DEBUTANTS HIJACK THE ALBUM FROM NUCLEYA!! (HIGH JACK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Nucleya, Anurag Saikia, Rajat Tiwari, SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar
♪ Lyrics by: Akarsh Khurana, Vibha Saraf, SlowCheeta & Rajat Tiwari
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 5th April 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th May 2018

High Jack Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


High Jack is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film starring Sumeet Vyas, Sonalli Seygall, and Mantra Mugdh, directed by Akarsh Khurana and produced by Phantom Films and Viu. The trailer makes it seem like a movie that requires insanely quirky music, and the music is by multiple composers. Nucleya, Anurag Saikia, Rajat Tiwari, SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar are composing for this album, and barring Nucleya, all the other composers are debuting with this album. So, fasten your seatbelts as we take off on this flight that is the album of this film!


Nucleya starts off the album with probably the freshest song I’ve heard in a while, Behka. The song starts with a pleasant guitar strum accompanied by a fresh EDM sound, that runs all throughout the song, and Nucleya does a nice job not making it boring, even though the song runs for four minutes! Vibha Saraf sings one stanza at the beginning, and the same one towards the end; barring that, the song is completely EDM — and good EDM at that! Nucleya is great at this kind of stuff, and it’s nice to see a Bollywood producer actually letting him make it. Anurag Kashyap directed his energies into making a high octane rap song earlier this year in ‘Mukkabaaz’, and now he (because Phantom produced the film) lets him do his signature EDM, which turns out mind blowing.
Nucleya’s other song Aapaatkaleen, is a short theme song with dialogues by the cast members, and another catchy and groovy EDM rhythm, and fun sound effects. It’s nice to see Nucleya get experimental with sound in a Bollywood film.
Anurag Saikia’s Bollywood debut happens with another experimental track, the best of this album, Prabhu Ji. The song appears in two versions. Both versions have the same arrangements, but just sung by two different singers, Asees Kaur and debutant Suvarna Tiwari.
The Asees Kaur Version will definitely be the radio’s favourite, while music lovers would love the Suvarna Tiwari Version, because of the classical singing talent she possesses. At the end of the day, both versions are enjoyable. Anurag Saikia’s composition is a winner, because it is an efficient bhajan-like tune, and the amazing fusion with Electronic music is a wonderful touch, making the song sound extremely fresh. The lyrics by director Akarsh Khurana are great, and intentionally (or unintentionally?) funny, because in such a film you know this isn’t going to be a real bhajan situation, so the lyrics sound all the more quirky!
SlowCheeta and Shwetang Shankar step into Bollywood with Kripya Dhyaan De, another song with some sick electronic programming, especially with the bagpipes. There isn’t much by way of composition here, as it is primarily a rap song, but that too, has been done tastefully. However, it isn’t something that you’ll think of much after listening to it. It’ll play and get over, and you’ll forget about it soon. That’s not saying it isn’t catchy though, and the composers have given it a nice soundscape.
The last composer Rajat Tiwari, also debuting with this album, presents his song Happy Ending Song, also in two versions. Both the First Version and the Second Version go completely acoustic and say so too, in the lyrics by Akarsh Khurana. (“Electronic music kaafi sun liya, isiliye acoustic bajaana hai“). The composition itself is enjoyable, feel-good, much like the rest of the songs in the album, and again the arrangements and vocals are done well. Taaruk Raina is a great find, he sings the song in a charming way in both versions, and while Sumedha Karmahe accompanies him (sounding as usual like she could have sounded better) in the first version, Manasi Mulherkar (sounding like Shefali Alvares). The lyrics are enjoyable and suitable for the end credits scene.


Barring one song, the album is completely high on electronic music, but more than that, it is a launchpad for four talented composers, who kind of hijack the album from Nucleya!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7 + 8.5 + 8.5 + 6 + 7 + 7 = 52

Album Percentage: 74. 3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Prabhu Ji (Both Versions) > Behka > Happy Ending Song (Both Versions) = Aapaatkaaleen > Kripya Dhyaan De

 

Which is your favourite song from High Jack? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A MUSICAL MUKKA FROM YOUNG TALENTS! (MUKKABAAZ – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rachita Arora, Nucleya & Vineet Kumar Singh
♪ Lyrics by: Hussain Haidry, Dr. Sunil Jog & Vineet Kumar Singh
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 20th December 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 12th January 2018

Mukkabaaz Album Cover

 

Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes


Mukkabaaz is an upcoming sports-cum-politics drama directed by Anurag Kashyap, starring Vineet Kumar Singh and Zoya Hussain in lead roles, and Ravi Kishen and Jimmy Shergill in supporting roles. The film’s music has been composed by last year’s debutante Rachita Arora, the composer of ‘Newton’, and features two guest compositions by Nucleya and lead actor Vineet Kumar Singh. I do expect something in the zone of Sneha Khanwalkar in Rachita’s music, because I don’t see why Kashyap would sign her if she didn’t! After musical successes like ‘Gangs Of Wasseypur’ and ‘Bombay Velvet’, let’s see what director Anurag Kashyap has in store for us, with this music album!


The album starts off with a very energising track, Paintra from the DJ Nucleya. Unlike his previous stint in Bollywood, ‘Let’s Nacho’ (Kapoor & Sons), this one actually has some use in the film’s narrative, and it does its job of promoting the film very well. The makers have added another version of it called Paintra (Extended Version), but it only has some hard-hitting dialogues by Jimmy Shergill, who plays the antagonist. The song itself is the typical Nucleya mishmash of interesting digital sounds, with a queer but catchy South Indian vibe to it. The Rap by DIVINE is the highlight of the song, and after a long time we get a meaningful rap in Bollywood, thanks to lyricist and lead actor Vineet Kumar Singh. Vineet himself has composed a song in the album, Adhura Main, a song trying to ape ‘Humni Ke Chhodi Ke’ (Gangs Of Wasseypur) so much so that it has the same singer, grown up now, and the same simplistic harmonium arrangement. Sadly, it doesn’t work — Vineet’s lyrics are the only good thing. The voice is harsh to the ears, and the high notes make you cringe.
The major chunk of the album, which is five songs, belongs to Rachita Arora, the talented young lady who scored for ‘Newton’ last year. Her first song, and my favourite of the album, is Mushkil Hai Apna Meil Priye, a folksy number enriched by Brijesh Shandilya’s vibrant vocals, and Dr. Sunil Jog’s amazing lyrics on class differences between lovers. Rachita arranges it fabulously too, with folksy vibes in the initial parts, that break out into an enjoyable up tempo brass band towards the end. In a similar zone is Bahut Hua Samman, a protest song against politicians, of course. The percussions here are spot-on, and though the composition slackens in between, the amazing vocals by Swaroop Khan keep you hooked. I particularly enjoyed the parts where the sound of the vocalist is muffled; it gives a fun effect. Bohot Dukha Mann is the last of the songs we can hear in any other non-Anurag Kashyap album. It is a classical-based song, quite in the Rahman zone, because of Raag Puriya-Dhanashree, Rahman’s favourite in the 90s. The song itself doesn’t hold together for long, and disintegrates completely after a second antara starts. Rachita Arora and Dev Arijit behind the mic too, fail to pique interest.
The remaining two songs fall into a typical ‘can’t-understand-what’s-happening’ Anurag Kashyap zone. Not that they aren’t enjoyable. Chhipkali is a laugh fest; the first time I heard it, I laughed out loud, and there haven’t been many songs that have made me do that before! The laughing is definitely because of Vijay’s interactive singing, Rachita’s amazing pseudo-retro arrangements and slow tempo, and Hussain Haidry’s lyrics that anyone living in a house infested with lizards would relate to. The ‘Gandhi ke photo ke peechhe‘ gag is hilarious. Saade Teen Baje, on the other hand, is a Bhojpuri-style ladies sangeet number that makes you want to understand why they’re having such a jolly time, if only the lyrics were audible amidst the giggling and the lead vocalist’s accent. Rachita’s typical wedding arrangements are great though.


Not the very best music to come out of an Anurag Kashyap film, but the single by Nucleya is sure to hit the radio. A sizeable punch, given that the composers are new talents!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 9 + 7.5 + 7 + 7.5 + 6.5 = 58

Album Percentage: 72.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mushkil Hai Apna Meil Priye > Bahut Hua Samman = Paintra = Paintra (Extended) = Chhipkali > Bohot Dukha Mann > Saade Teen Baje > Adhura Main

 

What is your favourite song from Mukkabaaz? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂