PRODUCERS KA HALKA HALKA GHUROOR!! (FANNEY KHAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Tanishk Bagchi, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Hasrat Jaipuri
♪ Music Label: T-Series / ‘Badan Pe Sitare’ on Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th July 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd August 20181400x1400bb3

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to ‘Achche Din Ab Aaye Re’: Saavn

Listen to ‘Badan Pe Sitare’: Saavn | Buy on iTunes


Fanney Khan is an upcoming Bollywood film starring Anil Kapoor, Pihu Sand, Rajkummar Rao and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan in crucial roles. The film is directed by Atul Manjrekar and produced by Rakeysh Om Prakash Mehra, Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Kussum Arora, Nishant Pitti, Anil Kapoor, P.S. Bharathi and Rajiv Tandon. The film is an adaptation of the Dutch film ‘Everybody’s Famous’, and it deals with the issue of body-shaming. The music of the film has been composed by Amit Trivedi, with one guest composition, (#NotARemake) by Tanishk Bagchi. This is Trivedi’s fifth album of the year, and out of the four previous ones, ‘Bhavesh Joshi Superhero’ and ‘Pad Man’s were the only solo albums, whereas in ‘Raid’ and ‘Blackmail’, T-Series had forced songs by other composers. Thankfully, in both the albums, the guest songs weren’t bad or frustrating. In fact, in ‘Blackmail’, it was Trivedi who wasn’t at the top of his game. Well, seeing as to how this album is 6/7th his, maybe this will be one of the better ‘multicomposer’ albums of his this year. Let’s dive in!


As is the norm, I usually get the guest composition done with at the beginnjng, or leave it for the very end; here, I will get it over with. So Tanishk’s guest composition Mohabbat, which has left many confused as to whether it’s a remake of Noor Jehan’s ‘Jawaan Hai Mohabbat’, (but which clearly isn’t a remake of that, if you pay attention to the tune), starts the album off. And it is one of the most disappointing original songs by Tanishk. First of all, he creates some weird sounds that hurt the ears, and continues it with grating programming of Sunidhi’s voice that makes her sound horrible! The composition is quite simple, and a bit catchy on and off, but for the most part, it is a very forgettable tune, that could’ve been propped up by Sunidhi’s vocals, if the composer hadn’t programmed it so badly! Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are nothing great, and when the song isn’t interesting, the lyrics don’t really matter that much.

Amit Trivedi too, uses Sunidhi for his first song, Halka Halka, an EDM reimagination of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s famous Qawwali. The difference in Sunidhi’s voice itself shows you what Tanishk had done wrong in the first song. Anyway, the song as a remake, is quite creative — the composer adds a pacy drop to the song after the hookline, and I love the new padding he has composed before the hookline, as the mukhda; it has a beautiful tune, which Sunidhi delivers fascinatingly. However, I didn’t quite like that the hookline has been extended to four lines. The original hookline with two lines was good enough! Divya Kumar complements Sunidhi well, and against the EDM backdrop, both of them, a duo not yet tested by composers, sound magical, and I’m glad Trivedi did try such a contrasting pair for a song.

Trivedi is also made to remake Shankar-Jaikishan-Mohd. Rafi’s iconic Badan Pe Sitare and who better than Sonu Nigam to sing a version of that song? We’ve been hearing the man sing his take on the song ever since I can’t even remember when, and to hear a proper mixed and mastered audio version of him singing the song is a treat for his fans. Amit Trivedi does an awesome job recreating the actual raw orchestra touch of the original song — drums and trumpets owning the arrangements. And obviously, Sonu Nigam owning the song with his energetic and boisterous performance!

The original part of the album is not as exciting as the remake part, sadly, but Amit still manages to give one beautiful song, Achche Din, which has a sweet middle-class touch to it, in both lyrics and tune. Amit’s heartfelt rendition helps the song sound genuine as well, and it suits the setting of Anil Kapoor playing a taxi driver waiting for his fortune to get better. Irshad KamilsK lyrics have a sense of genuineness in them, which propels the song further and Amit’s use of clarinets (I.D. Rao) and flutes is wonderful. But what keeps the song together is the strong composition. The reprise version type of song, Achche Din Ab Aaye Re is the same audio file with a little additional coda at the end, where the lyrics have been tweaked to let us know that Anil Kapoor’s character’s fortune has sparkled.

The rest of the album is sung by Monali Thakur, who is the voice for Pihu Sand, who plays Kapoor’s daughter in the film. The first of the songs, Tere Jaisa Tu Hai, is straight out of the ‘Secret Superstar’ soundtrack, with a less stronger voice than Meghna Mishra. Monali Thakur seems to be struggling with the high notes in this song; the song itself has nothing new to offer beyond the soaring trumpet portions, but then, we heard something similar in ‘Main Kaun Hoon’ (Secret Superstar), so it doesn’t strike me as anything special. Irshad KamklsK lyrics are meaningful, but only good to listen to as long as the song plays; they are easily forgotten after the song ends.

The last song Fu Bai Fu is like those Bollywood medleys that used to feature in our movies, except, since the music label might not possess rights to all the songs, the composer has composed a song and the lyricist sprinkles different lyrics throughout that tune. The songs featured are quite fun to listen to, but nothing beyond that. The use of the Marathi folk song ”’ Bai Fu’ merely raises eyebrows — why was it needed? And was it needed? The arrangements are some of the most bland arrangements Trivedi has provided in recent times — a repetitive loop of the same sounds plays all throughout the song. Monali’s rendition is good in this song, though, and so are her imitations in the interlude. But again, why?


The whole album seems like the producers were way too overconfident with their movie, and in the process, their halka halka ghuroor seems to have made them pay no attention to the quality of the music album! A letdown of a music album for a movie that revolves around music!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6 + 7 + 7 + 7.5 + 7.5 + 6.5 + 6 = 

Album Percentage: 67.86%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Achche Din = Achche Din Ab Aaye Re > Badan Pe Sitaare = Halka Halka > Tere Jaisa Tu Hai > Mohabbat = Fu Bai Fu

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 30 (from previous albums) + 02 = 32

Which is your favourite song from Fanney Khan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

5 SONGS THAT SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN REMADE!! (MUSICAL LIST #1)

So today marks the start of a new section in the blog — The “LISTS” Section, where I’ll be listing songs based on one particular theme, depending on what theme I’m feeling like listing songs about. :p

What better way to start this section off, than doing it in collaboration with one of my close blogger friends, Jemma Rajyaguru from the Girl At The Piano blog! Her blog is full of random musical thoughts, lists of songs, throwbacks to the Golden Era of Bollywood music, and new releases by new and upcoming artists!

Today, we will both be listing five songs each, which we wish would never have been remade! And yes, after reading my list, be sure to read Jemma’s, as her song choices are just as exciting, if not more exciting, than mine!! Correction: they definitely are more exciting!😁 So let’s get started with my five songs so you can check her list out! 🙂 If you want to check it out now though, here it is!

P.S.: I believe no song should be remade, but these are the ones where I just don’t agree with the remake!

P.P.S: These are in no particular order; it isn’t a Top5 list 🙂


1. Mere Rashke Qamar (Pop Song by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan)

• Original Song Details:

Music by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by Ustad Qamar Jalalvi, Sung by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, First Performed in 1988, Music Label: Hi-Tech Music

• Remake Details:

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by Fana Buland Shehri & Manoj Muntashir, Sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Tulsi Kumar, Used in 2017 Bollywood film ‘Baadshaho’, Music Label: T-Series

One would think that nephew Rahat Fateh Ali Khan would object to mauling his uncle’s gem of a qawwali, but instead, he helps maul it even more, with loud and screechy vocals that would even make the laziest person cringe. Tanishk Bagchi’s constant mandolin hook doesn’t help when it keeps repeating itself all the time amidst the din of Rahat and the backing vocalists shouting.


2. Dum Maaro Dum (Hare Rama Hare Krishna; 1971)

• Original Song Details

Music by R.D. Burman, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Asha Bhosle, for the 1971 Bollywood film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’, Music Label: Saregama

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Pritam Chakraborty, New Lyrics by Jaideep Sahni, Sung by Anushka Manchanda, for the 2011 Bollywood film ‘Dum Maaro Dum’, Music Label: T-Series

One of the party songs I doubt Pritam is proud of making, ‘Dum Maaro Dum’ stands high as a song that ruined the original for me big time. Yes, a lot of cool stuff is going on in the music, but the major letdown is Anushka Manchanda’s vocals, where they create a mess of what Asha Bhosle ji and R.D. Burman actually created in the 70s. And don’t even ask me about the rap.


3. Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast (Mohra; 1994)

• Original Song Details

Music by Viju Shah, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Udit Narayan & Kavita Krishnamurthy, for the 1994 Bollywood film ‘Mohra’, Music Label: Venus Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, New Lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed, Sung by Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, for the 2017 Bollywood film ‘Machine’, Music Label: T-Series

Probably the best remake on the list, but again, Tanishk stuck to his mandolin template here, where he kept repeating the hook of the song on mandolin, and though Neha Kakkar sounds passable, Udit Narayan seems to be the saving grace of the song, sounding younger than ever. The awkward dubstep mid way through the song is just *awkward*!


4. Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas (Blackmail; 1973)

• Original Song Details

Music by Kalyanji-Anandji, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan, Sung by Kishore Kumar, for the 1973 Bollywood film ‘Blackmail’, Music Label: Universal Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan retained, Sung by Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neumann Pinto, for the 2016 Bollywood film ‘Wajah Tum Ho’, Music Label: T-Series

Arijit himself wasn’t happy with the way Abhijit Vaghani programmed his voice in this one; and I can’t help but agree! How would you like it if you got to remake a song by the legendary Kishore Kumar, and get your voice all destroyed by electronic touches? To complement Arijit’s bad voice, we had Tulsi Kumar, who surprisingly sounded better!


5. Waqt Ne Kiya Kya Haseen Sitam (Kaagaz Ke Phool; 1959)

• Original Song Details

Music by S.D. Burman, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi, Sung by Geeta Dutt, for the 1959 Bollywood film ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’, Music Label: Saregama-HMV

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Rohan-Vinayak, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi retained, Sung by Amitabh Bachchan, for the 2018 Bollywood film ‘102 Not Out’, Music Label: Saregama

The most recent remake on the list. One would think Amitabh Bachchan ji would be a bit more sensitive when singing old classics as these, but sadly, he drones the song out in such a way, that you wonder “Waqt ne Kiya, kya Haseen sitam”. Rohan-Vinayak literally do nothing but stand and watch as they treat the listeners to almost six minutes of that torture without any enjoyable music in the background either!!


Well, all in all, I feel recreations were fine until they started to be blown out of proportion and being forced into every single album that Bollywood produced. Thanks to Jemma for giving me the mauka and dastoor to vent out my feelings about remakes; I hope you guys enjoyed our collaboration, and please make sure to check out Jemma’s list (it’s amazing)!

Thanks for reading, and stay tuned for more such lists about varied topics! 😁

THE LYRICISTS’ SUCCESSFUL RAID!! (RAID – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Tanishk Bagchi & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir & Indraneel
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 1st March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 16th March 2018

Raid Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Raid is a thriller starring Ajay Devgn, Saurabh Shukla and Ileana D’Cruz, directed by Rajkumar Gupta and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Kumar Mangat Pathak and Abhishek Pathak. The film is about India’s longest raid in the 1980s, and I’m sure all of you have already watched the film; blame my laziness for the late music review. Anyway, the music has been composed by Tanishk Bagchi and Amit Trivedi, both having composed (rather Tanishk having recreated and Trivedi having composed) two songs each.


Once again, T-Series taps into the remake-producing compartment of Tanishk’s brain, but this time, the results are actually not bad! Two Qawwalis of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan have been chosen by the makers here, and Tanishk recreates each of them with finesse and most importantly, respect. Sanu Ek Pal Chain, a soft romantic number, turns out to be the polar opposite of the horrendous ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ (Baadshaho). Tanishk learns from his mistakes and this time the soul of the original song is kept intact. Tanishk’s composition skills are also tested here, because he makes his own antara, and does quite well at it too. The arrangements are similar to how Arko arranges his love songs, with the acoustic sounds being more prominent. Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s rendition is great, and thankfully not ear-piercing like ‘Baadshaho’, and the lyrics by Manoj Muntashir hit the right note.
If “Sanu Ek Pal” was remade well, Nit Khair Manga‘s makeover is splendid, and Tanishk shows some real creativity there. Again, Rahat and Manoj join hands with him for the vocals and lyrics respectively. But if you notice, Tanishk has many more original lines to compose here, and apparently has much more freedom to do what he wants, and it results in some mind-blowing arrangements. The hookline is the peak of the song, where Tanishk starts off with the typical Sufi tabla rhythm, only to stop it, and start it again. It continues in this stop-start fashion all throughout! The trend of playing the hookline on the mandolin is followed here, too, but it sounds great here, and not contrived like it does everywhere else. Rahat manages the vocals beautifully, his nuances on point and very intricate.
Amit’s half of the album is purely situational. What Amit couldn’t probably do, they made Tanishk handle, and what Tanishk probably can’t do, they let Amit handle, as he is, after all, a senior to Tanishk, and knows how to create situational songs!
Black is like the theme song of the movie, but Amit Trivedi gets the 80s setting of the film spot-on in his arrangements for this song. Sukhwinder handles such songs amazingly, and he does so here too. Since the song is situational, it doesn’t grow instantly, but the peak of the song is surely the high pitched line before the hook. The hook, trademark Trivedi stuff, is something that will set your head nodding in its rhythm. The interlude is entertaining too. Indraneel’s lyrics suit the theme well; I guess he is a debutant, have never seen his name as a lyricist before! Amit’s percussions are top-notch, and the trumpets help give the song an authoritative feel.
The other Trivedi song, Jhuk Na Paunga, is your everyday Bollywood patriotic song, but oh, does it work in its intent. Comparisons to ‘Tu Bhoola Jise’ (Airlift) are inevitable, but in its own place, the song works well. It starts off with a typical Trivedi guitar riff followed by a typical Trivedi trumpet piece, and as soon as Papon’s feathery voice kicks in, so do your goosebumps. The mellow hookline is enough to melt the heart of anyone who regards himself a staunch nationalist. Again, the percussions and brass instruments are the highlight of the arrangements, but Amit adds a wonderful tabla rhythm in the antara, which will steal your heart. The chorus towards the end of the song is fascinating — “Toofan Mein Jalti Hui…“. It is small touches like this that make this the best song of the album, but the main reason, is Indraneel’s lyrics. Though the composition might be inaccessible for many of the masses, nobody can say they didn’t connect with the poignant lyrics.


Both the music composers do equally well here, but the lyricists raid the music and take away the spoils!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 7.5 + 8.5 = 31.5

Album Percentage: 78.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Jhuk Na Paunga > Nit Khair Manga > Sanu Ek Pal Chain = Black

 

Which is your favourite song from Raid? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 13 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Raid) = 15

NOTHING ROYAL ABOUT THE ALBUM!! (BAADSHAAHO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Ankit Tiwari, Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Cafe, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, A1 Melody Master – Fana, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Sahir Ludhianvi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 1st September 2017

Baadshaho Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Baadshaho is an upcoming crime action thriller, starring Ajay Devgn, Emraan Hashmi, Vidyut Jammwal, Ileana D’Cruz, Esha Gupta and Sanjay Mishra in lead roles. The film is directed by Milan Luthria, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Milan Luthria. The film follows the story of a gold robbery from a train in the 1970s. The music album is yet another of those albums produced by T-Series wherein a load of people have been hired to remake songs. Here too, we have three remakes, two by Tanishk Bagchi, and one by Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Café, who remake Saint Kabir’s songs. Ankit Tiwari has done the last song, and it is an original song. Let’s see just how un-royal this album is.


1. Mere Rashke Qamar / Mere Rashke Qamar (Female Version) / Mere Rashke Qamar (Remix)

Singers ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan / Tulsi Kumar / Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Additional Vocals by ~ Shabab Sabri & Altamash Faridi, Original Composition by ~ Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ A1 Melody Master – Fana & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, Remix by ~ DJ Chetas

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s Qawwali that has suddenly gotten a popularity spurt, had to be remade in a Bollywood film, and it happens to be this one. It appears in three versions. Tanishk ropes in Rahat, which is an apt decision, but nevertheless, the song is a letdown. Rahat sings in a very painfully high-pitched voice, and Tanishk gives it a very modern and digital based arrangement, making the song lose its soul. And those backing vocalists are just a pain to the ears. Tulsi Kumar’s version is surprisingly less high-pitched and hence less harsh to the ears. But the backing vocalists ruin it again. DJ Chetas’ remix is abominable. The lyrics have been modified to make it more Bollywoodish, but it gets more boring and tedious. The most tedious and loud romantic song ever!

Rating: 2/5 for Rahat Version, 2.5/5 for Tulsi Version, 1/5 for Remix

 

2. Piya More

Singers ~ Neeti Mohan & Mika Singh, Music by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit’s only song in the album is an item song, which features Emraan Hashmi with Sunny Leone. The composer has used the composition of his old song ‘Nasha Sar Pe Chadke Bole’ (Dee Saturday Night), and made it, and that had a very nice 50s-ish sound in the hookline. However, legal issues followed, and he changed the hook tune, making it sound so distorted, it is disgusting. So now I don’t like the hook tune, and the rest of the song was anyway a typical item song tune. Neeti’s vocals are awesome, but Mika (a double track of his vocals, God save us) sounds horrendous. The arrangements are nice, and the sarangi interlude is fun. Lyrics are bad. Could’ve been much better!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

3. Socha Hai / Socha Hai (2nd Version)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan / Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Sahir Ludhianvi, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Again, this song was a remake of ‘Keh Doon Tumhe’ (Deewaar), until they changed it recently, and now it seems like they’ve tried to erase any trace of the old song. I don’t know why. Now it sounds so forced, I don’t know why they would interfere with art that way. The tune seems tweaked and stretched everywhere, to try to take it out of the ‘Keh Doon Tumhe’ mould. The funniest part is that now, there’s no mention of ‘Socha Hai’ in the song, which was there before. The vocals are good, but for Neeti’s portion, it sounds like somebody has a cloth tied around her mouth, which made her voice muffled. That sounds bad! Tanishk’s new antaras are the best parts of the song. Previously they had parts of the old song there too, but sadly those are gone too. Oh and the two versions are just one that is edited out of the other — why couldn’t they just keep it one version?? I don’t know what’s going on, but this song got a horrible makeover.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Short Version, 2.5/5 for Long Version

 

4. Hoshiyar Rehna

Singer ~ Neeraj Arya, Music & Lyrics Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Café

Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Cafe remakes traditional folk songs by Kabirdas. Here they present us with a very staid and clichéd and very preachy folk number that tries to tug at your heart, but is too weak. The song proceeds very monotonously, and the dialogues thrown in increase its heaviness. The arrangements are good with the Rajasthani touch, but again, some variations in terms of arrangements would’ve been welcome! Even Neeraj’s vocals are quite bland. Very straightforward and preachy, boring song.

Rating: 2.5/5


Baadshaho Is the typical below average multicomposer, full of remakes fare. It has four songs, out of which three are remakes, and then it has three versions of the remade songs. The only original song too, sounds like a distorted 50s song. There’s nothing Royal about this album! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2.5 + 1 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 2.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 44.29%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: You Decide!

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 26 (from previous albums) + 03 = 29

 

Which is your favourite song from Baadshaho? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂