anvita Dutt

After two slightly disappointing songs, Sachin-Jigar get to make a wedding song for the film. Now, this song seems to be one of those disappointing songs which grow with time, because that’s what happened with me. I found it a bit weird at first, but in the successive listens, I started to like it bit by bit. Now this is purely subjective, but I still think Sachin-Jigar didn’t try to make this song (or any song from this film) complicated and layered, and that’s why this is happening. The songs are straightforward, something we hardly get from Sachin-Jigar, and that’s why we might be disappointed at first. Anyway, the composition is a peppy wedding number, complete with Punjabi phrases and effective Indian wedding arrangements. The hookline seems very cheesy at first, but becomes catchy later on. The beginning is quite entertaining, with those dialogues, and after that, Jonita’s weird programmed voice singing something gibberish, I believe. That is one of the best parts of the song. The female chorus too, is very entertaining, and the word “ponga pandit” specifically caught my interest. Lyricist Anvita Dutt has utilised it so nicely. As the hookline gets closer though, the song increases its heard-before-ness, and it becomes an ordinary wedding song by the time the hookline arrives, though it is catchy. The antara is no better. Vocals are entertaining, especially Jonita’s, and the female backing vocalists. Divya gets the same part to sing twice, and he sounds good too, but it is the composition of his parts that sounds too flat. Arrangements consist of digital beats accompanied by Indian wedding instruments like the shehnaai (wonderful interlude on that!), dhols etc. Anvita Dutt’s lyrics are very innovative at parts and very ordinary at parts. A confusing song! You don’t know whether you like it or not!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Kho Diya

Singer ~ Sachin Sanghvi, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

Now comes what I’ve been expecting from Sachin-Jigar ever since ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ released and I loved all the songs. After that, frankly, I didn’t love any Sachin-Jigar song as much as I loved the song ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’, in any of their albums that released. But now, in ‘Bhoomi’, they come up with a deserving opponent for ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ with this song, another ghazal, and in my opinion, even better than ‘Maana Ke Hum…’ itself. I’ll explain why. The composition is genuinely ghazal-like, as in an actual, authentic ghazal! Though that song was also a ghazal, it did have minor Bollywood-ish touches. But in this song, Sachin-Jigar do not bow down to peer pressure in order to make a Bollywood-friendly song. The song still does carry many nuances of Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s style of composition though. I sincerely hope SLB catches this song and ropes Sachin-Jigar in for his next project! The antara is one of the most beautiful compositions I’ve heard in a while. The arrangements too, are amazing, with soothing tablas, divine manjeeras, beautiful Guitars, and scintillating strings that provide an atmosphere of love and divinity. The water drop sounds, so characteristic of SLB, sound beautiful. Sachin Sanghvi says this is his first solo song in Bollywood (He also sang a duet with Shreya Ghoshal in ‘Jayantabhai Ki Luv Story’ before this), and he does his solo debut in a smashing manner! His voice has that amazing metallic touch, which people might mistake for programming, but it is his raw voice! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are yet again, one of the most brilliant she’s written this year. A lovely number that is surely going to stay with me for a long time!!

Rating: 5/5

 

5. Daag

Singer ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

The pathos enters now, as it always does. Of course, because this is an Omung Kumar film after all. There has to be an overtly dramatic sad song. And that happens to be this song. Now, the composition is really good, if I have to judge as per it’s genre. But as an individual song, this doesn’t take me anywhere. After the magic that the former song had me possessed with, this song falls flat! The duo try to lift it up with an intriguing and mysterious arrangement (this guitar riffs do the trick), but how much can a song be able to be saved by good arrangements if the composition isn’t appealing? Sukhwinder adds to the tedium, with his heavy voice, and it sounds very uncomfortable. Even though the composition is so poignant, it all sounds fake due to the overcooked nature of the music and vocals. The hookline itself too, is very tedious. It sounds like something that should have released around 2008. Sadly, this one isn’t memorable at all!

Rating: 3/5

 

6. Jai Mata Di

Singers ~ Ajay Gogavale & Sanjay Dutt, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Srivastava & Utkarsh Naithani

To wrap up the album, Sachin-Jigar present a devotional song. Now Ganeshotsav has ended, and Navratri is about to start, and with the film opening just one day after Navratri starts, it seems an apt decision to include a song entitled ‘Jai Mata Di’ in the album. Now, the song is primarily a very dramatic devotional song again, to make it fit with Omung Kumar standards of drama. However, it fares a bit better than that one, thanks to the divine touch. The composition is amazing, and Sachin-Jigar mould themselves into a very trademark Ajay-Atul mode to compose this one. Actually, if Ajay-Atul had composed for the ‘Sarkar’ series, and the chants would’ve been ‘Jai Mata Di’ instead of ‘Govinda’, then this would have been the perfect background score for the ‘Sarkar’ franchise. To add to the Ajay-Atul feel, Sachin-Jigar even rope in Ajay as the lead vocalist. As always, he aces the song. Sanjay Dutt starts the song with a mantra, bt his interventions throughout the actual song when he sings “Jai Maa Jai Maa’, sound better. The arrangements are good, and Especially the strings are amazing. Other sounds like the tabla, and the pathos-filled composition make it sound like yet another SLB song, a la ‘Gajanana’ (Bajirao Mastani), and ‘Dola Re Dola’ (Devdas). This song isn’t something to enjoy with your earphones, but something to experience in theatres!

Rating: 3.5/5


Bhoomi is a great example of an album composed by talented composers, but which suffers due to their inexperience in the genre of drama. Sachin-Jigar have composed for drama films very less; they usually go for rom-coms or musicals, but in this one, their discomfort is visible while composing for such a film. They still do try to add their own elements into the album, like the quirkiness of ‘Will You Marry Me’, which diffuses into thin air later on in the song. The best song in definitely ‘Kho Diya’, which I’m sure you will agree with, and so might they themselves. Anyway, it is one of those rare occasions where Sachin-Jigar disappoint, and it will surely pass!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 5 + 3 + 3.5 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 71.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kho Diya > Lag Ja Gale > Will You Marry Me = Jai Mata Di > Daag > Trippy Trippy

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhoomi? Please vote for it below! Thanks!! 🙂

A RISHI RICH BEAT SAVES THE POSTER BOYS!! (POSTER BOYS – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Daler Mehndi, Dilip-Sameer, Rishi Rich, Sunai Marathe, Shreyas Iyengar & Sonny Ravan
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Javed Akhtar, Kumaar, Saurabh Pandey & Sonny Ravan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 8th September 2017

Poster Boys Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Poster Boys is an upcoming satirical Bollywood film, starring Sunny Deol, Bobby Deol and Shreyas Talpade in lead roles. The film is an official remake of Shreyas-directed Marathi film ‘Poshter Boyz’, and is also directed by Shreyas Talpade himself. The film is produced by Sunny Sounds Pvt. Ltd., Shreyas Talpade and Deepti Talpade. The film revolves around three men who suffer humiliation in their village when they appear on an advertisement for vasectomy, without their knowledge or permission. The film seems like a comic caper, at the same time trying to create awareness about this. The music, which I actually expect to be bad, just because this film seems like one of those films where music plays a minuscule role, is by four composer entities. Remake master Tanishk Bagchi comes back with a remake here, while Rishi Rich gets to compose an original. The album also serves as the debut vehicle for three new composers, a duo, Sunai Marathe Shreyas Iyengar, and an individual, Sonny Ravan. So let’s see how this album with half its songs by known personalities, and half by newcomers, fares!


1. Kudiyan Shehar Diyan

Singers ~ Daler Mehndi & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Dilip-Sameer & Daler Mehndi, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Javed Akhtar, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

So T-Series messes up with credits again — the old song ‘Kudiya Shehar Di’ (Arjun Pandit; 1999) which this song is a remake of, was credited to Dilip and Sameer Sen, but now they credit Daler Mehndi as its composer! Anyway, Tanishk (the go-to recreator these days) tries to infuse more life into the already lifeless and staid Punjabi number (or so I personally feel), by giving it a better mixed dhol arrangement, and having Neha Kakkar sing the female parts. But replacing one screechy singer (Alka Yagnik in the original) with another screechy singer, is not too wise! The only energy in the song is because of Mehndi’s amazing singing. Tanishk hasn’t actually newly composed anything; the song is just permutation and combination of the parts in the old song. Lyrics are functional, nothing great. An okayish remake of an okayish song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Kendhi Menoo

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Sukriti Kakar & Ikka Singh, Music by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Rishi Rich is in charge of the next song: a nice hip hop number with a peppy and groovy beat that instantly has you hooked. The composition too, is quite catchy. Especially the hookline’s tune. The antara isn’t great, but good enough to go with the amazing beats. The arrangements are the highlight of the song, and those trumpet sounds are some of the best beats in a Bollywood hip-hop song this year. That being said, it isn’t like the song is extraordinary either, just surprisingly good enough and compared to the others in the album, it is a masterpiece. The vocals are nice too, with Yash Narvekar and Sukriti carrying the hip-hop vibe very well. I wish Sukriti wouldn’t mumble though. Ikka’s rap is good too! The lyrics are understandably ordinary. A good hip-hop number with a groovy “Rishi Rich beat”.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Noor-E-Khuda

Singer ~ Kailash Kher, Music by ~ Sunai Marathe & Shreyas Iyengar, Lyrics by ~ Saurabh Pandey

This song is the typical Bollywood sad Qawwali, which gets played in movies whenever things are going wrong. Usually it’s Sukhwinder Singh or Kailash Kher singing these Qawwalis, and sure enough, here, the newcomer duo, Sunai Marathe & Shreyas Iyengar, present the song in Kher’s voice. The composition itself is very maudlin and typically dramatic. The roopak rhythm, as overused as it is, sounds very heavy here, and I am beginning to feel like it should be used less often now! The tablas and claps too, are very typical — nothing new. The lyrics are good as they should be, but again, very typical. Kailash Kher has the tendency to bore in such songs, but here it’s everything else that draws you away from the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

4. The Posterboys Anthem

Singer ~ Shree D, Music by ~ Sonny Ravan, Lyrics by ~ Sonny Ravan

Now the second debutant gets to end the album with something called the “Poster Boys Anthem”, and I must say, it is quite a tedious anthem. And also one of the saddest debuts I’ve seen. The composition is dead, and seems like someone who doesn’t know much about what it takes to make a good song, came out and composed a song for an everyday morcha, and decided to use it here. I don’t even know where this kind of a song would fit as the theme song to a satire as this. The vocals are so bad, it’s unbelievable. SKIP!

Rating: 0.5/5


Poster Boys is yet another bad multicomposer album. It pains us reviewers when our point is proved that the multicomposer trend is slowly corroding the quality of music. Well, actually, the trend isn’t to blame here. The makers could’ve gone for more established and seasoned artists, who would’ve composed some good music!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2.5 + 3.5 + 2 + 0.5 = 8.5

Album Percentage: 42.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kendhi Menoo > Kudiyan Shehar Diyan > Noor-E-Khuda > The Posterboys Anthem

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 30 (from previous albums) + 01 = 31

 

Which is your favourite song from Poster Boys? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DAGAONKAR BABU SANGEETBAAZ!! (BABUMOSHAI BANDOOKBAAZ – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gaurav Dagaonkar, Abhilash-Joel, Debojyoti Mishra & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Ghalib Asad Bhopali & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 17th August 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 25th August 2017

Babumoshai Bandookbaaz Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a Bollywood crime comedy film, starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui and Bidita Bag and directed by Kushan Nandy. The film has been produced by Kiran Shyam Shroff and Ashmith Kunder. The music for this film has been given (five out of six songs) by Gaurav Dagaonkar, a composer we hear in Bollywood quite infrequently. The last time we heard him was in ‘Wah Taj’ when he made a song that nobody heard again. Before that though, he had given some good music for ‘Heartless’ (2014), and ‘Kaafirana’ (Joker; 2012). Hopefully since he’s in charge of the major chunk of the album here, he will do his best. The guest composers are a debutant duo named Abhilash-Joel, who have worked on a scratch composition by Debojyoti Mishra, and built their song around it. Hopefully, they make a great debut! So let’s jump into this bandookbaaz album and hope it is sangeetbaaz!!


1. Barfani (Male) / Barfani (Female)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Orunima Bhattacharya, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

Gaurav Dagaonkar starts off this album with a delightfully haunting (What an oxymoron) classical number, based on raag jog. The composer really pleasantly surprised me with his amazing command over classical notes. The way his notes have come out in such a mellifluous manner, is commendable. The mukhda is an instantly gripping portion, and the hook, ‘jal jaane do‘, is what gives you the goosebumps. The antara, in the ideal way that classical songs usually go, follows a more happy-sounding route, and it contrasts very well with that haunting mukhda. The composition reminds you of many 90s songs, when Bollywood music was so heavily inspired by traditional classical music. The lyrics by Ghalib Asad Bhopali are quite intense, and do justice to the song’s theme quite perfectly. The word ‘barfani‘, is a word I’m hearing for the first time in a Bollywood song in recent years! The song is presented in two versions, male and female — both with the same haunting arrangements, thanks to a wonderful beat given by the jingle bells (ghungroo), and a very beautiful play of the guitars and the Dobro (Shomu Seal) which give a very sitar-ish sound. The male version is sung with impeccable finesse, by Armaan Malik, and I believe this is his first such song, which is so heavily based on classical music. He handles the song beautifully, in the lower octaves, and I believe it is his career’s best performance, solely because he tries something new! Orunima Bhattacharya is in charge of the other version, and she takes up a higher pitch, and aces it, and you can tell she has been classically trained. A beautiful and haunting romantic song to start off the album!

Rating: 4.5/5 for Male Version, 4.5/5 for Female Version

 

2. Aye Saiyan

Singers ~ Orunima Bhattacharya & Vivek Naik, Original Composition & Lyrics Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The second song seems like a song that was a residue from the ‘Anaarkali Of Aarah’ album that released earlier this year. It follows the same folksy vibe, as if there’s a dance going on in the village. Gaurav aces the composition, which is essentially a Bhojpuri folk song, but his music makes it more lively and likeable. The same tune is repeated throughout the song, so it does get a bit tedious towards the end, but I guess that’s how the folk song is. The lyrics are funny, if you understand Bhojpuri. The harmonium (Satyajeet Prabhu) leads the way right from the beginning, giving a very fresh vibe to the song, and the sprightly rhythm and percussions (Satyajeet Jamsandekar) is enjoyable as well! There are amazing dholaks that give the song a rhythm to which you can nod your head! The vocals by Orunima are great here as well, and she showcases her versatility in this song, which is so different from the first one! Vivek Naik has a short interruption, which disturbs more than sounds good. A fun and cute folksy number!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Ghungta

Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Chorus ~ Vivek Naik, Santosh Bote & Rahul Chitnis, Original (Hook) Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, New Composition by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi

Here comes another remake, and this time, it’s incorporated into an item song. But before we apply our judgements to that sentence, let’s listen to the song with an open mind. Because when I did that, I really enjoyed the song, thanks to Gaurav Dagaonkar’s enjoyable music, and Neha Kakkar’s very energetic vocals! The song is the remake of R.D. Burman’s ‘Haye Re Haye Tera Ghungta’ (Dhongi), and what I liked is that the only part taken from the old song is the hook. The only difference is that the girl is singing ‘mera ghungta‘ instead of the boys singing ‘tera ghungta‘. The rest of the composition goes well with that hook, and especially the antara is very catchy, and has a trademark Panchamda touch to it. The arrangements are just as lively, with the signature Maharashtrian dhol-taasha rhythm backing it. But amazing guitars (Arvind Haldipur) welcome the listeners into the antara, and that makes the antara sound even more enticing. The vocals are something that propel the song to heights that might not have been touched, had the singer been different, or if Neha Kakkar had sung even a little bit lifelessly. However, her rendition is lively, and she proves again how much energy her voice has. Ghalib Asad Bhopali’s lyrics are very typical to this genre. One of the better of such songs to release this year.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Chulbuli

Singer ~ Papon, Additional Vocals ~ Vivek Hariharan, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The retro vibe kicks in with the next song, a naughty, mischievous number with a very retro tune. Gaurav Dagaonkar has composed it very well, and right from the opening harmonium bar, you know you are in for a treat. The composer has created a nice vaudevillian-esque tune, resembling the musical style that was prominent in the 50s. The tune of the Mukhda is amazing, and gets you gripped there itself. The lilt of the song is increased by the tempo and the beats. The Antara is irresistible, again having a very retro tune. The arrangements are beautiful; surprisingly, they’re a little less retro-esque. The European touch is high in them, with the accordions, mandolins and chimes being most prominent. However, to balance this old-school vibe, Gaurav throws in a number of wonderful things like electric guitars, drums and brass instruments. The vocals are mellifluous, and what can you expect other than mellifluous when it is the genius Papon behind the mic? His voice is so magnetic, you just can’t pay attention to anything else. Vivek Hariharan joins him in backing vocals. His rendition reminds me of ‘Labon Ka Karobaar’ (Befikre), and so do the arrangements, now that I think of it. Ghalib’s lyrics are great and fun! The best song of the album yet!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Khali Khali

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan, Music by ~ Debojyoti Mishra & Abhilash-Joel

The debutants Abhilash Lakra and Joel Dubba step in for this song, and they are in charge of a melancholic number, that haunts your soul. The composition is very haunting, and has been composed with such notes, that are sure to make you emotional, and frightened at the same time. The pace is very slow, aptly so. The problem arises in the Antara, where the song gets into the Bhatt mode, and as the listener, I started to zone out. And the way it runs after that is very tedious. The duo tries to make up for that with mysterious arrangements, but that too, sounds maudlin. There are amazing strings though, all throughout the song, and even the percussions are great. Mohit Chauhan sounds good, but doesn’t manage to keep our interest in the song. The lyrics are good, again. Not very impressive of a debut.

Rating: 2.5/5


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a pretty surprisingly good album! I was expecting very little from it before the first song came out. After that came out I started hoping for a little more, and the makers just gave more and more after that! Gaurav Dagaonkar finally gives an album that he can be proud of for ages — with Indian classical, folk, European music that proves his versatility. The debutant duo Abhilash-Joel do disappoint relatively, but show promise in their great sense of composition and arrangements. That makes this a quite sangeetbaaz album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4.5 + 2.5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Barfani (Male) = Barfani (Female) = Chulbuli > Aye Saiyan = Ghungta > Khali Khali

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 24 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz) = 26

Which is your favourite song from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A BREACH IN THE RAABTA!! (RAABTA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: JAM8, Meet Bros., Sohrabuddin & J-Star
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Kumaar, Jitendra Raghuvanshi, J-Star & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 3rd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Raabta Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raabta is an upcoming Bollywood romantic reincarnation drama, starring Kriti Sanon, Sushant Singh Rajput, Jim Sarbh, Varun Sharma and Rajkummar Rao. The film is the directorial debut of already many times successful producer, Dinesh Vijan. The film is produced by him along with Homi Adajania, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s official gist is this: “When a human being dies, they lose 21 grams from the body. This, they say, is the weight of the soul. The journey of a soul transcends over space and time… beyond the realms of this earth. This film tells the story of two seemingly ordinary individuals, going about their lives until their paths cross and they realize that they belong with one another. Unaware of a connection that was forged several hundred years ago, Shiv and Saira are inexplicably drawn to each other, and it takes them on a hysterical rollercoaster of love, intrigue, entertainment and life (twice over!). When two souls unite, they become one.” 😴 Hopefully, it is executed well. The music of the film is by JAM8, and a guest composition by Meet Bros. also features on the album. I guess we all know the controver(sies) surrounding the music of the film, due to that one guest song, so there is no point reiterating them. We all know who the actual composer of the songs credited to JAM8 is, but he wishes that his name shouldn’t be associated with ‘Raabta’ because of his policy to only compose for solo-composer albums, so there’s no point in naming him. I just hope the music company learns its lessons and reconsiders it’s actions!! On this grave (😄) note, let’s start with the music review of ‘Raabta’. 


1. Ik Vaari Aa / Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hai pyaar toh kayi dafaa kiya,
Tujhse nahi kiya toh kya kiya,
Tera mera yeh vaasta,
Hai iss zindagi ki daastaan,
Ya phir koi hamaara pehle se raabta?
Toh ikk Vaari aa, aa bhi jaa!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The album starts off with a very happy-go-lucky, romantic club number, with a lilting yet groovy sound. The composition has the stamp of Pritam all over it, and the way it flows is in the trademark way that almost all Pritam songs flow. The song’s melody starts off right with the hook, which is a wonderfully composed piece, that efficiently works in pulling you into the song. The antara following it, too, is very happy-sounding and charming, but it is the last stanza, which I call the ‘conclusion’ because it just doesn’t seem like an antara, is what steals the thunder. That part has been composed in a very entrancing manner, and is a major throwback to the corresponding ‘conclusion’ part in Pritam’s ‘Tu Chahiye’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The high-pitched bridge line that leads to the hookline, is just amazing. The arrangements are quite similar to Pritam’s previous club song arrangements, with the upbeat EDM portions, and that wonderful “chipmunk” that we heard in ‘The Breakup Song’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) last year. There is a Sajid-Wajid touch in the arrangements somewhere (‘Mukhtasar’ from ‘Teri Meri Kahaani’ and ‘Raat Bhar’ from ‘Heropanti’). But on a whole, the EDM has a very international touch to it, and it sounds like JAM8 is trying to recreate Pritam’s club arrangements in an international style. But because I always something out-of-this-world in a Pritam club song, and since this song is by his company, this song was quite underwhelming in that department. The pumped-up portions of the arrangements sometimes clash with Arijit’s super-high-pitch, and that sounds quite odd at times. That brings us to Arijit’s vocals. Definitely not the best he’s performed, but he still manages to carry the song in a quite charismatic way, and doesn’t drive you to sleep like he did in ‘Half Girlfriend’. But of course, the parts where he goes super-high-pitch, made me uncomfortable, and that doesn’t happen with every other singer. In the second version of the song which takes a sans EDM route, and is more reliant on guitars to propel it, everything that sounded wrong in the arrangements is set right. A slight rock guitar backdrop makes the song lighter than it was in the original version, and definitely more enjoyable. The company also replaces the fun chipmunk-like EDM with a nice vocal chorus, which gives off ‘Tum Mile’ vibes somehow,and immediatel removes all Sajid-Wajid vibes. As for the vocals, they have improved due to Jubin’s smooth treatment of the composition, taking care not to sound like he is straining his voice too much, and handling the high notes much better than Arijit did. And the small nuance he takes while singing “yaara” and all of its rhyming words, is just magnificent! In the conclusion stanza, Jubin gets to sing an entirely differently-tuned line that fits in perfectly and sounds as good as its counterpart in the original version. Oh, and it is a welcome change, considering that we have been hearing the original for over a month now. So this reprise is really one of the best reprises to have come out, ever! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are great, and suitable for a fun romantic number. I don’t know what I missed in the first version, but something is surely missing. To cover it up though, the Reprise takes a nice romantic twist!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4.5/5 for Jubin’s Version

 

2. Raabta (Title Track)

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Arijit Singh, Original Composition by ~ Pritam, Music Recreated by ~ JAM8, Original Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya, New Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Hadd se zyaada mohabbat hoti hai jo,
Kehte hain ke ibaadat hoti hai woh,
Kusoor hai, ya koi yeh fitoor hai,
Kyun lage sab kuch andhera hai,
Bas yehi noor hai,
Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”

– Irshad Kamil

The recreation craze continues as ‘Raabta’ (Agent Vinod) is recreated in this movie, which takes its name from that song. But how fortunate are we, that the man who made the original song, is the one who is remaking it (through his company, that is). The track, originally a romantic number, and probably the first time Arijit Singh actually came into large notice, though he had sung other songs before that, has now been remade into a dance track for the film. But this dance track is as far from a regular Bollywoodish dance track as you can imagine. It has a very quite and soothing vibe to it, and a very unexpected twist in the form of a nice interruption wherein JAM8 introduces to Bollywood, a new genre of music called ‘Tropical House’, which sounds like some techno Caribbean music. Anyway, the new composition that the group has made for the remake, is great. The mukhda, sung by newbie (in Bollywood) Nikhita Gandhi, is charming and scintillating, with its romantic vibes really reaching you. The way they have joined it to the hookline of the original song too, is quite cool. The time the song goes downhill is when, after the nice and refreshing Tropical interlude, Arijit comes back to reprise his portion, the antara from the original song, a part I felt didn’t quite merge with this song. Yes, I know that if the hookline adapted well into this song, every other part should too, but I just didn’t feel the antara this time. When it went back to the new composition, I started grooving to the beats again. So it was like a sudden disconnection from the song. But then, JAM8 makes up for it in the fantabulous (which is a very small word to describe it!) ‘conclusion’ part of the song, which has a lilting and entrancing tune. Especially the oddly-but-fantastically placed line, “Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”, is a wonderful bridge from the ‘Conclusion’ to the hookline. And the continuous EDM beats, really infuse life into the song. The composers also add wonderful piano notes occasionally, and the guitars that start off the song are so vibrant! So I guess I have already spoken about the arrangements as much as I could. Moving on to the vocals, Nikhita Gandhi, another singer from the Rahman camp of singers, joins Pritam’s camp for this one (quite similar a story to that of the other well known ‘Gandhi’ singer, Jonita — not sisters!) And she totally owns her debut. Yes, Arijit gets the major part in the song, but because she opens it so smashingly, the listeners get hooked and keep waiting for her voice to return. Sadly, it comes back only for the hooklines. Arijit is his usual self, trying to be charming , succeeding and also acing that aforementioned ‘conclusion’ portion. Irshad Kamil writes the new lyrics for this song, wrapping Amitabh Bhattacharya’s already awesome lyrics with an awesomeness of his own. A song that takes itself miles away from its original, neither better nor worse, but just at par, in a different genre. Barring the copy-paste antara, the song is quite good.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Sadda Move

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh, Pardeep Singh Sran & Raftaar, Additional Vocals ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Bhangra ke rhythm mein, tuney Bharatnatyam kyun milaaya?
Mere mehboob, dekho sadda move!”

– Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya

In the next song, JAM8 cuts out the whole international feel that was looming over the album all this time, to replace it with a street hip-hop number in Punjabi style. And I must say, how disappointed I was, hearing this song. The composer takes a very weird route with this song. There isn’t much by way of composition, but whatever is, sounds like very often recycled Punjabi lines used innumerable times. Like the antaras. And the mukhda just starts off so abruptly, it takes time to adjust to it. Actually, a rap starts the song, and it is quite obnoxious. Raftaar. That “Sadda Move Move” line by Raftaar is so irritating. The hookline of the song, too, isn’t too impressive. Arrangements are what lift the song up for me. That flute loop that plays every now and then is just insane — a glimpse of the trademark Pritam-ish insanity that JAM8 has so far, cruelly kept out of this album. The digital beats are quite groovy, but they don’t really provide anything new and innovative, which is what I would like to hear when I listen to a Punjabi street hip-hop number. The tumbi and “burrrhhhaaaa“s are the typical Punjabi people clichés, thrust into the song just to stereotype Punjabi music. But I must say, the dhols are quite engaging. The vocals are above average — Diljit sounds good but not excellent; probably the composition is barring me from liking his rendition too. On the other hand, his co-singer, Pradeep Singh Sran, who made it big in Bollywood with his song ‘Cutiepie’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), brings back his Labh Janjua-ish voice and steals the listeners’ hearts. Raftaar is strictly annoying, and his rap is least enjoyable. Overall the song has a strong Meet Bros-ish vibe. Legends Amitabh Bhattacharya & Irshad Kamil come together to write something that Kumaar or Shabbir Ahmed would’ve written by themselves, if they had been approached. Quite stereotypical, and ‘enjoyable’ would be an exaggeration. A clear dip in the level of the album. 

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Altamash Faridi & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Tere nishaan, yaadon mein hai,
Tu kyun nahin, taqdeer mein?
Naadaan dil, hai dhoondhta,
Qurbat teri tasveer mein.
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Dekhe khudaya, do aashiqaan diyaan tabaahiyaan
Ve badi lambiyaan si judaiyaan!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After three relatively happy-sounding songs, it was necessary, I guess, for the composers to bring in a touch of pathos in the album. So they bring a sad song sung by Arijit, which I feel is loosely modelled on Pritam’s ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), because of the slight Sufi touch to it. The composition, I have to say, is something that disappointed me highly. I just couldn’t find anything great in it. The song is trying so hard to be emotional, but manages to ve not even one bit emotional! And that almost never happens with Pritam songs. The first two stanzas are composed on the same tune, and that is a major drawback, because it is what makes the song sound very, very monotonous. The very first line of the song made me think, “What?” because the music that starts off the song is very promising! After that it becomes a crying fest, something so overdramatic I wouldn’t have expected it to be a song from a big banner films as ‘Raabta’. The hookline is so unidimensional, it hardly managed to touch my heart as an emotional song should. The composition ends with another “conclusion” stanza, and this time, that stanza is clearly trying to emulate the “conclusion” of ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) with its composition, arrangements and Arijit’s singing style. The arrangements of the song are also very heard-before, and stale arrangements. The Dholak rhythm has gotten so old and typical, I wish no composer uses it in sad songs anymore! The music that starts the song though, the violin one, is very good! And that is what made me believe the rest of the song too, would follow suit. Arijit sings this one with utmost lack of expression, almost like a robot. It seems he spent all his energy in ‘Ik Vaari Aa’. The Faridi brothers pitch in for a good but again, clichéd, Sufi interlude, that only makes the song sound more artificial. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are good, but not amazing. A sad song that makes me sad that it had to be in this film.

Rating: 2/5

 

5. Main Tera Boyfriend

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Neha Kakkar & Meet Bros., Original Composition by ~ J-Star & Sohrabuddin, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Na Na Na Na!

– J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi

Guest composers, Meet Bros, step into the album now, for their remake of the popular track of J-Star’s, ‘Na Na Na Na’. Now there’s a huge controversy regarding who stole the song from whom and blah blah blah. But besides all that, I think the whole nation is raving about the song and how catchy it is. The original was definitely one of the catchiest pop songs of that year and even now, and Meet Bros try to keep its catchiness intact. They have built a typical Bollywoodish composition around it, which sounds least like a Meet Bros. composition, and more like a Pritam one. How coincidental because JAM8’s ‘Sadda Movie’s sounded like a Meet Bros song. The Mukhda starts the song off on a very nice tune, and expectations rise right away. It is the antara that could’ve been better, and repeating each Antara twice was not needed; it just made the song that much longer. The hook… Do I need to speak about it! 😀 The arrangements too, are very similar to Pritam’s, complete with the chipmunk noises here too. The club sounds are great as well, and make the song enjoyable at all points. The vocals are energetic, with Arijit replenishing all his drained energy, and giving a very spunky rendition of the song. Is it just me, or does anyone else also think he sounds amazing in upbeat numbers as well!? Neha cannot match up to her co-singer’s level and performs a bit disappointingly this time. Meet Bros. also come and sing an interlude that would have sounded better had it stayed out of the album. 😥 And after that, there’s a lady’s voice that says “I Wanna be your boyfriend.” 😮 Kumaar’s lyrics are the usual type of lyrics that go into such songs. A song that I didn’t expect much from, since it was a remake, turns out to be quite foot-tapping!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Darasal

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Inkaar mein jo chhupa hai woh ikraar ho!”

– Irshad Kamil

Finally, to finish off the album, JAM8 bring an Atif Aslam romantic melody, something that is quite quintessential in recent T-Series albums. As soon as the song started, it reminded me of ‘Jeena Jeena’ (Badlapur) because of the similar pattern of the guitar piece. The composition is actually very sweet, and it is also slow-paced like ‘Jeena Jeena’, and would suit well for a waltzy arrangement too. But JAM8 choose to keep things minimal and grace the song with nothing more than a nice and sweet guitar riff, and occasional amazing strings. The tune, though slow-paced, grows on you instantly. It is instantly likeable, unlike all the other JAM8 songs in the album, which I took some time to get accustomed to (Except the Jubin ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). I loved the way how they repeated the last line of every antara twice, and the last line of the song thrice. The antara itself is very calm and soothing, and gives a very breezy feel to the song. In the Mukhda, the line where he repeats the words twice, is just outstanding! (“Teri Ada, Ada Pe Marta…” etc.) This is actually what is expected from an ideal romantic comedy. Sadly, it comes in at the end of this album! 😪 Atif’s vocals are some of the best I’ve heard from him in quite a while; he sings the song with a totally different charm than he sung his other songs of late. It draws the picture of the typical boy-next-door image in Bollywood rom-coms. Kamil’s lyrics are just beautiful! Some of them are just salute-worthy, like the one I’ve featured up there at the beginning of this song’s review. Finally, a cute romantic song that befits the film’s romantic aspects. 

Rating: 4.5/5


Raabta is an album I wouldn’t have expected (read, I would have expected much more) from a romantic film like this. Most of the songs are prohibited to be the usual fun-and-frolic that we associate with Pritam, for no specific reason. In fact, the dance song from guests Meet Bros is better than the dance song from JAM8 itself. JAM8 sticks to a very conventional route, save the title track, and only manages to deliver well in two songs in that conventional barrier (‘Darasal’ and ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). But I can’t take away from the album that, as an entire album, it is full of variety and sounds good. It is just lacking on the innovative quotient, and likeability quotient, and hence, the repeat value. ‘Raabta’ means ‘connection’, but there is a slight breach in this Raabta!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 + 3 + 2+ 3.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darasal = Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version) > Raabta (Title Track) > Ik Vaari Aa = Main Tera Boyfriend > Sadda Move > Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 = 17

 

Which is your favourite song from Raabta? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

A TRIED-AND-TESTED MACHINE! (MACHINE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Dr. Zeus & Viju Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Arafat Mehmood, Niket Pandey, Ikka, Mohammed Irfan, Jasmine Sandlas, Shabbir Ahmed & Late Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 17th March 2017

Machine Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Machine is an upcoming Bollywood romantic thriller starring Kiara Advani and Mustafa Burmawalla, who is the son of Abbas Burmawalla. The directors of the film are Abbas-Mustan themselves, and the movie has been produced by Jayantilal Gada, Haresh Patel, Pranay Chokshi, Abbas-Mustan Films productions, and Dhaval Jayantilal Gada. The film revolves around two racing enthusiasts who fall in love. Abbas-Mustan’a films are known as very massy thrillers, and this seems to be no exception. Music seems to play a very important part in their films, and they make it a point to promote their films’ albums heavily before the movie’s release. And they’ve worked quite well with whatever compoosed they’ve worked with in the past. With the exception of their latest movie before this, ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ which had quite a dull album (and it wasn’t a thriller), many of their albums have been hits. They’ve collaborated with Jatin-Lalit (‘Khiladi’), Anu Malik (‘Baazigar’, ‘Baadshaah’, ‘Soldier’, ‘Ajnabee’), Himesh Reshammiya (‘Humraaz’, ‘Taarzan: The Wonder Car’, ‘Aitraaz’, ’36 China Town’) and Pritam (‘Naqaab’, ‘Race’, ‘Players’, ‘Race 2’). All of these albums were quite popular. However, the album to ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’ was below even that. And it was a multicomposer album! This time around, the duo try to change that by roping in a single composer for five songs of the album, and a guest composer for one song. The man behind most of the album here is Tanishk Bagchi, who is currently riding on the success of his two enjoyable songs from ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. He has worked with the duo in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’, for one song (the best song of that album). The guest composer is Dr. Zeus, who also had a song in ‘Kis Kis Ko Pyaar Karoon’. I’m expecting quite a lot from Tanishk though, so let’s jump right in!


1.Itna Tumhe

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Shashaa Tirupati, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Can’t find any lyrics worth this space)

The soundtrack opens wih a romantic song filled with the Bhatts’ templated sound, but also paying “homage” to another old song, which, since it hasn’t been credited, has to be a “coincidence”. The song’s first line itself makes you instantly think of “Aakhir Tumhe Aana Hai” (Yalgaar), but all the coincidences flee at the end of that line, as composer Tanishk Bagchi sets the song to its very own composition that is quite catchy in itself. Now, Tanishk has never really given such a templated song before, at least not in the romance genre of songs, so it takes a little time to get accustomed to the fact that Tanishk has composed it. Till then, though, the song grows on you. The similarities in the first line of the mukhda notwithstanding, the rest of the song fares quite well as a romantic Bollywood song. Some places sound very heavily heard-before, but that doesn’t lessen the likeability in any way. The antara with its high notes sounds a bit uncomfortable to the ears at first, but sets in after a couple of listens. As a whole, it sounds like a song that the Bhatts had reserved but then never got a film to add it into. The English interlude by Shashaa Tirupati sounds very generic, but again, good enough. The arrangements are what makes the song even more likeable — the strings at the beginning are nice, and the digital beats are charming. Not to mention the cool twinkling sounds that Tanishk had added, which adds considerably to the ‘mechanical’ sound of the song, given that the name of the movie is “Machine”. Yasser Desai (who had dented last year with a couple of songs in ‘Beiimaan Love’ which I had no time to review) doesn’t quite fit in with the song, and his voice is kind of hard to digest; it sounds too robotic. Autotuned heavily, it is quite weird to listen to at first, but as everything else does, his voice also sets in later. Shashaa does her English interlude beautifully, but other than that, doesn’t have any other lines. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics are quite laidback, not to mention that the conscious effort to add the “..aana hai” and other rhyming stuff at the end of every hookline sounds a bit too forced! An above average start to the soundtrack, but gets the “Machine” theme right, because of the great arrangements and accidentally mechanical vocals.

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Chatur Naar

Singers ~ Nakash Aziz & Shashaa Tirupati & Ikka, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Niket Pandey, Rap by ~ Ikka

(Utterly banal lyrics!)

Next up we get a party song, which is mandatory in every Abbas-Mustan film, so that they can show the actor driving up in a cool Lamborghini, and then the branded sunglasses of the actress. This time, without Pritam, they have to resort themselves to a quite low-standard party song (I believe that Pritam has given them the best party songs in the past) which tries to be a remake of the classic ‘Ek Chatur Naar’ (Padosan) but fails, because it sounds nothing like it except in bits and parts. And since they haven’t credited the old song’s musicians, I’m taking it to be a ‘spin-off’ like I did for ‘Mere Miyan Gaye England’ (Rangoon). The composition is upbeat and might (notice that I say MIGHT) get Gen Y dancing to its beats, which I still think are too loud for today’s music sensibilities. Though the composition is something I wouldn’t care to listen to again, the arrangements are quite youthful and lively. The beats really do make the song enjoyable, and Tanishk’s offbeat additions make the arrangements all the more weirdly likeable. Weird vocal tweaks added in the weirdest places are quite funny to hear. Otherwise, the composition is quite generic. The vocals are enjoyable as well. Nakash Aziz is enjoying himself in this party track, and his variations make the song worth listening. Shashaa Tirupati sings her lines like a typical club song singer, and she gets her voice programmed heavily as is the tradition in such songs. Ikka’s rap is very short thankfully, and it is not that great either. The other lyrics by Niket Pandey are another set of words more bent towards rhyming instead of making sense. Heard as a club song, it might work. But if you hear it thinking it is a remake, it will spoil the song.

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Brake’An Fail

Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rajveer Singh & Ikka, Music by ~ Dr. Zeus, Lyrics by ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Rap by ~ Ikka

“Teri Meri Kahaani, duniya yaad karegi soch le,
Brake’An ne mereya fail te sajjna, rok saki te rok le!”

– Jasmine Sandlas

Dr. Zeus enters the soundtrack with his guest composition, another club/party song. Abbas-Mustan seriously can’t go without adding at least two of these in their albums! The song surprisingly, shows no resemblance to previous Dr. Zeus songs, and I was really surprised when I couldn’t find any of those screeching ladies and that trademark Dr. Zeus shattering glass in the song! The composition is quite a melancholic one, considering that it is for a club song. I mean, if he removed the club beats, it could just as well go as an undercover agent and place itself in a Sanjay Leela Bhansali soundtrack as the melancholic track. (Okay, just kidding!) The hookline “teri meri kahaani…” is quite catchy, and the rest of the song too, isn’t bad at all. The composition is actually catchy for once. It is one of those Dr. Zeus songs (probably the only one?) that doesn’t irritate. The arrangements are suitable for the song, and this time, Dr. Zeus aptly replaces those screaming ladies (from ‘Happy New Year’s ‘Lovely’ and ‘Ek Paheli Leela’s ‘Desi Look’) with car brake sounds, according to the theme of the movie, car racing. Jasmine’s vocals suit the song well, and the song wouldn’t have had the same impact with somebody else singing it. Rajveer Singh has quite little to contribute but Ikka has an extra long rap in the middle somewhere, which we just have to wait for it to end. Jasmine herself writes the lyrics for this one, and they are completely in Punjabi, and they seem quite meaningless, considering that it is a Club song. A good song from Dr. Zeus after all those screaming ladies and all that shattering glass.

Rating: 3/5

 

4.Tu Hi Toh Mera

Singer ~ Yasser Desai, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood

(Very staid lyrics!)

Tanishk re-enters wih the fourth track of the album and one can’t help but think of Disney Princesses when this track starts. The arrangements really increase the Disney feel of the song. The composition is quite likeable until that jarring Pakistani pop styled line comes up and the hookline that follows too, follows the same template. The parts where the tempo is slow and everything actually sounds like a ballroom dance, are the best parts of the song, while everything else sounds below average, straight out of a Bhatt movie. The arrangements too, excel in the ballroom portions of the song. The sparkling sounds, coupled with the extravagant strings, set very fantastic arrangements to the song, and especially the beginning of the song, which is very waltzy, sounds amazing. But again, the parts before and during the hookline, sound very laidback and clichéd. There is a nice Spanish interlude which is enjoyable as well. Again, Yasser tries to be Arijit desperately, and one can’t help but sit and point out parts where he sounds a LOT like Arijit, which is almost the entire song. It would’ve been better for the makers to have just called in Arijit. Arafat Mehmood’s lyrics here too, are very very heard-before and offer nothing new. A Bhatt-Disney fusion doesn’t work so well.

Rating: 2/5

 

5.Tera Junoon

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

“Jeena muhaal hai abb, tera sawaal hai abb,
De bataa, tu zara, kya naam loon main tere pyaar ka!”

– Arafat Mehmood & Mohammed Irfan

Finally, here comes what I was expecting from Tanishk after he showed us his versatility in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’. The composer takes his much-used desert-nomadic styled arrangements (he used it before in ‘Rabba’ from ‘Sarbjit’) and weaves a wonderful melody through it. The composition is just so melodious, it hooks you right away. It is one of those songs that you end up loving even though they are so ordinary, simple and heard-before. However, what made me love this one in spite of all these factors, was the simplicity of the composition, the fact that the déjà vu in the composition didn’t matter to the makers, and they just presented this song with a very simple coating. The arrangements are fascinating, with the mandolin rising high above everything else, even the strings. The claps give wonderful beats that are the highlight of the song. The overlying Arabic flavour works wonderfully in favour of the song. And the vocals are beautiful! Jubin sings in a way I’ve never heard him sing before, so much so that I hardly recognized him the first time I heard the song, until I read the credits! Well, it just goes to show his versatility. Arafat Mehmood is joined by Mohammed Irfan the singer to write this one, and I must say, the composition saved the lyrics, which resort to weird-sounding words to make it work. A great song hidden in an album of songs that are concentrated more in the “average” zone!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

6. Cheez Badi

Singers ~ Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, Original Composition by ~ Viju Shah, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Tu Cheez Badi hai mast mast, tu cheez badi hai mast!”

– Late Anand Bakshi

The last song of the album was a later addition in that it released much later than the other five tracks did. And since I’m always so late in writing reviews, I get the advantage of adding such latecomer songs in my reviews. 😉 Anyway, about the song. As you might already have gauged by reading the name, the song is a remake (this time an official one) of the 1994 super-duper hit track by Viju Shah (who was one of the most innovative young composers of the time) ‘Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast Mast’ (Mohra). And the man who has been churning out one remake after another, Tanishk Bagchi, is in charge of this one. It was a relief to see him remaking it, instead of T-Series’ other go-to’s for remakes these days, Gourov-Roshin. So after two great 90s songs remade, Tanishk remakes this one with the club theme in mind. It starts off like an ordinary club song, but then that trademark “Pa ni saaaa…” from the old song comes in to indicate that it is a remake of that song. The composition contains almost nothing new except for a short line that Udit Narayan sings (he has redubbed everything for this song; his voice clipping hasn’t been retained from the old song). And yes, that line sounds quite odd in the song. It doesn’t gel in well with the rest of the song. The previous two remakes by Tanishk of course, had the old song’s tune retained, so this one is an odd one out that way. I liked the way he brought the old song’s antara’s tune to become the mukhda and then the antara too, of this version. The arrangements disappoint, with very everyday club beats. The mandolin playing the hookline’s tune provides respite, and so do the electronic tabla beats, but otherwise, the EDM is quite heavy, and too loud as well. The interludes both consist of very heavy EDM that is tough to digest with one of your favourite old songs. I enjoyed the small portion where Tanishk incorporated the old song though, in the second interlude. Vocals by Udit Narayan are awesome; he always manages to sound young! Neha Kakkar too, sings her parts well, without adding unnecessary nuances anywhere. Shabbir Ahmed’s additions to Anand Bakshi’s original lyrics are not any more crazy than the original, and the part which goes “zabardast dast” really calls for a cringe. Not one of Tanishk’s best remakes, but I would say it isn’t his “dosh dosh” as new lyrics have been added, unlike his other remakes (with the exception of the “Badrinath” title song).

Rating: 3/5


Machine seems to be an album miserably bowing down to supposed public demands. There’s a remake, three club songs, three Bhatt-ish romantic songs (of which one excels). Tanishk’s songs range from one sode of the spectrum to the other. If some are utterly boring, some are just as beautiful. Dr. Zeus gets it right with his sole song, but it won’t be something on my playlist for long. A tried-and-tested machine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 3.5 + 2 + 4.5 + 3 = 18

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Junoon > Brake’An Fail > Itna Tumhe = Cheez Badi > Tu Hi Toh Mera = Chatur Naar

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 07 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Machine) = 08

 

Which is your favourite song from Machine? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

SURRENDER YOUR EARS TO THIS ALBUM!! (BADRINATH KI DULHANIA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Tanishk Bagchi, Akhil Sachdeva & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Kumaar, Akhil Sachdeva, Indeevar, Ikka & Badshah
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 14th February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 10th March 2017

Badrinath Ki Dulhania Album Cover

Badrinath Ki Dulhania Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Badrinath Ki Dulhania is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com starring Alia Bhatt and Varun Dhawan. The film is directed by Shashank Khaitan and produced by Karan Johar, Hiroo Yash Johar and Apoorva Mehta. So we had a film in 2014 named ‘Humpty Sharma ki Dulhania’, which was a bit of a sleeper hit, and the cast and crew behind it happens to be the same that is behind this one. But according to the makers, it has no connection to the film except that the director, the producers and even the actors, are exactly the same. This film continues the ‘Dulhania’ franchise (If we can call it a franchise with just two films) in U.P., contrary to the setting in Punjab in the first film. Anyway, over to the musical department. Karan Johar has always delivered back-to-back hit soundtracks, and this should be no exception. I still feel guilty that I misjudged the ‘Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania’ album terribly when it released. After a month or so, it started growing amazingly. And now I love it. So I’ll be careful this time around not to make that mistake again. Here, we get a trio of composers, starting with Bollywood’s newest hit-machine, Amaal Mallik, who has composed two songs. Next up is a newcomer named Akhil Sachdeva, with one song, which hopefully is strong enough to bag him a debutant award this year, and lastly is young talent Tanishk Bagchi, who has been composing for so many multicomposer albums here and there that I’ve lost track. Both Amaal and Tanishk have delivered good songs in the past, and with Karan Johar both have a hit record, so I can’t expect anything more than catchiness (sticking to the rowdy look of the movie’s posters and all) in their tunes. As for Akhil, I hope he has something great in hand! So let’s jump right into this soundtrack!


1. Aashiq Surrender Hua

Singers ~ Amaal Mallik & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

“Arey bhagyawaan, maan bhi jaa, ladna befizool hai,
Pyaar dikhe na kya, aankhon mein padi dhool hai?
Pyaar dikhe na kya, aankhon mein padi dhool hai!!
Taj Mahal banvaana Shah Jahan ki bhool hai,
Uske paas paisa, apne haathon mein toh phool hai!
Tune gusse mein phone mera kaata toh aashiq surrender hua!”

– Shabbir Ahmed

The rowdiness starts from the very first song. And who better to get the catchiness in that rowdiness right than Amaal Mallik, who I believe is following Pritam’s footsteps in this regard? The song is an enjoyable chhed-chhad number, the type of which Bollywood’s music records of the past abound in. But very few fit the bill and actually get everything in the right place. And though this one isn’t PERFECT, it definitely gets you grooving. Amaal’s composition doesn’t rely on complicated turns and meanders for it to get famous. Instead, it takes a very heard-before but enjoyable tune, and carries it forward to make a song that impresses with its simplicity and innocence! The tune is of a type we Indians love to dance to; play it in any wedding and people will dance like crazy even if they don’t know it! And the song will propagate just like that! People will play it somewhere, it will catch on to someone else, and then to someone else, and someone else and someone else. Like a viral fever, but a good one. :p The antaras have been composed very playfully and one cannot miss that overlying South Indian flavour that the beats infuse into the song. That brings us to the arrangements. The aforementioned beats are full of heavy percussion (Dipesh Verma and team) following a kuthu rhythm, which has been laid down by Dipesh Verma, Keyur Barve and Omkar Salunkhe. As of that was not enough, the composer decides to let his assistant Krish Trivedi go all-out with the whistles. The noises with which the song starts off are just so instantly gripping! The occasional brass instruments really bring an Indian-wedding touch to the song. Other digital beats really decorate the song, which would otherwise sound like a recording from a wedding at a village. The song aptly ends with that quintessential ‘play-the-hookline-on-brass-instruments’ trick. Vocals are perfectly enjoyable and help the song to get through to the listener. The composer himself takes the mic and sings the song very efficaciously and mischievously. But of course, nobody sings such songs as well as Shreya Ghoshal, who was a great decision for it, considering that she isn’t getting too many songs like this these days! In her short one-stanza cameo, she does very well, while Amaal carries the rest of the song on his shoulders! Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics are a clever kind of rowdy, and at least they’re decipherable and their meaning comes out clearly! Rowdy but classy!

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Roke Na Ruke Naina

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Haathon ki lakeerein do, milti jahaan hain,
Jisko pata hai bata de, jagah woh kahaan hai..
Ishq mein jaane kaisi yeh bebasi hai,
Dhadkanon se milkar bhi dil tanha hai,
Doori main mitaaoon kaise, jaane na manaaoon kaise, tu bataa?
Roke Na ruke naina, teri ore hai inhe rehna..”

– Kumaar

Next up is a pathos-filled romantic song composed by Amaal. And Amaal has composed this one in one of my favourite styles of composition for sad songs — rustic and earthy. Quite recently we heard ‘Naina’ from Pritam’s ‘Dangal’. Quite similar to that in that the song is a sad song with a traditional tune and traditional instruments. The song starts with a heart-rending sarangi piece, and gets to your heart right away. The composition by Amaal has to be one of his maturest compositions in this genre. The mukhda does a nice job in making the ambience damp and melancholic. The soothing piece is followed by an ethereal hookline, something that isn’t blurted out by the singer and forced onto the listener, but proceeds quite calmly. The antaras have yet some more beautiful notes strung together to make a heard-before but engaging stanza. Amaal treads over both high and low octaves with the antaras, and that one odd line in the antara which is made of high notes, just finds its way directly to your heart. The arrangements do half of Amaal’s work in making listeners teary-eyed. Of course the aforementioned sarangi brings in the Indian part of the pathos, as do the wonderful tablas and the oh-so-majestic flute. But Amaal cleverly tops it with acoustic guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) and drums (Debashish Banerjee), in a kind of soft rock template. When the drums interrupt out of nowhere in the till-then very traditional arrangements, I just couldn’t help but remember ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani). And then Amaal also puts to use nice oriental instruments like the mandolin (Tapas Roy) which sends chills down your spine when they play. The vocals are top-notch; Arijit infuses the rustic touch to them. He splendidly covers both low and high notes impeccably, as always. Kumaar has penned one of his finest lyrics for this song. A beautiful sad song, which excels in the instrumentation department!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Humsafar

Singers ~ Akhil Sachdeva & Mansheel Gujral, Music by ~ Akhil Sachdeva, Lyrics by ~ Akhil Sachdeva

“Jitni haseen ye mulakatein hain, unse bhi pyari teri baatein hain
Baaton mein teri jo kho jaate hain, aaun na hosh mein main kabhi
Baahon mein hai teri zindagi, haaye
Sun mere humsafar, kya tujhe itni si bhi khabar?”

– Akhil Sachdeva

The new composer Akhil Sachdeva enters the album next, with his sole song, a romantic ballad, the type of which we haven’t not heard before in Bollywood. The composition follows the familiar template of Pakistani romantic songs, but nevertheless manages to tug at your heartstrings. The song starts with a nice Punjabi couplet rendered by Mansheel Gujral in her strong voice. The mukhda itself gets you swaying to the song, and it actually makes you feel happy. The hookline here too, is quite subtle, but you still get that forced feel. The antara is soothing, with its low notes, again, making you fall in love with them. But overall, there is nothing innovative in the composition. It kills with its simplicity. The arrangements are basically acoustic guitar (Veljon) riffs and digital beats that don’t really leave any scope for anything else. However, the newcomer adds a wonderful harmonica that magically uplifts the mood whenever it plays. The vocals by the composer are fine, not excellent. At places he sounds a lot like Atif Aslam, but doesn’t get the prolonged notes as right as Atif does. Also, his pronunciation needs a lot of improvement. He needs to work on his ‘jh’ sounds, which come across as ‘zzzzh’. I say this not in a demeaning manner though. On a whole, his rendition is soulful. Mansheel has more of a backing vocalist role here, but stuns in her parts. Akhil himself has written the lyrics here, and he uses all the possible Bollywood romance clichés in one song — ‘sunn mere humsafar’, ‘baahon mein teri kho jaate hain’, ‘tujhe maan loonga khuda‘ and whatnot. Nevertheless, the song makes for a good listen.

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Badri Ki Dulhania (Title Track)

Singers ~ Dev Negi, Neha Kakkar, Monali Thakur & Ikka, Additional Vocals ~ Rajnigandha Shekhawat, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, Rap By ~ Ikka

“Khelan kyun na jaaye, tu hori re rasiya,
Khelan kyun na jaaye, tu hori re rasiya,
Poochhe hain tohe saari guiyaan kahaan hai Badri Ki Dulhania?”

– Shabbir Ahmed

And Tanishk makes a grand entry with the next song, which happens to be the title song of the movie. The song is an enjoyable one with a folksy rhythm and whose upbeat tempo makes you dance and sing along. The song starts with a wonderful folksy line, composed playfully. After that and a rap, Tanishk’s mukhda to the song begins, and it has all the required spunk for a successful Bollywood dance track. And then when we come to the hookline, he cleverly incorporates the tune of the folk number ‘Chalat Musafir’ to Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics. (Or maybe Shabbir wrote it after he composed. Any which way, both of them went about it very cleverly!) The antara is a short stanza that efficiently carries forward the naughtiness and catchiness in the composition. Tanishk has to be commended for this composition, because I’ve never heard such a good song of this genre from him after ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns) and that was what he composed with his friend Vayu. So hats off to him. The arrangements are amazing. The percussion (Dipesh Verma) is topnotch with a strong U.P. flavour to it, and the harmonium (Pradip Pandit) is another star of the song. The song is a holi song, and so the quintessential dhols (Deepak Bhatt) do the needful. The vocals are the strong point of the song. If someone doesn’t like the composition, they’ll fall in love with the song anyway, because of the vocals. Dev Negi, at his exuberant best, renders the male portions spot-on, while the three female vocalists all impress with their respective portions. Neha Kakkar, who takes the major chunk of the female portions, sounds cute, naughty and funny. The way she sings ‘muniya re muniya‘ is enough to melt your heart. Monali, whose ‘Cham Cham’ (Baaghi) is still on the majority of Indians’ playlists, and whose ‘Dhanak’ (Dhanak) is still on mine, renders the antara with ease, but doesn’t sound quite the innocent girl she always sounds, here! It is surprising that Neha sounds more innocent in this song! 😀 And when Neha takes over from Monali in the antara, I couldn’t even recognize Neha the first time I heard the song, and that’s saying something! The third lady vocalist is classical singer Rajnigandha Shekhawat, who sings the introductory folksy lines so beautifully, I’m in love with them. Ikka raps here, and his rap isn’t as irritating as it could have been. Maybe he toned it down a bit. He suits the rustic environment of the song, and doesn’t really rap anything odd. Shabbir Ahmed’s lyrics here are functional, if not good. An apt title song!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Tamma Tamma Again

Singers ~ Bappi Lahiri & Anuradha Paudwal, Chorus ~ Dattatray Mestry, Archana Gore, Arun Ingle, Aparna Ullal, Mandar Apte, Mayuri Patwardhan, Nitin Karandikar, Deepti Rege, Voice-over ~ Ameen Sayani, Original Composition by ~ Bappi Lahiri, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Indeevar, Rap by ~ Badshah

“Been bajaati hui…. NAAGIN!”

– Ameen Sayani

And Tanishk, with his second song, also closes the album, with another remake. If the previous song was a remake, then this one is definitely a remix. The makers have decided to rehash ‘Tamma Tamma’ (Thanedaar) for the movie. And thankfully, they retain the original track and just construct other additional around the sample. The composition by Bappi Lahiri (which was also ‘inspired’ by Mory Kante’s ‘Tama Tama’) was a rage in India when it released and the portion sampled in this song is the mukhda, hookline (obviously!) and one antara. Tanishk has rehashed this so well, I almost disliked it at first. He has used the song-break technique by stopping the song multiple times before actually getting to the hookline, something else which we hardly get to hear completely twice or thrice (or maybe more. I didn’t count!) But then, I realised that I had started liking the song. It happened spontaneously. One moment I was all about ‘Remakes are bad!’ and the next moment I was a freak dancing to a remake. Because it has been done very diligently, not to mention cleverly. Club beats have been added that really enhance the disco touch of the song, and the original voices have been muffled in such a way that actually does make the old song sound ‘old’! Tanishk has added very efficient beats to the hookline, like the electronic tabla. And the interlude, besides containing another interruption by Badshah, also contains a wonderful mandolin solo by Tapas Roy. The only tampering Tanishk has done with the original track is, he has added a new chorus to sing the hook, and it sounds pretty good too. Badshah’s rap does sound agitating at first, but Tanishk has enhanced that too with his nice electronic tabla beats. Ameen Sayani, the RJ of Binaca Geetmala, has done a voiceover, and the “been bajati hui naagin” part is particularly INSANE!!! Tapas Roy’s mandolin returns to play the hookline at the end of the song, and it sounds awesome then! An efficient remake!

Rating: 4/5


Badrinath Ki Dulhania is yet another feather in the cap of so many people. First of all, the composers, two relative youngsters doing so well in the competitive industry, Amaal and Tanishk, who have made two stellar songs each, and one newcomer, Akhil, who plays it safe in his debut. Next, the singers, who have really outdone themselves with their singing in this album! Dev Negi and Amaal Mallik for instance. After that, Karan Johar, because his productions always have enjoyable music, and he gets yet another successful album. Here is an album I would happily surrender my ears to. It is a kind of antidepressant album!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 86%

Final rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Roke na Ruke Naina > and then any order you like

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes: 04 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Badrinath Ki Dulhania) = 06

 

Which is your favourite song from Badrinath Ki Dulhania? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂