DON’T MISS THIS ‘TRIP’PY KARWAAN!! (KARWAAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Anurag Saikia, Prateek Kuhad, SlowCheeta, Shwetang Shankar & Imaad Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Akarsh Khurana, SlowCheeta, Imaad Shah & Prateek Kuhad
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th July 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 3rd August 20181400x1400bb1

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Karwaan is an upcoming travel comedy film starring Dulquer Salmaan, Irrfan Khan and Mithila Palkar in lead roles. The film is directed by Akarsh Khurana, the director of ‘High Jack’ which released earlier this year, and produced by Ronnie Screwvala and Priti Rathi Gupta. With just one film to his credit, Akarsh Khurana has showed us that he does indeed, give much importance to the music in his films. The multicomposer album to ‘High Jack’ was a quirky album, high on EDM and fusion and whatnot. Two composers entities, Anurag Saikia and SlowCheeta & Shwetang Shankar, who had composed for that film too, are retained for this album, while two others, namely, Imaad Shah (who composed ‘Calcutta Kiss’ from ‘Detective Byomkesh Bakshy’ in collaboration with Saba Azad) and Prateek Kuhad (debuting in Bollywood as a composer, but who has already sung a song ‘Kho Gaye Hum Kahan’ in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’) are the two new additions to the soundtrack. So let’s jump in and see whether the journey that listening to this soundtrack is, turns out to be a memorable one!


SlowCheeta and Shwetang Shankar’s Dhaai Kilo Bakwaas actually turns out to be three minutes of insane fun; the duo mixes cool Malayalam sounds with a trippy hip-hop arrangement, and an amazing rap by SlowCheeta which has some bloody relatable lyrics interrupts the songs for about a minute. I still don’t understand by SlowCheeta calls himself that! He raps so rapidly, I mean! 🤣 Anish John and Sanjeev Kumar Nair are behind the main vocals, and whoever is the main vocalist out of the two, sounds a lot like Rahul Pandey or Jubin Nautiyal. The lyrics by SlowCheeta are hilarious; about how the plans of a group that has set out on a trip, go haywire.

To link to SlowCheeta’s second song, where he just raps and doesn’t compose, we need to enter young talent Anurag Saikia’s territory of the album. Heartquake is everything ‘Selfish’ (Race 3) was trying to be — a breezy and gentle Hinglish romantic ballad. Anurag however, gets it right because of his wonderful use of sound. The way the song starts itself, with the guitar loop and a tribal chant, is enough to pull you in. And as Papon starts with his dreamy voice, you fall into a lilt along with the beautiful mandolins, strings and tablas that Saikia has employed in the arrangements. Akarsh Khurana’s lyrics work because they don’t seem to be trying too hard, but are just right. One English word in each line isn’t a low allowance, I agree, but somehow, everything fits in beautifully. Maybe it has to do with the fact that Anurag’s composition is the seamlessly beautiful. The coda at the end going “Mashallah.. yeh sama..” is so beautiful, as well. But where does SlowCheeta come into the picture, you ask? Well, he features in the Aftershocks Version of the song, where Anurag re-composes the song to make it fit for a trippy beat and an EDM vibe which sounds like it fell out of the plane from the ‘High Jack’ soundtrack and landed in the caravan in the ‘Karwaan’ soundtrack. 😃 The new composition is really catchy as well; SlowCheeta aptly adds his signature punch with a punchy rap, while Papon now pronounces ‘Heartquake’ as ‘Heart-ku-wake’, which sounds a bit appealing, I must admit! The arrangements for this track are nowhere near the original, obviously, but at least the composer didn’t put the same composition through an endless EDM loop and make it sound like an unnecessary remix! 👍

Anurag Saikia’s part of the album ends up with the heard-before but still engaging travel ballad Chota Sa Fasana, which again uses electronic music as its base and that’s why it becomes so entrancing. I’m sure the composer could’ve made the background a bit more ‘happening’, but it seems deliberately muffled to give the feel of an immersive journey, when you just stare out of the window and feel the breeze on your face. The ‘Oh-oh’ chants after every line of the hookline are enjoyable, as well as Arijit Singh’s trademark vocals; I admit I took my time to like them in this song, but I eventually did! As long as Anurag Saikia keeps his compositions this strong, though, any flaw or discrepancy in the arrangements or vocals would be completely overlooked!

The next artist that stands out in the soundtrack is Prateek Kuhad, who has his separate couple of songs in the album to show his mettle. The mellow Kadam transcends you to this dreamy mind space, where the artist uses his wonderful guitar loops to calm you down, and his distinct voice gives the song an edge above other songs of the same type, say, by Jasleen, who usually composes in the same style. The lyrics too, are by Prateek, and he writes them very meaningfully; they are kind of on the lines of the theme of self-discovery. If ‘Kadam’ gets repetitive for you, though, Saansein is what you’re looking for. This too, starts as a very plain and simple song; it sounds like a sad song almost. The piano in the initial portions is just too sweet to get over, until the composer adds a bass line that gets you nodding your head along to it, and then he adds shakers, too! The composition too, is catchy, and there comes a point where he leaves it to the drums and guitars to take over, and boy, do they take over! This is the food your head-nod needs! Eagerly waiting to hear more of Prateek’s music in the coming months!

Finally, Imaad Shah (Composer) and Saba Azad (Singer) present Bhar De Hamara Glass, an irresistible retro number with some cool sound effects. However, the voice gets a bit irritating after a bit, and I can’t really see myself listening to this song over and over! Therefore, it’s signature Madboy/Mink stuff, but just doesn’t seem right over here!


Just like ‘High Jack’, we get another melodious album for Karwaan! This is a ‘TRIP’py Karwaan you must take a ride in!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8.5 + 9 + 7.5 + 8.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 7 = 57

Album Percentage: 81.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Heartquake > Saansein = Chota Sa Fasana = Dhai Kilo Bakwaas > Kadam > Heartquake (Aftershocks) > Bhar De Hamara Glass

 

Which is your favourite song from Karwaan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MUSIC KA MAIDAAN FATEH NA HO PAAYA! (SANJU – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: A.R. Rahman, Rohan-Rohan & Vikram Montrose
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Shekhar Astitwa, Puneet Sharma & Rohan Gokhale
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 29th June 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 29th June 2018

1400x1400bb2.jpg

Sanju Album Cover

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Sanju is a Bollywood biopic starring Ranbir Kapoor, Paresh Rawal, Manisha Koirala, Dia Mirza, Vicky Kaushal, Sonam Kapoor, Karishma Tanna, Jim Sarbh and Anushka Sharma among others. The film is directed by Rajkumar Hirani, and produced by him along with Vidhu Vinod Chopra. We all know how Sanjay Dutt features in almost all of Hirani’s films, save ‘3 Idiots’. However, Hirani says he never got to know him personally until one day he started talking about all his hardships during an emotional breakdown. That lit a lamp in Hirani’s mind, and he decided to make a biopic. Now, I can’t comment on the movie as I haven’t watched it yet, but I can sure do a music review, right? 🤣 The music of the film has been composed by three composer entities (one being a duo), Rohan-Rohan, Vikram Montrose and A.R. Rahman. It’s surprising to see Rahman first of all in a multicomposer album, because whenever he did those in the past, it was because he left midway due to other commitments. But here, he was the last addition reportedly! Rohan-Rohan have two songs, and it isn’t their Hindi debut; that happened four years ago with ‘Mumbai Delhi Mumbai’, but it is Vikram’s Hindi film debut — he has done some Hindi pop songs and a Marathi album called ‘Bhay’, which was mediocre. Also, I’ve noticed that Hirani uses music as a prop to take the story forward, but not even in the way other filmmakers do (they’ll have a song play in the background and all). No, Hirani will have a full-fledged four-minute song sequence, but it’ll make the moment fun and enjoyable. However, the music itself isn’t always up to the mark. His favourite film album of mine is ‘Pk’, because the music actually was good there. Let’s check out how the music is with ‘Sanju’, though you might already know by my review’s headline. Sorry. I’m dimwitted that way.


Rohan-Rohan are the ‘chosen ones’ who get to begin this album. And they do it in quite a quirky manner too! Main Badhiya Tu Bhi Badhiya is a song that is supposed to be an old song that the character are singing in the 80s, so the song is composed like a 50s nok-jhhok number. It starts with a wonderful opening prelude, which instantly sucks you into the 50s. Sunidhi’s voice modulation is fantastic, and is obviously one of the best vocal renditions of the year. Sonu Nigam, in comparison seems weak, but I wonder, since he can mimic so well, why didn’t he sing in a nasal tone, as well? He still has sung in one, but it could’ve been more pronounced I feel. Rohan-Rohan’s composition is fun, but takes some time getting used to. And Puneet Sharma’s lyrics are very quirky and funny, especially the part when they talk about ‘family planning’ or rather, the lack of it. The song somewhat addresses Sanjay Duty’s commitment issues, and it’s the typical Hirani way of presenting a serious topic in such a flippant and casual way.

Rohan-Rohan’s second song doesn’t fare too well. Bhopu Baj Raha Hain tries to start with a retro sound as well, trumpets blaring, bhopus belting out weird noises, but it soon transcends into a very weird zone. Nakash Aziz was the obvious choice for the song, and I must say Rohan-Rohan’s arrangements are enjoyable, but I’m sure nobody will listen to this song again. There’s not magnetism or attractiveness to it. The antaras are poorly structured, and I’d never expect this song to be in any big commercial film. The worst part is that this is a Hirani film. Though the duo has tried to create the Hirani zone in this song as well, I feel it could’ve been less effervescent. The lyrics by Rohan Gokhale and Shekhar Astitwa are just a bunch of words you never think much about.

Vikram Montrose, the debutant, also starts off his share of the album with a song that everyone would love because of the motivational touch, the powerful vocals and the inspirational lyrics. Kar Har Maidaan Fateh does carry thag irresistibly moving sound, I agree. The choice of Sukhwinder Singh wasn’t surprising, but the choice of Shreya Ghoshal was surprising, and the way she sings is even more surprising — she sings quite lower than she usually sings. She shines even then, though. Sukhwinder Singh’s parts sound almost heard-before and nothing new, but because of the freshness Shreya brings through her low pitch, the song reaches different levels of awesomeness. Vikram arranges is quite standardly, with rock guitars, percussions, and drums. However, the violin playing the hookline in the interludes, is amazing. Also, the composition took some time to grow on me, but when it did, I couldn’t get it out of my head. All in all, it was a good debut for Montrose.

His second song Baba Bolta Hain Bas Ho Gaya, is hinged on the quirky lyrics by Puneet Sharma and Rohan Gokhale. Papon brings a different, rough texture to his otherwise smooth voice, but I enjoyed Ranbir’s parts more. And Supriya Pathak (not the one you’re thinking of) sings her lines quite funnily. The groove and gun sounds throughout the song have been overused so many times in so many gangster movies in Bollywood, that it sounds boring here. The song is also unbearably long, at just under than 5 minutes. However, I’m sure this song is for the theatres.

And then enters A.R. Rahman, who gets two songs too. Ruby Ruby starts with that irresistible bass line, followed by the wonderful guitars (Keba Jeremiah) and a grungy voice keeps whispering “Rrrrrubyy”. When the actual melody starts, you are initially confused, and the song takes some listens to get used to, but since it depicts Dutt’s drug addiction phase, I think it’s deliberately composed like that — so many lines repeating so many times; there’s actually three discernible different parts in the song that keep repeating over and over. And it sends us into a trance. The percussions are amazing too, as are the strings! Shashwat Singh masters the grunge very well, and I especially loved the part when he does the descension from ‘Tu bhi, ruby, ruby…’. Poorvi Koutish is a capable backing vocalists, and her ‘la la la’ is so haunting, it sucks you in.

Speaking of haunting, Rahman’s next song Mujhe Chaand Pe Le Chalo is just that. A sensuous composition, rendered just perfectly by Nikhita Gandhi, the song immediately has you hooked. It has a number of lines ending with high notes, which Nikhita holds so wonderfully. The rhythm Rahman employs in the background is intriguing, and reminds you of ‘Muskaanein Jhoothi Hai’ from ‘Talaash’ with the shakers, the subtle percussion, and very muffled strings that give the song an even more sensuous atmosphere. Irshad Kamil writes lyrics that suit the ambience of the song, and I feel that the song itself can transport you to the moon. Also, Nikhita hums so brilliantly at the end of the song. 😍


Sanju turns out to be the weakest Hirani album for me, due to the meaningless quirks from the newer songs by the younger composers, that just brings the album down. The music field has sadly not been conquered by Hirani this time.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 5 + 8 + 6 + 8.5 + 9 = 44.5

Album Percentage: 74.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी< सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mujhe Chaand Pe Le Chalo > Ruby Ruby > Main Badhiya Tu Bhi Badhiya = Kar Har Maidaan Fateh > Baba Bolta Hain Bas Ho Gaya > Bhopu Baj Raha Hain

Which is your favourite song from Sanju? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE MUSICAL SUPERHERO RESURFACES!! (BHAVESH JOSHI SUPERHERO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya, Anurag Kashyap, Babu Haabi & Naezy
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 1st June 2018

Bhavesh Joshi Superhero Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Bhavesh Joshi Superhero is a Bollywood action film starring Harshvardhan Kapoor, Priyanshu Painyuli and Nishikant Kamat, directed by Vikramaditya Motwane and produced by Reliance Entertainment, Eros International, Anurag Kashyap, Madhu Mantena and Vikas Bahl. The film is about a group of friends who set out to expose the water scams and other wrong activities in the city. When one of the friends dies, Sikandar (played by Harshvardhan Kapoor) sets out to become a vigilante and avenge his friend’s death and stop the corruption in the city. The film is quite different from what Motwane has made in the past, and it shows he is a versatile filmmaker, never repeating his formula. Of course, for music, he ropes in Amit Trivedi, after that one movie, ‘Trapped’, where he didn’t compose the music. Let’s see, what with all the soundtracks of his releasing this year, can Trivedi do a great job for a director whose films he is known to have done great music for?


The soundtrack starts off with a song called Hum Hain Insaaf that actually summarises the entire theme of the movie in three minutes — in a groovy rap track set to catchy beats and music by Trivedi, and rendered just as addictively by Babu Haabi and Naezy. Babu Haabi sounds much more amazing than he did two years ago in the songs of ‘Udta Punjab’, while Naezy sounds great as usual. Trivedi’s digital beats are catchy, especially the opening bars, which immediately attract your attention. The rap in this song actually doesn’t get boring at any point; it is fun also to listen to the lyrics, which are meaningful (written by Anurag Kashyap, Babu Haabi and Naezy together). The hookline has an anthemic ring to it, perfect for such a movie.

The other song that carries the change-the-world theme in its lyrics is Qasam Kha Li, because Bollywood superheroes can’t go without a dramatic oath ceremony. Just kidding, Phantom ‘Ph’ans. 🙂 Anyway, the song seems to have been quite easy for Trivedi, having composed ‘Jhuk Na Paunga’ (Raid) just recently. Maybe he called Papon over and said, “Let’s record two songs, both having the same blood running through them, and let’s see which one ends up in which movie.” That being said, this song is just as soulful and beautiful as the other, and clearly this fits into the ‘Bhavesh Joshi Superhero’ soundtrack more than the other song, and again, I was just joking about the “Let’s see which movie blah blah.” The strings and drums used by Trivedi are captivating throughout the song, and Papon’s sombre rendition is perfect for this retrospective number. Towards the end, Trivedi sets right what went wrong in Blackmail’s ‘Nindaraan Diyaan’ — he uses the rock template in a much better way than he did there (where he spoiled the entire climax of the song by overdoing the rock)! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are beautiful, and just perfect for what I’d imagine an Indian common man superhero to sing. 🙂

It is Chavanprash which has probably polarised audiences about this soundtrack; it is a super-cheesy and typical Trivedi qawwali-ish number with just as cheesy lyrics by Bhattacharya, but hey, I did enjoy it! Trivedi, first of all, is an expert at making such songs catchy, and he brings back his ‘Ghanchakkar’ self to make a kind of amalgamation of three songs from that soundtrack — ‘Ghanchakkar Babu’, ‘Allah Meherbaan’ and ‘Jholu Ram’. Divya Kumar’s effusive vocals make it known that you’re supposed to have fun listening to and crooning this song. And Amitabh’s lyrics, even the cringeworthy hookline, are fun! Trivedi adda those qawwali elements like the bulbultarang, and rock elements, and his signature quirky female chorus (Arohi Mhatre and Pragati Joshi) are ever loyal and give yet another enjoyable performance. The ‘satak’, ‘jhatak‘ effect in the antaras are so fun. Anyway, I love this song and you can judge me for it.

The best of the soundtrack comes with Tafreeh, where Trivedi starts the proceedings with a heady digital rhythm coupled with a nice guitar loop, and the Vikramaditya Motwane side of Amit Trivedi surfaces for the first time in this Vikramaditya Motwane soundtrack; the song instantly sends you back to the ‘Udaan’ soundtrack, more so because of Trivedi’s dreamy melody, than the arrangements. Also, he sings the ‘Chal Zaraa…” portion so amazingly, it’s hard not to get addicted! That beat he keeps up for the entire song in the background never gets repetitive. He even uses marching rhythms later on! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics have a certain message we all need to understand; the ‘carpe diem‘ philosophy resounding very vehemently throughout the song. Again, Trivedi does the rock parts well, and ends the song on a very entrancing high.


I won’t have many supporters for this statement, but I’m going to go ahead and call this Trivedi’s best soundtrack after a long time! Motwane really brings out the musical superhero that Trivedi really is! 😊

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 = 33

Album Percentage: 82.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tafreeh > Chavanprash > Qasam Kha Li > Hum Hain Insaaf

 

Which is your favourite song from Bhavesh Joshi Superhero? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

IMPRESSIVE TEAMWORK!! (DAAS DEV – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sandesh Shandilya, Vipin Patwa, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Anupama Raag & Shamir Tandon
♪ Lyrics by: Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Deepak Ramola, Dr. Sagar, Bulleh Shah, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Munir Niazi, Gaurav Solanki & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 27th April 2018

Daas Dev Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Daas Dev is a Bollywood political thriller starring Rahul Bhat, Aditi Rao Hydari and Richa Chadha in lead roles. The film is directed by Sudhir Mishra, and produced by Saptarishi Cinevision. The film has tanked as Such it Mishra’s weakest film, but we concern ourselves with the music, and let me tell you, this album is probably the dark horse album of the year! The music is composed by Sandesh Shandilya, Vipin Patwa, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Anupama Raag and Shamir Tandon. Read on to find out why I call it the dark horse album of the year so far! 🙂


Sandesh Shandilya and Vipin Patwa are the lead composers for the film: both have two songs each while the other three composers present us with one song each. Let’s start with Vipin Patwa’s portion of the album, since he hasn’t been active for so long!
Sehmi Hai Dhadkan is a melancholic but intense romantic song, that really works opposite to how these songs usually work with me. I actually liked the song. The tune is gripping, the instrumentation deep and likeable, and Atif’s vocals strong. The cello and piano work together against the digital beats, and Vipin’s composition is really captivating, especially with the hook, and the line before it, where Atif performs an impeccable aalaap. Dr. Sagar’s lyrics are good, but run of the mill. Vipin’s other song, Tain To Uttey, is a nice reimagination of Bulleh Shah’s verse, set against an electrifying folksy-rock fusion. Javed Bashir performs in a way that equals his rendition of ‘Piya Tu Kaahe Rootha Re’ (Kahaani), and he sounds amazing in those aalaaps, and in the hookline, when the composer brings in amazing rock elements accompanied by nice classical music elements. The interlude with Javed’s SARGAM is unforgettable.
Sandesh Shandilya though, takes the album to a different plane, with clever folk-techno fusion in both his songs. The relatively weaker (in no means a bad song), Raat Youn Dil Mein Teri, is a sensual romantic song sung by Papon and newcomer Shraddha Mishra. Two of Faiz Ahmed Faiz’s poems get amalgamated into this song, where Papon delivers an amazing performance as always, and even newcomer Mishra supports him and does her part beautifully with her distinct voice. The composition stands out as sensuous and experimental, while the techno sounds give it an even more intense lounge-ish sound. It reminds me of ‘Behroopia’ (Bombay Velvet) with its soundscape. The composition of the antara is mind blowing and tough to not love!
Sandesh’s other song, my personal favourite of the album because of its quirkiness and happy-go-lucky sound, is Challa Chaap Chunariya. The composition is essentially that of a folksy dance song, and it gets really catchy in the hookline and the cross line before it, and even more captivating with Rekha Bhardwaj’s stylish vocals. But the real magic here is the fusion by Shandilya. It’s so surprising this is the same Shandilya who made songs like ‘Suraj Hua Maddham’ (Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham) and ‘Aaoge Jab Tum’ (Jab We Met) in the 2000s, but now he has reinvented his style so drastically! The sarangi pairs beautifully with the psychedelic sounds, and the quirky programming makes it even more addictive.
Arko Pravo Mukherjee also breaks out of his spree of composing sugary sweet romantic songs, to create a nice rock ballad. Rangdaari has all the elements of a catchy rock song. Navraj Hans gets a short prelude in Punjabi, that we wish lasted longer, or featured once more in the song, until Arko takes the mic and sings his addictive composition. The arrangements are just like any rock song you’d hear, but nevertheless, very likeable. The hookline has a catchy composition as well; I just wish some more established singer had sung it. The guitars in the interludes are amazing, and so are the romantic lyrics by Arko Pravo Mukherjee.
Debutante composer Anupama Raag presents Azaad Kar, a song composed on that oh-so-heart-warming seven beat rhythm that is so prevalent in Bollywood, mainly for sad songs. The Indian tune is beautiful, as are the arrangements, with one digital plucked instrument playing throughout, coupled with jingle bells and tablas later on. The choice of Swanand Kirkire for singing it is really perfect; kudos to Anupama for remembering him. Gaurav Solanki’s lyrics are good too.
The weakest song of the album comes from Shamir Tandon; he composes a very heavy pathos-filled rock song, Marne Ka Shauk, that does not connect at all, with cringeworthy vocals (surprisingly by Papon and not so surprisingly by Krishna Beura) and very cringeworthy lyrics (as expected from Sameer Anjaan by now). It’s probably what the Devdas in this retelling sings when he starts drinking. 😂


All in all, this album turns out to be a surprisingly great album from multiple composers, but each pitch in to do their best, as per the script of the movie.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 + 7.5 + 8 + 5.5 = 54

Album Percentage: 77.14%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Challa Chaap Chunariya > Raat Youn Dil Mein Teri >
Azaad Kar = Tain To Uttey > Sehmi Hai Dhadkan = Rangdaari > Marne Ka Shauk

Which is your favourite song from Daas Dev? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

THE LYRICISTS’ SUCCESSFUL RAID!! (RAID – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Amit Trivedi, Tanishk Bagchi & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir & Indraneel
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 1st March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 16th March 2018

Raid Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Raid is a thriller starring Ajay Devgn, Saurabh Shukla and Ileana D’Cruz, directed by Rajkumar Gupta and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar, Kumar Mangat Pathak and Abhishek Pathak. The film is about India’s longest raid in the 1980s, and I’m sure all of you have already watched the film; blame my laziness for the late music review. Anyway, the music has been composed by Tanishk Bagchi and Amit Trivedi, both having composed (rather Tanishk having recreated and Trivedi having composed) two songs each.


Once again, T-Series taps into the remake-producing compartment of Tanishk’s brain, but this time, the results are actually not bad! Two Qawwalis of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan have been chosen by the makers here, and Tanishk recreates each of them with finesse and most importantly, respect. Sanu Ek Pal Chain, a soft romantic number, turns out to be the polar opposite of the horrendous ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’ (Baadshaho). Tanishk learns from his mistakes and this time the soul of the original song is kept intact. Tanishk’s composition skills are also tested here, because he makes his own antara, and does quite well at it too. The arrangements are similar to how Arko arranges his love songs, with the acoustic sounds being more prominent. Rahat Fateh Ali Khan’s rendition is great, and thankfully not ear-piercing like ‘Baadshaho’, and the lyrics by Manoj Muntashir hit the right note.
If “Sanu Ek Pal” was remade well, Nit Khair Manga‘s makeover is splendid, and Tanishk shows some real creativity there. Again, Rahat and Manoj join hands with him for the vocals and lyrics respectively. But if you notice, Tanishk has many more original lines to compose here, and apparently has much more freedom to do what he wants, and it results in some mind-blowing arrangements. The hookline is the peak of the song, where Tanishk starts off with the typical Sufi tabla rhythm, only to stop it, and start it again. It continues in this stop-start fashion all throughout! The trend of playing the hookline on the mandolin is followed here, too, but it sounds great here, and not contrived like it does everywhere else. Rahat manages the vocals beautifully, his nuances on point and very intricate.
Amit’s half of the album is purely situational. What Amit couldn’t probably do, they made Tanishk handle, and what Tanishk probably can’t do, they let Amit handle, as he is, after all, a senior to Tanishk, and knows how to create situational songs!
Black is like the theme song of the movie, but Amit Trivedi gets the 80s setting of the film spot-on in his arrangements for this song. Sukhwinder handles such songs amazingly, and he does so here too. Since the song is situational, it doesn’t grow instantly, but the peak of the song is surely the high pitched line before the hook. The hook, trademark Trivedi stuff, is something that will set your head nodding in its rhythm. The interlude is entertaining too. Indraneel’s lyrics suit the theme well; I guess he is a debutant, have never seen his name as a lyricist before! Amit’s percussions are top-notch, and the trumpets help give the song an authoritative feel.
The other Trivedi song, Jhuk Na Paunga, is your everyday Bollywood patriotic song, but oh, does it work in its intent. Comparisons to ‘Tu Bhoola Jise’ (Airlift) are inevitable, but in its own place, the song works well. It starts off with a typical Trivedi guitar riff followed by a typical Trivedi trumpet piece, and as soon as Papon’s feathery voice kicks in, so do your goosebumps. The mellow hookline is enough to melt the heart of anyone who regards himself a staunch nationalist. Again, the percussions and brass instruments are the highlight of the arrangements, but Amit adds a wonderful tabla rhythm in the antara, which will steal your heart. The chorus towards the end of the song is fascinating — “Toofan Mein Jalti Hui…“. It is small touches like this that make this the best song of the album, but the main reason, is Indraneel’s lyrics. Though the composition might be inaccessible for many of the masses, nobody can say they didn’t connect with the poignant lyrics.


Both the music composers do equally well here, but the lyricists raid the music and take away the spoils!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 8 + 7.5 + 8.5 = 31.5

Album Percentage: 78.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: 
Jhuk Na Paunga > Nit Khair Manga > Sanu Ek Pal Chain = Black

 

Which is your favourite song from Raid? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 13 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Raid) = 15

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

DAGAONKAR BABU SANGEETBAAZ!! (BABUMOSHAI BANDOOKBAAZ – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gaurav Dagaonkar, Abhilash-Joel, Debojyoti Mishra & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Ghalib Asad Bhopali & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 17th August 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 25th August 2017

Babumoshai Bandookbaaz Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a Bollywood crime comedy film, starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui and Bidita Bag and directed by Kushan Nandy. The film has been produced by Kiran Shyam Shroff and Ashmith Kunder. The music for this film has been given (five out of six songs) by Gaurav Dagaonkar, a composer we hear in Bollywood quite infrequently. The last time we heard him was in ‘Wah Taj’ when he made a song that nobody heard again. Before that though, he had given some good music for ‘Heartless’ (2014), and ‘Kaafirana’ (Joker; 2012). Hopefully since he’s in charge of the major chunk of the album here, he will do his best. The guest composers are a debutant duo named Abhilash-Joel, who have worked on a scratch composition by Debojyoti Mishra, and built their song around it. Hopefully, they make a great debut! So let’s jump into this bandookbaaz album and hope it is sangeetbaaz!!


1. Barfani (Male) / Barfani (Female)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Orunima Bhattacharya, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

Gaurav Dagaonkar starts off this album with a delightfully haunting (What an oxymoron) classical number, based on raag jog. The composer really pleasantly surprised me with his amazing command over classical notes. The way his notes have come out in such a mellifluous manner, is commendable. The mukhda is an instantly gripping portion, and the hook, ‘jal jaane do‘, is what gives you the goosebumps. The antara, in the ideal way that classical songs usually go, follows a more happy-sounding route, and it contrasts very well with that haunting mukhda. The composition reminds you of many 90s songs, when Bollywood music was so heavily inspired by traditional classical music. The lyrics by Ghalib Asad Bhopali are quite intense, and do justice to the song’s theme quite perfectly. The word ‘barfani‘, is a word I’m hearing for the first time in a Bollywood song in recent years! The song is presented in two versions, male and female — both with the same haunting arrangements, thanks to a wonderful beat given by the jingle bells (ghungroo), and a very beautiful play of the guitars and the Dobro (Shomu Seal) which give a very sitar-ish sound. The male version is sung with impeccable finesse, by Armaan Malik, and I believe this is his first such song, which is so heavily based on classical music. He handles the song beautifully, in the lower octaves, and I believe it is his career’s best performance, solely because he tries something new! Orunima Bhattacharya is in charge of the other version, and she takes up a higher pitch, and aces it, and you can tell she has been classically trained. A beautiful and haunting romantic song to start off the album!

Rating: 4.5/5 for Male Version, 4.5/5 for Female Version

 

2. Aye Saiyan

Singers ~ Orunima Bhattacharya & Vivek Naik, Original Composition & Lyrics Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The second song seems like a song that was a residue from the ‘Anaarkali Of Aarah’ album that released earlier this year. It follows the same folksy vibe, as if there’s a dance going on in the village. Gaurav aces the composition, which is essentially a Bhojpuri folk song, but his music makes it more lively and likeable. The same tune is repeated throughout the song, so it does get a bit tedious towards the end, but I guess that’s how the folk song is. The lyrics are funny, if you understand Bhojpuri. The harmonium (Satyajeet Prabhu) leads the way right from the beginning, giving a very fresh vibe to the song, and the sprightly rhythm and percussions (Satyajeet Jamsandekar) is enjoyable as well! There are amazing dholaks that give the song a rhythm to which you can nod your head! The vocals by Orunima are great here as well, and she showcases her versatility in this song, which is so different from the first one! Vivek Naik has a short interruption, which disturbs more than sounds good. A fun and cute folksy number!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Ghungta

Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Chorus ~ Vivek Naik, Santosh Bote & Rahul Chitnis, Original (Hook) Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, New Composition by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi

Here comes another remake, and this time, it’s incorporated into an item song. But before we apply our judgements to that sentence, let’s listen to the song with an open mind. Because when I did that, I really enjoyed the song, thanks to Gaurav Dagaonkar’s enjoyable music, and Neha Kakkar’s very energetic vocals! The song is the remake of R.D. Burman’s ‘Haye Re Haye Tera Ghungta’ (Dhongi), and what I liked is that the only part taken from the old song is the hook. The only difference is that the girl is singing ‘mera ghungta‘ instead of the boys singing ‘tera ghungta‘. The rest of the composition goes well with that hook, and especially the antara is very catchy, and has a trademark Panchamda touch to it. The arrangements are just as lively, with the signature Maharashtrian dhol-taasha rhythm backing it. But amazing guitars (Arvind Haldipur) welcome the listeners into the antara, and that makes the antara sound even more enticing. The vocals are something that propel the song to heights that might not have been touched, had the singer been different, or if Neha Kakkar had sung even a little bit lifelessly. However, her rendition is lively, and she proves again how much energy her voice has. Ghalib Asad Bhopali’s lyrics are very typical to this genre. One of the better of such songs to release this year.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Chulbuli

Singer ~ Papon, Additional Vocals ~ Vivek Hariharan, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The retro vibe kicks in with the next song, a naughty, mischievous number with a very retro tune. Gaurav Dagaonkar has composed it very well, and right from the opening harmonium bar, you know you are in for a treat. The composer has created a nice vaudevillian-esque tune, resembling the musical style that was prominent in the 50s. The tune of the Mukhda is amazing, and gets you gripped there itself. The lilt of the song is increased by the tempo and the beats. The Antara is irresistible, again having a very retro tune. The arrangements are beautiful; surprisingly, they’re a little less retro-esque. The European touch is high in them, with the accordions, mandolins and chimes being most prominent. However, to balance this old-school vibe, Gaurav throws in a number of wonderful things like electric guitars, drums and brass instruments. The vocals are mellifluous, and what can you expect other than mellifluous when it is the genius Papon behind the mic? His voice is so magnetic, you just can’t pay attention to anything else. Vivek Hariharan joins him in backing vocals. His rendition reminds me of ‘Labon Ka Karobaar’ (Befikre), and so do the arrangements, now that I think of it. Ghalib’s lyrics are great and fun! The best song of the album yet!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Khali Khali

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan, Music by ~ Debojyoti Mishra & Abhilash-Joel

The debutants Abhilash Lakra and Joel Dubba step in for this song, and they are in charge of a melancholic number, that haunts your soul. The composition is very haunting, and has been composed with such notes, that are sure to make you emotional, and frightened at the same time. The pace is very slow, aptly so. The problem arises in the Antara, where the song gets into the Bhatt mode, and as the listener, I started to zone out. And the way it runs after that is very tedious. The duo tries to make up for that with mysterious arrangements, but that too, sounds maudlin. There are amazing strings though, all throughout the song, and even the percussions are great. Mohit Chauhan sounds good, but doesn’t manage to keep our interest in the song. The lyrics are good, again. Not very impressive of a debut.

Rating: 2.5/5


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a pretty surprisingly good album! I was expecting very little from it before the first song came out. After that came out I started hoping for a little more, and the makers just gave more and more after that! Gaurav Dagaonkar finally gives an album that he can be proud of for ages — with Indian classical, folk, European music that proves his versatility. The debutant duo Abhilash-Joel do disappoint relatively, but show promise in their great sense of composition and arrangements. That makes this a quite sangeetbaaz album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4.5 + 2.5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Barfani (Male) = Barfani (Female) = Chulbuli > Aye Saiyan = Ghungta > Khali Khali

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 24 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz) = 26

Which is your favourite song from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂