NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1 (ITTEFAQ, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR, RIBBON, RAM RATAN, SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA & JULIE 2 – Mini Music Reviews)

November 2017 Round-Up #1

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #1

This round-up covers the following albums of November 2017 releases: ‘Ittefaq’ by Tanishk Bagchi, ‘The House Next Door’ by Girishh G, ‘Ribbon’ by Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai, ‘Ram Ratan’ by Bappi Lahiri, ‘Julie 2’ by Rooh Band, Viju Shah & Javed-Mohsin, and ‘Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana’ by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Zain-Sam-Raees, Rashid Khan & Anand Raj Anand.

The ones that haven’t been covered in this post will be included in the next round-up for November, or will be written about in a separate post all for themselves.



♦ Intense & Intriguing, Ittefaq Se: ITTEFAQ Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi & Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Anjaan, Tanishk Bagchi & Groot
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 23rd October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the song: Saavn
Buy the song: iTunes


The only song from this film is a Atmos-Pop remake of “Raat Baaki” (Namak Halaal), named Ittefaq Se. Tanishk Bagchi is back to his remaking streak, after some nice original music in “Shubh Mangal Saavdhan” with partner Vayu. He keeps the original song intact, and that’s good, and he mysterious vibe that accompanies the song goes well with the setting of the film. The beats are nice as well. The only place the song lacks is the vocals, where Jubin sounds like he always does, and is starting to sound monotonous now, and Nikhita eats up her words while producing an over-stylish voice. I would have preferred Neeti Mohan on this one. The change in lyrics from “Pyaar Se” to “Ittefaq Se” actually fits in really well!


A good remake, that called for better voices behind it!

 

Total Points Scored by This Song: 3.5 

Song Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 38 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Ittefaq) = 39


♦ As Always, Romance Predominates: THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR Music Review

♪ Music by: Girishh G
♪ Lyrics by: Shakeel Azmi, Vayu Srivastava & Chen-Yu Maglin
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 16th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the album: Saavn
Buy the album: iTunes


Girishh G starts the album off with a dulcet Mithoon-with-Bhatts-like melody, O Mere Sanam, that impresses because of its complexity, like every other Mithoon melody. Benny Dayal sings in his trademark husky tone for romantic songs, and the hookline is something that gives you goosebumps. Girissh’s piano is the highlight of the arrangements, while Shakeel Azmi’s lyrics are beautiful with a delicious assemblage of Urdu words. Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai is aptly disturbing, demonic as it is, and the composition is frankly very bad. It is Vayu Srivastava’s lyrics that make the song disturbing, and not because it is scary! Because it is cringeworthy. Suraj Jagan spoils the vocals, his co-singer Shilpa Natarajan could’ve done just fine without him. Xiao Xiao Ma is a haunting Chinese lullaby-ish number, which is good as long as it lasts, volatilizing shortly afterwards. The last track, The House Next Door, is a short instrumental piece, which again has the problem of not being captivating, despite the wonderful use of strings.


Not the best album for Girishh to debut in Bollywood with!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 1.5 + 3 + 3 = 12

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध।< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Mere Sanam > The House Next Door = Xiao Xiao Ma > Ye Waqt Maut Ka Hai

 



♦ Cute Little Ribbon: RIBBON Music Review

♪ Music by: Mikey McCleary & Sagar Desai
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Sagar & Puneet Sharma
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 31st October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Mikey McCleary presents a Sufi rock song, Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai, to start off the album, and also introduces a new singer Aniket Mangrulkar, a singer who is a much better tuned rock singer than the much-in-demand Amit Mishra. The composition by McCleary is irresistible, especially in the hook parts. The rhythms are spot on, and the lyrics too, are meaningful. Sagar Desai, the second composer, comes with a dulcet number, Har Mod Par Umeed Hai, which couldn’t have been better sung by anyone other than Jasleen Royal with her sweet voice. The composition is slow and jazzy, and so it takes some time to love, but it is at par with the first song on the lyrics front.


This seems to be the season for short and sweet (and most importantly, script-driven) soundtracks.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 = 7.5

Album Percentage: 75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Charkha Ghoom Raha Hai > Har Mod Par Umeed Hai



♦ Bappi’s Music Ratan Has Lost Its Shine!: RAM RATAN Music Review

♪ Music by: Bappi Lahiri
♪ Lyrics by: Deepak Sneh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 12th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 3rd November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


So, I only heard this album because the music composer was Bappi Lahiri, and I should’ve realised he is so irrelevant these days as far as composing goes. Nevertheless, here’s the “review” — a highly uninterested one, at that. Nand Lala starts off thinking it is ‘Bairi Piya’ (Devdas), but then goes off into a ‘Maiyya Yashoda’ (Hum Saath Saath Hain), and then becomes cheesier than any Krishna song ever. Palak’s cheap vocals do not help. The composition is bad, as expected, and Bappi doesn’t give anything great in the arrangements either. Instead he adds a cringeworthy English “rap” in the interlude! 😣 Nagada Nagada is the most dated 2000s Gujarati dhol mix, and Raja Hasan and Bhoomi Trivedi are made to sing like pop artists making a Garba album to be sold outside temples. Yeh Hai Dance Bar is as cheesy as its name — and Bappi is singing it himself. He tries to make it full of techno sounds but it flops. Jal Jal Jal Rahi Hain Raatein, starts off as if it could be the best of the album, with the irresistible sensuous tabla beats that R.D. Burman used in ‘Jaane Do Na’ (Saagar), but as soon as Sadhana starts with her outdated voice, it goes downhill. Mohammed Irfan too, sings like Bappi Lahiri! It turns out to be the most cringeworthy song on the album.


Bappi Lahiri clearly has lost his Music Ratan!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 1.5 + 0.5 + 2 = 6.5

Album Percentage: 32.5% 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Why don’t you just skip it? I might be the only one in the world to have had the honour of listening to it!



♦ Reprise Versions Zaroor Sunna: SHAADI MEIN ZAROOR AANA Music Review

♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Raees-Zain-Saim, Rashid Khan & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Kunaal Vermaa, Shakeel Azmi, Kumaar & Gaurav Krishna Bansal
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of the three versions that Jogi appears in, any layman would pick Shafqat’s version as the best – owing to his seasoned voice and classical prowess, and amazing nuances, not to mention Arko’s clever usage of wedding sounds at the beginning. The duet version is spoiled by Yasser trying to ape Shafqat’s singing style, and Arko’s typical duff rhythms with harmonica. The female version by Aakanksha Sharma is good too, where Aakanksha sounds like a better version of Palak Muchhal. The overall composition, though, is typical of Arko now, and he needs to move on from this. It is the sister of ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ and ‘Nazm Nazm’. Kaushik-Akash-Guddu compose Main Hoon Saath Tere for JAM8, another song that relies on the company’s previous success, ‘Zaalima’. The digital tune is tweaked, and Harshdeep gets kicked out, and some notes undergo permutations and combinations, and voila! We get this song. The hookline reminds me of some song, but I cannot remember at all which one! Arijit’s singing is very dull and he seems asleep, but Shivani Bhayana’s female version is pretty good, with different arrangements. The song falls flat in the antara though. It is Pallo Latke by newcomers Raees-Zain-Saim, which surprisingly becomes the song of the album, as an individual song (not including the various versions). As a remake of a Rajasthani folk song, it is surprisingly good, and will do until we get to hear some real Rajasthani folk music in “Padmavati”. Jyotica Tangri sounds amazing here, sweeter than she does in her Neha Kakkar avatar. Yasser spoils the song again, along with Fazilpuria’s annoyingly interrupting rap. The Dr. Zeus-esque tumbi seems out of place in a Rajasthani song though. Rashid Khan returns after a loooooooooong time, to give another typical romantic song Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki, again in three versions, out of which once again, Shafqat’s steals the thunder. The composition is nothing special, it is Rashid’s usual sweet as sugar tune which is oh-so-predictable. Asees sounds sweet in her version, while newcomer Asit Tripathy also does well. Asit’s version scores high because of the beautiful Rajasthani arrangements — the ravanhatta being most prominent. The lyrics resemble those of ‘Main Rang Sharbaton Ka’ (Phata Poster Nikhla Hero), and are good enough until they become very cringeworthy with the Hinglish portion. Last on the album is veteran Anand Raaj Anand’s angsty rock song (in two versions) Mera Intkaam Dekhegi about a boy warning his girlfriend (ex-girlfriend??) that if she rejects him, she will have to see his revenge. Oh, the melodrama. She should just say, “Oh alright, let me get my camera too so the world can see it too.” Krishna hurts the ears with his painful rendition, and Anand’s was skip-worthy right from the beginning.


An ensemble of composers bring five pleasant, but heard-before songs, and are forced to make innumerable versions of them, to make sure we never forget them. No wonder the newcomers steal the cake. 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 4 + 1.5 + 1 = 37

Album Percentage: 67.27%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jogi (Shafqat Version) > Pallo Latke = Jogi (Duet) = Jogi (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Asit) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Shafqat) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Female) = Tu Banja Gali Benaras Ki (Female) > Main Hoon Saath Tere (Male) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Krishna) > Mera Intkaam Dekhegi (Anand)

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 39 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Shaadi Mein Zaroor Aana) = 40

 



♦ Raunchy Diaries: JULIE 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Viju Shah, Rooh Band, Atif Ali & Javed-Mohsin
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan & Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: Divo Music / VMS Music / Publishing Sdn Bhd
♪ Music Released On: 18th September 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Rooh Band & Atif Ali’s debut in Bollywood starts off with quite a corny title song Oh Julie, which is good enough as far as the arrangements and rhythm go, but the vocals and lyrics pull it down; stuff we have heard time and again. Their second song Koi Hausla Toh Hoh, also sung by their leading vocalist Anupam Nair, is the everyday Pakistani pop, something even the Bhatts would resist from including in their albums now, with staid lyrics like “Saanson Ka Chalte Rehna Hi Toh zindagi nahin”. Veteran composer Viju Shah’s stint of three songs for this album is devoid of much electronic disturbance. The romantic song Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai, is a typical 90s melody, in which the singer Mistu Bardhan sounds like Sadhana Sargam does in her live concerts. The voice is harsh to the ears. The reprise version Aise Kya Baat Hai, in Palak Muchhal’s voice, is better only because the voice is more ear-friendly. Otherwise, the song is just as flat and dated. His third song happens to be a raunchy item number, Kharama Kharama, sung by Pawni Pandey, and which surprisingly fares much better, thanks to the irresistible South Indian rhythm. Again, it is bogged down by a typically 90s composition, and the lyrics obviously. Javed-Mohsin, nephews of Sajid-Wajid, present the last song, Mala Seenha, sung by Mamta Sharma, a tedious rehash of their uncles’ item songs with the singer. Again, the rhythms are the only worthy parts of the song.


An album that you will automatically avoid.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2 + 2 + 2.5 + 3 + 3 = 15

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kharama Kharama = Mala Seenha > Aise Kya Baat Hai = Oh Julie > Kabhi Jhootha Lagta Hai = Koi Hausla Toh Hoh



 

Hope you enjoyed this Round-up! Second one coming soon!!

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OCTOBER 2017 ROUND-UP (CHEF, TU HAI MERA SUNDAY, RANCHI DIARIES, GOLMAAL AGAIN, JIA AUR JIA — Mini Music Reviews) + Important Announcement!!


The Important Announcement

Due to the scarcity of time, from now on, I will sum up the entire month’s reviews in a set of two articles each month, one usually around the 15th of the month and the other towards the end. Of course, certain albums that I feel need a separate post (either because they might have many songs, or be spectacular albums, or even if the movies are highly awaited ones) I will do so for those albums. I will reveal the chosen album for this month — it’ll be “Secret Superstar” — I don’t guarantee it’ll be rated very high, but because of the buzz surrounding it, it requires a separate post, I feel! Meanwhile, the usual monthly awards posts will sum everything up once again at the end of every month in the form of awards. I really hope this format helps me balance my schedule! And I can’t wait to return to my normal long posts — till then enjoy your luck of getting to read short reviews from my side!!


October 2017 Round-Up

So this post will cover the reviews for the all but two of October releases that have already released — ‘Chef’ by Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik, ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’ by Amartya Rahut (Bobo), ‘Ranchi Diaries’ by Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran, ‘Golmaal Again’ by Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George-DJ Chetas & Abhishek Arora, and ‘Jia Aur Jia’ by Sachin Gupta, Nisschal Zaveri & Sameer Nichani. There will be separate reviews for ‘Secret Superstar’ and ‘Rukh’, both by Amit Trivedi.



♦ A Delectable Treat For The Ears: CHEF Music Review

♪ Music by: Raghu Dixit & Amaal Mallik
♪ Lyrics by: Ankur Tewari & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to ‘Tere Mere’: Saavn
Buy ‘Tere Mere’: iTunes


Raghu Dixit starts off the album with Shugal Laga Le, a song having a heavy folk influence from Kerala. The backing vocalists provide that freshness associated with Kerala, and Raghu’s characteristic voice makes it all the more intriguing to listen to. In his arrangements too, he adds a dash of everything, and especially those percussions are mind blowing, along with the banjo. Ankur’s lyrics made me acquainted with a new phrase “Shugal Laga Le” meaning “find a hobby, or find something to do”. The next song by him is also reliant on folk music, this time Celtic/Irish. Banjaara is steeped heavily on the beautiful flutes that characterise Irish music, with amazing percussion and backing vocals yet again. Vishal Dadlani does great justice to the sing with those power-packed vocals. The song is one of those many motivational songs that Vishal gets to sing in Bollywood, except that this time, it has a whole new style to it. The mellow Darmiyaan, exudes a positivity in spite of the fact that it is a sad song — mostly because of Raghu’s ebullience. A splendid guitar backdrop makes it simple and sweet, and Raghu’s diction has to be lauded. Raghu takes forth the melancholia in a more Bollywood-ish way in Khoya Khoya, which I rank as the best of the album — underrated Shahid Mallya taking charge of the vocals in a very beautiful way, and Dixit’s composition has that old-world-charm to it. The sarangi is quite impressive here! The alternative rock set up will make this one loveable to many! Raghu’s last song on the album is the effervescent Tan Tan, rendered with spunk by Nikhita Gandhi, the only female vocalist on the album. In her texture, she gives off vibes of Shalmali and Shefali. Guest composer Amaal Mallik, whose song Tere Mere was also removed from the album later, produces a song you can immediately tell is by him. That doesn’t make its richness diluted, though — it’s still wonderful, with the nice dholak rhythm accompanying Armaan Malik’s beautiful voice. Also, Rashmi-Virag’s lyrics are amazing!
All in all, Chef is one of the best albums of the year in that it is a clever mix of melancholia, inspiration and romance. Raghu Dixit must sign more and more Bollywood films — I firmly believe that this is his best Bollywood album yet!

Total Points Scored by This Album (in the order mentioned in the review): 4 + 5 + 4 + 5 + 4.5 + 4 = 26.5

Album Percentage: 88.3%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Banjaara = Khoya Khoya > Tan Tan > Tere Mere = Shugal Laga Le = Darmiyaan



♦ A Perfect Sunday Album: TU HAI MERA SUNDAY Music Review

♪ Music by: Amartya Rahut
♪ Lyrics by: Milind Dhaimade
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 29th September 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 6th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Out of Arijit’s two songs, the classically-steeped sad song Dhundlo Tum fares better, with an addictive strings orchestra accompanying it, and it quickly steers away from the Bhatt-ish genre that it starts off with. Had that continued, it wouldn’t have been half as good. The digital Sitar is beautiful. His other song, Thodi Si Jagah, is also classical-based for some initial parts, before it turns into an upbeat number that loses itself halfway through the song. The rock backdrop ofthe hook line couldn’t have been more clichéd. Arijit’s vocal prowess is clearly showcased in the song though. It is Amartya’s violin solo that impresses though, with its distinct classical tune. The title song, Tu Hai Mera Sunday, takes a pleasant Christmassy turn, with soft jazz making your ears happy. Shalmali renders it with a familiarity that makes you feel amazing. The brass portions have been done really well here, as are the drums. The clarinet and piano is wonderful too. It is nothing more than the lyrics that make it sound even more personal though. Ash King’s Yeh Mera Man is a pleasant departure from his previous song ‘Bandook Meri Laila’ (A Gentleman) and brings him back to his comfort zone. Again, a jazzy tune gives the song a kind of spring, and that whistle portion is so pleasantly surprising and charming, it is hard to dislike. The guitars are impressive here. Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai, a clubbish number sung by Nandini Srikar, is probably the weakest of the album, where the tune and the arrangement are just mismatched; the hookline sounds like this song was pitched for the situation of ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ (Don) before ‘Aaj Ki Raat’ was finalised.
Amartya’s best album to date provides us with a nice mix of classical music, jazz music and a banal club number! This album will go highly underrated and unnoticed though!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album (in order mentioned in the review): 4.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dhundhlo Tum > Thodi Si Jagah = Tu Hai Mera Sunday > Yeh Mera Man > Yeh Jo Pyaar Hai



♦ Uninteresting Diaries: RANCHI DIARIES Music Review

♪ Music by: Nickk, Jeet Gannguli, Tony Kakkar & Bobby-Imran
♪ Lyrics by: Nickk, Manoj Muntashir, Tony Kakkar & Sattwik Mohanty
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 13th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Some newcomer Nickk is — he has just been made to make another ‘Baby Doll’, now that Meet Bros. just be refusing to do it. However, Fashion Queen has something in addition to the usual ‘Baby Doll’ sequels — an Arabic strings backdrop that just helps it as much as a car can help you fly. The new singer Raahi seems disillusioned with the ideals that it is okay to sing like Kanika Kapoor if you aren’t her. The composer’s rap is dumb. Helicopter‘s lyricist and composer Tony Kakkar uses the word ‘helicopter’ as a metaphor for ‘getting high’. 😶 Siblings Tony and Neha render it with as much mediocrity as they can muster. I can’t believe Tony is the same guy behind ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D) and ‘Khuda Bhi’ (Ek Paheli Leela), but then he has made ‘Ek Do Teen Chaar’ (Ek Paheli Leela) and ‘Do Peg Maar’ (One Night Stand). Jeet Gannguli’s Thoda Aur is the composer’s usual pathos-filled romantic number — you would think that after a year-long break, he would return with something pleasant. But it is the same old Arijit-Palak love story. And the irony is that this song sounds like ‘Saawan Aaya Hai’ (Creature 3D). So did Tony help him here instead of making his own song better? 😏 The last song is a banal Mika solo Godfather, composed by Pritam’s former assistants Bobby-Imran, which I couldn’t even finish once when I started to listen to it.
This is a Hodge-podge of the worst songs from the weirdest mix of composers ever.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2 + 1.5 + 3 + 0.5 = 7

Album Percentage: 35%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे <  < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Thoda Aur > Fashion Queen > Helicopter > Godfather



♦ Amaal Ka Kamaal (Again): GOLMAAL AGAIN Music Review

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik, Thaman S., Lijo George, DJ Chetas, Abhishek Arora, Anu Malik & Raamlaxman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar & Rahat Indori
♪ Music Label: T-Series [“Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 6th October 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 20th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate”: Saavn


The album to the much-awaited fourth instalment to the ‘Golmaal’ series starts with the Title Track, where South film composer Thaman S. is called in just to do that clichéd Kuthu rhythm we are all bored of. Brijesh Shandilya does well as the lead male singer, but Aditi Singh Sharma sounds utterly replaceable. She gets another song, Itna Sannata Kyun Hai, composed by Lijo George and DJ Chetas, where her part towers over her male co-singer Amit Mishra’s parts. The hookline is like a desperate scream in our ears, to make noise. The EDM after the hookline is so bad, I can’t describe it. Amaal Mallik, lead composer, gets two songs, where one is obviously a 90s remake. ‘Neend Churayi Meri’ (Ishq) is the privileged song, named by the company as Maine Tujhko Dekha. The song’s best part is that Neeraj Sridhar returns after a long time to sing a song that is tailor-made for his song. Sukriti Kakar complements him well, but the song is better as an individual song than it is as a remake. Had the hookline been original, it would have been amazing! Amaal’s second song happens to be the album’s best — Hum Nahi Sudhrenge gives those rays of positivity like ‘Apna Har Din’ did in ‘Golmaal 3’. Though the song is similar to Amaal’s other EDM numbers like “Sooraj Dooba Hai”, “Buddhu Sa Mann” and “Zindagi Aa Raha Hoon Main”, it works well because of its positivity and Armaan yet again sings charmingly! What Saregama holds of the album is an unplugged, slow-paced version of ‘Maine Pyaar Kiya’s Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate, sung very simply by Nikhil D’Souza and Anushka Manchanda, and arranged soothingly by Abhishek Arora (of Abhishek-Akshay) and Samyuktha Narendran. It doesn’t work too much though, in spite of not changing much from the old song.
The worst Golmaal album is held up solely by Amaal’s songs (or song).


Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 = 16

Album Percentage: 64%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hum Nahi Sudhrenge > Maine Tujhko Dekha = Aate Jaate Hanste Gaate > Itna Sannata Kyun Hai = Golmaal Again (Title Track)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 35 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Golmaal Again) = 37


♦ Nisschal O Nisschal, Aur Compose Karo! : JIA AUR JIA Music Review

♪ Music by: Nisschal Zaveri, Sachin Gupta, Sameer Nichani & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Mudassar Aziz, Raqueeb Alam, Vachaspati Mishra & Hasrat Jaipuri
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company [“Jia O Jia Reprise” on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 17th October 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th October 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes

Listen to “Jia O Jia Reprise”: Saavn


The songs by Sachin Gupta start off the album, and though they do not impress you immediately, you do get attuned to them on hearing them for a couple of times. Na Shukre is a wild rock song about carefree girls, and Smita Malhotra makes a rocking debut with her vocals in this, the rock guitars played wonderfully. Shivani Bhayana’s Naach Basanti, on the other hand, is a bit too rowdy to go with its amazing club arrangements, but apparently by the lyrics, it is supposed to be some sort of an ode to “Sholay”. Many of the small additions by Gupta in this song happen to catch your attention, like the techno sounds at the beginning, and the folksy portion at the end.
The newcomer composer, Nisschal Zaveri, steps in for the rest of the songs (with lyrics) and I must say, he does quite an amazing job in his first album itself. His lullaby-ish, classical-based Na Jaa appears in two versions, one in Asees Kaur’s voice, with a stark resemblance to her singing in ‘Kaari Kaari’ (Dobaara), while the other is in Nandini Srikar’s voice. Obviously, Nandini’s version wins my heart because of her seasoned voice and more classically inclined singing. The Tabla in this song has to be mentioned, as do the strings, guitars and mandolin. The arrangements overpower the voice of Asees in her version, another drawback of that version. Nandini’s version has everything that the music buff longs for in a good song.
Zaveri’s other song, released by Saregama, is a reprise of Shankar-Jaikishan-Mohd. Rafi classic Jia O Jia, and is an apt remake of the song, with an upbeat clubbish sound, one of the freshest remakes I’ve heard this year. The song feels like a splash of water on your face — despite being a remake, Zaveri uses his creativity to make it a bit unconventional, without being bogged down by the thought of what’s popular these days. The synth has been used amazingly, and the backing chorus singing “Jia O” after every hook is just sweet! Jyotica sounds amazing in this song, the least she has sounded like Neha Kakkar ever! But Rashid Ali, being heard after a long time, falls flat due to the excessive programming done to his voice. The Latino turn of sound midway into the song takes time to get used to, but is awesome!
The background score composer for the film, Sameer Nichani, gets one of his instrumental pieces added to the album, and it is called Jia Aur Jia Theme, and is heavy on Spanish guitars, played in a very sensuous way. It is extremely short at one and a half minute, but soothes your senses for all its worth.
A hidden gem of an album, wherein we find a new composer who must get many, many more songs in Bollywood!! Zaveri scores higher than Gupta here.


 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 4 + 4 = 23.5

Album Percentage: 78.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Na Jaa By Nandini > Jia O Jia Reprise = Na Jaa = Jia Aur Jia Theme > Na Shukre > Naach Basanti

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 37 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Jia Aur Jia) = 38


I hope that wasn’t too long (though I know it was) but this is what I’m going to have to do until I am a bit more free. I personally liked this method of reviewing and don’t mind continuing it forever too! So maybe, just maybe, you might get the “Secret Superstar” and “Rukh” reviews in this format too, but in separate posts and not clubbed together! Lets see! Till then, enjoy music! 😉

A TRIPLE-DEBUT TREAT TOILET!! (TOILET: EK PREM KATHA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vickey Prasad, Manas-Shikhar & Sachet-Parampara
♪ Lyrics by: Siddharth-Garima
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 11th August 2017

Toilet – Ek Prem Katha Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Toilet – Ek Prem Katha is an upcoming Bollywood satire, starring Alshay Kumar, Bhumi Pednekar, Divyendu Sharma and Anupam Kher,  directed by Shree Narayan Singh, and produced by Aruna Bhatia, Shital Bhatia, Abundantia, Viacom Motion Pictures, Arjun N. Kapoor and Hitesh Thakkar. The film comes in support of PM Modi’s ‘Swacchh Bharat Abhiyaan’ by raising fingers at the issue of open defecation, prevalent in remote and underdeveloped parts of the country. Now it is a really good topic, but somehow, by the trailer and promos, I am not sure whether it will be carried out in a humorous way without looking dramatic. Anyway, the music, very surprisingly, has been scored by three debutant music composers, two duos and one individual. Vickey Prasad, Manas-Shikhar and Sachet-Parampara are the five lucky people who got to debut in Bollywood with an Akshay Kumar album, and how wonderful an opportunity is that!! I hope they make great use of it though, and provide us with a nice and clean ‘Toilet’! {Sorry for the desperate joke!}


1. Hans Mat Pagli

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam & Shreya Ghoshal, Music by ~ Vickey Prasad

The first newcomer starts off the album with a cute romantic song which sends off a great rural-setting vibe. The song’s composition is nothing innovative as such, but it still manages to hook the listeners, since it is so cute and such a throwback to Bollywood of the 90s. The only grouse I have with the composition is that the hookline sounds a lot like the antara of ‘Pardesi Pardesi’ (Raja Hindustani), which would be where the 90s vibes are coming from. The song is structured quite oddly, with a male mukhda, a male antara, and then a female mukhda followed by a female antara. Why couldn’t they just club the mukhdas together and the antaras together? That way, the listener would get some variation from male to female and then back to a male voice. Anyway, as they wish. The composition for all these stanzas is very cute again. The recording seems a bit faulty and raw, but that’s probably deliberate? The arrangements are again, not anything new or innovative, but that soft Qawwali setting to the hookline gives a soothing feeling, and the dholaks have been played beautifully, as are the plucked string instruments throughout the song, and the guitar itself. There is a wonderful rapid tabla piece before Sonu sings his antara. The rhythm is heard before, but the cuteness of the composition helps you listen to such a rhythm yet again without complaining. The vocals send you back to 2005-2007, when Sonu-Shreya duets were the thing. Every director wanted a Sonu-Shreya duet in their film; sadly, nowadays, that happens only in films where the director knows only about the old singers, and hence his music ends up sounding outdated. But here, there is no datedness whatsoever. It is more like a nostalgia. Both singers do an amazing job, though I somewhere thought that Shreya was struggling with such a high-pitched line in the antara. Siddharth-Garima choose the perfect line for the hookline; it increases the cuteness quotient of the song. The rest of the lyrics are cute too, but not too innovative. A good song to start the album with, but it has its own faults.
Rating: 4/5

 

2. Bakheda

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vickey Prasad

Vickey has the second song to his credit as well, making him the main composer on this album. This song takes a more lively route, but stays a romantic song. As soon as it starts, the folksy vibe hits you, and you are also relieved that Vickey has used a more modern recording style for this one; it proves that the recording was deliberately done that way for the previous song. The composition is a lively one, but the hookline is really a letdown — it is so staid and bland. Also, we have heard such a hook so many times where the mukhda builds up to it, and then after a pause, the hookline takes the song forward. The antaras are very well composed. Sukhwinder, at his usual energetic self, renders the song with ease, and creates a good impact on the listeners. The problem lies in Sunidhi’s vocals, which seem less energetic as usual. It really sounds like she wasn’t interested, or maybe the pitch was too low. That makes her portion sound very odd, despite the beautiful composition of the antara. The arrangements are lively folksy arrangements with the percussion leading, and a nice plucked instrument entertaining throughout. A sarangi can also be made out occasionally. The percussion is the star of the song though. Siddharth-Garima, again, write an effective song to go with the film, but the impact of the lyrics doesn’t reach the audience out of the film. A functional song, but won’t really stay with you for long.
Rating: 3/5

 

3. Gori Tu Latth Maar

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam & Palak Muchhal, Backing Vocals ~ Umesh Joshi, Vijay Dhuri, Swapnil Godbole, Karan Kagale & Rishikesh Patel, Music by ~ Manas-Shikhar

The Rahman vibe hits you as soon as this one starts with the beautiful chimey music at the beginning. Manas-Shikhar, another debutant duo, enter the album with this song, and with only one song to prove their worth, they seize the opportunity and let me tell you, they make the best use of it, better than both of the other composer teams on this album! They employ a very lively setting to a supposed-to-be sad song. It is the festival of Holi, but of course, Bhumi Pednekar’s character is mad at Akshay’s character, because of we know what! So this is a situational song, in which Akshay pleads to her for forgiving him. Against the backdrop of a Holi song, a very emotional song, and I’ve heard something like this for the first time. Siddharth-Garima’s lyrics reveal all the emotion in the best way possible. Now let’s go back to Manas-Shikhar’s music. Their composition is just so catchy, especially the mukhda, which should be catchy in order to hook the listeners right away. It sounds like something straight out of a Rahman song. The hookline also succeeds in being a very beautiful, and catchy line. The antara is the female part of the song, and it has a very beautiful tune as well, which will remind you of the 90s songs, that used to slow down in the middle for the female parts. There’s a nice tempo-rise towards the end, in which we hear the already popular “Radhe Radhe” chorus. Sonu Nigam renders the tune with such brilliance, knowing when to emote which emotion, and wonderful aalaaps. Palak too, sings beautifully, and the brilliant composition of her portion helps her do that wonderfully. The arrangements are ever fluctuating, with the emotional and soft sound from the mukhda alternating with the usual Holi sound of the dholaks and other percussions. The shehnaai is played in a very beautiful tune. Those bells at the beginning are the most beautiful though. A wholesome song that defines what Bollywood is all about — colour, festivity, emotion and dance! Oh, and congratulations to Manas-Shikhar for a smashing debut!
Rating: 5/5

 

4. Subha Ki Train

Singers ~ Sachet Tandon & Parampara Thakur, Backing Vocals ~ Sukriti Kakar & Rituraj Mohanty, Music by ~ Sachet-Parampara

The last of the debutants bring up the finale of the album, which happens to be yet another cute romantic song. This one is a little less folksy than the others, but it does have the effect that it should. Sachet Tandon and Parampara Thakur have composed a lilting melody, that, though situational, and very predictable, still makes you smile and feel good. The prelude gave off some vibes of “Tere Sang Yaara” (Rustom). The mukhda is very sweet and simple, and instantly grabs your attention. The letdown here is the hook, which is as staid and heard-before as imaginable. But the antara is mind-blowing; especially the second line of it. The arrangements too, follow a very simple template, with that cute Duff rhythm, and in a wonderful second interlude, the flutes assortment and strings orchestra just mystifies. The first interlude with the mouth organ is splendid too. Sachet and Parampara handle the vocals themselves, and strangely enough, employ Rituraj Mohanty and Sukriti Kakar as backing vocalists for the aalaaps. Parampara’s is a voice to look out for, while Sachet’s voice just blends in with the multitude of new male voices we have in Bollywood, other than Arijit. 😅 Again, Siddharth-Garima stick to situational yet catchy lyrics; the hook lyrics made me smile. A good finale, and a promising debut, but not a song that will stay in my head for more than a month.
Rating: 3.5/5


Toilet – Ek Prem Katha is an album just like Akshay Kumar movie albums usually are — fun, vibrant and groovy, but with an overbearing romantic theme. What makes it even more special is that all the composers are debutants and it is commendable of the makers to have accepted the three for a film which will reach so many people! Seizing the opportunity, all three newcomers do a good job, and especially Manas-Shikhar do an amazing one. The album is a triple-debut treat!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 5 + 3.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 77.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Gori Tu Latth Maar > Hans Mat Pagli > Subha Ki Train > Bakheda

 

Which is your favourite song from Toilet – Ek Prem Katha? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

CRYBABYIEE WEDS NRI!! (SWEETIEE WEDS NRI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo & Shah Jahan Ali
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Dr. Devendra Kafir, Late Shyam Bhateja, Palak Muchhal, Shakeel Azmi & Banjara Rafi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Sweetiee Weds NRI Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

{P.S. The song “Shiddat (Reprise)” is sung by Mohd. Irfan on Saavn and YouTube, and Sharad Patel on iTunes. Since the former is there on two sites, I will review that}


Sweetiee Weds NRI is an upcoming Bollywood rom-com, with the clichéd theme of a wedding. The film stars Himansh Kohli and Zoya Afroz in the lead roles, and is directed by Hasnain Hyderabadwala, and produced by Cyrus Dastur, Dhaval Patel, Sada Bhuvad, and Tariq Mohammed. I couldn’t care less about the plot of the film, so heading on towards the music front. We have a multicomposer album, as is the norm for T-Series, but it is shocking to not see any of the T-Series protégés working for the film. Except maybe Arko. Jaidev Kumar, Palash Muchhal, Raaj Aashoo and newcomer Shah Jahan Ali are the other composers for the film. Jaidev just gave us a better-than-the-original mata-ki-chowki recreation of Badshah’s ‘Kala Chashma’, and he gets one song here. Palash, back after doing nothing in films for three years, gets five songs all of a sudden in this film. Let me break the suspense. It is actually two songs, one of them having four versions. Raaj Aashoo, who has composed quite passable music before, gets a song and its reprise too, while Shah Jahan Ali, newcomer, gets one song too. Let me specify that even Arko has one song only. So with five composers and ten tracks, let’s see whether this grand wedding is just all quantity or has some substance too.


1. O Saathiya

Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Prakriti Kakar, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

Thankfully, the first song is composed by the person whose song I was waiting for and at least expecting something from, Arko. And sure enough, the song is a pleasant and enjoyable listen. The composition is a breezy one, and starts off quite pleasantly. The soothing quality of the song continues as it progresses, and the  peak point of the song is the “Humrahi” hook, which is like fresh air. (Don’t watch that part in the video song though! 😂) There is no antara as such, the mukhda is repeated twice in the song, once by the male singer Armaan and the other time, by the female singer, Prakriti. That’s why the song ends up sounding shorter than it is, because the mukhda is repeated twice and that’s it. The arrangements are breezy as Arko’s arrangements usually are. The Acoustic guitars, and shakers and those digital beats in the hookline, giving a ballroom feel, are amazing. The interlude consists of a nice, feel-good, guitar piece, followed by a refreshing flute portion, which is in turn followed by a sweet piano piece. The vocalists carry the song out with ease, Prakriti sounding amazing with the nuanced singing. Armaan sings in that slightly uncomfortable low pitch which he rarely sings in, in the beginning, but gets better in the high pitched hookline. Arko’s lyrics are typical romantic song lyrics, but suit the ambience of the composition. A simple but sweet and effective song.

Rating: 4/5

 

2. Kudi Gujarat Di

Singers ~ Jasbir Jassi, Sonia Sharma, Akasa Singh & KD, Music by (Original and Recreation) ~ Jaidev Kumar, Original Lyrics by ~ Late Shyam Bhateja, New Lyrics by ~ Dr. Devendra Kafir, Rap Written by ~ KD

Jaidev Kumar steps in here, and with another remake, after his remake of ‘Kala Chashma’ in the recent ‘Behen Hogi Teri’. As we know, this music company’s latest fad is to remake hit Punjabi pop numbers of the 90s, and after they remade ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ by Sukhbir, in ‘Hindi Medium’ last month, they choose ‘Dil Le Gayee’ by Jasbir Jassi to remake this month. And the ingenious naming system of T-Series starts again, naming this one ‘Kudi Gujarat Di’, which are just the words that appear right after ‘Dil le gayee’ in the song’s lyrics. However, I’m quite pleased with this remake. The main reason is that Jaidev Kumar, who had composed the original, which was in fact his debut, has recreated it. So he keeps the flavour of the song intact, and yet manages to add a pleasant club touch. The composition has been kept the same, and lyrics have been changed. Unlike the ‘Ishq Tera Tadpaave’ remix, this one actually is a remake. The arrangements have been changed to good club arrangements that are actually enjoyable. The techno sounds here, make the song more viable for today’s audience, who is only behind club songs. The vocals are great too, with Jasbir showing that he is still sounding as young as ever. The female singers, get very less scope, and I don’t even know which of them has sung what. A rap by someone called KD sounds very spoofish and amateurish. The new lyrics by Dr. Devendra Kafir, who wrote ‘Bolna’ (Kapoor & Sons) before this, are fun but typical. An enjoyable remake. 

Rating: 3.5/5

3. Musafir / Musafir (Reprise) / Musafir (Remix)

Singers ~ Atif Aslam & Palak Muchhal / Arijit Singh / Atif Aslam & Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

The next song witnesses Palash entering film music after a long time; his last release was ‘Amit Sahni Ki List’ in July 2014 if I’m not wrong. And this song, he provides in as many as three different versions. The composition is a very typical, Bhatt-ish composition that at first seems very bland and boring, but sounds better the next time. And when you start liking it, you start listening to it frequently, and after listening to it a lot, you start hating it. So like almost all Bhatt-ish songs, this song has a quite uninteresting life story. Jokes apart, Palash’s composition, though nothing innovative, provides temporary relief like Zandu Balm and sticks in your head for that short while as if it has been stuck with Fevicol. (There, I managed to put ‘Dabangg’ references in my review.) The mukhda is very typical, and so is the hookline, so much so that the first time I tried to listen to the song, I didn’t go past the hook. The antara is nothing great either. But despite all this, the song somehow manages to get in your head. So it’s like a Rohit Shetty film — not perfect, but manages to get you watching ahead. The arrangements must be the reason we are able to go forward. Both actual versions (not counting the remix for now) have different arrangements. While the Atif Aslam version has a clichéd-to-the-core acoustic guitar setting with occasional electronic tabla beats, the Arijit Singh version has better arrangements, starting off with a flute, and progressing with a more unplugged-ish acoustic background, piano and guitars. The flute really impressed throughout the song, and Palash isn’t stingy with the use of the flute. Atif’s diction is very irritating in his version, and when he says “Gira” for “Ghira”,Batakta for “Bhatakta“, and “Dikka” for “Dikha“, you can’t help but cringe. Palak joins him to repeat the mukhda at the end of the song. Arijit goes solo in his version, and he rectifies all of Atif’s diction mistakes. However, Palash makes another mistake here, which is making Arijit sing the repeated mukhda at the end, making the song seem extra long. He could have stopped after the antara, or made Palak sing it for some respite from the overbearing drowsiness. The remix is a miserable attempt to quieten the two ever-at-war fan bases of Atif and Arijit, by cramming both into one song. But why would anyone want them to be together in a remix. And I can’t even say how sappy the vocal programming sounds when Palash uses it on Atif, making him sound like a goat. The beats are typical remix beats that make your ears explode. The lyrics by Palak are suitable for the song, but again, very typical and nothing innovative. I don’t even know whether I like this one or not, so I’ll say it’s somewhere in the middle.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Musafir, 3/5 for Musafir Reprise, 0.5/5 for Musafir Remix

 

4. Wedding

Singers ~ Shahid Mallya & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Palash’s second song is the wedding song of the album, very uncreatively titled “Wedding”. The composition is something that totally belongs to an Indian animated film for children. Come on, even children’s songs are composed more thoughtfully than this. The “Saiyaan Oh Saiyaan” refrain by Palak is very cheesy. Some of it is way too sweet to digest, and the lack of usual Punjabi arrangements, makes it even more bland. Instead, Palash uses weird-sounding techno sounds that make it sound very over-the-top. And of course, the typical brass band, which is also, unfortunately, digital. A weird EDM-ish interlude tries to makes things “cool”. Palash tries to bring in a folksy feel to the song by roping in Shahid Mallya to sing it, but he sounds so uninterested, it comes out through his singing. And the lines he’s made to sing! 😵 Palak sounds too, too, sweet, like the syrup in Gulabjamun if someone adds too much sugar. Her lyrics too, are straight out of a fairy tale; the cringeworthy Hinglish takes a toll on you by the time the song ends. When EDM and an overly sweet melody spoil everything.

Rating: 1.5/5 

 

5. Shiddat / Shiddat (Reprise)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Mohd. Irfan, Additional Vocals by ~ Priyanka Negi, Seepi Jha & Bhuvan Ahuja, Music by ~ Raaj Aashoo, Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

With Raaj Aashoo’s song, things take an even more downhill turn. Totally overloaded by a very overbearing melancholic sound, the song exhausts you by the time it is over. The composition is something even the Bhatts would shy away from nowadays. What’s more, the song spans for over five minutes, something utterly unbearable. And two versions. So it sadly has eleven minutes of unmerited footage in this already long album. The arrangements are typical digital beats that would be a rage if it were 2007 right now. The vocalists in neither version could keep the interest of the listener in place, till the end. Armaan, trying to be K.K., disappoints like never before. On the other hand, Mohd. Irfan in his version sings in a voice that defies the beauty of his real, silky smooth voice. The female backing vocalists are irritating throughout. I would rather not talk about the unstylish lyrics. Welcome to 2007.

Rating: 1/5 for Shiddat, 1/5 for Shiddat Reprise

 

6. Zindagi Bana Loon

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Shah Jahan Ali, Lyrics by ~ Banjara Rafi

Newcomer Shah Jahan Ali comes into Bollywood with this song, and brings yet another old-fashioned, slow-paced song into the album, much to the dislike of the audience. The tune is so complicated, with so many pauses in random places, and no indication as to whether it is a happy romantic or a sad romantic song, that you just forget about it after you hear it once. Shah Jahan Ali must have been feeling like Roop Kumar Rathod felt while composing ‘Agar Tum Mil Jao’ (Zeher), or M.M. Kreem while composing ‘Jaadu Hai Nasha Hai’ (Jism), because the song is like a wannabe version of those. The slow pace doesn’t help either. Neither do the arrangements. The guitars are played so typically, the lack of innovation makes you go crazy. Palak tries to bring nuances like Shreya Ghoshal into her singing, succeeding at none of them. She sings in such an unnaturally high-pitched voice, it even surpasses the cheesiness of ‘Kaabil Hoon’ (Kaabil). The lyrics of the song are cringeworthy again. Another staid composition.

Rating: 1.5/5

 

7. Kinara

Singer ~ Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Palash Muchhal, Lyrics by ~ Palak Muchhal

Finally the album comes to an end. But waiting right at the end for us, is another version of ‘Musafir’ by Palash Muchhal. This time it has been disguised under another name, ‘Kinara’ because the word ‘Musafir‘ doesn’t come in the new lyrics. But it is a version of ‘Musafir’. This album has so many versions of ‘Musafir’, which means tourist. As if the album is a tourist destination! The composition and lyrics are much the same, except one line in the hook, where the lyrics have been changed. The arrangements comprise an overtly sentimental combination of violin, piano and jingle bells. Palak tries again to imitate Shreya, when she does her Female Versions, like the one of “Sunn Raha Hai” (Aashiqui 2) and that of “Hasi” (Hamari Adhuri Kahani). Even Palash tries to imitate the arrangements of the former, with those jingles and the occasional tabla. Clearly, the makers were under the false impression that the public would love ‘Musafir’ so much that they would hover around long enough to wait for a mediocre female version. 

Rating: 1.5/5 


It looks like the album of Sweetiee Weds NRI was finalized years ago. Dated melodies, arrangements that originated sometime before the dinosaurs, and a tracklist trying to imitate ‘Aashiqui 2’ with vocals that sound bland to say the least and the same vocalists used over and over again, this album isn’t really as good as the makers made it out to be when they were promoting it. Instead of Sweetiee Weds NRI, the name should’ve been Crybabyiee (you can throw a few more e’s in there if you want) Weds NRI!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 3 + 0.5 + 1.5 + 1 + 1 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 

Album Percentage: 40%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  O Saathiya > Kudi Gujarat Di > Musafir (Reprise) > Musafir > Wedding = Zindagi Bana Loon = Kinara > Shiddat = Shiddat (Reprise) > Musafir (Remix)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 14 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Sweetiee Weds NRI) = 15

 

Which is your favourite song from Sweetiee Weds NRI? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

‘KAABIL’ OF BEING FORGOTTEN! (KAABIL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rajesh Roshan & Gourov-Roshin
♪ Lyrics by: Nasir Faraaz, Manoj Muntashir, Anjaan, Anand Bakshi, Kumaar & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd December 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 26th January 2017

Kaabil Album Cover

Kaabil Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Kaabil is an upcoming Bollywood action/romantic film starring Hrithik Roshan, Yami Gautam and Ronit Roy. The movie is directed by Sanjay Gupta, and produced by Rakesh Roshan. The movie is about two blind people who fall in love (God knows how…). And then dishoom dishoom happens and then it probably ends happily. Moving on to the music. The music has been composed by yesteryear hitmaker Rajesh Roshan, who has given quite a number of great songs in the olden days, but seems to have lost his charm with his last outing, ‘Krrish 3’. I mean, I don’t even know how it is possible that his music in ‘Kites’ (2010) sounded so much with the music of the time, and so modern and all, while three years later in 2013, when ‘Krrish 3’ released, his music sounded dated. You would think that’s impossible! Well, all we can hope is that he has composed great tracks for this album. Again, as always, T-Series gives us a shock by adding a composer duo in the music directors panel for the album. The duo is Gourov-Roshin, the go-tos for remaking and spoiling old songs. This time they have been given charge of two of Rajesh Roshan’s hits from the 70s and 80s respectively — ‘Dil Kya Kare’ (Julie) and ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana). So technically, Rajesh Roshan has composed the songs. Smart. Expectations are a bit more than zero, and given that the songs to be remade are of such a high standing, the remakes have to be good or else T-Series wouldn’t have added them.. or at least that’s what I think.. 😛 Anyway, since I have such less expectations from the first album of 2017 to release, I’m just diving into it very cautiously and sceptically.

Note: Before you start off, you might want to check out the new rating scheme with effect from 2017..


1. Kaabil Hoon / Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Nasir Faraaz

“Tere mere sapne sabhi, band aankhon ke taale mein hain,
Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa, woh Chaand ke pyaale mein hai,
Phir bhi sapne kar dikhaaon Sach toh kehna bas yehi…
Main tere kaabil hoon ya, tere kaabil nahi!”

– Nasir Faraaz

So this was the first song of 2017 to release, releasing in early December or so. You’d think that the makers had some reason behind releasing the song so early, but after hearing the song, you understand that the only reason was to get the songs released and aside, so the makers can concentrate on other ‘important’ stuff, like getting bad reviews. Veteran Rajesh Roshan offers nothing new in terms of composition. One might argue that he just tried to compose in his trademark style, and I agree, but it just doesn’t suit in today’s times. The mukhda is quite bland, but you start liking it after you hear the dreary hookline. And what’s more, it plays four times throughout the song! (Not the hookline, but the WHOLE mukhda!) The antaras are two very ear-splittingly high-pitched stanzas that irritate more than pacify. Look Mr. Roshan (and I hope you aren’t reading this..), we really appreciate you bringing forth the music of yore, but at least modernize it like Vishal Bhardwaj & Sanjay Leela Bhansali do! Yes, after a few listens, it gets listenable, but that’s only because we are so much rooted to our beautiful 90s music. 🙂 The arrangements are as typical and predictable as typicality and predictability can get. I don’t know if music programmer Abhijit Vaghani has chosen the beats (or maybe arranger Dhrubajit Gogoi), but whatever it is, it sounds like a desperate attempt to modernize the stale composition, by adding beats similar to Major Lazer and Justin Bieber’s pop single ‘Cold Water’. The dafli makes the arrangements sound sooooooo old-school. And whoever has arranged the song, has put in a mishmash of synth sounds as if his life depended on it, and horns wherever they shouldn’t have been. That guitar riff which the song starts off with resembles that hook tune of the aforementioned ‘Cold Water’ so much. And same with the trumpet. And the first time Jubin sings “Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa…”, there is an unexpected outburst of noise that wasn’t required. However, in the first antara’s beginning, there is a nice trademark Rajesh Roshan percussion, which pleases the ears. The composer ditches his recent regulars for such songs, Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal, to bring in two supposedly ‘modern’ voices, Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal, but Mr. Roshan! Songs don’t sound modern because of singers! You need a modern tune for that…! Jubin sounds suppressed for some reason, and drawls out the lines like he’s bored, making you miss Arijit’s voice for once. And Palak is hands down off tune. Everything she sings is way too high-pitched for her to carry off perfectly, and her voice comes across as cheap. Especially when she sings the hookline after the first antara. And both of their voices have been kept raw, as they were recorded, making it sound more like a scratch version of the song. And at the end, the singers are made to sing “la la la…” and “hey hey hey...”, as if they are from the 80s! Nasir Faraaz’s lyrics ooze of the 90s! What is “Tere Naam ko hi pukaarke, khanakengi meri choodiyaan“??? I highly doubt she’s wearing bangles in the song.. unless the second antara is shot at their wedding. In the sad version, Rajesh Roshan slows down the pace so much that it is tough to discern that it is the same song. Not that it sounds any better though. The arrangements there are minimal except for some strings. And it is just one and a half minutes long, so it is clearly made only for the background score. The lyrics have been tweaked too, with no better result. A song that would’ve created waves, had it been included in ‘Krrish’! Heck, even the ‘Krrish’ album sounds better!

Ratings: 2/5 for Original Version, 1.5/5 for Sad Version

 

2. Haseeno Ka Deewana

Singer ~ Payal Dev, Rap By ~ Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

“Sara zamaana, haseeno ka deewana,
Zamaana kahe phir kyun, bura hai dil lagaana!”

– Anjaan

Before the song released, I was having a tough time wondering how Rajesh Roshan would remake his own old song! And then it hit me, and my worst fears came true. T-Series had conveniently handed over Rajesh Roshan’s two old songs in the album to Gourov-Roshin! Unfortunately, there was no choice for us listeners but to hope the song would be remade well. The result, however, is atrocious. Gourov-Roshin follow the path they paved for themselves when they remade ‘Kaate Nahin Katte’ (Mr. India) in ‘Force 2’. They spoil this song, ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana) as well and present in front of us a bad mix of noises and horrendous singing. The mukhda and antara have been recomposed, and they sound horrible, nothing else. Even the original hook, which could’ve been the best part of the song, is spoiled by singing which is supposed to sound cool. The arrangements are nothing but a lot of unbearable noises, supposed to be club sounds. I don’t know if they want the clubbers to enjoy or die of some undiscovered ear disease. Random techno sounds grace the whole song, and it just sounds BAD! Payal Dev sings in her ‘Veerappan’ voice — an extremely harsh, cutting voice that does nothing but grate your eardrums. I don’t know what she’s up to.. on one side she sings gems like ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani) and on the other hand, bleats out songs like this. She also mauls the hookline, the hookline that anybody raised in a Bollywoodish background has grown up listening. And the last straw is when she sings the antara. (“Yeh kaaauuuuun keh raha hai..”) Raftaar, after his successful stint in ‘Dangal’s ‘Dhaakad’, reverts to his original form, and delivers a rap that proves that it was a mistake that he bagged ‘Dhaakad’. The lyrics by Kumaar are just your normal Bollywood item song fare, with the lady praising her flaws. And the boy agrees, somehow. Now that everyone must have heard it, I can’t even tell you to skip it. A horrific remake.

Rating: 1/5 (and that’s being generous)

 

3. Kuch Din

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Aksar ataa pataa mera, rehta nahin, rehta nahin,
Koi nishaan mera kahin milta nahin, milta nahin,
Dhoondha gaya, jab bhi mujhe, tere gali mein mila..
Kuch din, se mujhe, teri aadat ho gayi hai,
Kuch din se meri, tu zaroorat ho gayi hai!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The next song is a romantic song, with a lulling melody. It starts off well enough, with dreamy music on the piano and something like a church organ. But then Jubin starts singing and you realise the blaring problem in the song — Bad recording. The vocals might be good, but bad recording and mixing help to steal all credit from Jubin. The voice is all muffled; even songs recorded in the 1970s sound better! The composition is better this time, because of that lilt in the melody. Again, it is a signature Roshan tune, and reminds you of the beautiful music of ‘Kaho Naa Pyaar Hai’. The mukhda plunges right into the hookline, and succeeds in the mission of soothing you. The antaras are a nice extension to the already nice tune. At least it pleases the ears. The high notes in the composition are pleasant this time, and the composition as a whole is hummable. Arrangements are nice and soothing, but muffled due to that flawed recording. Strings and brass instruments bring a nice 90s flavour to the song. Again, Roshan takes the help of techno beats, but this time it is a bit toned down, and hence doesn’t bother much. The second interlude has a nice guitar portion, which sounds good in spite of being a bit dated. Jubin, as mentioned before, sings well here, adhering to Roshan’s tune loyally, and evoking memory of Abhijeet’s songs with Shah Rukh Khan, at places. As mentioned above, that recording spoils the feel. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are good, but nothing extraordinary. He sticks to the 90s style of lyrics-writing. A good, pleasant melody, with good vocals and arrangements, is spoiled by the bad recording and sound mixing!

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Mon Amour

Singer ~ Vishal Dadlani, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Kadam se kadam jo miley, toh phir saath hum tum chale,
Chale saath hum tum jahaan, wahi pe baney qaafiley!
Mon Amour!!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rajesh Roshan’s last song on the album takes the form of an upbeat Latino-flavoured song, that’ll surely get you up and dancing. The song starts off with a nice intro, taking the one of the repeating lines from the song having Vishal Dadlani sing it in a slow tempo, and it serves as a good buildup for the upbeat song that follows. The composition by Roshan this time too, is enjoyable. The hookline starts off the song, when the intro is over, and gets you ready for a nice dance song. The mukhda is what Vishal had sung in the intro, and it has a nice Spanish flavour to it, carried out very efficiently by Roshan. The antaras are as enjoyable as can be. They don’t seem like antaras, more like continuations of the mukhda, giving the effect that the whole song is a single stanza. All I can say is that they have been composed wonderfully. In the process, Rajesh Roshan tries to make a ‘Senorita’ (Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara) for this album, and succeeds to an extent. The arrangements remain loyal to the Latino flavour of the song, with guitars leading the way for some time, before handing over first command to the trumpets, which infuse life into the song after that short introduction is over. Percussion is topnotch, and it gives the Salsa feel very nicely. The xylophone that comes in the antara’s last line is so playfully awesome! I like how the title of the song stands alone in the song, with nothing to support it. It makes the song progress seamlessly from line to line. Vishal’s energy seems a bit diluted here, but nevertheless, the song sounds quite energetic still. Recording seems a problem here too, but it is ignorable because of the song being good. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here, are probably the only moderate lyrics on the album — not too old-fashioned (‘Kaabil Hoon’ and ‘Kuch Din’) and not toooooo modern (‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’). They are enjoyable though, making use of sounds like ‘Da ra di da ra’ and ‘Baila baila’ to make it sound more Latino-flavoured! A nice upbeat number, but I’m not sure whether it will be promoted enough to create an impact on the public!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Muusic Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si, iss duniya ki rasmein,
Na kuchh tere bas mein jaana, na kuchh mere bas mein!”

– Anand Bakshi

Another remake. Once again, a Rajesh Roshan melody of the golden era, and again, remade by Gourov-Roshin. This time, Roshan’s beautiful melody from ‘Julie’, ‘Dil Kya Kare’. Expectations were zero, and maybe that’s why I was pleasantly surprised by this one! The main reason I liked it was that the composers have tried to retain the flavour of the original, and not tried to change everything. The mukhda has been changed, and that’s about it. This tracks starts with a nice modern touch, similar to so many (good) English songs you hear nowadays, to such an extent that that person singing ‘Woah’ or whatever at the beginning sounds like Justin Bieber. :\ Is this soundtrack inspired by Bieber or what? Anyway, the new mukhda is a nice addition to the song, it just takes time to get used to it. The hookline follows the new mukhda, and the mukhda of the old song (“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si…”) takes the form of the first antara, as it is (except the ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein Julie‘ is changed to ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein jaana‘) and the hookline returns, bridged to the antara by one of the lines of the new mukhda. The first antara of the old song appears as the second antara in this track, and it sounds good in Jubin’s voice! And this time, the programming is good too! The duo’s arrangements are pleasant, surprisingly, and they don’t bombard the ears with a fusillade of unwanted noises. Instead, they’re quite calm club beats. Now these are club beats! Piano graces the second interlude with its presence, to a great effect. The finger snaps are intriguing throughout the song. However, what I missed is that drum which Rajesh Roshan had added in the background of the old song (which he has also used in the title track of this album, if I’m right). Jubin perfectly takes over from Kishore Kumar, but of course the original always is better. Now that we have to deal with it though, I must say Jubin has done a good job. He sings the “oonchi oonchi..” part exceptionally well. I don’t know whether it is autotune or not, but here, his high notes sound good. At least it doesn’t sound like a scratch version. The additional lyrics are quite functional, if not great. I’m still in love with the original ones! 😍 A pleasant redux. That’s a remake for you. I think Gourov-Roshin are better at romantic songs (except ‘Maahi Ve’ from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’) than idiotic item numbers that are remakes.

Rating: 3.5/5 


In Kaabil, Rajesh Roshan actually delivers better than his last ‘Krrish 3’. Out of three songs, two are pleasant and sound much better than what he had offered in his last album. Gourov-Roshin with their two remakes of his old songs, do a mediocre job in one, and better in the second. However, as a whole, the albums seems extremely dated and behind its time. Had the album released somewhere around 2005 or so, the songs might’ve gained more momentum and more hearts. But now, it just seems like another average album. A middling start to 2017!

 

Total Points of the Album: 2 + 1.5 + 1 + 3 + 3.5 + 3.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 48.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mon Amour = Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye > Kuch Din > Kaabil Hoon > Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version) > Haseeno Ka Deewana

 

ALERT! ANOTHER NEW SECTION!

Here is a remake counter, counting the number of remakes this year. :p Just for fun. 😉

Number of Remakes: 02

 

Which is your favourite song from Kaabil? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

AMAAL’S SOLO CENTURY!!! (M.S. DHONI: THE UNTOLD STORY – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 5th September 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 30th September 2016

M.S. Dhoni - The Untold Story Album Cover

M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story is an upcoming Bollywood sports biopic, based on the life of the current captain of the Indian cricket team, Mahendra Singh Dhoni. The movie stars Sushant Singh Rajput as Dhoni, Anupam Kher as Dhoni’s father, Bhumika Chawla as his sister, Disha Patani as his ex-girlfriend and Kiara Advani as Sakshi Dhoni, his wife. The movie has been directed by Neeraj Pandey, abd produced by Arun Pandey and Fox Star Studios. The movie, which releases tomorrow, chronicles the journey of M.S. Dhoni and how he became the successful man he is now. The music of the movie has been given by Amaal Mallik, and what’s special is, that after successfully spending two years in the industry, he has finally got his first full solo album to compose, wih nobody else interfering, and I’m glad because if not anybody else, he is the one person who really deserved that. So let’s see, whether Amaal can hit Dhoni’s famous helicopter shot with this album!!


1. Besabriyaan
Singer ~ Armaan Malik

Amaal starts off his first solo album with a soothing motivational song, sung by none other than Armaan. The song starts off with a wonderful piano solo, followed by guitar strums that will tell you that you’re in for something very calm. And sure enough, Amaal fulfills your desire by making the rest of the song live up to the starting. The composition is perfect for that of an inspirational song, depicting M.S. Dhoni’s years of training and hard work. The mukhda gives the song a perfect start, with a tune that instantly grabs the listeners’ attention. The way Amaal puts that high-pitched line in the mukhda, right before the hookline, is beautiful! That line makes a difference, and it is then when you realize how much you’re really going to enjoy the song. The hookline is wonderfully composed, though comprising only one word, and again, that is something commendable. The antara keeps the soulfulness going, and again, the high-pitched line comes to captivate you and also brings with it a lot of gooseflesh. 😀 Amaal uses various common instruments, but the way he uses them just goes to remind you how great a musician he is. The guitars (Ankur Mukherjee & Meghdeep Bose) are amazing as usual, but it is the violins (CMA Musicians, Mumbai; Conducted by Suresh Lalvani) that grab most of your attention throughout the song. The interludes are wonderfully graced by the sound of the violins, and they sound extraordinary in the song. There are also flutes (Tejas Vinchurkar) which leave you mesmerized. The electric guitar too, plays in the interlude and the acoustic guitar leaves you awestruck in the hookline of the song. There is a beautiful piano piece in the second interlude, very easy to miss, sandwiched between the guitars and the violins, but do go back and notice it and how extravagantly it has been played. Coming to the vocals, Armaan sings the song with utmost ease and elegance, bringing out the calmness as well as the inspirational touch very well. Again, it is because of him, that the high-pitched notes that Amaal had thought of, work out so well. The way he glides from one note to the other in the hookline, is enough to make anyone fall in love with his voice, yet again! Even Amaal, for that matter! 😀 Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are apt for the situation, and very meaningful as well. They do a good job in making the song sound good, and if it weren’t for this man’s lyrics, the tune by Amaal could just as well have gone to some romantic song in another film! Thank God though, that it didn’t happen! 😀 An awe-inspiring and otherwise inspiring start to the album! after hearing this one, my besabriyaan (impatience) to hear the rest of the songs increases! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Kaun Tujhe
Singer ~ Palak Muchhal

The mellow notes of the piano welcome you to the next song, a melancholic love song from the point of view of the girl. The song is a gem, in that it is a beautiful, and perfect blend of emotions, soulfulness and beautiful music that you can relax to. Amaal seems to have put his entire soul into making this song, as is evident from what is in front of us. The composition is something that haunts you even after you hear it only one time, and you instantly fall in love with it. We heard a similar song to this just last month, which was ‘Jab Tum Hote Ho’ (Rustom), a sad love song from the female point of view, but this one seems to surpass that as well. Amaal’s composition is a very matured one, and doesn’t seem overdramatic at all. The mukhda itself is something that gets you attuned to what is going to follow; it is a wonderful line with haunting notes played in a very beautiful sequence. The hookline has the notes going a bit higher, and it seems as though it is a part of the mukhda itself. It is actually the vocals that make the hookline sound outstanding, and makes us see it as an independent part of the song. What excel in the composition by Amaal though, are the brilliant antaras. The melancfoly of it all is concentrated in these parts of the song, and this is when it actually hits you very strongly. The line just before the antara ends, “meri nigaahein, hain teri nigaahon pe, tujhe khabar kya, bekhabar” is something I would love to listen to over and over and over and over and over again, and I mean it!! The brilliant humming by Palak after the hookline is something you find yourself waiting for after each time the hookline plays! The arrangements are graceful, with strings leading the song, and digital beats beautifully providing the mellowed-down atmosphere of the song. Guitars (Ankur Mukherjee & Meghdeep Bose) are audible in the hookline, and they are wonderful. There is a beautiful flute (Tejas Vinchurkar) and strings interlude after the first antara, and that is something to hear on loop. And then, the vocals. Palak has done an outstanding job, with probably the best performance in her entire career. She sings both the low and high portions with ease, and also, she doesn’t try to copy Shreya Ghoshal here!! 😀 Her voice too, seems to have matured a lot, and maybe it must be a miracle brought about by Amaal’s programming, but either way, I’m up for more songs like this by her!! Manoj’s lyrics perfectly describe the feelings of a girl in love, and are cute as well as emotional, especially when we come to know that this song is going to be picturtised on Dhoni’s first girlfriend, who had passed away in an accident. Amaal has outdone himself with this one; a beautiful love ballad from the female point of view! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Jab Tak / Jab Tak (Redux)
Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Armaan Malik

Amaal brings the next song in two versions, and this is yet another love ballad, this time, picturized on Dhoni and his now-wife, Sakshi. This song follows a more cheerful composition, and is more dreamy in the sense that there is absolutely no melancholy kicking in. The composition is again, very matured, and Amaal has done a good job in making it very appealing. The mukhda starts with the song title itself, and it is a line that you will never forget once you hear it. It has that instant magically appealing effect on the ears. Though it starts off a bit slow, you will start falling in love with it after the hookline starts — “mere paas tum raho, jaane ki baat na karo“. The line makes you feel free and transports you in a different world altogether. And Armaan’s humming after the line, is hauntingly, magically, mesmerizing! And just then Amaal comes up with another beautiful antara, but it ends so soon, you fond yourself craving for more. “Well, no worries”, says Amaal, “I’m here with a redux too!” The redux has the same basic composition, but a faster tempo to it, and where the first version would be a matured romantic song, the redux would probably be one made for a more lighter situation, or maybe even just for the delight of the listeners. The main point is that, the song is longer due to longer interludes, and this one too, doesn’t leave you. Well, Armaan sounds mesmerizing in the first version, while he seems to be enjoying himself a lot in the redux, much to the delight of the listeners. Amaal’s arrangements in both versions are spot-on. While the first version has a mellowed-down, very dulcet atmosphere around it, and makes you feel very light, as if you’re flying, the second version has a more Amaal-ish instrumentation, with peppy guitars (Ankur Mukherjee), both rock and acoustic, and even drums. The first version accomplishes its dulcet nature with strings (played by the CMA Musicians and conducted by Suresh Lalwani) that really make you shiver at their grandeur. (That’s a compliment. Sorry if it doesn’t look or sound like one, but everything isn’t what it seems! 😉 ) The highlight of the first version’s arrangements though, are intensely grand trumpets, that steal your breath away whenever they play, much to your surprise, because this kind of a symphonic arrangement is rare in Bollywood, though Pritam, Ajay-Atul and A.R. Rahman (and maybe others) have tried it previously. The lyrics by Manoj Muntashir are beautiful in both versions, and are one of the reasons the song stands out – because of its simplicity. Something that will be on my playlist forever!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

4. Phir Kabhi
Singer ~ Arijit Singh

And of course, the next song is what all the so-called music lovers that show themselves on Twitter and Facebook before the release of every album, asking composers if the album has any song by Arijit Singh, were waiting for. It is yet another romantic song (God, is Dhoni even gonna play anything in this movie?????) This time too, Amaal gives the song a nice, pleasant and breezy touch, and it appeals to the listeners’ ears immediately. The composition, though treading very familiar territory, instantly stands out. Amaal tunes the mukhda beautifully, the high notes working well as usual. The hookline has a nice, breezy feel and can be heard on loop. The antara too, is very soft to the ears, and very simple. Amaal excels in the arrangements; having gone to great lengths to arrange the instruments in a beautiful manner. This song is the most extensively arranged song on the album in my opinion, with guitars doing a great job in making it seem so. The ukelele played by Ankur Mukherjee really adds a beautiful oriental touch to the whole song. African ethnic vocals in one of the interludes made me think M.S. Dhoni somehow got transported to Ashutosh Gowariker and A.R. Rahman’s Mohenjo Daro. :p They sound awesome nonetheless! And harmonicas wonderfully steal the show in their charming portions. Arijit is the perfect choice for the vocals, and he handles the composition very gracefully. Those fans on social media aren’t idiots after all, are they? Manoj’s innocent lyrics really help the listeners connect to the song very well, and help the song reach heights. This song stands out in that it is so simplistic and innocently heard-before, that I loved it!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Parwah Nahin
Singer ~ Siddharth Basrur

The next song is a rock song, very heavy in its treatment, and something that I believe Amaal is doing for the very first time. As a first attempt, the song has turned out to sound exceptionally good. The composition is something you can conveniently groove to and tap your feet to. The song starts with whispers that have been sung in a grungy voice. This part isn’t something that would instantly grab your attention, but it is the rock guitars that arrive next, that make you listen ahead. The mukhda, is quite nicely composed, with a nice catchiness to it. The hookline is something that could’ve been composed better, though. The antara as well, is a typical rock composition, and is good as a whole. Amaal has put in many efforts as is evident. The arrangements are electrifying, with the mandatory electric guitars (Jeenti Dutta, Keshav Dhar & Armaan Malik), and drums (Jai Row Kavi) infusing the spunk into the song. The interludes have wonderful, elevating portions of rock, with the electric guitars playing wonderful tunes. Whoever has played the electric guitar in the second interlude, kudos to him! Siddharth Basrur, an otherwise very efficient singer, doesn’t really seem at comfort in this song though. Though he gets the grunge and huskiness into the song, it all just doesn’t work as a whole. Manoj Muntashir, again, writes a great song, with a good inspirational and motivational message to it. A song that will work in the film, but not as an audio song.

 

6. Padhoge Likhoge
Singers ~ Ananya Nanda & Adithyan A. Prithviraj

A very out-of-place dappankuthu rhythm starts the last song on this album, and it isn’t until you understand what the song is actually about, when you start loving it with all your heart. The song is a peppy, fun number, probably picturized on the lead character as small kids. It sounds like Dhoni’s sister is lecturing him about how he should study, but the smart kid that Dhoni was, argues in a very fun manner, and in the bargain, we get a wonderful song from Amaal. 😛 The composition is enjoyable, the hookline in particular being the peak point in the song. Though invoking memories of Amaal’s own ‘Chaarr Shanivaar’ (All Is Well), the song manages to appeal. The mukhda gives a good headstart to the song, while the antara dwindles a bit, but soon comes back to the catchiness of the other parts. The line before the hookline, sung in a very cute way by the little boy, is something very well composed by Amaal as well. The arrangements are enjoyable as well, especially the percussions (Dipesh Verma, Omkar Salunkhe & Keyur Barve; Arranged by Dipesh Verma & Daboo Malik) which are definitely the highlight of the music. And then there’s that shehnaai (Omkar Salunkhe) in the interlude and antara which grabs your attention. The peppy way in which all this falls into place, is worth hearing. And now, to talk about the singers. Ananya Nanda, winner of ‘Indian Idol Junior Season 2’ (yet another singer from the season debuting this month, after Nahid did in ‘Rajj Rajj Ke’ from ‘Akira’) plays the role of elder sister well, and her voice sounds mature and pleasant to listen to, while it is the cute and innocent voice of Adithyan A. Prithviraj, which steals the show. What a cute Dhoni he plays. And the words given to him make him sound even cute, thanks to Manoj Muntashir. He makes the two singers sing lyrics that are so funny at parts, especially when Adithyan sings against studies. 😀 OUTSTANDING! A fabulous end to the album! #5StarHotelSong!!


M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story turns out just as expected. Amaal hits that helicopter shot and wins to his credit an album that would be remembered in the list of his greatest works. Though the filmmaker seems to have concentrated on Dhoni’s love story a lot more than his sports career, Amaal caters to his vision and cooks up a great album with six songs that will bring the story forward. Amaal scores a century in his first solo album!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jab Tak > Kaun Tujhe > Besabriyaan > Jab Tak (Redux) > Phir Kabhi > Padhoge Likhoge > Parwah Nahin

 

Which is your favorite song from M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

RAAZ TO SUCCESS: RECYCLE THE BHOOT!? 🙈 (RAAZ REBOOT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Jeet Gannguli & Sangeet-Siddharth
♪ Lyrics by: Kausar Munir & Rashmi-Virag
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 16th September 2016

Raaz Reboot Album Cover

Raaz Reboot Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raaz Reboot is an upcoming Bollywood horror film, and the fourth installment of the ‘Raaz’ franchise. The movie stars Emraan Hashmi, Gaurav Arora (‘Love Games’ fame), and débutante Kriti Kharbanda. The movie is directed by Vikram Bhatt and produced by Mukesh Bhatt, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Of course somebody is possessed by an evil spirit and Emraan Hashmi loves that someone and all those clichés of a Bollywood horror-romance starrign Emraan Hashmi, must be there in the film. Who cares about the story though, when the music is the highlight? Music is definitely the highlight of a Bhatt film, and though I keep mocking it in some of my other reviews, I have to admit that sometimes, the songs are very beautiful. The third ‘Raaz’ movie had a wonderful soundtrack by Jeet Gannguli, and guest composer Rashid Khan had also composed (or ‘copied’) a wonderful song. This time too, things are quite like the last time. Jeet Gannguli is in charge of the full album, consisting of six tracks (three original songs, with one of those having two versions and one more having three, so 3+2+1=6) and guest composers are Sangeet-Siddhartha Haldipur, with one track. Jeet Gannguli has been impressing on and off this year, his last memorable song being the wonderful ‘Dekha Hazaro Dafaa’ (Rustom), while Sangeet-Siddharth gave a good album to ‘Love Games’ earlier this year, which was highly impressive and innovative. So, I expect some good things from these two, and hopefully, they give a good reboot to the ‘Raaz’ series!


1. Lo Maan Liya
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

Jeet starts off the album with a song that evokes memories of Bhatt songs that have been entertaining us for the last two decades. This song is a perfect blend of the Bhatts’ sound in the 2000s as well as this decade. Jeet’s composition is something that instantly gets you hooked to it, despite the fact that it is oh-so-clichéd! The mukhda is something that sounds so sweet even in all its painfulness, and you immediately start humming it after the song is over. Making a successful typical melpdy is an art that Jeet seems to have mastered over the years. The song is reminiscent of his own ‘Dard’ (Sarbjit) in one line of the mukhda, (“ayyee yaar zara humko”) and it is also my favourite line from the song, composed beautifully. The hookline lies in the mukhda itself, and I’ve already said how catchy it is. The antara, however, takes the song to a whole new level. It is composed in a very 90s-ish manner. The haunting feel of the rest of the song flees away in this part, and a sweet and lovable tune sets in, until the hookline comes back. It kind of reminded me of the title track of ‘Khamoshiyan’ which was composed in the same style (a haunting mukhda followed by a sweet antara). Jeet aces the arrangements, with those ever-so-loyal guitar and flutes of his stealing the show. The beats in the rest of the song are quite ordinary, but work in favour of the song. The assortment of flutes play this sweet, but haunting hook tune, which always makes you feel awesome when it plays. However, the star of the song has to be the singer this time. I know how many times I’ve joked about Arijit singing songs from the one-thousand-and-fofty-eighth installment of the ‘Raaz’ franchise, but I’ve got to give it to him; he sings these songs perfectly! His voice has the right mix of sweetness, innocence and instensity with which to render this composition. The way he sings my favourite line of the song (which I pointed out above), is fantastic! And the first line of the antara!! He sings that so wonderfully! No wonder the nation is crazy after him. The lyrics seem like they’re written with the very harsh intention of hurting somebody with the taunt that they don’t remember you, and neither do you remember them. 😂 It’s a perfect song to sing when you’re mad at someone and want to taunt them or vice versa. Jokes apart, Kausar (after a long time; last she wrote were some songs in ‘Laal Rang’, I believe) writes lyrics suitable to the dard-judaai-with-a-bhoot-interfering theme! 🙂 A perfect kick start to the album; something Jeet is known for, and he delivers it perfectly once again!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Raaz Aankhein Teri
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Rashmi-Virag

The title song comes up next, with the maestro of title songs, Jeet Gannguli, behind it. The composer goes to new lengths to make this composition worth listening on loop. Keeping the haunting theme of the movie in mind, this song is perfectly composed. The composition once again, is very typical and heard-before, yet we can’t help but develop a liking towards it. In fact, it is a remake of Jeet’s Bengali song ‘Ki Kore Bolbo Tomay’ (from the movie ‘Ki Kore Toke Bolbo’) Once again, Jeet takes the help of a haunting mukhda to attract the audience, while the antara calms things down with a very charming and calm tune. This song perfectly blends together the horror and romance in the movie. Though not as hooking and gripping as ‘Lo Maan Liya’, it still manages to grab your attention, and there is nothing missing as such in the composition. The arrangements are not extraordinary, yet appeal to the listener. The guitars play the main role in making this happen. They’ve been played in a very Latin/Spanish way and are very attractive. The song starts with the hookline playing on a violin, which is a perfect haunting start to the song. The violin comes back to amaze us in the first interlude, while the piano takes over in the second interlude, only to be followed by a whole orchestra of strings. But again, the guitar is the central focus throughout the song. Arijit sings this one with a more hoarse throat, probably to get that horrorific expression in the song. He sings this one with just as prowess as he did the first, though both songs are composed with different tones altogether. The lyrics by Rashmi-Virag are also good for the song and haunting, but nothing beyond that. Another stellar title song by Jeet Gannguli! However much I may be teasing such songs, I must admit I loved this one!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. O Meri Jaan
Singer ~ K.K, Music by ~ Sangeet-Siddharth Haldipur, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

Here come guest composers Sangeet-Siddharth with their only song on the soundtrack. The song starts off in a very heavenly, blissful way with flutes luring the listener in. The flutes are so beautiful, that you expect nothing but a wonderful song to ensue. Unfortunately, things don’t turn out quite so good. The composers try to concoct a composition that would enforce listeners to hear it repeatedly on loop, but fail miserably because of the pitiful commonplace treatment. The composition starts off well in the mukhda, but almost immediately loses its charm in the hookline, because the line before it (‘Tere bina aadhe bhi kya, tere bina adhoore kya’) evokes memories of the duo’s song ‘Mohabbat’ from ‘Love Games’, and this time the tune doesn’t work. The hookline itself isn’t hooking. The antara takes things uphill once again, but doesn’t manage to keep it there sadly. The irony here is that, this song doesn’t sound typical at all, but fresh (not like the usual Bhatt song), but the composer miss the opportunity to make it noteworthy and extraordinary. The arrangements are quite applause-worthy, with some very calming and charming sounds interspersed throughout the song, like those wonderful xylophonic sounds, and the entertaining guitar riffs. The flute, of course, remains the star of the song. The strings also help elevate the ordinary composition. The first interlude is a wonderful, dreamy one, played on the mandolin, I suppose. The vocals by K.K., will manage to attract listeners to an extent, but they don’t really go out of their way to impress you. The only reason he’s the perfect choice for this song is that soothing texture of his voice. Lastly, the lyrics by Kausar too, are nothing special, but very typical of romantic songs. A decent attempt to make a lilting, dreamy romantic song, but the composition turns out to be flat and dull. Sangeet-Siddharth fail to live up to the great expectations they created after ‘Love Games’.

 

4. Yaad Hai Na / Yaad Hai Na (Unplugged)
Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Kausar Munir

A haunting, yet sweet piano loop starts off Jeet’s next song, and before you know it, you are sucked into a whirlpool of Jeet’s lilting and dreamy composition. Now this song is something very, very innovative from the composer. Being the last original song on the album, it definitely wins the race in being the best song of the album right away. Once you hear the composition, you would never forget it for quite some time. Jeet once again builds the hookline into the mukhda itself, so that the hookline starts the song. And this line is what sucks you into this dreamy experience. The antara, too, is something that calms you down as well as haunts you in a very unusually pleasant way! The real magic is in the arrangements, and the vast difference between the two versions of the song. In the first version, Arijit sings along very Celtic arrangements, complete with the claps and strings (played in a very Celtic-sounding tune). Jeet orchestrates the strings so well, that it seems to have been taken right out of some classical European song! And those claps!! All throughout the song, claps infuse that pleasant quality into the song; quite an innovative beat, if you ask me. The flute in the second interlude has been played oh-so-wonderfully, again in a Celtic manner. Arijit himself excels in the song, and though it is his third song in the very same album, I am not as much frustrated as I am awestruck at his voice! This time, pure romance displays itself in his voice. In the also-very-innovative unplugged version, Jubin gets to sing along the backdrop of a very, very weirdly attractive guitar arrangement. When you hear this arrangement of this song, you’ll be shocked that Jeet could have thought of such a thing! The way the guitars constantly keep the beat, but go off tune once in a while so randomly, is so unconventional. While hearing this song, I could see a cowboy sitting on a stack of hay on a lazy Sunday with his banjo, and singing this song! 😀 Jubin, too, sings wonderfully, and the humorous arrangements complement him well. Kausar excels in her writing here. The lyrics are simple, but sweet and heart-touching. Some very innovative stuff from Jeet, Arijit, Jubin & Kausar! Both versions are fabulous, and will definitely get you swaying to the beat. Both versions are #5StarHotelSongs!!

 

5. Hummein Tummein Jo Tha
Singers ~ Papon & Palak Muchhal, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Rashmi-Virag

The next song is a short reprise of the title track; this time meant as an aftermath-of-separation song. The composition is exactly the same as the title track, which was very impressive, keeping the horror theme in mind. Here too, it suits as a judaai song, but other things aren’t in place here. This time, Arijit is replaced by Papon, who sings the melody with emotion, but just doesn’t suit here as much as Arijit did in the original. He is complemented by Palak, who takes charge of the antara, and sings it beautifully, surprisingly. 😀 The arrangements too, are the same as those of the original. However, the lyrics have been changed to suit a sad romantic theme, and everything goes haywire. The lyrics are too simple to be appreciated, and also sound too melodramatic. A reprise of the title track which just doesn’t work as well!

 

6. The Sound Of Raaz
Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Rashmi-Virag

The album ends with a song perfectly suiting the horror theme of the movie. This song is also a reprise of the title track, and it takes the mukhda of the song in a very slow pace, making it suit the horror theme even more. The arrangements are nothing but haunting sounds like the wind blowing very creepily. Jubin’s voice is perfect for the song, as he sings each note with this heavy, haunting air. There’s pretty much nothing else to say about this one except that it is such a good background music piece and also a #5StarHotelSong!!


Raaz Reboot surprisingly turns out to be an album which doesn’t bore even though it follows the typical clichés of a Bhatt album. Jeet comes up with a good compilation of his songs for this movie, while the guest duo Sangeet-Siddharth doesn’t really live up to expectations. All in all, the album is enjoyable and cherishable, and not just something to be used for publicity, as it would live on longer than that. After years of observation, I finally believe that the raaz (secret) to the Bhatts’ success, is recycling the bhoot! (Ghost) And this reboot works by recycling the bhoot!

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां 

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Yaad Hai Na > Lo Maan Liya > Yaad Hai Na (Unplugged) > Raaz Aankhein Teri > The Sound Of Raaz > O Meri Jaan > Hummein Tummein Jo Tha 

 

Which is your favourite song from Raaz Reboot? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Pink, Chefs: Anupam Roy, Shantanu Moitra & Faiza Mujahid