MULTICOMPOSERS GIVE A HUGE, BUT NANHA-MUNNA ALBUM!! (MUNNA MICHAEL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Danish Sabri, Sabbir Khan & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st July 2017

Munna Michael Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Munna Michael is an upcoming Bollywood dance/action film starring Tiger Shroff, Nidhhi Agerwal and Nawazuddin Siddiqui in central roles. The film is directed by Sabbir Khan, and produced by Viki Rajani and Eros International. The film revolves around a dance competition, in which a vagabond played by Shroff decides to participate, until he is entangled into teaching the local villain how to dance, and they both fall in love with the same girl. So, the typical *yaaaaaawwwwwwwnnn* Bollywood plot. The music is by multiple composers, featuring songs by Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu. I’m not excited about anybody’s song particularly, except maybe Tanishk’s solo song and Tanishk’s song with his ex-co-composer Vayu, who he partnered up with again for this song after 2015’s smashing debut for them, ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), so let’s just see what the album is about and we might just get surprised!


1. Main Hoon

Singer ~ Siddharth Mahadevan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is a tribute to Michael Jackson, since the film is a dance film and the main character is probably an MJ fan, if we can deduce anything from his name. Tanishk’s composition is bland. Hookline is oddly-placed, but the Antara has a bearable tune. Arrangement and mixing are chaotic, as if Tanishk was adamant on using all techno sounds there are. The impactful vocals dont help either. Lyrics worth avoiding. When an oddly placed hook spoils almost the entire song!

Rating: 2/5

 

2. Ding Dang

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Antara Mitra, Rap by ~ Parry G, Shivi & Danish Sabri, Music by ~ Javed-Mohsin, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri & Sabbir Khan

A tribute to Jackie Shroff (atleast lyrically). The generic composition leaves you unflinched. Typical tapori arrangements with random backing vocals of “Aah-aah”. Both vocalists fail to make the song better, and the rappers fail miserably. Lyrics are cheap, trying-to-be-funny but failing miserably again. The hook lyrics make you go, “Sorry, what???” Ding dung?

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Pyar Ho

Singers ~ Vishal Mishra & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A very soothing romantic composition but quite heard-before, and the arrangements too remind of some songs heard in the past. The strings, guitars and digital arrangement still win your heart, though. The composer himself has sung as if he wanted Arijit to have sung it and Arijit would have been apt. Sunidhi is her usual perfect self while Neeti Mohan seems to have done backing vocals, but hasn’t been credited! Lyrics are very staid and nothing new. Best of the album but nothing creative.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Swag

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya & Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

A very situational song for a performance of Nawazuddin’s character. And they have tried to make it sound so-called “cool”, but it doesn’t work much. That instrumental loop that keeps repeating throughout the song is catchy, and the digital beats are cool, but sound very similar to an English song that I can’t recall. Brijesh’s vocals are the fun part of the song, but Pranay’s interruptions could have been avoided. Lyrics are bad, again. Except for Brijesh and that instrumental loop, a forgettable song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Beparwah

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Nandini Deb, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is one of Gourov-Roshin’s rare songs that are not recreations, and surprisingly, it starts off quite promisingly, in a retro-sounding prelude. The composition is still good, but a duration of six minutes is way too far-fetched, because the song is also very repetitive, and after one antara the song gets too boring. Arrangements are the same techno sounds that featured in the other songs, and many times in the past too. A rock interlude somewhere in the middle makes your ears bleed. Siddharth Basrur does a good job, but his cosinger, Nandini Deb, doesn’t impress. Again, lyrics are unimpressive. It is a song Hrithik Roshan should have got in 1999. 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Shake Karaan

Singers ~ Kanika Kapoor & Meet Bros., Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

I see the credits for this song.. and I prepare myself for another ‘Baby Doll’. And sure enough, those pop sounds and ladies shrieking feature in this song. I admit that the composition is catchy but not as much as previous Meet Bros-Kanika songs. The sound is a welcome change from the overpowering disco theme of the rest of the songs. Kanika’s voice is enjoyable as always. Lyrics continue to be the sloppiest they can be! A welcome change from the overbearing techno sounds of the album, but not innovative at all! 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

7. Feel The Rhythm

Singer ~ Rahul Pandey, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Pranay M. Rijia & Sabbir Khan

Pranay’s next song is actually quite impressive. The composition is a perfect example of a catchy MJ-ish tune, complete with glitzy arrangements that Pranay aces. The techno sounds here and the techno sounds in the other songs differ so much in the freshness quotient. This one is on the lines of ‘Iss Tarah’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) and that’s how it impressed me. Rahul Pandey sings a bit like Yash Narvekar and Benny Dayal, and sings impressively too. Again, the lyrics are the usual. A nice and fresh-sounding dance song!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

8. Beat It Bijuriya

Singers ~ Asees Kaur & Renesa Baadchi, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

Tanishk-Vayu return after two years (‘Banno’; ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’) with another folksy song, this time with a techno twist, obviously. The song has a very superficial tune, and hard to grip. Also it sounds inspired from Tanishk’s own ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ Title track. The arrangements match those of their first song; folksy harmonium, dhols and other techno sounds make for an entertaining listen. There’s an amazing fiddle interlude. Asees sings like never before, with a grunge in her voice in the hookline. The lyrics are a kind of funny Hinglish that I couldn’t grasp at once. Entertaining but limitedly.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

9. Pyar Ho (Redux)

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Sunidhi sings this Redux of ‘Pyar Ho’ solo. It has a melancholic arrangement, with those slow and mellow piano notes, that gets quite boring to hear after some time. The strings are good enough though. Sunidhi’s solo rendition though, is a treat to the ears. The composition is the same, and the lyrics have been tweaked to make it sound sad. Not something I’d like to listen to often.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

10. Swag (Rebirth)

Singer ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

‘Swag’ had apparently died while the rest of the songs were playing, so its ‘Rebirth’ appears now. Now, whatever little elements ‘Swag’ had going for it, are all removed in this Rebirth. It has even been stripped of all melody (whatever little it had) and now sounds like a funky instrumental that makes you cringe because of the way Pranay chants those lines creepily. The arrangements are fresh here, but there’s nothing like a good tune or good vocals to accompany it. So that’s a wasted opportunity. I prefer the song in its last life.

Rating: 1.5/5


Munna Michael sounds like a very badly done ‘ABCD’ album. Then again, if ‘ABCD’ would’ve had such music, we wouldn’t have had a sequel. The overdose of (badly done) techno music really sounds useless. One song gets it right, but no others impress. When you can groove to only one song in a dance film’s album, the album’s got problems. Also, when a director or producer asks for “Give me one Kanika song, one tribute to Jackie Shroff, one to Michael Jackson, one funky Hinglish song, many wannabe retro songs”, the results are bound to be bad. ‘Munna’ is a name usually used for small kids. So may I say that these Munna Multicomposers failed miserably? 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 1.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pyar Ho = Feel The Rhythm > Swag = Beparwah = Shake Karaan = Beat It Bijuriya = Pyar Ho (Redux) > Main Hoon = Ding Dang > Swag (Rebirth)

 

Which is your favourite song from Munna Michael? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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EACH SONG, DOBAARA! (DOBAARA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar, D. Wunder & Macks Wolf
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Puneet Sharma, D. Wunder & Tasha Tah
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Dobaara Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dobaara is an upcoming Bollywood horror film, starring Huma Qureshi, Saqib Saleem, Adil Hussain, Lisa Ray and Rhea Chakraborty in crucial roles. The film has been directed by Prawaal Raman and produced by the director along with Ishaan Saksena, Vikram Khakhar and Sunil Shah. It is an official remake of the 2013 Hollywood horror film ‘Oculus’, which is considered to be one of the scariest movies of all time. So horror films in Bollywood have been very miserably made, with people flying around so pathetically that it looks hilarious. For once, I feel that this is going to be a well-made horror film in Bollywood. Of course, another thing typical of Bollywood horror films is that they have romantic songs. For ‘Dobaara’, the music has been composed by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar, D. Wunder and Macks Wolf. Well, I know nothing about the latter two names, so I can’t speak about them, but I am expecting a lot from the first two names — Arko and Samira. Arko has been giving great songs for the whole of the last year and I don’t think he wants to stop now, so expecting good, creative songs from him. Meanwhile, Samira has vanished from composing after her amazing debut more than two years ago, with ‘Maati ka Palang’ (NH10). And she’s back now. Again, expecting a good song from her. So let’s see exactly how haunting the music of ‘Dobaara’ is!


1. Kaari Kaari / Kaari Kaari (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Asees Kaur / Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Payal Dev, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

“Maazi ko maazi rehne de, ankhiyon se nadiyaan behne de,
Toote inn waqt ke tukdon ko, rab ki farmaaish sehne de,
Shaakhon se kaliyaan tooti hai, jab se tu khud se yun roothi hai,
Zara dekh gaur se, oh saaiyaan, aks yeh tera, tu hi hai!”

– Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The song with which Arko starts off the album, reassures me yet again, that he is going to give amazing songs for this album. A beautiful, and by beautiful I mean extremely beautiful and more than that too, semiclassical melody is what the album starts with, and Arko can bask in the success of the song as it will reach many a listener’s hearts. The composition is a semiclassical melody that instantly hooks you, and Arko has structured it in a way that Bollywood songs usually aren’t. For example, after the mukhda, there’s a short stanza that doesn’t fall into any category and it goes “Tere jaisa hi dikhta hai, aks tera..” That stanza is bliss! The antara is just as soothing as the mukhda, while the hookline (which is subtly hidden within the Mukhda/antara) is just outstanding. As in all classical tunes, this one has intricate nuances, and the vocalists carry them out well. The song, featuring in two version, gets everything right in both versions. The arrangements are slightly different in each version. The first version has a beautiful, acoustic setting, with the guitar riff sounding mind blowing. Piano starts it off with a wonderful female voice programmed so as to enchant you right at the beginning! But the guitar riff that sets in once the melody starts, is just so simple and down-to-earth, that it is tough to dislike! The slide guitars + snaps combo in the interlude is wonderful as well. The Reprise takes the more classical route, and it starts off in a different way altogether. The guitar riff has been scrapped from this, and replaced by digital beats, along with something sounding like a Chinese xylophone. The arrangements of this one were a major throwback to ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani), and how coincident that Payal Dev has sung that one too. This one has an amazing aalaap in the interlude, and it is entrancing. Of course, no Arko song is completed without at least one guitar strum or riff, and he brings the guitar into play in the antara. The vocals are flawless in both versions. Asees in her version, gives her career best performance, and it sends chills down the spine listening to her perfecting each and every note, especially the nuances in the hookline. Payal, on the other hand, gives a more classically-toned rendition, which is probably why I remember the ‘Bajirao Mastani’ song. The thing to note is when she suddenly goes high in one of the hooklines towards the end. That was splendid! Arko, with his deep voice, enters in the antara, but complements the two ladies well in their respective songs. He writes the lyrics as well, and gives an aptly romantic, and soulful piece. A mind-blowing classical-based song, but kept extremely simple, all the better to win hearts with! 💜

Rating: 5/5 for Original, 5/5 for Reprise

 

2. Humdard / Humdard (Alt. Version)

Singers ~ Jyotica Tangri / Neha Pandey & Parry G, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Rap in Alt. Version Written by ~ Parry G

 “Takleef hogi, bechain honge, yeh raaste hain pathreeley,
Woh Zindagi ki, kahaani kaisi, ke bin lade hi jo jee le!”

– Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The next song by Arko, is highly disappointing. It is supposed to be some kind of sad song, but it barely manages to get the emotion right. The composition is more like a club song where a lady is sitting and singing a song while the main characters are sitting in the bar trying to forget their breakup. The beginning itself is so abrupt and odd, that it is tough to go on trying to like the song. The antara is good compared to the rest of the song, though. The arrangements are mostly digital beats that irritate mostly, and remind one of the songs from the ‘Saansein’ (2016) album. However, there’s a nice portion on strings that is mildly entertaining. Both versions have basically the same arrangements, but they differ in the vocal department. And both singers, I must say, fail to fit the bill here, and both of their renditions turn out to be least satisfying. The first version has Jyotica Tangri trying to be Neha Kakkar again, but even Neha Kakkar wouldn’t have sounded great in this song. Maybe Sonu Kakkar. And in the Alternate Version, newcomer Neha Pandey doesn’t impress at all, unfortunately; she suddenly changes vocal tones and that sounds very weird. And a quite impressive rapid rap by Parry G, who impressed even in ‘Jai Maa’ (Behen Hogi Teri), also features in the second version. I must say he sounds a lot like Yo Yo Honey Singh. The lyrics by Arko, are the saving grace of the song. They are actually good, and deserved a better composition to accompany them! A disaapointment from Arko after that brilliant song.

Rating: 1/5 for the Original, 1.5/5 for the Alternate Version

 

3. Ab Raat (Version 1) / Ab Raat (Version 2)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Samira Koppikar & Jonathan Rebeiro, Music by ~ Samira Koppikar, Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

“Dard dard andhera, zakhm si chaandni, Dhul jaayegi dhoop mein,
Sard haathon ka ghera, shehar ki berukhi, kho jaayegi goonj mein,
Parindon ki azaanein, gungunaati raah bhi, kehti hain aankhein choomke,
Bas, Abb raat guzarne waali hai, abb raat guzarne waali hai,
Abb raat guzarne waali hai, bas raat guzarne waali hai!”

– Puneet Sharma

At first, I thought this song is a remake of the old song ‘Ab Raat Guzarne Waali Hai’ (Awara), because the lyrics of the hook are the same, but it apparently isn’t, because this song has been released by Zee and not Saregama. 😂 Anyway, Samira steps in with her song, and even this song features twice. (The makers are really taking the title ‘Dobaara’ very seriously, huh?) However, I have no complaints with this song featuring twice. The song is a very, very soulful composition that gives you goosebumps. It is songs like this that must be added into horror films and not useless romantic songs. Samira’s composition is haunting to the core, very apt for the situation. The mukhda starts a bit slowly, but as soon as the hookline plays for the first time, you start getting intrigued and immerse yourself into the song. The first antara has an amazing tune, as does the second one, which is more like a Pritam-ish conclusion, rather than an antara. The arrangements by Samira, are yet another example of how to impress with the most used and most clichéd template ever. She employs a very effective soft rock arrangement to the first version, and it provides the required strength to the composition, which would sound sleepy without it. The drums, acoustic guitars and rock guitars complement each other very well, and it provides such a BEAUTIFUL ambience, spellbinding indeed. A Version 2 has been given a more acoustic treatment till the hookline starts, with the Acoustic guitar prominent. However, instead of making it plain and boring with only the guitar, Samira adds in a bit of this and a bit of that to make it sound better. A heart-rending flute has been employed in various places, and especially the interlude’s flute portion is something not to miss. Samira still doesn’t resist to add the drums here either, though. So this version sounds more like a Lounge Version, due to the combination of the flute, acoustic guitars and drums. Vocals are again flawless in both versions, Arijit at his soulful best, and Samira singing in a very different voice than she has in her other songs. She keeps it high-pitched, unlike the low pitch she uses in many of her songs. She has a co-singer named Jonathan Rebeiro, who has given a couple of words here and there as backing vocals. Last but definitely not the least, can we admire the lyrics here? The song is such a soulful song, but behind that tune are the genius words of Puneet Sharma, who writes less frequently, but has written some amazing songs for ‘Revolver Rani’ (2014; also the first album I ever reviewed!!) and songs for albums like ‘Cute Kameena’ (2016), ‘Mr. Joe B. Carvalho’ (2014) and ‘Aurangzeb’ (2013). But here, he gives another amazing piece of writing, which I just instantly fell for. The song is about waiting for the dark times to pass, and as they say, “This too shall pass”. A ravishing song!

Rating: 4.5/5 for Version 1, 5/5 for Version 2

 

4. Malang

Singers ~ Tasha Tah & D. Wunder, Music by ~ D. Wunder & Macks Wolf, Lyrics by ~ D. Wunder & Tasha Tah

“Malang Malang Maiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnn” 🐏

– D Wunder

This next song makes me recheck whether I’m actually listening to the ‘Dobaara’ album anymore or not. A generic Punjabi club number on the lines of Dr. Zeus’ songs is what makes up the “grand” finale to this album. The composition is so irritating at places, but catchy in some places. The hookline has the lead female singer bleating like a sheep, “Maiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnn”. That part is so irritating. The arrangements are typical club beats, but they aren’t so engaging. The vocals are execrable, and I’ve given an example up above. The English parts of the song are enjoyable though. But that’s like a “One in a million” good part, to quote the song. The Punjabi parts are so irritating, you forget to like anything else. Lyrics? What lyrics? Appalling.

Rating: 0.5/5


Dobaara is an album that depends on the Reprise versions to propel it. Three out of the four songs have another reprise, so that we hear it again. Thankfully, all these reprises are either better than or equal in comparison with the original songs, so I’m not complaining. Arko strikes gold, and what shiny gold, in the first song of his, but disappoints with the next one. Meanwhile, Samira Koppikar gets her guest composition extremely well, in both versions. Whoever D Wunder & Macks Wolf are, I hope they aren’t looking at Bollywood for a career. An album that gets a much higher rating than it would have, thanks to reprises, which made us hear the songs “dobaara”!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 5 + 1 + 1.5 + 4.5 + 5 + 0.5 = 22.5

Album Percentage: 64.29%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kaari Kaari = Kaari Kaari (Reprise) = Ab Raat (Version 2) > Ab Raat (Version 1) > Humdard (Alt. Version) > Humdard > Malang

 

Which is your favourite song from Dobaara? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A BEHEN WHO CAN’T DANCE, BUT CAN ONLY ROMANCE! (BEHEN HOGI TERI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Rishi Rich, Jaidev Kumar, Amjad-Nadeem, Yash Narvekar & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Bipin Das, Yash Narvekar, Amit Dhanani, Late Anand Bakshi, Sonu Saggu, Rohit Sharma, Parry G & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 23rd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Behen Hogi Teri Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Behen Hogi Teri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy starring Shruti Hassan, Rajkummar Rao, Gautam Gulati and Gulshan Grover in lead roles. The film is directed by Ajay K. Pannalal and produced by Tony D’Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. The film’s slogan is “All Indians are NOT Brothers and Sisters!” Well, going by the trailer and this slogan thingy, it seems like a quirky and light hearted romantic comedy, but you know Bollywood, they can add drama into anything and everything. The music of the film, as expected is by multiple composers, including Pritam’s A&R venture JAM8 (Kaushik-Akash-Guddu this time), Rishi Rich, Amjad-Nadeem (after a long time, huh!), Jaidev Kumar and Yash Narvekar. Out of these composers, none, I repeat none, have given anything outstanding in the past, so one can just hope that some miracle occurs and they give us great music for this film. Expectations are moderate, but hoping for the best, let’s explore the music of ‘Behen Hogi Teri’.


1. Jai Maa

Singers ~ Sahil Solanki, Jyotica Tangri & Parry G, Original Composition by ~ Prem Hardeep & Badshah, Music Recreated by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap Lyrics by ~ Parry G

Wow. So now the music industry has started remaking remakes. ‘Kala Chashma’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which was a quite banal remake by Badshah, of the Punjabi pop number ‘Kala Chashma’ by Prem Hardeep, itself, now gets remade into a mata-ki-chowki song. Jaidev Kumar, who had earlier remade ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz) into a similar satirical devotional song, ‘O Meri Mata’ in ‘Bajatey Raho’, takes the same composition that Badshah had made. Nothing changed in the tune, and that’s why it would make the public even crazier. The arrangements seem more toned down and not as harsh and shrill as they were in the original (I mean the original remake). I guess they added the dhols here specially for the jagraata setting. And they’ve, quite to my immense pleasure, gotten rid of the EDM at the end, and the shouting ladies and breaking glasses from the ‘Baar Baar Dekho’ song. Vocals here sound good and aptly funny as per the Goddess prayer setting. Sahil Solanki sounds much better than Amar Arshi, the original singer of both the original and Badshah’s remake. A rapper called Parry G {I don’t know why these people like to write a single letter after a weird nickname; we are going to meet another one later in the album!} reprises Badshah’s “sadkon pe chale jab ladkon ke dilon mein tu aag laga de baby firrrreeeeee” with a rap that sounds much more pleasant. Jyotica Tangri is a nice replacement for Neha Kakkar, but with less of an edge in her voice. The replacement lyrics by Sonu Saggu are quite funny too, but not something that will make you “ROFL” or “LOL” either. Interesting how the remake of a remake turns out to be better than the original remake. Let’s start remaking remakes now. P.S. I hope a certain music company doesn’t read that or else we will be over-flooded with ‘Baby Doll’ remakes. (Then again, aren’t we already over flooded by them!)

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tera Hoke Rahoon

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash-Guddu (KAG for JAM8), Lyrics by ~ Bipin Das

Next up, we get a dulcet melody from Pritam’s A&R company, JAM8. This time, the composers of the two songs in ‘1920 London’, Kaushik-Akash, are joined by someone calling himself Guddu, thus making it a trio. And this way, they produce a song that I will remember as one of the best (and the best till now) from any composer for JAM8. The composition, for once, doesn’t sound like a Pritam composition; for once the composers working behind the JAM8 label do not try to emulate Pritam’s late 2000s style of composition. In fact, the composition kind of reminded me of Bobby-Imran’s songs in ‘Badmaashiyan’, or some of Jeet Gannguli’s works. The free flow of the hookline makes it instantly likeable, and the mukhda and antara has a calm, soothing but haunting touch to it, something I’m always ready for if it isn’t too maudlin. The arrangements are fabulous; they just add to the haunting characteristic of the song. The guitar has been played in such a subtle manner, in the beginning, that it is impossible to not be sucked in right away. And when the orchestra sets in, the song just gets many times better. The electronic tabla adds to the serenity, while that wonderful flute interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. In the antara guitars have been played in a wonderful play-stop-play-stop manner that is so comforting. And the tabla doesn’t stop either! Arijit, the first choice for any composer associated with Pritam, and Pritam himself, renders the mellow composition with such ease, in the voice of his that I love, as opposed to that droning voice he uses in sleepy songs. The way he sings the “uff tak na yaara karoon”, is so beautiful! Bipin Das (newcomer?) writes lyrics that are instantly lovable. The first time JAM8 do something that doesn’t resemble their mentor’s work heavily, and it turns out to be a success. 

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Jaanu

Singers ~ Juggy D, Shivi & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

So after the remake of a remake, we get a remake of another classic, in fact, one of my favourite songs by R.D. Burman. The likeable, sweet and fun-to-listen-to classic gets a makeover and now it looks horrendous. Rishi Rich seems to have struck a big deal in Bollywood after his long hiatus, because after he returned in ‘Half Girlfriend’, with a mediocre title song, he gets to do another (though horrible) song here. The man makes sure that somebody says “This is a Rishi Rich refix” before the song starts, and that is so annoying! We have the credits in front of us and we can read your name there. I know here are some music listeners out there who don’t care about who made a song, and they will continue not caring, so even if you say your name there, they wouldn’t care. And then comes the cliché of saying the names of the singer (Juggy D) and the rapper (Raftaar). And what I don’t understand is, why not say the name of the female artiste! Hasn’t she contributed anything to the song? They did the same thing in ‘High Heels’ from ‘Ki & Ka’ and they repeat it here. If anything, Shivi is shining in this song amongst the hackneyed renditions of the male artist and Raftaar. Oh by the way, Juggy D. 😄 Another artist naming himself like that. Rishi Rich has kept the composition intact, fortunately. But what he does instead, is even more unfortunate. He breaks up the hookline, making it sound like a cassette that is stuck at one point. And then it stops to make way for a weirdly-placed techno music piece. And then it proceeds and ends. How boring. There are so many raps in the song, it is hard to concentrate on the actual song. And Raftaar raps so oddly. Just to keep the “Behen” theme intact, he adds so many lines about sisters, that were so unnecessary. And now for thr vocals. Juggy D can’t sing at all. The proof? If someone isn’t able to sing the nuance in the word “Hindustan” in this song, he or she is definitely not a good singer. Shivi barely manages to sing that part, but does much better than her co-singers, making her stand out even with a mediocre performance. Of course, they don’t match the singing calibre of the legendary combination of Kishore Kumar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle & Usha Mangeshkar from the original song. The arrangements are irritating club sounds, EDM thrown here and there. But I enjoyed the parts with the Spanish guitars, and the strings incorporated from the old song. A horrible remake of a song that deserved a much better remake, or no remake!

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Teri Yaadon Mein / Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai, Pawni Pandey & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar & Sukriti Kakar, Music Composed by ~ Yash Narvekar, Music Produced by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Yash Narvekar & Amit Dhanani

Rishi Rich comes back for the next song too, but this time, things are different. This time, the song is a romantic song. And this time, Rishi Rich has only produced the song. Rishi Rich gives a composing break to someone I’ve seen many times in the singer category in various Amaal Mallik, Meet Bros. and even Rishi Rich songs, Yash Narvekar. He gets to compose the tune. And I must say, it is quite a commendable tune! Yes,  does follow the usual Bollywood romance template, with its tune, but it manages to engage the listeners. However, the listener does lose interest in some places. The hookline is very typical, but still, it managed to garner my interest. The antara too, follows the same pattern. What really engages the listeners, though, is Rishi Rich’s beats and arrangements. In the first version, Rishi employs a nice and groovy beat, a hip-hop beat in a romantic song, which at first elicits a weird reaction from the listener, but it sets in perfectly after a couple of listens. Especially the tablas which Rishi has added occasionally, are amazing. The second version, the Reprise, takes a more templated route, with guitars and piano taking the lead, making for a more calm listen. A harmonium too pops up later on, quite oddly. The piano interlude in that version is a must-hear. The vocals are good in both versions. While Yasser, sounding as similar to Arijit as ever, and Pawni Pandey stir up a nice chemistry in the first version, the essence of the song only reaches us in the Reprise because the voices of Yash & Sukriti haven’t been touched. Programming ruins the feel of the voices in the first version. However, I loved Yash’s backing vocals in the first song, that sound like tabla bols. Yash & Amit Dhanani together write a song that is full of typical lines and phrases, like the song title itself. Experimental, but works to some extent. The Reprise version fares better!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Original Version, 4/5 for Reprise Version

 

5. Tenu Na Bol Pawaan / Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Jyotica Tangri / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Amjad-Nadeem, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Sharma

Amjad-Nadeem, back in the composing scene after quite some time, have been roped in for the final song on the album. Amjad-Nadeem are usually known to meddle in typical romantic songs or horrendous massy item songs. This time around too, they have provided a typical romantic song, but that typicality is very enjoyable. The composition is sugary-sweet, something that is very rare from Amjad-Nadeem, who usually produce melodramatic sounding songs. The hookline is so heard-before, so clichéd, yet it manages to click with the listener. There is a high-pitched line that just makes you love the song even more. The antaraa are a bit less engaging, but still manage to keep the flow of the song intact. There are two versions to this song as well; one being a male version (with female humming in the background, hence the credit for Jyotica) and the other being a female version, which is kind of unplugged. The male version has heavenly instrumentation. It starts off with nice chimey sounds, followed by the sweetest flute portion I’ve heard in quite a while. The melody is structured on a simple guitar riff that, though it is very simple and typical, engages the listener. Strings join in later, bringing the third dimension to the song, and how! The second version is, as I said before, unplugged, and has a nice acoustic guitar riff playing in the background, and nothing else. The minimalistic feel of it, makes it even more appealing. Vocals are perfect in both versions. This is no doubt, Yasser’s best performance ever, and he sounds so different than usual here! Jyotica does the humming in Yasser’s version. Asees Kaur, on the other hand, renders her unplugged version with such a beautiful aura around her, that it is mesmerizing. Though her track is longer by one minute than Yasser’s, it makes for a good calm listen. The lyrics by Rohit Sharma (I don’t know whether he’s the Sharma who composed the songs of ‘Anaarkali of Aaraah’ or any other one. He’s definitely not the cricketer, right?) are sweet too. A song full of sweet things. Sweetness lies in simplicity after all.

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Reprise Version


Behen Hogi Teri is an unexpectedly cool multicomposer album! Going by the composers’ names, I was least expecting such a good album. However, it seems like all the composers have pitched in to provide their best. For a romantic comedy, a good album is a must, and fortunately, this album delivers as expected, if not less than expected. Yes, one song is very bad, but the others make up for it. And since the finance theme predominates the album, maybe that’s why they managed to wrench out such good songs from the music directors. An album predominantly made of romantic songs, but still works fine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 4.5 + 1 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hoke Rahoon = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein > Jai Maa > Jaanu

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 12 (from previous albums) + 02 = 14

 

Which is your favourite song from Behen Hogi Teri? Please vote for it below! Thanks!