ROCHAK’S Ph.D IN PUNJABI FOLK! (KHANDAANI SHAFAKHANA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Tanishk Bagchi, Badshah, Payal Dev, Jasbir Jassi, Shyam Bhateja & Anand-Milind
♪ Lyrics by: Tanishk Bagchi, Mellow D, Shabbir Ahmed, Kumaar, Badshah, Gautam G Sharma, Gurpreet Saini, Davinder Khandewal & Deepak Chaudhary
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 26th July 2019
♪ Movie Released On: 2nd August 2019

 

Khandaani Shafakhana Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Khandaani Shafakhana is a Bollywood comedy film starring Sonakshi Sinha, Varun Sharma, Badshah and Annu Kapoor. The film is directed by Shilpi Dasgupta and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Mahaveer Jain, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba, Divya Khosla Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film revolves around a woman who has to take over her uncle’s infamous sex clinic. The music of the film has been given by the remake expert Tanishk Bagchi, the rapper who is acting in the film Badshah, Rochak Kohli, fresh from the success of his brilliant work in ‘Music Teacher’ earlier this year, and Payal Dev, Who is surprisingly debuting as a composer, making it another mainstream female singer doing so after Kanika Kapoor last year with ‘Chhod Diya’ (Baazaar). So let’s see how this multicomposer album to this film turns out to be.


Music promotions for any film these days start with remakes, and ‘Khandaani Shafakhana’ makes sure it isn’t the norm-breaker. Tanishk Bagchi’s interpretations of old Bollywood super hit songs and/or Punjabi pop songs are a norm these days: another norm this album shies away from breaking.
The album hence starts with Koka, a Tanishk Bagchi remake of Jasbir Jassi’s pop song ‘Koka Tera Kuch Kuch’ from the album ‘Just Jassi’. Tanishk does add his own composition to the hookline from Jassi and Shyam Bhateja’s original, and manages to present us with a catchy and groovy remake. Badshah’s presence in the film warrants a rap from him, while Jasbir Jassi is called to dub the rest of the vocals, and he delivers them in top form. Dhvani Bhanushali, taking the support of oodles of autotune, however, sounds odd; not that singing prowess matters so much in a dance track like this. The beats are catchy, and there’s also a T-Series advertisement thrown in very abruptly in the beginning. If that’s your kind of thing, ‘Koka’ is for you.
Tanishk’s second remake happens to be that of a 90s Bollywood song. Sheher Ki Ladki is a highly unimaginative, though still attractive, recreation of Anand-Milind’s ‘Shehar Ki Ladki’ (Rakshak), with Badshah donning the singer’s cap, obviously coming nowhere close to the original singer Abhijeet Bhattacharya in doing so. His ‘Hi, how are you?’ and ‘How do you do’ sounds so bland as compared to Abhijeet’s (which also features in this song as a bonus addition, I guess, as Tanishk likes to sample the original singers’ voices like Kumar Sanu in ‘Aankh Maarey’ from ‘Simmba’ and Kavita Krishnamurthy in ‘Hawa Hawai 2.0’ from ‘Tumhari Sulu’). Chandana Dixit too, gets her original line featured behind an extremely loud and high-pitched Tulsi Kumar. The latter gets her own original verse too, sounding not as bad! Badshah’s rap is more irritating here than in ‘Koka’, where it actually went with the flow of the song. Also irritating is how Bagchi never lets the hook of the song complete, always interrupting it with that jarring electronic loop that plays so many times throughout the song. A good attempt to revive the song, but people would obviously go for the original!
Apart from acting in the film and rapping in two remakes, Badshah also gets selected to prepare his own original song for the film, which, not surprisingly, tops the two remakes by Tanishk. Saans Toh Le Le is a groovy song with the trademark Badshah beats, but with a retro Punjabi folk twist, a la ‘Naughty Billo’ (Phillauri) and ‘Bhangra Ta Sajda’ (Veere Di Wedding), both songs by Shashwat Sachdev. The programming really makes the song interesting, especially Tejas Vinchurkar’s folksy flute pieces, and makes the middling composition sound more interesting to listen to. Badshah, along with Rico, deliver the lines well, too, making it an all in all fresh listen.
Payal Dev makes her composing debut with this album, in a song called Dil Jaaniye, a very sweet romantic duet by Jubin Nautiyal and Tulsi Kumar. The composition, though reminiscent of many romantic Punjabi songs Bollywood has churned out over the years, still makes a mark, and especially the mukhda gets you gripped enough to listen forth. Aditya Dev’s arrangements are soothing, the Indian percussions (Chari, Shashi, Mushtaq and Sharafat) taking centre stage, along with the wonderful Pianica piece by Aditya Dev himself. The antara sung by Jubin is great, but the one with Tulsi sounds a bit unnecessary, because it stretches the song a bit too long, and then we have to listen to it in Tulsi Kumar’s double-layered, badly processed voice. Shabbir Ahmed, a rare choice for romantic songs as this, writes functional lyrics. However, the stars of the song are definitely Payal with her composition, Aditya with his arrangements and Jubin with his part of the vocals.
Two more soft songs follow, both by Rochak Kohli. In Bheege Mann, he goes back to the style of music he composed for the songs he did for Luv Ranjan films, ‘Tera Yaar Hoon Main’ (Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety) and ‘Dil Royi Jaaye’ (De De Pyaar De). The same kind of dulcet melody decorated with guitar riffs, piano notes (arrangements courtesy Aditya Dev) and stray aalaaps, but this time Arijit Singh is replaced by an equally efficient Altamash Faridi, thereby giving the song a rustic touch with his earthy voice. The composition is strong, and will have you enraptured for its entire duration, in spite of its similarities with Kohli’s previous numbers. Gautam G Sharma and Gurpreet Saini write pensive lines to accompany the serious composition, but all-in-all, it is a pleasant song to listen to.
Rochak’s second song, Udd Jaa, is a delight to listen to, because it starts with ethnic strokes of the bouzouki, mandolin and rabab (Tapas Roy), immediately blending into a folksy dholak rhythm, very Rochak-ish (reminding one of ‘Meer-e-Karwaan’ from ‘Lucknow Central’!) which is then followed by the beautiful voice of Tochi Raina (where was the man for so long!?) which suits the motivational and inspirational nature of the song so well! Rochak churns out a very creative composition, which sounds straight out of Coke Studio thanks to the gratuitous folk sounds. While listening to this song, I realise how heavily Rochak relies on folk music to make his songs sound rich, right from the initial days (I think he started using it mainly with ‘Mera Yaar Funtastic’ from ‘Welcome 2 Karachi’) to his songs in ‘Hawaizaada’, to the earlier mentioned ‘Meer-e-Karwaan’ (Lucknow Central), the beautiful Punjabi romantic song ‘Nain Na Jodeen’ (Badhaai Ho), right to the very recent songs in ‘Ek Ladki Ko Dekha Toh Aisa Laga’. Rochak is incomplete without presenting Punjabi folk music in a very flattering way in his songs! Back to the song, Kumaar’s lyrics in the song suit the inspirational aspect of it, and complement the melody well, and put together, Tochi, Rochak and Kumaar end this album on a high note, with a strong folksy melody!


This album turns out to be one of the better-compiled multicomposer albums by T-Series after a while, the last ones being ‘Kabir Singh’ and ‘De De Pyaar De’ in my opinion! All four composers here try to bring what the movie needs, Tanishk with his mass-attracting remakes with club beats, Badshah with his trademark catchy beats, Payal Dev with her great composing debut and finally Rochak with his astounding use of Punjabi folk music.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 8.5 + 9 = 46

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Udd Jaa > Bheege Mann > Dil Jaaniye > Koka > Saans Toh Le Le > Sheher Ki Ladki

 

Which is your favourite song from Khandaani Shafakhana? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NAWABS THAT PARTY AND DANCE IN CLUBS..? (NAWABZAADE – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gurinder Seagal, Guru Randhawa & Badshah
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Kunaal Vermaa, Ikka, Kumaar, Sandeep Nath & Badshah
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th July 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th July 20181400x1400bb2

Listen to the songs: Saavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Nawabzaade is an upcoming comedy film starring Raghav Juyal, Dharmesh Yelande, Punit J. Pathak and Isha Rikhi. The film is directed by Jayesh Pradhan and produced by Lizelle D’Souza and Mayur K Barot. The music for the film is composed by Guru Randhawa, Gurinder Seagal and Badshah. I don’t really expect much from the album, looking at the composer names, and I’ll be honest: I’m reviewing it so I don’t have to have only two big albums, Dhadak and Soorma competing in the monthly awards. 😅 So let’s see what entails…


Guru Randhawa continues his spree of rehashing his pop sinhles under T-Series, into Bollywood club tracks; he also continues making the Bollywood variants sound fresher and less raw than the pop songs — giving them a more polished sound. High Rated Gabru is propelled by the two special appearances by Varun Dhawan and Shraddha Kapoor, though. The song is your typical Guru Randhawa EDM number that attracts you at first, but wears off with further listens. As for me, it hasn’t worn off yet though, so I guess this is one of the stronger ones. I like the drum beats Guru has put in occasionally, and the club sound still sounds fresh, so I guess he still has the audience grooving. The Female Version is even more unnecessary than having ice cream in December. Aditi Singh Sharma’s over-stylised vocals seem to say “Remember me? I haven’t got a song in Bollywood for a long time, but I still can’t sing in a normal voice.” The Punjabi reprise of the lyrics just sounds odd. The programming in this version isn’t as fresh and bubbly as in the male version, so it’s bound to get less takers.

Badshah too, is made to rehash his tried-and-tested formula, with a steady beat running throughout the song, Tere Naal Nachna is adorned with noises like an Indian auntyji going “Hainn?” The bass line though, is really addictive, and the hookline by newcomer (?) Sunanda Sharma is irresistible. Badshah has the most catchy female singer portions in his songs! Looks like after Aastha Gill, he is now introducing another quirky singer. The lyrics are the usual Badshah rap stuff, while vodka makes a cameo in the hookline, as always.

Lead composer Gurinder Seagal gets three songs to his credit: he doesn’t make much of the opportunity, though. Amma Dekh is a pacy dubstep number that should have been released two or three years ago. Sukriti Kakar awkwardly tries to sing like Neeti Mohan, while Ikka provides a banal rap portion. Gurinder does give it a cool sound though, with a variety of sound effects used throughout the song. Kumaar’s lyrics are nothing except for Sameer’s hookline from the song ‘Amma Dekh’ (Stuntsman).

If that was cringeworthy though, what awaits you in Mummy Kasam will have you wincing in terror. The staid-by-now Bollywood kuthu rhythm has been given a tedious presentation here, with cringeworthy lyrics by Kunaal Vermaa, and weird vocals by Gurinder Seagal. Ikka presents an even worse rap in this song than he did in the former. Payal Dev tries to sound like Neha Kakkar, and obviously fails. Too loud for my liking.

The only song where Gurinder remotely proves that he can compose, and not just program, is Lagi Hawa Dil Ko, which just happens to be the best song of the album because all the others are nowhere near it. It sounds refreshing to get a normal, romantic melody after so much noise, and my brain felt glad to get to process something for once. Altamash Faridi leads the vocals wonderfully, while others like Gurinder Singh, Shivay Vyas, Nettle and even Mika Singh in a short energetic departure from the romantic tune, complement him well. The reason this song stands out from the others is that it has variety. The arrangements are pleasant — guitars, harmonica, tablas, even, in a short Qawwali portion, drums, trumpets and rock guitars in a rock-and-roll portion, this song has a wide range. Sandeep Nath’s lyrics are nothing great, but more of better-than-the-rest.


Except for one experimental song, this album is mainly going to be heard and forgotten. In fact, I can’t even guarantee that the experimental song won’t be forgotten!!

Total Points Scored by This Album: 6.5 + 5.5 + 7 + 5 + 3 + 7.5 = 34.5

Album Percentage: 57.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Lagi Hawa Dil Ko > Tere Naal Nachna > High Rated Gabru > High Rated Gabru (Female) > Amma Dekh > Mummy Kasam

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes : 27 (from previous albums) + 02 = 29

Which is your favourite song from Nawabzaade? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 😊


 

ALLAH DUHAI HAI, SELFISH YEH ____ HAI!! (RACE 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Meet Bros., Tushar Joshi (for JAM8), Vicky-Hardik, Shivai Vyas, Gurinder Seagal, Kiran Kamath, Deep Money & Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Salman Khan, Kumaar, Shabbir Ahmed, Shloke Lal, Raja Kumari, Hardik Acharya, Shivai Vyas, Shanky, Kunaal Vermaa, Rimi Nique & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 12th June 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th June 2018

Race 3

 

Listen to the songs: Gaana


Race 3 is an upcoming action thriller (read horror comedy) film starring Salman Khan, Anil Kapoor, Bobby Deol, Jacqueline Fernandez, Saqib Saleem, Daisy Shah and Sonakshi Sinha, directed by Remo D’Souza and produced by Salma Khan, Salman Khan and Ramesh Taurani. The film blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’ blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’ blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’ and has music by Salman Khan Vishal Mishra, Meet Bros., Tushar Joshi, Vicky-Hardik, Shivai Vyas and Gurinder Seagal. blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’.


NOTE: After reading the review, you are to fill-in the blank in the heading of this review. 😊 Have fun thinking of words that rhyme with ‘Duhai’, like the makers do in every instalment of the ‘Race’ franchise.


I must admit that lead composer Vishal Mishra’s first song Selfish is much better in its music and composition, than it is in its lyrics and female vocals. Salman Khan, who has now proclaimed himself as a lyricist as well, writes lyrics like a ‘Baybeh’. Poor Vishal Mishra gets to decorate his beautiful composition and soulful arrangements with Salman’s awkward lyrics and Iulia Vantur’s just as awkward voice. Her pronunciation isn’t bad though, for somebody who doesn’t know Hindi. Atif Aslam saves what’s left of the song; and that makes the song work anyway. Vishal’s strings and piano actually deserved a better treatment by the production house and the lead actor. Thankfully, we get a Solo Version sung only by Atif Aslam, and it does sound half less awkward than the duet. The Unplugged Version is a duet with Vishal Mishra himself, and though the composer sings well, against the acoustic guitar backdrop, Atif still steals the cake. The bad part is, the exact same lyrics in all three versions — adding up to 15 minutes of ‘Selfish’ on this album. Are you trying to tell us something, Salman?
I started loving ‘Selfish’ even more after listening to I Found Love. Vishal Mishra tries to recreate something like his own ‘Pyar Ho’ (Munna Michael), with similar piano portions and digital beats, but it ends up being so awkward, you wonder how somebody can find love singing this song. The rock part in the hook tries to be Pritam-ish but fails miserably. At least in the previous song, we had a good composition. Here we have no such luck. And Salman sings it as well as writes it. “Ik Baat Achhi Hui Ki Khoobiyon Ke Pehle Khaamiyan Pata Chali.” (I can’t find the *slow claps* emoji… Come on Android, we need one.. fast!) Newcomer Veera Saxena has a functional voice, but I can’t help but wonder why she didn’t sing ‘Selfish’, the good song, and why Iulia didn’t sing this, which was already sounding bad!
The second song Iulia sings on the album, actually sounds good. Party Chale On by newcomer composer duo Vicky-Hardik sounds closest to Pritam’s music, almost consciously mimicking ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz), and even Iulia sounds good in this one. So does Mika. That doesn’t mean it’s exceptional or anything, but it sure seems so after the two awkward songs. That said, Hardik’s lyrics aren’t all that comfortable either. I appreciate that at least some efforts have been taken in making the arrangements good, but Pritam has been credited with special thanks in the YouTube credits, so now I don’t know what to assume. It’s the only song of the album I sat through without cringing once.
Heeriye is Salman Khan’s attempt to imbibe Punjabi pop in his films as well, given that he has somehow steered clear of it till now. Meet Bros “compose” (since it is a note-to-note remake of Deep Money composed ‘Naina Da Nasha’ which released 3 years ago) a 2000s-ish tune and decorate it with EDM that reminds me of ‘It’s Magic’ (Koi Mil Gaya). Deep Money’s vocals are underwhelming but thankfully, someone else didn’t sing it. Neha Bhasin sounds awesome, but I don’t know why she’s signing songs where she has so little to do. (Swag Se Swagat, and now this). Kamaal Khan’s irritating interruptions of ‘I’ve been thinking about you’ and ‘You blow my mind’ do nothing to add any class to the song. Side note: I just love, love, love the contrast between Jacqueline’s dance and Salman’s dance in the video.
Another newcomer Shivai Vyas is given a ‘big break’ by Salman with the song Ek Galti. Now, this song is decent. But as I said before, it isn’t one where I didn’t cringe. Shivai Vyas composes quite well, and towards the hookline, it actually sounded like something Pritam would offer back in 2008 (that’s ten years ago already! 😱😱) for the ‘Race 1’ album. The song needed someone like Atif Aslam or Arijit Singh (that would be great right? Salman saying to Arijit — ‘Hey, you can sing in ‘Race 3′ if you want’ and then Arijit would reject it and then five more years of waiting for forgiveness from Salman.) But Shivai sings it himself, and ends up shouting in the antara, where the song would’ve sounded intense and serious in someone else’s voice, but now it sounds like a hastily made pop song which ended up in (what’s supposed to be) a big film. He even tries to put tablas and other instruments that make the song sound decent.
Saansain Hui Dhuan Dhuan starts with someone singing “R, A, C, E, 3”, as if the characters of the film know that they’re in a film which is the third instalment of a film franchise called ‘Race’. 😹 That said, Gurinder Seagal makes sure the song has some class; the music is clearly up-to-date, and the composition suits the sinister theme of the film (or the sinister theme the film should have.. which has turned into comedy in this film). Payal Dev sounds impressive, and Iulia must’ve sung that English part, but it still sounds like an Indian accent, so I don’t know why she puts on her Romanian or whatever accent in Hindi songs but puts on an Indian accent in an English part. 😒
Tushar Joshi, acting under JAM8 gets to remake his mentor Pritam’s iconic theme song. Allah Duhai Hai is a sick (I mean sick, not the modern ‘sick’ which people use for saying “Yo man dat’s sick!”) reinterpretation of Pritam’s theme song. The song starts off well enough, thanks to Amit Mishra, but as soon as Sreerama pitches in with that ear-splitting ‘nasha, tera, nashaaa‘, which was oh so graceful when Sunidhi sang it ten years ago, I lost interest in the song. As a result, even with some of the best singers of today (Amit & Jonita) the song turns out underwhelming. The antara has no memorable tune, it just sounds like the singers were given some words and asked to put some tune to it. Shabbir Ahmed’s new lyrics are not bad, considering the standard of lyrics in the rest of the album. Raja Kumari’s rap takes up a major portion of the song, backed with sick (again, you know which ‘sick’) EDM that falls on its face.
Kiran Kamath’s Mashup is a mashup. Don’t listen to it. I’m not gonna tell you ‘well made’ or whatever because mashups are mashups. I’ll just give it a 2/10 based on what I heard. 😏


blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah ‘Our business is our business none of your business’.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5.5 + 6.5 + 6 + 2 + 7 + 5.5 + 5 + 5 + 4.5 + 2 = 49

Album Percentage: 49%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: If possible, don’t even try the songs below 5/10

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 21 (from previous albums) + 04 = 25

Do you have a favourite song from the Race 3 album? Please don’t vote for it. Instead, participate in this poll! Thanks! 🙂

A HAPPY WEDDING OF PUNJABI AND ELECTRONIC MUSIC!! (VEERE DI WEDDING – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Shashwat Sachdev, Vishal Mishra, Qaran Mehta & White Noise
♪ Lyrics by: Anvita Dutt, Raj Shekhar, Shellee, Shashwat Sachdev, Gaurav Solanki, Qaran Mehta, Rupin Pahwa, Badshah & White Noise
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 8th May 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 1st June 2018

Veere Di Wedding Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Veere Di Wedding is a Bollywood coming-of-age film revolving around four friends played by Kareena Kapoor Khan, Sonam K. Ahuja, Swara Bhasker and Shikha Talsania. The film is directed by Shashanka Ghosh and produced by Ekta Kapoor, Shobha Kapoor, Anil Kapoor and Rhea Kapoor. Now, the film has been creating buzz right from its trailer release, and the music which has become a rage across the nation already (not all songs but a select few) has been composed by composers including Shashwat Sachdev, Vishal Mishra, Qaran Mehta and White Noise. Shashwat and Vishal are two young talents that haven’t yet disappointed with whatever they’ve composed. On the other hand, Qaran, who has been assisting music directors like Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Pritam for quite some time now, gets to make his composing debut with this film, and White Noise is actually Sachin-Jigar’s Artists & Repertoire venture like Pritam’s JAM8. So there is reason enough to believe this will be an enjoyable multicomposer album.


The lead composer, Shashwat Sachdev, actually has four songs in the album, which is half the number of original songs there are in the album, so let’s start with his songs. 😁
Pappi Le Loon, the album opener on all the streaming websites as well, is a fun-filled, catchy number, where, surprisingly, the vocals arrangements outdo the composition! You can even say there is almost nothing by way of composition; the entire stress is laid on the way the sound interacts with the booming vocals by Sunidhi Chauhan. Shashwat’s electronic music is impressive too, and as such, he didn’t need a strong tune, to make this song any better! Everything has been done by the entertaining vocals and arrangements. The Punjabi-flavoured portions nicely marry the electronic sound and make this song one to look forward to in the album — one of the main attractions in the album, I would say. And when has Sunidhi Chauhan ever underperformed? And Shellee’s lyrics are suitably quirky and fun.
In another Punjab-meets-electronic music fusion, Sachdev serves a folk song in modern packaging, quite the same way he did ‘Naughty Billo’ back in ‘Phillauri’, where he turned the folk song ‘Jhooth Boliya’ into a trippy hip-hop number. Here he gets to remake ‘Bhangra Ta Sajda’ into an EDM-Punjabi music fusion track named Bhangra Ta Sajda (No One Gives A Damn!). The song itself is really entertaining; it has everything you’d require to groove at a wedding, and out of one too — trippy EDM, entertaining dhols, and a nice touch of sarangi, something Shashwat seems to love hiding in each of his upbeat songs. Romy delivers an amazing performance, and Neha Kakkar delivers one which made me like her voice in a song after a long, long time. The initial retro-ish portion of the song has been done well, and Gaurav Solanki’s lyrics are just quirky fun. (I have a feeling I’ll be saying this about every song in the album)
Shashwat’s best comes with Bass Gira De Raja, where he composes, writes and sings the song! The song is standard Shashwat quirky fusion; the composition instantly has you hooked,and the lyrics actually had me smiling at certain points. The man sings amazingly too, and once the bass drops, the song becomes much more interesting than it was when it started. The way Sachdev plays and experiments with different sounds is what makes me look forward to his composing for many more films in the future. In ‘Phillauri’ he got to do a completely traditional Punjabi sound, and the fact that he is doing such experimental stuff here, showcases his versatility and talent!
His weakest song, and probably the weakest song of the album, Aa Jao Na, comes next, with its repetitive tune that is actually the typical Arijit melody. Even though it reaches a peak at one point, it just goes back to same droning nature over and over again — which gets really boring after a point. What’s more, composer Shashwat Sachdev doesn’t even give us much to chew on as Arijit belts out the repetitive tune — just digital beats and very few piano notes, which don’t really fill in the gaps well. Anyway, I know this song is going to be the biggest and most popular, so whatever I just wrote might just not matter.
The composer with the next largest number of songs is yet another upcoming talent Vishal Mishra, who still has me stunned by his amazing two songs in ‘Qarib Qarib Singlle’ last year. His part of the album starts with the song that everyone loved right from the trailer, Veere, which can best be described as the movie’s theme song. He takes the friendship theme of the film, and constructs such a positive composition using that idea, it’s quite surprising this song didn’t come from a Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy or a Pritam! It totally belongs to the rom-com age of Bollywood when they made happy songs like this for movies like ‘Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu’, ‘Anjaana Anjaani’, etc. The hookline has the listener in a trance the first time it plays, and keeps entrancing the listeners everytime it plays! To break the trance though, unfortunately, there are some elements that the song could’ve done without. First of all, the too-many-to-keep-track-of female singers! If you ask me, Aditi Singh Sharma was the only one who should have sung the female part, because I can unfortunately make out Iulia Vantur over there, and unfortunately, she starts the unfortunate female portion. How unfortunate. But happily, things are better in the second antara, where Vishal Mishra comes back to take things under control, and the female chorus here sounds amazing. He’s the second composer on the album now, who sings just as well as he composes! Wow! We have a cool future for Bollywood music! 🙂 Also, Anvita Dutt’s lyrics make for a really enjoyable friendship anthem, so that middle portion can easily be ignored!
Vishal Mishra sings his next song Dagmag Dagmag along with Payal Dev, who sounds like a less hyperactive version of Neha Kakkar. Anyway, the song could be easily mistaken for an Amit Trivedi song, with that amazingly catchy digital beat, and quirky tune. The hookline, which sounds the cheesiest the first time, really sets in with the passage of time (the number of times you listen to the song) and doesn’t sound as cheesy later on. The arrangements are mostly digital, as mentioned above, and that’s mainly where it resembles the Trivedi sound. Both the singers do an amazing job and seem to have had a fun time singing this track.
Qaran Mehta’s Tareefan, is an insanely catchy and addictive club track, Badshah sounding like he has never sounded before! Qaran’s programming is the main reason the song sounds so fresh, and that addictive hookline, and the loop that goes on behind it in the song, I can’t stop praising the song; it’s like a guilty pleasure listen of mine. 😂 The flak the song has been receiving is just so unjustified — how can you hate a song if you hate its music video? This song will probably remain the catchiest club song of 2018 for me, and even that cringeworthy rap of Badshah’s takes getting used to, but you end up ignoring that by the time you’re addicted to the song. Qaran, hor das kinni tareefan chaidi ae tenu?
The song appears in two more versions, one being a Remix By Dj Notorious, which is also quite addictive (as if the original song wasn’t sounding like a remix itself) and so it sounds like another version of the song, had DJ Notorious programmed it instead of Qaran himself. The Reprise Version acquaints us with a promising new singer, Lisa Mishra, whose voice seems weird on the song at first, but then it starts sounding better and better than that. The unplugged version required such a calm and soothing rendition, because the composition, which is quite strong, makes sure that it can stay fresh in any form, be it a club song, or a soothing number like this reprise.
As for the last song of the album, Laaj Sharam by Sachin-Jigar’s A&R venture White Noise, the song is also quite weak as compared to the rest of the album. Something seems off in White Noise’s fusion of Punjabi and electronic music, but the vocalists Divya Kumar and Jasleen Royal save the song with their entertaining rendition. Jasleen’s voice gets a makeover; she puts on a husky voice here, and I wish she uses this voice in more of her own compositions from now on; of course, when and if the need arises. The hookline for this song sounds unnecessarily repetitive, but the dhols do the job in pulling you through that. Enbee’s rap is passable, and it’s not like it ends soon, and the composers don’t add any entertaining music in the background during that either! Overall, this ends up as the second weakest song on the album for me.


A ten song album, this really delivers what was promised in such a huge scale wedding flick about friendship. The soundtrack has variety, and after listening to it so many times, I can say it has the potential to live even after the movie is watched and forgotten by everyone.The biggest achievement this soundtrack has made, is that, though it has multiple composers, they all have one set aim which they all succeed in — to make Punjabi music marry electronic music!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 8 + 7.5 + 6.5 + 9 + 8.5 + 8 + 8.5 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 7 = 77

Album Percentage: 77%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Just Listen to them all in the order given on Saavn. 😂

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 20 (from previous albums) + 01 = 21

Which is your favourite song from Veere Di Wedding? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

COMPLETELY REBELLIOUS!! (BAAGHI 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sandeep Shirodkar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Mithoon, Gourov-Roshin, Pranay M. Rijia, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Panjabi MC
♪ Lyrics by: Ginny Diwan, Javed Akhtar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Sayeed Quadri, Kumaar & Channi Khannewala
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 30th March 2018

Baaghi 2 Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baaghi 2 is a Bollywood action film (read comedy) starring Tiger Shroff, Disha Patani, Manoj Bajpayee, Prateik Babbar, Darshan Kumar, Randeep Hooda and Deepak Dobriyal in crucial roles. The film is directed by popular dance choreographer Ahmed Khan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. If you remember, the first film (which I hated) had a quite likeable album, by Meet Bros., Amaal Mallik and Manj Musik. A “bonus” song by Pranay Rijia was released later. For this album, the music composers of the first film are completely forgotten, and except for Pranaay, they have all been replaced, by Sandeep Shirodkar, Gourov-Roshin, Arko Pravo Mukherjee and Mithoon. Now, I basically know that there will be a horde of remakes in this album, just by looking at the composers’ names — Sandeep Shirodkar and Gourov-Roshin have basically just created almost only remakes ever since they debuted. Arko and Mithoon’s songs do pique my interest, but nothing like “Oh, I’m so excited, I’m dying of excitement”.. nothing of that level. Anyway, let’s see just how well this album upholds the reputation (or demolishes it) of its predecessor.


Just because he has two songs, both remakes, Sandeep Shirodkar becomes lead composer for Baaghi 2. (It was Meet Bros. in ‘Baaghi’). His first remake is Mundiyan, a remake of Labh Janjua’s ‘Mundiyan Toh Bachke Rahi’. I must say, though, the song is quite enjoyable. Sandeep gets the Bhangra vibe right, and that’s the most important in such songs. Navraj Hans and Palak Muchhal make for some interesting vocals — especially Palak, who explores such songs once (okay, maybe twice, but not more) in a blue moon. She even raps! Navraj Hans is a vocal powerhouse as it is; there’s no use writing that he’s done well (it was taken for granted that he would). The one place Sandeep does mess up though, is the uncountable vocal breaks, disturbing proceedings many times, slowing down the pace of the song.
He doesn’t fare as well in his second song Ek Do Teen, remake of the song with the same name from ‘Tezaab’. Now, this is a very iconic song, not so much for its composition and music, (which was quite clichéd, if I may say so) than for Madhuri’s iconic moves on the dance floor. But even then, the flak the song is receiving is quite unjustified. Maybe it’s because the dance moves have been slaughtered (they have), or maybe it’s because the remake trend has achieved this abominable level these days. But the song isn’t that bad. Shreya substituting for Alka is a great decision; she sounds okay in the mukhda but amazing in the antaras. At least we haven’t gotten somebody like Neha Kakkar in charge of this song. The music is functional at best, with nothing remarkable in Sandeep’s new arrangements, except the easy-to-miss electric guitar riffs, and the spunky Bappi-ish disco sounds. Also, why does she only count till 20 here! That’s destroying the point of the song! 😂
Mithoon’s Lo Safar is a better result of his composition sung by Jubin Nautiyal, than the last one, which was ‘Tum Mere Ho’ (Hate Story IV). Here, at least, the composition isn’t overly sensuous, and not even trying to be. It is just a humble typical Mithoon melancholic melody, supposed to be a romantic song but playing more like a sad song. Jubin sings it well, and Mithoon’s arrangements consisting of nice guitar riffs, an amazing rap on many drums at the same time, and a serene flute, work wonders. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are just not the kind of lyrics he’s known for. Having written so many beautiful lyrics (especially the amazing ‘Ji Huzoori’ from ‘Ki & Ka’) for Mithoon, this should have been much better.
Gourov-Roshin’s Soniye Dil Nayi is also a remake of some T-Series pop single, whose credits on YouTube are so vague, they don’t credit the original composer, even in the video for the original song! The only good thing about this song, is that it doesn’t let Ankit Tiwari’s lazy voice get too much control over the song, because Shruti Pathak arrives at the right times to save us, with amazing aalaaps. Her portions are amazing, but the composition both of these singers have to sing is lazy, boring, dull and any other negative adjective you can think of. The composers try their best to ape Ankit’s composing style, so that his lines always end with us expecting a “Sunn Raha Hai Na Tu..” or a “Teri galliyan..” to follow. Too much said about this song.
The only composer repeated from ‘Baaghi’ is Pranaay Rijia, whose song ‘Get Ready To Fight’ from ‘Baaghi’ I neither reviewed nor heard (except in the movie) because it released late as a single track. Here he comes back to present Get Ready To Fight Again a song which you should be ready to fight again. That’s about it. I won’t tell you about the horde of singers roped in to sing a worthless song, and I won’t tell you about the actionless arrangements, even though this is probably the background song for when Tiger Shroff is showing off his stunts. This time the song gets a more folksy vocal treatment, thanks to Jatinder Shah’s vocals. Benny Dayal in the original song sounded terrible. (Let’s just put that out there since I hadn’t reviewed that.)
The best song of the album, more out of helplessness, than actually on its merit, is Arko’s O Saathi, a romantic melody sung by Atif Aslam, which fits perfectly into the Arko template of romantic songs. It might be a rehash of ‘Nazm Nazm’ (Bareilly Ki Barfi) and ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ (Rustom), with the exact same duff rhythm, and strings, and everything else, but it nevertheless sticks with you, because it is charming in spite of being heard before. Payal Dev’s humming lends the song a serene quality. The antara of the song is amazing; it follows a really unconventional composition, at least unconventional for Arko’s music. Atif sings it impeccably, especially the “Allah Mujhe” line. The hookline’s tune seemed forcibly stretched to cover about fifteen seconds of runtime each time it plays.. that’s about a minute that could’ve been spent in adding another antara! But I must say, Arko’s lyrics are beautiful, especially the mukhda!


While I still listen to ‘Baaghi’s music album sometimes even now, when I’m bored, I doubt I’ll listen to this album even one month from now. While “‘Baaghi’s album had zero remakes, this has four. While “‘Baaghi’s album was not a ‘BAAGHI’ (rebel) at all, this one totally is!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 4 + 8 =

Album Percentage: 65%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Saathi > Lo Safar = Mundiyan > Ek Do Teen > Soniye Dil Nayi > Get Ready To Fight Again

 

Which is your favourite song from Baaghi 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 04 (from Baaghi 2) = 10

WELCOME TO 2012!! (WELCOME TO NEW YORK – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid, Shamir Tandon & Meet Bros.
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Kausar Munir, Sajid Khan, Danish Sabri, Charanjeet Charan & Varun Likhate
♪ Music Label: Pooja Music / Sony Music
♪ Music Released On: 16th February 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 23rd February 2018

Welcome To New York Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Welcome to New York is a Bollywood comedy starring Sonakshi Sinha, Diljit Dosanjh, Karan Johar, Boman Irani, Lara Dutta, Riteish Deshmukh and a bunch of whoever turned up at the 2017 IIFA Awards held at New York City. The film is directed by Chakri Toleti and produced by Vashu Bhagnani and Jackky Bhagnani. Now, the film seems to be a huge two hour long advertisement for IIFA, and no wonder it flopped. On top of that, the music is by people who aren’t very famous for giving great music (at least not anymore) — Sajid-Wajid, Meet Bros & Shamir Tandon. So let’s see whether the music of this film is just as farcical as the film itself seems to be!


A film that seems to be made on a whim, just because people happened to be available to make a film with, has music too, that seems to be made on a whim. What else can justify the creation of a song called Pant Mein Gun? Maybe the fact that Sajid-Wajid have composed it makes it a bit less shocking. The only good that comes out of this one, is that we know that Sajid-Wajid know how to play with EDM now. But that’s not good, either, considering how great they are at doing the live instruments thing. Diljit Dosanjh and Sajid himself belt this one out as if they’re robots, repeating the same lines over and over again. This is definitely one of those songs that are so bad that they are good! Highly recommended.
The other one by Sajid-Wajid is Nain Phisal Gaye, a quite entertaining song about a tailor fantasizing that she is stitching clothes for Salman Khan. How interesting. 😐 Well, Sajid-Wajid’s composition is purely desi thankfully; they get the best out of themselves when they go the desi way, and has a kind of retro vibe to it. The lyrics by Kausar Munir are fun, though situational, with ample references to words that come across everyday in a tailor’s business. Payal Dev sings it effectively, and thankfully doesn’t repeat her horrific act from ‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’ (Kaabil) last year.
Shamir Tandon gets two songs as well, with Ishtehaar turning out to be the best of the album, but only because of it adhering to the conventional Bollywood sad song template, and roping in Rahat Fateh Ali Khan makes it all work. Dhvani Bhanushali, debuting in Bollywood with this song, makes it sure that she is here to stay for some time. Her voice is perfect for Bollywood! The flute has been played wonderfully in this song, and that’s pretty much all that is noteworthy!
Shamir’s other song, Smiley Song, is a song where the composer himself, along with Dhvani Bhanushali and Boman Irani take it in turns to try and imitate the laughter of a number of Bollywood celebrities — it gets highly irritating after a point.
The last song is by Meet Bros, a Punjabi number which sounds like we have all heard it many times before, bearing the name Meher Hai Rab Di. The song itself doesn’t have “rab di mehr” because of its laidback sound and typical lyrics and whatnot. Also, it is sung by Mika (don’t need to explain why that is an excuse for it’s being bad) and Khushboo Grewal, who hardly gets anything to sing.


As a means of timepass also, this album fails miserably! Welcome to 2012 I would say, when songs like these were oh-so-prevalent.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 6 = 29.5

Album Percentage: 59%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishtehaar > Nain Phisal Gaye > Meher Hai Rab Di > Smiley Song > Pant Mein Gun

 

Which is your favourite song from Welcome To New York? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DECEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP (FUKREY RETURNS, FIRANGI, TERA INTEZAAR & MONSOON SHOOTOUT – Mini Music Reviews)

It is time for my Round-Up for December 2017, which is slightly delayed due to me being so busy, but better late than never, right?

December 2017 Round-Up

This Round-Up includes the following music reviews:

1) Fukrey Returns – Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, Gulraj Singh, IshQ Bector, Shree D & Laxmikant-Pyarelal

2) Firangi – Jatinder Shah

3) Tera Intezaar – Raaj Aashoo

4) Monsoon Shootout – Rochak Kohli, Viveick-Mayur, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry

The music review for “Tiger Zinda Hai” will be posted separately.


♦ Fukrey Returns, But Ram Sampath Doesn’t! – FUKREY RETURNS Music Review

♪ Music by: Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, IshQ Bector, Shree D, Gulraj Singh & Laxmikant-Pyarelal
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Late Anand Bakshi, Aditya Sharma, Satya Khare, Raftaar, Rohit Sharma, Arsalaan Akhoon, Shree D, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba & Vipul Vig
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 16th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 8th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


So Fukrey has returned. Sadly, the man behind “Fukrey”s enjoyable music, Ram Sampath has not returned, and after his underwhelming stint in ‘Raees’, he doesn’t get a chance to bounce back with a franchise that was initially his. Anywho, let’s judge on what we have been given.
Prem-Hardeep, the original composers of ‘Kala Chashma’ before Badshah remade it in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’, get a chance now, to ruin somebody else’s song. Laxmikant-Pyarelal’s ‘O Meri Mehbooba’ (Dharam Veer) gets ‘remade’ into Mehbooba, a banal club song which starts and ends with the Fukras being rejected by a random girl in the club, who happens to be singing in Neha Kakkar’s voice. Yasser Desai gets one line that repeats over and over again, and it is frankly the best line of the song. Raftaar’s rap is too stereotypical. Jasleen Kaur Royal’s Peh Gaya Khalara, though fitting into her now-overused Punjabi dance number template, is quite enjoyable, with the sweet vocals by herself and Divya Kumar, Akasa Singh & Akanksha Bhandari accompanying them. The arrangements are what make the track more enjoyable, and also the quirky lyrics.
Familiar territory is entered in Ishq Bector & Shree D’s semiclassical Raina, which, though quite soothing, gets tedious due to its length (it is the only song on the album over three minutes long, and goes up to over four minutes long!) The arrangements help propel it forward though, and also Shree’s vocals. Shaarib-Toshi enter the Bollywood scene after a long time with a delightful Punjabi melody, Ishq De Fanniyar. The male version by Shaarib is great, but the Female Version has all the feels, hence scores higher. The beautiful melody seems like a wonderful sequel to the first movie’s ‘Ambarsariya’. The lyrics are sweet as well, not to mention amazing accordions in the arrangements.
The techno sounds come along with the last three songs, bunched up together, out of which two are by Sumeet Bellary (composed for ‘Fuddu’ last year), and one is by (another person who re-enters Bollywood as a composer after a loooooong time, longer than Shaarib-Toshi), Gulraj Singh.
Sumeet’s two songs rely on weird techno gimmicks, which fail to propel the songs forward. Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai is a quirky friendship anthem, but is pulled down by lack of catchiness in both music and composition. Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai is like a title song, but gets all over the place in no time. The arrangements are slightly better here. Both songs are sung by Gandharv Sachdev, wit Shahid Mallya joining him in the latter song, and aren’t all that well sung.
Gulraj does well in his title song, Fukrey Returns, with a nice catchy musical loop, and heavy use of brass and techno sounds which makes his song sound even better. Siddharth Mahadevan on the vocals is a bonus.


Not as great as the first movie’s album, but still a commendable album considering the amount of new talent on there. But nevertheless, I wish Ram Sampath had returned!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 68.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishq De Fanniyar = Ishq De Fanniyar (Female) > Peh Gaya Khalara = Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai = Raina = Fukrey Returns > Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai > Mehbooba

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 43 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Fukrey Returns) = 44


♦ Quite A Desi Album! : FIRANGI Music Review

♪ Music by: Jatinder Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Devendra Kafir, Ashraf Ali & Krishna Bhardwaj
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


The song with almost the least amount of Punjabi words (second only to ‘Gulbadan’, which comes later on in the album) in its lyrics, Oye Firangi, starts the album off, and Jatinder Shah steals your heart right away. The charming melody immediately gets you grooving — thanks to a little EDM twist in the hookline — and though it is very simple, it is amazing thanks to the programming, and Sunidhi’s marvellous voice. There comes a British-era ballroom style orchestral portion at the end, but I wish the composer had extended that into another antara instead of ending the song with it! Another charming but heard-before melody, Sahiba Russ Gayiya, starts from where ‘Channa Mereya’ ended, with a similar structure and arrangement. Rahat’s voice is a boon to the song, and it’s the first song of his in a long time that doesn’t get on my nerves.(Ahem, ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’!) I love the way he pronounces the hookline. The Unplugged Version sung by Shafqat Amanat Ali, is funnily named ‘Sahiba (Male)’, as if Rahat’s version wasn’t by a male singer. The song itself is an improvement on the original, in that we get to hear Shafqat’s impeccable aalaaps, and though the choice of Shafqat doesn’t make it sound less like a Pritam song in general [Shafqat is just as much of a Pritam camp singer as Rahat is!] it surely does sound less like ‘Channa Mereya’, because the electric guitars have been toned down. Acoustic guitars play the larger role here. However some factors make both versions balance out at the end.
If ‘Sahiba’ had ‘Channa Mereya’ written all over it, Tu Jit Jawna has ‘Bhaag Milkha Bhaag’s title song all, and I mean ALL over it! Daler Mehndi, who I wish had sung the BMB number too, sings this one, and so it is quite bearable, but otherwise, it falls flat and sounds hollow in its emotion. It is also lyrically a counterpart to ‘Oye Firangi’, except Daler paaji doesn’t call him a ‘Firangi’ (foreigner), while Sunidhi did.
Gulbadan is a Qawwali-esque number, sung by Mamta Sharma. Good to hear her sing a different kind of song, though I’m sure the video will be the same kind of Bollywood ‘item number’. The hookline is greatly composed, with amazing arrangements by Shah, but again, falling into the too much tried-and-tested category of arrangements. I guess the best that comes out of this song is hearing Mamta Sharma’s gentle voice, because she thankfully hasn’t been made to sing in the annoying loud voice of hers.
But the album’s best is the wonderful folksy number, Sajna Sohne Jiha, which transports you back to the Punjab of the olden days. Wadali Bros’ Qawwali ‘Ve Sone Diya Kangna’ has been given a nice reinterpretation by Shah, and it works so well. The rhythms at the beginning really bring out the song’s folksiness, and Jyoti Nooran’s strong voice helps propel it to the finish line, where it emerges the winner compared to the other songs of the album!


A very desi album to the film ‘Firangi!’

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sajna Sohne Jiha > Sahiba Russ Gayiya (Shafqat) > Oye Firangi = Tu Jit Jawna = Gulbadan = Sahiba Russ Gayiya



♦ No Intezaar for This Album! : TERA INTEZAAR Music Review

♪ Music By: Raaj Aashoo
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 11th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


After a long time (or is it the first time?), one single composer gets a chance to compose an album for a film starring Sunny Leone. Somehow, she debuted smack in the middle of the multicomposer craze and so, got mainly multiple composers to compose for all her films! Raaj Aashoo handles the album.
The title track, titled Intezaar Title, instead of a more apt ‘Tera Intezaar’ (Obviously, because that’s the film’s name), is a dreary 2000s melody, sung by Shreya Ghoshal too, as if she is still in her debut year. Adding to the ennui, is the Qawwali-ish chorus. Raaj’s composition is good, but dated. The arrangement is the best thing about the song, especially the flute. Another very typically 90s melody, Khali Khali Dil, sees Payal Dev and Armaan Malik at their clichéd best. The digital sounds do not help make it more ‘modern’ or anything, and even the harmonica fails to create any impact. Quite a similar sound follows in the dreary Mehfooz, another song straight out of Nadeem-Shravan’s music-bank. The guitar work makes it sound like a version of Mithoon’s ‘Sanam Re’ title track, sans the tablas. Yasser gets a version, and, sounding like Arijit as always, manages to make it sound genuinely interesting. The arrangements here too make this song much more interesting than ‘Khali Khali Dil’. The song appears in two more versions, one by Palak Muchhal and the other by a new singer named Hrishikesh Chury. Palak’s 2½ minute long version fares better than Hrishikesh’s normal length one, because of the pleasant arrangements. Also, Hrishikesh tries to sound like Kumar Sanu.
The best song on the album, Abhagi Piya Ki, becomes the best only because the others don’t deserve it. It appears in two versions, a banal one sung jarringly by Kanika Kapoor and Raja Hasan, and a slightly better version sung much better by Payal Dev and Javed Ali. The tablas that went missing from ‘Mehfooz’ seem to have come to this song, and they play in surplus. The semiclassical touch to the song is good, but the 90s melancholia seems to have followed the composer like a thundercloud whenever he sat to compose for this film.
The only song that does not sound anything like a 90s song is Sexy Baby Girl, and it doesn’t work because it tries to sound uber-cool with its lead singer Swati Sharrma, like always, trying to add unnecessary style to her words, resulting in a disaster. Also, the lyrics are cringeworthy.


This is not an album anyone would have waited for. 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 53.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Abhagi Piya Ki (Javed/Payal) > Abhagi Piya Ki = Intezaar Title = Sexy Baby Girl > Mehfooz = Mehfooz (Palak) > Mehfooz (Hrishikesh) = Khali Khali Dil



♦ Surprising Monsoon in Winter!!: MONSOON SHOOTOUT Music Review

♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Viveick Rajagopalan, Mayur Narvekar, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry
♪ Lyrics by: Sumant Vadhera, Kartik Krishnan, Deepak Ramona, Chinmay Harshe, Rohit Bhasy, Neeraj Sharma, Vinit Gulati, Nidhi Gulati
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th December 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 15th December 2017

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn


Rochak gets two songs, and reminds us why he’s one composer that keeps popping up in numerous albums scattered over the year’s span. It is because of his strong melodies. Pal is a cherishable melody which, though predictable, does give you goosebumps, and makes you want it to rain. Arijit’s heart-touching rendition is enough to make anyone fall for the song. On the other hand Miliyo Re is a very Sachin-Jigar-ish romantic song, with Monali and Rochak behind the mic, with vocals that aren’t amazing, but are functional. The composition is good but very commonplace; not as distinct as Rochak’s other songs this year.
Viveick-Mayur present their only song Andheri Raat next, a haunting song with weird Marathi rap, and awesome Punjabi-flavoured male vocals. Neha Bhasin kills it behind the mic, as does her co-singer, Rajiv Sundaresan, doing the aforementioned Punjabi-flavoured portions. The Marathi rap by Aklesh Sutar is funny, and quite weird too.
The other three songs are quite situational, all by newcomers, with neither one exactly standing above the others. Chinmay Harshe’s Miss You Balma, by Akriti Kakar, is experimental but has you questioning “Why??” because the jazzy composition and the rock arrangements don’t really gel well with each other. Akriti aces the vocals though, singing in an unusually (for her) low pitch. The other duo, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry, present two songs, one being a folksy item song Maachis Ki Teeli, in which the very unconventional choice of singer, Bhavya Pandit, whi hasn’t ever sung such a song, proves to be great, as she adjusts to the song’s folksiness very well. Her co-vocalists provide good company as the loafers interjecting occasionally. The last song Faislay has a quite dated tune, and a very mismatching digital loop that starts it off, but Mandar Deshpande’s singing brings it up.


An album that is good, but still will be a wipeout.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pal = Miliyo Re > Andheri Raat = Maachis Ki Teeli > Miss You Balma = Faislay



Hope you liked this section of reviews! The review for ‘Tiger Zinda Hai’ will be out soon!