EACH SONG, DOBAARA! (DOBAARA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar, D. Wunder & Macks Wolf
♪ Lyrics by: Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Puneet Sharma, D. Wunder & Tasha Tah
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 24th May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 2nd June 2017

Dobaara Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dobaara is an upcoming Bollywood horror film, starring Huma Qureshi, Saqib Saleem, Adil Hussain, Lisa Ray and Rhea Chakraborty in crucial roles. The film has been directed by Prawaal Raman and produced by the director along with Ishaan Saksena, Vikram Khakhar and Sunil Shah. It is an official remake of the 2013 Hollywood horror film ‘Oculus’, which is considered to be one of the scariest movies of all time. So horror films in Bollywood have been very miserably made, with people flying around so pathetically that it looks hilarious. For once, I feel that this is going to be a well-made horror film in Bollywood. Of course, another thing typical of Bollywood horror films is that they have romantic songs. For ‘Dobaara’, the music has been composed by Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Samira Koppikar, D. Wunder and Macks Wolf. Well, I know nothing about the latter two names, so I can’t speak about them, but I am expecting a lot from the first two names — Arko and Samira. Arko has been giving great songs for the whole of the last year and I don’t think he wants to stop now, so expecting good, creative songs from him. Meanwhile, Samira has vanished from composing after her amazing debut more than two years ago, with ‘Maati ka Palang’ (NH10). And she’s back now. Again, expecting a good song from her. So let’s see exactly how haunting the music of ‘Dobaara’ is!


1. Kaari Kaari / Kaari Kaari (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Asees Kaur / Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Payal Dev, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

“Maazi ko maazi rehne de, ankhiyon se nadiyaan behne de,
Toote inn waqt ke tukdon ko, rab ki farmaaish sehne de,
Shaakhon se kaliyaan tooti hai, jab se tu khud se yun roothi hai,
Zara dekh gaur se, oh saaiyaan, aks yeh tera, tu hi hai!”

– Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The song with which Arko starts off the album, reassures me yet again, that he is going to give amazing songs for this album. A beautiful, and by beautiful I mean extremely beautiful and more than that too, semiclassical melody is what the album starts with, and Arko can bask in the success of the song as it will reach many a listener’s hearts. The composition is a semiclassical melody that instantly hooks you, and Arko has structured it in a way that Bollywood songs usually aren’t. For example, after the mukhda, there’s a short stanza that doesn’t fall into any category and it goes “Tere jaisa hi dikhta hai, aks tera..” That stanza is bliss! The antara is just as soothing as the mukhda, while the hookline (which is subtly hidden within the Mukhda/antara) is just outstanding. As in all classical tunes, this one has intricate nuances, and the vocalists carry them out well. The song, featuring in two version, gets everything right in both versions. The arrangements are slightly different in each version. The first version has a beautiful, acoustic setting, with the guitar riff sounding mind blowing. Piano starts it off with a wonderful female voice programmed so as to enchant you right at the beginning! But the guitar riff that sets in once the melody starts, is just so simple and down-to-earth, that it is tough to dislike! The slide guitars + snaps combo in the interlude is wonderful as well. The Reprise takes the more classical route, and it starts off in a different way altogether. The guitar riff has been scrapped from this, and replaced by digital beats, along with something sounding like a Chinese xylophone. The arrangements of this one were a major throwback to ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani), and how coincident that Payal Dev has sung that one too. This one has an amazing aalaap in the interlude, and it is entrancing. Of course, no Arko song is completed without at least one guitar strum or riff, and he brings the guitar into play in the antara. The vocals are flawless in both versions. Asees in her version, gives her career best performance, and it sends chills down the spine listening to her perfecting each and every note, especially the nuances in the hookline. Payal, on the other hand, gives a more classically-toned rendition, which is probably why I remember the ‘Bajirao Mastani’ song. The thing to note is when she suddenly goes high in one of the hooklines towards the end. That was splendid! Arko, with his deep voice, enters in the antara, but complements the two ladies well in their respective songs. He writes the lyrics as well, and gives an aptly romantic, and soulful piece. A mind-blowing classical-based song, but kept extremely simple, all the better to win hearts with! 💜

Rating: 5/5 for Original, 5/5 for Reprise

 

2. Humdard / Humdard (Alt. Version)

Singers ~ Jyotica Tangri / Neha Pandey & Parry G, Music by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Rap in Alt. Version Written by ~ Parry G

 “Takleef hogi, bechain honge, yeh raaste hain pathreeley,
Woh Zindagi ki, kahaani kaisi, ke bin lade hi jo jee le!”

– Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The next song by Arko, is highly disappointing. It is supposed to be some kind of sad song, but it barely manages to get the emotion right. The composition is more like a club song where a lady is sitting and singing a song while the main characters are sitting in the bar trying to forget their breakup. The beginning itself is so abrupt and odd, that it is tough to go on trying to like the song. The antara is good compared to the rest of the song, though. The arrangements are mostly digital beats that irritate mostly, and remind one of the songs from the ‘Saansein’ (2016) album. However, there’s a nice portion on strings that is mildly entertaining. Both versions have basically the same arrangements, but they differ in the vocal department. And both singers, I must say, fail to fit the bill here, and both of their renditions turn out to be least satisfying. The first version has Jyotica Tangri trying to be Neha Kakkar again, but even Neha Kakkar wouldn’t have sounded great in this song. Maybe Sonu Kakkar. And in the Alternate Version, newcomer Neha Pandey doesn’t impress at all, unfortunately; she suddenly changes vocal tones and that sounds very weird. And a quite impressive rapid rap by Parry G, who impressed even in ‘Jai Maa’ (Behen Hogi Teri), also features in the second version. I must say he sounds a lot like Yo Yo Honey Singh. The lyrics by Arko, are the saving grace of the song. They are actually good, and deserved a better composition to accompany them! A disaapointment from Arko after that brilliant song.

Rating: 1/5 for the Original, 1.5/5 for the Alternate Version

 

3. Ab Raat (Version 1) / Ab Raat (Version 2)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Samira Koppikar & Jonathan Rebeiro, Music by ~ Samira Koppikar, Lyrics by ~ Puneet Sharma

“Dard dard andhera, zakhm si chaandni, Dhul jaayegi dhoop mein,
Sard haathon ka ghera, shehar ki berukhi, kho jaayegi goonj mein,
Parindon ki azaanein, gungunaati raah bhi, kehti hain aankhein choomke,
Bas, Abb raat guzarne waali hai, abb raat guzarne waali hai,
Abb raat guzarne waali hai, bas raat guzarne waali hai!”

– Puneet Sharma

At first, I thought this song is a remake of the old song ‘Ab Raat Guzarne Waali Hai’ (Awara), because the lyrics of the hook are the same, but it apparently isn’t, because this song has been released by Zee and not Saregama. 😂 Anyway, Samira steps in with her song, and even this song features twice. (The makers are really taking the title ‘Dobaara’ very seriously, huh?) However, I have no complaints with this song featuring twice. The song is a very, very soulful composition that gives you goosebumps. It is songs like this that must be added into horror films and not useless romantic songs. Samira’s composition is haunting to the core, very apt for the situation. The mukhda starts a bit slowly, but as soon as the hookline plays for the first time, you start getting intrigued and immerse yourself into the song. The first antara has an amazing tune, as does the second one, which is more like a Pritam-ish conclusion, rather than an antara. The arrangements by Samira, are yet another example of how to impress with the most used and most clichéd template ever. She employs a very effective soft rock arrangement to the first version, and it provides the required strength to the composition, which would sound sleepy without it. The drums, acoustic guitars and rock guitars complement each other very well, and it provides such a BEAUTIFUL ambience, spellbinding indeed. A Version 2 has been given a more acoustic treatment till the hookline starts, with the Acoustic guitar prominent. However, instead of making it plain and boring with only the guitar, Samira adds in a bit of this and a bit of that to make it sound better. A heart-rending flute has been employed in various places, and especially the interlude’s flute portion is something not to miss. Samira still doesn’t resist to add the drums here either, though. So this version sounds more like a Lounge Version, due to the combination of the flute, acoustic guitars and drums. Vocals are again flawless in both versions, Arijit at his soulful best, and Samira singing in a very different voice than she has in her other songs. She keeps it high-pitched, unlike the low pitch she uses in many of her songs. She has a co-singer named Jonathan Rebeiro, who has given a couple of words here and there as backing vocals. Last but definitely not the least, can we admire the lyrics here? The song is such a soulful song, but behind that tune are the genius words of Puneet Sharma, who writes less frequently, but has written some amazing songs for ‘Revolver Rani’ (2014; also the first album I ever reviewed!!) and songs for albums like ‘Cute Kameena’ (2016), ‘Mr. Joe B. Carvalho’ (2014) and ‘Aurangzeb’ (2013). But here, he gives another amazing piece of writing, which I just instantly fell for. The song is about waiting for the dark times to pass, and as they say, “This too shall pass”. A ravishing song!

Rating: 4.5/5 for Version 1, 5/5 for Version 2

 

4. Malang

Singers ~ Tasha Tah & D. Wunder, Music by ~ D. Wunder & Macks Wolf, Lyrics by ~ D. Wunder & Tasha Tah

“Malang Malang Maiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnn” 🐏

– D Wunder

This next song makes me recheck whether I’m actually listening to the ‘Dobaara’ album anymore or not. A generic Punjabi club number on the lines of Dr. Zeus’ songs is what makes up the “grand” finale to this album. The composition is so irritating at places, but catchy in some places. The hookline has the lead female singer bleating like a sheep, “Maiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnn”. That part is so irritating. The arrangements are typical club beats, but they aren’t so engaging. The vocals are execrable, and I’ve given an example up above. The English parts of the song are enjoyable though. But that’s like a “One in a million” good part, to quote the song. The Punjabi parts are so irritating, you forget to like anything else. Lyrics? What lyrics? Appalling.

Rating: 0.5/5


Dobaara is an album that depends on the Reprise versions to propel it. Three out of the four songs have another reprise, so that we hear it again. Thankfully, all these reprises are either better than or equal in comparison with the original songs, so I’m not complaining. Arko strikes gold, and what shiny gold, in the first song of his, but disappoints with the next one. Meanwhile, Samira Koppikar gets her guest composition extremely well, in both versions. Whoever D Wunder & Macks Wolf are, I hope they aren’t looking at Bollywood for a career. An album that gets a much higher rating than it would have, thanks to reprises, which made us hear the songs “dobaara”!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 5 + 1 + 1.5 + 4.5 + 5 + 0.5 = 22.5

Album Percentage: 64.29%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Kaari Kaari = Kaari Kaari (Reprise) = Ab Raat (Version 2) > Ab Raat (Version 1) > Humdard (Alt. Version) > Humdard > Malang

 

Which is your favourite song from Dobaara? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

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‘KAABIL’ OF BEING FORGOTTEN! (KAABIL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rajesh Roshan & Gourov-Roshin
♪ Lyrics by: Nasir Faraaz, Manoj Muntashir, Anjaan, Anand Bakshi, Kumaar & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd December 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 26th January 2017

Kaabil Album Cover

Kaabil Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Kaabil is an upcoming Bollywood action/romantic film starring Hrithik Roshan, Yami Gautam and Ronit Roy. The movie is directed by Sanjay Gupta, and produced by Rakesh Roshan. The movie is about two blind people who fall in love (God knows how…). And then dishoom dishoom happens and then it probably ends happily. Moving on to the music. The music has been composed by yesteryear hitmaker Rajesh Roshan, who has given quite a number of great songs in the olden days, but seems to have lost his charm with his last outing, ‘Krrish 3’. I mean, I don’t even know how it is possible that his music in ‘Kites’ (2010) sounded so much with the music of the time, and so modern and all, while three years later in 2013, when ‘Krrish 3’ released, his music sounded dated. You would think that’s impossible! Well, all we can hope is that he has composed great tracks for this album. Again, as always, T-Series gives us a shock by adding a composer duo in the music directors panel for the album. The duo is Gourov-Roshin, the go-tos for remaking and spoiling old songs. This time they have been given charge of two of Rajesh Roshan’s hits from the 70s and 80s respectively — ‘Dil Kya Kare’ (Julie) and ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana). So technically, Rajesh Roshan has composed the songs. Smart. Expectations are a bit more than zero, and given that the songs to be remade are of such a high standing, the remakes have to be good or else T-Series wouldn’t have added them.. or at least that’s what I think.. 😛 Anyway, since I have such less expectations from the first album of 2017 to release, I’m just diving into it very cautiously and sceptically.

Note: Before you start off, you might want to check out the new rating scheme with effect from 2017..


1. Kaabil Hoon / Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Nasir Faraaz

“Tere mere sapne sabhi, band aankhon ke taale mein hain,
Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa, woh Chaand ke pyaale mein hai,
Phir bhi sapne kar dikhaaon Sach toh kehna bas yehi…
Main tere kaabil hoon ya, tere kaabil nahi!”

– Nasir Faraaz

So this was the first song of 2017 to release, releasing in early December or so. You’d think that the makers had some reason behind releasing the song so early, but after hearing the song, you understand that the only reason was to get the songs released and aside, so the makers can concentrate on other ‘important’ stuff, like getting bad reviews. Veteran Rajesh Roshan offers nothing new in terms of composition. One might argue that he just tried to compose in his trademark style, and I agree, but it just doesn’t suit in today’s times. The mukhda is quite bland, but you start liking it after you hear the dreary hookline. And what’s more, it plays four times throughout the song! (Not the hookline, but the WHOLE mukhda!) The antaras are two very ear-splittingly high-pitched stanzas that irritate more than pacify. Look Mr. Roshan (and I hope you aren’t reading this..), we really appreciate you bringing forth the music of yore, but at least modernize it like Vishal Bhardwaj & Sanjay Leela Bhansali do! Yes, after a few listens, it gets listenable, but that’s only because we are so much rooted to our beautiful 90s music. 🙂 The arrangements are as typical and predictable as typicality and predictability can get. I don’t know if music programmer Abhijit Vaghani has chosen the beats (or maybe arranger Dhrubajit Gogoi), but whatever it is, it sounds like a desperate attempt to modernize the stale composition, by adding beats similar to Major Lazer and Justin Bieber’s pop single ‘Cold Water’. The dafli makes the arrangements sound sooooooo old-school. And whoever has arranged the song, has put in a mishmash of synth sounds as if his life depended on it, and horns wherever they shouldn’t have been. That guitar riff which the song starts off with resembles that hook tune of the aforementioned ‘Cold Water’ so much. And same with the trumpet. And the first time Jubin sings “Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa…”, there is an unexpected outburst of noise that wasn’t required. However, in the first antara’s beginning, there is a nice trademark Rajesh Roshan percussion, which pleases the ears. The composer ditches his recent regulars for such songs, Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal, to bring in two supposedly ‘modern’ voices, Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal, but Mr. Roshan! Songs don’t sound modern because of singers! You need a modern tune for that…! Jubin sounds suppressed for some reason, and drawls out the lines like he’s bored, making you miss Arijit’s voice for once. And Palak is hands down off tune. Everything she sings is way too high-pitched for her to carry off perfectly, and her voice comes across as cheap. Especially when she sings the hookline after the first antara. And both of their voices have been kept raw, as they were recorded, making it sound more like a scratch version of the song. And at the end, the singers are made to sing “la la la…” and “hey hey hey...”, as if they are from the 80s! Nasir Faraaz’s lyrics ooze of the 90s! What is “Tere Naam ko hi pukaarke, khanakengi meri choodiyaan“??? I highly doubt she’s wearing bangles in the song.. unless the second antara is shot at their wedding. In the sad version, Rajesh Roshan slows down the pace so much that it is tough to discern that it is the same song. Not that it sounds any better though. The arrangements there are minimal except for some strings. And it is just one and a half minutes long, so it is clearly made only for the background score. The lyrics have been tweaked too, with no better result. A song that would’ve created waves, had it been included in ‘Krrish’! Heck, even the ‘Krrish’ album sounds better!

Ratings: 2/5 for Original Version, 1.5/5 for Sad Version

 

2. Haseeno Ka Deewana

Singer ~ Payal Dev, Rap By ~ Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

“Sara zamaana, haseeno ka deewana,
Zamaana kahe phir kyun, bura hai dil lagaana!”

– Anjaan

Before the song released, I was having a tough time wondering how Rajesh Roshan would remake his own old song! And then it hit me, and my worst fears came true. T-Series had conveniently handed over Rajesh Roshan’s two old songs in the album to Gourov-Roshin! Unfortunately, there was no choice for us listeners but to hope the song would be remade well. The result, however, is atrocious. Gourov-Roshin follow the path they paved for themselves when they remade ‘Kaate Nahin Katte’ (Mr. India) in ‘Force 2’. They spoil this song, ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana) as well and present in front of us a bad mix of noises and horrendous singing. The mukhda and antara have been recomposed, and they sound horrible, nothing else. Even the original hook, which could’ve been the best part of the song, is spoiled by singing which is supposed to sound cool. The arrangements are nothing but a lot of unbearable noises, supposed to be club sounds. I don’t know if they want the clubbers to enjoy or die of some undiscovered ear disease. Random techno sounds grace the whole song, and it just sounds BAD! Payal Dev sings in her ‘Veerappan’ voice — an extremely harsh, cutting voice that does nothing but grate your eardrums. I don’t know what she’s up to.. on one side she sings gems like ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani) and on the other hand, bleats out songs like this. She also mauls the hookline, the hookline that anybody raised in a Bollywoodish background has grown up listening. And the last straw is when she sings the antara. (“Yeh kaaauuuuun keh raha hai..”) Raftaar, after his successful stint in ‘Dangal’s ‘Dhaakad’, reverts to his original form, and delivers a rap that proves that it was a mistake that he bagged ‘Dhaakad’. The lyrics by Kumaar are just your normal Bollywood item song fare, with the lady praising her flaws. And the boy agrees, somehow. Now that everyone must have heard it, I can’t even tell you to skip it. A horrific remake.

Rating: 1/5 (and that’s being generous)

 

3. Kuch Din

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Aksar ataa pataa mera, rehta nahin, rehta nahin,
Koi nishaan mera kahin milta nahin, milta nahin,
Dhoondha gaya, jab bhi mujhe, tere gali mein mila..
Kuch din, se mujhe, teri aadat ho gayi hai,
Kuch din se meri, tu zaroorat ho gayi hai!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The next song is a romantic song, with a lulling melody. It starts off well enough, with dreamy music on the piano and something like a church organ. But then Jubin starts singing and you realise the blaring problem in the song — Bad recording. The vocals might be good, but bad recording and mixing help to steal all credit from Jubin. The voice is all muffled; even songs recorded in the 1970s sound better! The composition is better this time, because of that lilt in the melody. Again, it is a signature Roshan tune, and reminds you of the beautiful music of ‘Kaho Naa Pyaar Hai’. The mukhda plunges right into the hookline, and succeeds in the mission of soothing you. The antaras are a nice extension to the already nice tune. At least it pleases the ears. The high notes in the composition are pleasant this time, and the composition as a whole is hummable. Arrangements are nice and soothing, but muffled due to that flawed recording. Strings and brass instruments bring a nice 90s flavour to the song. Again, Roshan takes the help of techno beats, but this time it is a bit toned down, and hence doesn’t bother much. The second interlude has a nice guitar portion, which sounds good in spite of being a bit dated. Jubin, as mentioned before, sings well here, adhering to Roshan’s tune loyally, and evoking memory of Abhijeet’s songs with Shah Rukh Khan, at places. As mentioned above, that recording spoils the feel. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are good, but nothing extraordinary. He sticks to the 90s style of lyrics-writing. A good, pleasant melody, with good vocals and arrangements, is spoiled by the bad recording and sound mixing!

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Mon Amour

Singer ~ Vishal Dadlani, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Kadam se kadam jo miley, toh phir saath hum tum chale,
Chale saath hum tum jahaan, wahi pe baney qaafiley!
Mon Amour!!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rajesh Roshan’s last song on the album takes the form of an upbeat Latino-flavoured song, that’ll surely get you up and dancing. The song starts off with a nice intro, taking the one of the repeating lines from the song having Vishal Dadlani sing it in a slow tempo, and it serves as a good buildup for the upbeat song that follows. The composition by Roshan this time too, is enjoyable. The hookline starts off the song, when the intro is over, and gets you ready for a nice dance song. The mukhda is what Vishal had sung in the intro, and it has a nice Spanish flavour to it, carried out very efficiently by Roshan. The antaras are as enjoyable as can be. They don’t seem like antaras, more like continuations of the mukhda, giving the effect that the whole song is a single stanza. All I can say is that they have been composed wonderfully. In the process, Rajesh Roshan tries to make a ‘Senorita’ (Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara) for this album, and succeeds to an extent. The arrangements remain loyal to the Latino flavour of the song, with guitars leading the way for some time, before handing over first command to the trumpets, which infuse life into the song after that short introduction is over. Percussion is topnotch, and it gives the Salsa feel very nicely. The xylophone that comes in the antara’s last line is so playfully awesome! I like how the title of the song stands alone in the song, with nothing to support it. It makes the song progress seamlessly from line to line. Vishal’s energy seems a bit diluted here, but nevertheless, the song sounds quite energetic still. Recording seems a problem here too, but it is ignorable because of the song being good. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here, are probably the only moderate lyrics on the album — not too old-fashioned (‘Kaabil Hoon’ and ‘Kuch Din’) and not toooooo modern (‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’). They are enjoyable though, making use of sounds like ‘Da ra di da ra’ and ‘Baila baila’ to make it sound more Latino-flavoured! A nice upbeat number, but I’m not sure whether it will be promoted enough to create an impact on the public!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Muusic Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si, iss duniya ki rasmein,
Na kuchh tere bas mein jaana, na kuchh mere bas mein!”

– Anand Bakshi

Another remake. Once again, a Rajesh Roshan melody of the golden era, and again, remade by Gourov-Roshin. This time, Roshan’s beautiful melody from ‘Julie’, ‘Dil Kya Kare’. Expectations were zero, and maybe that’s why I was pleasantly surprised by this one! The main reason I liked it was that the composers have tried to retain the flavour of the original, and not tried to change everything. The mukhda has been changed, and that’s about it. This tracks starts with a nice modern touch, similar to so many (good) English songs you hear nowadays, to such an extent that that person singing ‘Woah’ or whatever at the beginning sounds like Justin Bieber. :\ Is this soundtrack inspired by Bieber or what? Anyway, the new mukhda is a nice addition to the song, it just takes time to get used to it. The hookline follows the new mukhda, and the mukhda of the old song (“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si…”) takes the form of the first antara, as it is (except the ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein Julie‘ is changed to ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein jaana‘) and the hookline returns, bridged to the antara by one of the lines of the new mukhda. The first antara of the old song appears as the second antara in this track, and it sounds good in Jubin’s voice! And this time, the programming is good too! The duo’s arrangements are pleasant, surprisingly, and they don’t bombard the ears with a fusillade of unwanted noises. Instead, they’re quite calm club beats. Now these are club beats! Piano graces the second interlude with its presence, to a great effect. The finger snaps are intriguing throughout the song. However, what I missed is that drum which Rajesh Roshan had added in the background of the old song (which he has also used in the title track of this album, if I’m right). Jubin perfectly takes over from Kishore Kumar, but of course the original always is better. Now that we have to deal with it though, I must say Jubin has done a good job. He sings the “oonchi oonchi..” part exceptionally well. I don’t know whether it is autotune or not, but here, his high notes sound good. At least it doesn’t sound like a scratch version. The additional lyrics are quite functional, if not great. I’m still in love with the original ones! 😍 A pleasant redux. That’s a remake for you. I think Gourov-Roshin are better at romantic songs (except ‘Maahi Ve’ from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’) than idiotic item numbers that are remakes.

Rating: 3.5/5 


In Kaabil, Rajesh Roshan actually delivers better than his last ‘Krrish 3’. Out of three songs, two are pleasant and sound much better than what he had offered in his last album. Gourov-Roshin with their two remakes of his old songs, do a mediocre job in one, and better in the second. However, as a whole, the albums seems extremely dated and behind its time. Had the album released somewhere around 2005 or so, the songs might’ve gained more momentum and more hearts. But now, it just seems like another average album. A middling start to 2017!

 

Total Points of the Album: 2 + 1.5 + 1 + 3 + 3.5 + 3.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 48.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mon Amour = Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye > Kuch Din > Kaabil Hoon > Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version) > Haseeno Ka Deewana

 

ALERT! ANOTHER NEW SECTION!

Here is a remake counter, counting the number of remakes this year. :p Just for fun. 😉

Number of Remakes: 02

 

Which is your favourite song from Kaabil? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MULTICOMPOSERS KE BIN… (TUM BIN 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Ankit Tiwari & Nikhil-Vinay
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Shakeel Azmi, Faaiz Anwar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Raool
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th October 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 18th November 2016

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

Tum Bin 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Tum Bin 2 is an upcoming Bollywood romantic drama, starring Neha Sharma, Aditya Seal and Ashim Gulati. The movie has been directed by director of the first instalment (Wow, that’s like an achievement for T-Series, to have the same director direct the sequel, even though the sequel is releasing like 15 years after the first movie!) Anubhav Sinha, who was trying his luck at other things like thrillers (‘Dus’, ‘Tathastu’ and ‘Cash’), sci-fi (‘Ra.One’) and also a social drama (‘Gulaab Gang’) and faring quite well at these genres too, until he came back to his first genre, romance, with this film! The movie has been produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Anubhav Sinha. The movie is another addition to the many quasi-sequels that T-Series has been churning out over the past three to four years, and, since T-Series is producing the film, we can expect a good soundtrack for this movie too! The music for the first film had been given by duo Nikhil-Vinay, and as was expected, a song ‘Koi Fariyaad’ has been remade for the sequel. The original soundtrack, as well as the remake, have been done by Ankit Tiwari, who gets his next solo album after exactly one year (Last was ‘Yaara Silly Silly’ last November). Hopefully, he gets out of his typicality, and seeing that he has given some quite different songs this year, I’m sure he’ll make that happen too. So, without further ado, let’s see how good this album is!


1. Teri Fariyad / Teri Fariyad (Extended Version)
Singers ~ Late Jagjit Singh & Rekha Bhardwaj (Both Versions), Original Composition by ~ Nikhil-Vinay, Music Recreated by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Original Lyrics by ~ Faaiz Anwar, New Lyrics by ~ Shakeel Azmi

The first song on the album, is a rework of the iconic ghazal from the first film, ‘Koi Fariyaad’. The name of the song and hence, its hookline has been changed from ‘Koi Fariyad’ to ‘Teri Fariyad’. Nikhil-Vinay, the composers of the original song, have done a marvelous job composing it, and I must say, Ankit Tiwari has recreated it beautifully. The song appears in two versions on the album, out of which the normal version is just a cropped part of the ten-and-a-half-minute long “Extended Version”, so I’ll just speak about the Extended Version. The song’s mukhda is an original composition by Ankit Tiwari, and it fits beautifully with the hookline that the composers of the original song had made. And whenever that happens in remakes, you know that the recreator has done half of his job right. The antaras too, start off with a new, utterly fabulous tune, which later connects seamlessly with the other half of the antara of the original song. The song has as many as five antaras, but (surprisingly) you don’t get bored at all throughout the song. Ankit’s arrangements are heavenly. The song starts off with the wonderful sound of the Kanoon, a Turkish/Arabic instrument that sounds oh-so-heavenly. As soon as the guitar tune (Guitars played by Rhythm Shaw) takes over though, the heavenliness just magnifies manifold. The sounds of the clarinet and saaz grace the song throughout, and help to male it sound more rustic and not too boring, either. The guitars play wonderful rhythms throughout the song, not to mention the beats taken care of by finger snapping sounds. And the interludes, are pure bliss! The clarinet seems to be the common instrument in all of them. The third interlude has the sweetest clarinet solo I’ve ever heard, which later simmers down to a very slow, and calmingly haunting musical piece led by the clarinet, and held up by finger snaps, and later joined into by a heavenly chorus. The fourth one has more going on in terms of guitars that help elevate the bliss that the clarinets provide. The kanoon once again makes an appearance in the fourth interlude, and touches your heart. The fifth interlude, which is what plays after the mukhda in the cut version of the song (the one they’ll probably use for radio promotions), is yet another beautifully arranged one, with the clarinet starting off yet again, only to give way to a calm and soothing church-like female chorus with bells jingling t keep the beat, and another wonderful kanoon piece. Strings throughout the song make it a ravishing listening experience. Vocals are top-notch, with Rekha Bhardwaj joining to add the newly composed female portions to the song, and executing them brilliantly, in her pleasantly high-pitched voice. The Great, Late Jagjit Singh’s portions, have been retained from the original song, and the cut-paste work has been done extremely diligently by Ankit Tiwari. I applaud him for choosing the right parts to retain from the old song and connecting with his composition. Also, I appreciate that for once, the makers have let the old voice be retained — they finally understood that nobody else can render such timeless classics. After ‘Hungama Ho Gaya’ (Queen) this is a pleasant surprise that the original singer’s voice has been retained (that too, by T-Series!) The lyrics are such that I can’t really say anything about them, can I? The new ones by Shakeel Azmi kind of suffer amidst the original poetry by Faaiz Anway, but it turns out to be a nice piece as a whole. Long song, long review! 😀 Beautiful recreation, and an apt start to the album! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Ishq Mubarak
Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals ~ Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra & Anas Ahmad, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit’s first completely original composition makes its way into the soundtrack after the mammoth of an opening song. The song is a wonderful Sufi love song, composed on the lines of the usual Ankit Tiwari template, but still striking a chord with listeners anyway. The composition starts off with a mukhda that screams Ankit Tiwari right away, because of all of its melancholia and sleepy notes. Thanks to the dreamy hookline that very gentlemanly comes to its rescue, though, the song just goes uphill from there onwards. The hookline has a very catchy Qawwali/Sufi feel to it, and you instantly develop a liking for it, in the bargain, forgiving everything that was wrong with the mukhda. The title of the song actually comes along in the interludes, where the backing vocalists nicely give it its own place in the song, without making it too obvious that this is the title of the song. The antaras, quite unlike the mukhda, are better behaved children of the composer, as they get all their notes right, aiming straight at your heart and mind, where they get stuck. The antara also has a very distinct Rahman-ish feel to it, which makes it sound all the more beautiful. The arrangements are elegant to the core. The shehnaai starts off the song with a very graceful sound, while the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) sound awesome trying to be sitars. The Dholaks and Tablas (Raju Sardar, Sanjeev Sen, Musharaf Khan, Hafiz Khan, Manoj Bhati, Yusuf Khan) give the song a nice and grand feel to it, and they sound astounding in the dreamy hookline. The shehnaai continues to awe you in the second interlude, while an awesome sargam by the backing vocalists and harmonium embellish the first interlude. The harmonium (Firoz Khan) really becomes the essence of the song by the end of it. Vocals by Arijit Singh were frankly not required. The song ultimately sounds like an Ankit Tiwari song, and just to mitigate that feeling, if Ankit has employed Arijit to sing this one, it really didn’t help, as I keep imagining Ankit anyway when the song plays. Notwithstanding, Arijit carries the dreamy composition with finesse. The smile on his face can be heard through his voice in some places. And that is just so pleasant to hear every time!! Backing vocalists Vaseem Ahmed, Shubh Dhingra and Anas Ahmad, do an extremely good job, and half of the beauty of the whole song, would be credited to them, since the’ve done their job so well!  Lyrics by Manoj Muntashir, I really enjoyed, maybe not so much because they’re nicely written and stimulate my brain to decipher their metaphors, but because they’re just cute and I simply liked them! HEAVENLY! Ankit scores with the very first original composition! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Dekh Lena
Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Tulsi Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

The next song of the album starts off with a very feel-good tune, slightly reminiscent of Ankit Tiwari’s song ‘Behki’ from his last solo album ‘Yaara Silly Silly’. The starting tune does refresh you, and gives a good indication of what’s to be found in the song. The composition is hummable and also breezy and feel-good, though I couldn’t help but notice how very ordinary it was. The mukhda starts off in a way that makes you think, “Okay, so it’s playing.. Let it play”, and you keep waiting for the point when the music will make you drop your jaw in awe, but that never comes, sadly. The hookline fares better in that it at least gives a tune that get stuck in your head, though again, very run-of-the-mill and 90s. The antara has been composed in a more matured way that fares better than both the mukhda and the hook, but more on why it doesn’t work later. The arrangements rely on the tabla and dholak beats (Sanjeev Sen) to accentuate the romance in it, which just ends up sounding sappy. The guitars are very ordinary, but functional, and surprisingly, three people (Rhythm Shaw, Pawan Rasailly and Roland Fernandes) are behind them. The flute (Naveen Kumar) too, fails to raise eyebrows, sadly. Vocals by Arijit and Tulsi male for a good romantic song, but they don’t really match. First of all, Ankit seems to have composed the entire song under some order by the makers of the film, that it has to sound like ‘Hum Mar Jayenge’ (Aashiqui 2), and so, those two singers seem to have been forcefully fitted into this song. I mean, the song is tailor-made for Arijit, but also sounds like a song recorded in the 90s from which Sonu Nigam was kicked out of, under the decree that “times have changed”. Arijit renders it nicely though. Tulsi comes in the antaras, with a horribly high-pitched rendition of the matured tune, destroying its essence completely. It sounds nice initially, but the feeling lessens gradually. By the time she reaches the end of her lines, the notes reach some pitch that nobody has ever heard yet! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics too, fail to satisfy, and struggle with their ordinariness. A song that is killed under the weight of the word ‘ORDINARY’. Also, too sugary for me!

 

4. Tum Bin
Singer ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Quite late into the album, comes the title track, sung by the composer himself. (Also the only song he sung in the whole album, so hats off to his self-control!) The song is not a remake of the title song of ‘Tum Bin’, which was already remade earlier this year by Jeet Gannguli, in ‘Sanam Re’. Rather, this one is an original composition by Ankit, and I must say, it is very grand. The only problem is in the complexity of the composition. Ankit seems to have gone overboard in making the song sound Rahman-ish, and adds many twists and turns in the composition, making it very hard to catch hold of, let alone find it catchy. The mukhda arrives after a prelude of piano and strings, that hooks you instantly. The composition of the mukhda is yet another sleepy one, but at least it has you wondering “what next?” The hookline too, fares well, with a pleasantly melancholic tune that doesn’t bore, except for when Ankit characteristically stretches the words out for like a gazillion seconds. The antaras are where the turmoil is created; an overtly convoluted tune doesn’t really help in a song that is already so melancholic. The tune did remind me of that awesome song ‘Do Pal’ from ‘Veer-Zaara’, however, and that provided a bit of respite through the tedious composition. Special mentiom to the point where the interludes meet the antaras though, such a wonderful transition, even though it is so abrupt. The magic of the song, completely lies in a different section of the song, which is, the arrangements. Ankit has provided a very ravishing strings orchestra (Macedonian Symphonic Orchestra, conducted by Oleg Kondratenko) along with the laidback tune, and that makes the listening experience all the more exquisite. The strings reminded me of so many timeless Bollywood songs, like the one from ‘Veer-Zaara’ which I mentioned above. They help to propel the listener through the song, and it is the strings, that make for at least a couple of listens to the song before you dismiss it completely. Piano too, has been played very beautifully throughout the song. Songs like ‘Tere Liye’ (Sanam Re; Mithoon) and ‘Junooniyat Hai Yehi’ (Junooniyat; Meet Bros. Anjjan) which released earlier this year, created this whole melancholic-yet-grand experience better than this song here, because the composition was a bit more ear-friendly. This song reeks especially the former song I mentioned, because that one too, was sung by Ankit, though composed by Mithoon. The vocals by Ankit surprisingly didn’t get to my nerves here, and I sat patiently through the song. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are easy to just ignore, but even if you hear them, they are pleasant. A ravishing orchestral arrangement makes this song worth a couple of listens, but the complexity in its composition reduces its playlist lifetime drastically.

 

5. Masta
Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani & Neeti Mohan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

After all that melancholia and romance, Ankit Tiwari decides to bring some fun and frolic into this album. And just as well as he does with the emotional and romantic part of the album, he does with the fun part. The composition is an upbeat, breezy one, that instantly hooks you to its lovely and lovable tune. The composer has left no stone unturned to bring every fun element into the song — right from a very catchy and upbeat tune, to an unmatchable rendition by Vishal Dadlani. The mukhda is a nice and fresh line, which, though abruptly, but nicely drives the listener into the fun song. The hookline blends in with the mukhda, and it is quite nice for a line that consists of only one word. The first antara treads on more mellifluous and subtle territory, with Neeti executing it brilliantly, with her bright and fresh voice that never seems to run out of magic. The second one, however, is yet another place where Vishal displays his energy. The  arrangements have a nice countryside feel to them, with the guitars (Ankur Mukherjee) stealing the show with their breeziness, while the strings, with strong, fervent strokes, intensify the European-ness of the arrangements. The mandolin (Jatantilal Gosher) wonderfully supports the composition with its playful nature. The drums (programmed by Bitopan Phukan) provide the nice upbeat tempo to the song. During Neeti’s antara, acoustic guitars (Jatantilal Gosher) give a pleasant quality to the music. Interludes are splendid, with the second taking one by surprise at the wonderful Irish jig that it breaks into, complete with the claps and what I think is the keyboard playing in a strings sound. Towards the end, a wonderful bagpipe ends the song on a wonderful note, amidst Vishal’s energetic vocals. Which reminds me of Vishal’s flawless performance on this track. His indefatigable singing really takes me aback every single time. Neeti’s feathery voice leads the first antara beautifully. Her rendition here is another reminder to what a lovely singer she is, and how badly her voice is utilized sometimes.  (Ahem, song-that-cannot-be-named from ‘Housefull 3’) Manoj Muntashir has written a nice song about being carefree, and all-in-all the words are a pleasure to hear. A fun and peppy track that really changes my views about Ankit Tiwari’s potential. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Dil Nawaziyaan
Singers ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee & Payal Dev, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Arko Pravo Mukherjee

The next song takes the freshness quotient of the album to an even higher level. The song is a nice love ballad that fuses two beautiful genres — classical and contemporary. Ankit’s tune is another one that instantly hooks you because of its fresh sound. The mukhda starts the song off on a fresh note, surrounded and propelled by wonderful guitars. The mukhda has two parts, one sung by each singer. When the hookline arrives, it sounds pleasant to the ears, but it isn’t till Payal’s Hindustani classical part comes and blows your mind away, that you start thinking that the song is really magical. That part is something that boosts the song to some uncharted territory, and it is from then that you start to listen more intently. Ankit has composed that part very soulfully, and Payal has rendered with the most classical quoted voice I can imagine. In short, everything falls into its own place PERFECTLY. After that, Arko comes with another surprise package. He comes and sings an English stanza, which is so beautiful because of its simplicity. The composition is beautiful as well. What’s weird is that, though the song is composed by Ankit, and Arko has but sung it, I kept feeling that the composition has some Arko touches to it. Kudos to Ankit, not only for bringing that Arko flavour into the song, but also roping him in to sing it. 🙂 The arrangements are pure bliss. While most of the song is propped on a quite typical acoustic guitar riff background, the guitars (Rhythm Shaw) bring the freshness to the song, and that’s half the reason the song sounds so magical. However, in the short classical respite we get that is led by Payal Dev, pure Lucknowi baithak styled tablas (Sanjeev Sen) take over and just make things more intriguing than the rest of the song. These tablas also come towards the end of the song to conclude it on a beautiful and refreshing note. The vocals are awesome. Both Arko & Payal sing their parts wonderfully, Payal sounding a lot better than all her other performances (except the very mystical one in ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Doongi’ from ‘Bajirao Mastani’) and Arko sounding better than he does in most of his own songs too! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are nice and pleasant again, while Arko’s English ones are just as refreshing, and gelling well with the Hindi words. A great fusion becomes the center of attraction in this song, due to which the magic of everything else seems less, but it definitely is magical!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

7. Jaeger Bomb
Singers ~ Harshi Mad, DJ Bravo & Ankit Tiwari, Hindi Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, English Lyrics by ~ Raool

It looks like Ankit isn’t yet finished with the fun and wildness, because, looking at the mere title of the next and last song on the album, I can tell that the mandatory club song is not yet over. The composition of this one clearly shows that Yo Yo Honey Singh was in rehab, Badshah had prior commitments to look to, and Millind Gaba was irritated that nobody liked his music, when this sing was in the making. In the absence of these three, Ankit had to muster up enough courage and stoop down to those standards in order to make such a composition. As is evident from the result, he succeeded in imitating them. 😀 This song seems like some tribute to them, with a slightly more monotonous beat. (I thought that nothing could get more monotonous than Yo Yo’s ‘Aao Raja’ from ‘Gabbar Is Back’!!) Anyway, the song starts with yet another ruined nursery rhyme. This time, ‘Humpty Dumpty’ gets even more cracks, thanks to the song. The rhyme has been placed on a nice jazzy tempo, but sung by Harshi Mad in such a way that kids should strictly not listen to it! Or else, next time they picture Humpty Dumpty, he would be sunbathing at a beach and drinking lemonade…maybe! Jokes apart, Harshi Mad renders the rhyme spunkily, since it was supposed to be that way. After that, the EDM starts and there onwards, there is very less of a tune. Harshi gets some nice portions to sing, which are composed in a very jazzy way. And Ankit shoves in another one of his typical tunes, even into a club song! DJ Bravo’s portions are proof that they were inserted as a merepublicity stunt, because nothing he says can be made out.. Maybe because he’s singing in Hindi.. Or what is supposed to be Hindi. The arrangements are mostly EDM, with some nice jazzy portions in occasional places. Manoj’s Hindi lyrics are the usual Hindi cabaret style lyrics in Harshi’s parts, while the usual Ankit sobbiness in Ankit’s part. The English portions by Raool are barely audible, so I don’t know about them. The grand finale turns out to be the worst song on the album. A bad attempt at making a club song that will accommodate Ankit Tiwari’s sobs and yawns, DJ Bravo’s spunk, Harshi’s debutant-ness, and Humpty Dumpty!


Tum Bin 2 really turns out to be quite a good album. Ankit Tiwari gets a whole album to compose to his credit, not for the first time, but he still makes good use of the opportunity. The album is surprisingly full of variety, with songs ranging from a nice Sufi love song, to a melancholic and grandly orchestrated title track, to a club song that barely works, to a fun-filled peppy number and many more. The ones that will stand out and be lapped up by the masses, are definitely the first two tracks of the album. The remake has been done indescribably well, while ‘Ishq Mubarak’ will connect with the masses a lot. The rest seem like tracks with a more situational effect, but which will be liked by the niche music lovers anyhow, especially ‘Masta’ and ‘Dil Nawaziyaan’. And ‘Jaeger Bomb’ stands out in that it will find it difficult to find takers. Though not matching the greatness of Nikhil-Vinay’s soundtrack to the first film, Ankit does a nice job with this quasi-sequel, proving that the multicomposer theory is wrong, once again. An album that does good WITHOUT having multiple composers.

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Fariyad (Extended Version) > Dil Nawaziyaan > Ishq Mubarak > Masta > Teri Fariyad > Tum Bin > Dekh Lena > Jaeger Bomb

 

Which is your favourite song from Tum Bin 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOT SO FREAKY; RATHER SWEET!! (FREAKY ALI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sajid-Wajid
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed & Danish Sabri
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th September 2016

Freaky Ali Album Cover

Freaky Ali Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Freaky Ali is an upcoming Bollywood sports / comedy film, starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Amy Jackson, Arbaaz Khan, Jas Arora, Seema Biswas and Nikitin Dheer. The movie has been directed and produced by Sohail Khan, and presented by Salman Khan. The movie is an unofficial remake of Adam Sandler’s 1996 movie, ‘Happy Gilmore’, and revolves around the story of a debt collector, Ali, whose fate changes when he discovers that he is made for playing golf, and what follows is the inspirational story of Ali. The story seems good, and would be interesting to watch, but what grabs my attention is a question — Where do songs come in the picture here?? Leave it up to Sohail though, for finding a perfect musical duo to compose for the movie, and that is Sajid-Wajid, returning after eight months after the flop that their album to ‘Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3’ was, with only ‘Jawaani Le Doobi’ busting the charts. This time, they decide to compose a mere three songs for the film, and that is surprising! Hopefully, they compose three gems according to the theme of the film, and stun us with their renowned arrangements. So, let’s see how many shots they score in their own musical game!


1. Din Mein Karengey Jagrata
Singers ~ Wajid, Divya Kumar & Swati Sharma, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

Sajid-Wajid start off this short album with a dance song, which is quite typical of their composition style, yet sounds different and unique. The song seems like a celebratory one, to be placed at a very happy occasion in the movie. The composer duo has produced a tune that doesn’t really fascinate you as such, but it still does what it is supposed to do, which is to entertain you. There are some places where the hookline is painfully dull and very heard-before and typical of Sajid-Wajid, but some lines are very polished and energetically captivating. The song starts off nicely, with some lines sung by Swati Sharma that are really quirky and funny, and when Divya Kumar starts, the song goes to a whole different level of fun and enthusiasm. The mukhda is quite captivating, managing to grab the listener’s attention, fortunately, because the rest of the song fails to match the enthusiasm of the starting, sounding uncontrollably outdated. The hookline itself is weak enough, but the antaras don’t help at all. (Reminding you a lot, lot, lot, of Sajid-Wajid’s ‘Phatte Tak Nachna’ from ‘Dolly Ki Doli’) However, just to save themselves from listeners leaving the song because of a weak composition, the duo infuses some great arrangements to catch your attention — rather, to divert it from the composition. The brass band is played in quite a quirky way, and after doing so many such songs in Bollywood, Sajid-Wajid seem to have got the hang of it. Some weird but catchy pigeon sounds grace the whole song, and the duo has put in more attractive sound effects like this. Of course, the traditional harmonium, dhols and electronic tablas can’t stay away in a wedding song by Sajid-Wajid! And no complaints, either. The duo cover up for the composition with their booming arrangements. The harmonium-led second interlude is a wonderful one. The duo also uses a lot of techno music to make the song connect more with the modern audience. The vocals are good as well, with Swati Sharma very nicely singing like a village girl, again, after ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns). Her voice is very suitable for this track and kudos to Sajid-Wajid for roping her in for this song, and making it her first song with them. Also, I am afraid they would’ve used Mamta Sharma’s voice if not Swati’s so thank God! Divya Kumar is as energetic as ever, and though he has sung so many songs of this type previously, he just steals the show, along with Wajid, who accompanies him mostly in the hookline. The lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed are not too bad, and not excellent, but enjoyable and suitable for this type of song! Sajid-Wajid shoot back with this song, which could’ve done with a better composition, otherwise, it’s a song to tap your feet on and go crazy to!

 

2. Parinda Hai Parinda
Singer ~ Wajid, Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed

The next song happens to be a motivational song, and the duo have made an excellent song. The composition evokes memory of Ajay-Atul’s Marathi song from ‘Sairat’, ‘Aatach Baya Ka Baavarla’ in the first line, but that gets diffused as soon as the listener can catch it. The duo has come up with a composition which is quite melodious and soulful, with a distinct Sufi touch to it. The song has the power to make you hear it patiently for the first time. The mukhda is very good and the melody sucks you in, while the antara keeps up the sweetness, and the hookline is something that appeals to you even in its clichéd-ness! Overall, Sajid-Wajid have struck the right notes with the composition. The arrangements are beautiful too. With the violin very gracefully starting the song off, the acoustic guitar and cello take over to make the arrangements sound more Westernized. The use of strings throughout the song is marvelous, with each of them superseding the other, resulting in a grand orchestration by Sajid-Wajid, consisting of so many stringed instruments, like both electric and acoustic guitars, violins, a cello, and many other types of strings! The beats are wonderful as well, with a very catchy groove to them. What did bother me though, was Wajid’s singing. His voice sounded very unusually shaky and it definitely did not work in favour of the composition, because the first thing I noticed when I first heard the song was his singing itself! It just didn’t go well with the tune, that, in my opinion, required a very young and smooth voice. Shabbir’s lyrics again, are good. This time he writes many more Urdu words in the song, and they sound good for sure. 😀 The lyrics trace Ali’s journey and success well. A good song, but again, shortly misses to be a great song, because of wrong choice of singer!!

 

3. Ya Ali Murtaza (Qawwali)
Singers ~ Wajid, Danish Sabri & Payal Dev, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri

The name of this song suggests right away that it is a Qawwali, but T-Series still thought it better to specify that extrinsically just in case. Anyway, if you know Sajid-Wajid, then you should also know that they are awesome at making Qawwalis too. However, this here isn’t a traditional Qawwali. Rather, it is a fusion of two cultures, two traditions and ultimately, two religions. The composition is a very strong and instantly-healing type. It exudes strength and makes you feel protected all of a sudden. The duo has done a wonderful job in fusing a typical Qawwali composition with a typical bhajan composition. Both the tunes have fused together so well, that it is hard to think after hearing this song, that a bhajan and a Qawwali are two different music styles! Last we heard this kind of fusion between a bhajan and a Qawwali was almost two years ago in ‘Teri Dua’ (Hawaizaada). The duo excel with this fusion, and though there is an omnipresent dark and sinister tone to the song, it is nothing but strengthening and motivating. The duo’s fantastic arrangement skills are showed off in this song as well, more so because it is a fusion between two music styles. Most of the song is arranged on Ganpati beats, with the dhols, taashe and lezims, along with a very trademark Marathi tune played in the first interlude. The duo very nicely go back and forth between the bhajan and Qawwali. The song starts with the adlib before a traditional Qawwali, sung with a lot of confidence and gusto by Danish Sabri and Wajid. After that is over, the energetic Ganpati beats set in, on which the hookline has been arranged! Everything happens so fast, that you need a couple of times hearing the song to process it all! There is a seamless transition from the loud Ganpati beats to traditional Qawwali beats on the tablas in the mukhda, but the manjeeras from the Ganpati side still don’t stop!! The antara starts with a bhajan which is again followed by a Qawwali portion. The brilliant idea and thought behind the song leaves you in awe. The duo must’ve worked really hard to bring out the contrast, yet unity in the song. At the end, there is a big tempo change, and the bhajan is interspersed with cries to “Maula” and “Ya ali murtaza“. The vocals are spectacular, and the coordination between the two parts is what makes it sound even better. Wajid and Danish Sabri handle the Qawwali with lots of boost and confidence, while Payal Dev’s voice has this very overpowering quality, while singing the aarti. All three of them sound fabulous together. Danish Sabri’s lyrics are very devotional, and you just drown into them. Here, the gem of the album is hidden; A devotional song for two communities showcasing the unity of these two prominent communities. A genius idea of the makers gets executed excellently and turns out to end this album on a very grand scale! #5StarHotelSong!!


Freaky Ali turns out to be quite a good album. Sajid-Wajid live up to expectations from a sports film like this one, by delivering less, but good songs. All three songs have a different touch to them, and though the first two lack in one department, as a whole the album is good! Sajid-Wajid give music to this film about a ‘freak’ in a very non-freaky, but sweet and enjoyable way!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ya Ali Murtaza (Qawwali) > Parinda Hai Parinda > Din Mein Karengey Jagrata

 

Which is your favourite song from Freaky Ali? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Raaz Reboot, Chefs: Jeet Gannguli & Sangeet-Siddharth Haldipur

NEITHER GREAT, NOR GRAND, BUT DEFINITELY FULL OF MASTI!! (GREAT GRAND MASTI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sanjeev-Darshan, Sharib-Toshi & Superbia (Shaan-Gourov-Roshin)
♪ Lyrics by: Sameer Anjaan, Manoj Yadav & Kumaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 7th July 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th July 2016

Great Grand Masti

Great Grand Masti

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Great Grand Masti is an upcoming Bollywood comedy film, starring Riteish Deshmukh, Vivek Oberoi, Aftab Shivdasani and Urvashi Rautela in lead roles. The film has been directed by Indra Kumar, and produced by Sameer Nair, Aman Gill, Ashok Thakeria, Sri Adhikari Brothers and Anand Pandit. The film is the third of its type to release this year, and all I know is that both of those, namely ‘Mastizaade’ and ‘Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3’, fell flat on their noses, and I expect this one to do so, as well, so all I’m concerned about is the music. The music of ‘Mastizaade’ was a one-hit wonder, with ‘Rom Rom Romantic’ by Amaal Mallik being the only song I loved out of four other songs by Meet Bros Anjjan and Anand Raaj Anand. In ‘Kyaa Kool Hain Hum 3’ too, only one song — ‘Jawaani Le Doobi’, was really addictive, out of the four, all by Sajid-Wajid. Here, we have three entities — firstly, the thrice-in-a-blue-moon (please understand what that means) composers Sanjeev-Darshan, sons of Shravan Rathod of Nadeem-Shravan. They had composed the title track for ‘Grand Masti’ and now get two songs out of four in the sequel. Next up is the consistently disappointing (at least this year) duo, Sharib-Toshi, with one song, and last up is the band Superbia, with its members being singer Shaan, and Gourov Dasgupta and Roshin Balu. They too, get one song, and so the album is very conveniently made up of songs composed by two duos and a trio. What we have to see, is exactly how enjoyable the songs actually are. (because those of ‘Grand Masti’ weren’t at all!)


1. Teri Kamar Ko
Singers ~ Sanjeev Rathod, Darshan Rathod & Kanika Kapoor, Music by ~ Sanjeev-Darshan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

An ode to the “Mastiiiiiii” from Anand Raaj Anand’s title track of the first ‘Masti’ movie, begins the album to the third instalment of the franchise. Not before long, the title of this movie comes and the peppy song takes off. Sanjeev-Darshan, who had composed a very dull and uninteresting title song fro ‘Grand Masti’, actually make up for their mistake there, with this song. This is the ideal song you want in a comedy movie — peppy, enjoyable, addictive and hummable. The duo have proved themselves in the 90s and it is commendable how they’ve evolved and are composing contemporary music, till date. Here, they do get in a bit of the templatised late 2000s sound of Bollywood, but everything is done very craftily. By craftily, I don’t mean it is a musical gem or something, but it is quite catchy, as it should be! The hook is infectious and energetic. It makes you groove along to it. The duo has composed a just as infectious tune, with three parts repeating, which are 1) the “Teri Kamar Ko” hook, 2) Kanika’s “darliiing” part, and 3) the 90s bhangra piece that goes like “oh baby teri look kamaal lagti hai…” . All three parts repeat throughout the song and mutually complement each other, to result in quite an appealing composition, overall. There is not even one word above the three parts I have mentioned, and that is kind of weird for a Bollywood song. So the mukhda is the antara and vice versa. Sanjeev-Darshan’s energetic singing too, gives the song half of its catchiness. Kanika sounds good, but not as unique as she does in other songs. It is Sanjeev-Darshan, who steal the spotlight. Arrangements are good as well. That groovy beat is present throughout the song, which is unforgettable. Brass has been used generously and it sounds great. The Punjabi part I spoke about has a great Dhol rhythm to it. Kumaar’s lyrics are enjoyable too. Especially true female part, is hilarious. Indifferent to the boys’ pleas, the clever girlfriends want a party, a ride in the car, a margarita, a diamond AND a meeting with his parents, before, in Kumaar’s words, “Jo bhi chaahe karle”! Surprisingly VERY catchy, and something that will play everywhere for a while! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Resham Ka Rumaal
Singers ~ Toshi Sabri & Soniya Sharma, Original Song by ~ Ila Arun, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

Sharib-Toshi are back after an unsuccessful stint in the first half of this year, with bad or just below average songs from ‘1920 London’, ‘Veerappan’ & ‘Housefull 3’. After composing for two ‘third instalments’ — those of ‘1920’ and ‘Housefull’, they are back in the third instalment for ‘Masti’, and this time, they remix a traditional folk song by Ila Arun, ‘Resham Ka Rumaal’, with, of course, many modern club beats and whatnot. The song actually starts off with a funky groove, but when the actual composition starts, you can’t help but daydream and get bored. The composition is really dull, and also a desperate mix of their very own ‘Emotional Fool’ (Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania) and ‘Pyaar Ki’ (Housefull 3). It is just the typical Sharib-Toshi composition for dance songs. {They have typical compositions in dance as well as romance!! :\ } The hookline is taken as it is from Ila Arun’s song, and I don’t actually like the composition of that either, so this was a nightmare, especially with the masculine voice of the female voice! That brings us to the vocals. Toshi sounds dull and bland, and as feminine as ever. The female singer sounds more masculine than him. Both sound bad, in short. She has included unnecessary nuances in order to sound cool, especially in the hookline, adding the “ha” sound everywhere she can, to make it sound kind of like this — “Rehesham kaha ruhumaahal galehe pehe dahalke tu aajana, o dude mere main, main dillihi kaha surma lagahake arree, khadi hun ca-lub kehe darwahajje pehe.” It is so irritating! I was as irritated while hearing it, as you were while reading that! And then there’s a rap that sounds stupid. The arrangements are not interesting at all, with club beats trying to elevate the song’s quality, but reducing it in the bargain. Manoj Yadav changes the hookline to make it sound more modern and ‘cool’, like changing “dildar” to “dude”, and “kab Se khadi hun darwaje pe” in the original to “khadi hun ca-lub [club] Ke darwaaje pe.” Disgusting. And then another disgusting line goes “Where are you, where are you, mujhe taiyaar karke”, to which the female singer answers with the hookline of the song in that annoying voice and pronunciation. Sharib-Yoshi and Manoj Yadav are back with another bad song! Skip!

 

3. I Wanna Tera Ishq
Singers ~ Shivranjani Singh & Shivangi Bhayana, Music by ~ Sanjeev-Darshan, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This song starts off VERRRRYYY addictively. The percussion that starts off the song really helps in attracting the listener’s attention. And the rattles after that just increase his/her interest. Sanjeev-Darshan have cone up with another catchy and haunting tune, which grabs you, but not as great as the title song. Nevertheless, it is quite groovy! The hookline is something that irritates you the first time, but gets better and better with each listen. The antara is something that has gotten stuck in my mind. The mukhda, too, attracts the listener and makes sure he doesn’t leave halfway. The arrangements are another great aspect of the song, with catchy and addictive beats, Arabic arrangements like the percussion and the rattle, which reminds me of a snake rattle for some reason. 😀 A wonderful saxophone interlude fills the gap between two stanzas, and electronic tabla beats sound great. The two lead singers really sing the song the way it is supposed to, with a sensuous tone, to make it more addictive. I can’t differentiate between the two, but both sound good (irritating at first, but again, better each time) and also remind one of Neha Kakkar. It is the lyrics where the song lacks out, as was expected. The hookline makes no sense. 😛 “I wanna tera ishq” means “I want to your love” which is nonsensical. But again, the vocals and composition saves Kumaar! Another catchy song from Sanjeev-Darshan! #5StarHotelSong!! {I haven’t had tomatoes thrown at me for a long time!! Bring it on!!}

 

4. Lipstick Laga Ke
Singers ~ Payal Dev & Shaan, Music by ~ Superbia, Lyrics by ~ Sameer Anjjan

The last song on the album goes into the calmest mode of the album, more like Indipop of 2000s, with Superbia (a trio comprising Shaan, Gourov Dasgupta & Roshin Balu) behind the composition and arrangements. The trio composes a decent song, which could’ve easily topped the charts, but in the time period I mentioned — the 2000s. In this decade, too, it is sounding good, but just that. The song is a like Punjabi pop number, with a slow-paced tune arranged on an overdose of tumbi, making it sound like a Kanika Kapoor song without Kanika Kapoor, and a Kanika Kapoor song without Kanika Kapoor is like ice cream without ice cream! 😦 😂😂😂 Nevertheless, the trio have made a nice instrumentation for themselves in the song, with a great guitar riff, and nice shehnais throughout. It is just the tumbi that sounds unnecessarily overdone. The “oh saiyyan ve” is crazily infectious, even in its slow pace! Payal Dev sounds good here, and at least she doesn’t sound irritating (like in “Veerappan”), but her voice sounds pretty addictive. And Shaan sings in a different avatar after a loooooonnnngggg time. His goody-goody songs are done I hope, and he features in an outright baddy-baddy song here, and sounds great rapping in Punjabi! A pleasant surprise for his peers. At least he didn’t add his too-sugary voice here, and spoil the song! Sameer’s lyrics are ATROCIOUS though. They’re too ridiculous to be talked about, but here are some highlights: “Lipstick lagake tenu loot liya ve / akhiyaan milake heart attack diya ve.” Excuse me, what’s “Myocardial infarction” then?? :\ I’m pretty sure Sameer learnt Biology with the lyricists of ‘Taang Uthake’, who are of the opinion that all our body parts have legs! A good composition, but a bit predictable and “on-and-off” type grooviness.


I never expected Great Grand Masti to have good songs. At the most, I was expecting one great song and the rest time pass. Yes, I know all are time pass songs, but for me, two of them stood out, and those are the two composed by the most senior composers, Sanjeev-Darshan. I know they’re ridiculous and I usually thrash such songs, but why thrash them when the movie needs such ridiculous songs. On one hand, we can have ridiculous songs with bad compositions (‘Housefull 3’) and on the other, they can have really addictive tunes (like these two). Even Superbia comes up with a functional composition, and partially gains my interest, but it is only Sharib-Toshi who disappoint. Again. And again. And again… All in all, it is an album that is neither great, nor grand, but full of ‘Masti’ for sure!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Teri Kamar Ko > I Wanna Tera Ishq > Lipstick Laga Ke > Resham Ka Rumaal

 

Which is your favourite song from Great Grand Masti? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

KAAYAR-APPAN!! (VEERAPPAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Jeet Gannguli, Sharib-Toshi & Sandeep Chowta
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Manoj Yadav & Nitin Raikwar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th May 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 27th May 2016

Veerappan Album Cover

Veerappan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Hungama CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Veerappan is an upcoming Bollywood biographical crime/action/thriller film, starring Sandeep Bharadwaj, Sachiin J. Joshi, Usha Jadhav and Lisa Ray in prominent roles. The film is directed by Ram Gopal Varma, and produced by Raina Sachiin Joshi. The movie is a biopic of bandit Koose Muniswamy Veerappan, dominant in the Sathyamangalam Forest in the states of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, and Kerala, and it revolves around his life and the events leading to Operation Cocoon, the mission to capture and kill him. Ram Gopal Varma had directed a Kannada movie named ‘Killing Veerappan’ that released earlier this year, but this, he claims, is not a remake of it. There are absolutely no hopes from the music of a gangster film, more over, a Ram Gopal Varma film, and it shocked me to see Jeet Gannguli as one of the composers. He has one song in the album, and the remaining three tracks are by duo Sharib-Toshi, from whom I’ve stopped expecting good music after ‘1920 London’ and ‘Housefull 3’. They have actually composed only one song, in two versions, and the third song is a remake of the superhit ‘Khallas’ (Company) by Sandeep Chowta, who I’ve credited, but T-Series hadn’t. :\ So. Let’s check this small album out, and I’m starting with the least of expectations.


1. Muchhi Re
Singer ~ Mohan Kannan, Music by ~ Jeet Gannguli, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Jeet Gannguli gets to start off the album with his sole composition in the album. He decides to create a folkish song that is very perfect for a song that is being sung at some type of celebration at a gangster hideout. Folksy woodwinds kick start the song, followed by a catchy folk string instrument (probably rabaab). I must say, Jeet has made a great attempt at giving a perfect gangster song, that would suit the theme of the film. However, the composition gets very boring after the mukhda. The hookline has no spunk, and the antaras are lifeless, with no actual tune to really make them catchy or appealing. The variations in the tune actually work against the song. The first antara, is very stale, while the second is at least decent. The “Chalat raho, ladat raho” chants are pretty irritating too. Mohan Kannan’s brilliant and energetic voice seems to infuse a god amount of life into the lifeless composition, but it still falls short of the standard. There are so many different voices, that I doubt Mohan sang it all by himself. The saving grace of the song is Jeet’s awesome arrangements. He has put in all his efforts to make the song sound genuinely gangster-ish, and his efforts have bore the desired fruit. The various sound effects, and the string instrument, percussion and woodwinds, all stand out beautifully. Especially the strings and percussion. Interludes are gripping and frankly, it is just the arrangements that make you hear the song multiple times. The rock guitars added in places are commendable. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics go well with the composition and the theme of the movie, but I don’t know why he wrote about the “Muchhi” (Moustache). Looking at the poster of the movie and Veerappan’s appearance though, that’s reasonable! 😂 A great attempt at something different from Jeet Gannguli. Arrangements are spot-on, while in the other departments, he needs to make some serious improvement! Fantastic attempt considering that it isn’t Jeet’s forte!

 

2. Veer Veer Veerappan / Veer Veer Veerappan (Rap Version)
Singers ~ Payal Dev, Vee, Sharib Sabri & Toshi Sabri (Both Versions), Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

Here come Sharib & Toshi with their first song in the album. The song has been included in two versions in the album, and what I don’t understand is, why!!????!! Is it just to force us to hear the pathetic song twice? I don’t know, but it sure seems so. The song is an attempt at creating something scary and frightening, but it comes across as cheap. First of all, Payal Dev in a screechy voice, trying to sound like Monjulika (Heck, Monjulika sounds better!) is not the usual idea we have of a gangster theme song. She has tried with all her might to be as cheap as possible, and I am pretty sure she won’t try such a song again. If she does, I have no comments. 😛 Sharib-Toshi’s base composition is really bad, and it has literally nothing to like, except maybe the hookline. The hookline has actually been composed seriously. Everything else has been composed like they are deliberately trying to be scary. Every time Payal comes to sing her parts, a different weird tune has been composed for each part. And guess what, her parts are reprises of children’s nursery rhymes! Manoj Yadav has just spoiled so many kids’ childhood! Take this: “Lalla Lalla Lori, Khoon Ki Katori” and “Jungle Jungle Baat Chali Hai Pata Chala Hai, Veerappan Khoon Karne Ko Nikala Hai”. I don’t feel like giving more examples. I mean, how are these lyrics even approved? Another line blatantly goes, “Narsanhaar Ki usey lagan Hai”. I’m like “Okayyyyyyy….?” And then they shamelessly use the “Shiva Mrutyunjay Mantra” at the end. 😂😂 The mantra which was so beautifully used in two songs of ‘Neerja’, now gets to feature in a BEAUTIFUL song of ‘Veerappan’! Congrats! 😒😨 Arrangements are slightly okay, compared to the rest of the song. The hookline has a groovy beat to it with manjeeras and tablas. The rest of the song has techno sounds, an overdose of EDM, ghouls screeching (ghouls have become a prominent musical instrument nowadays, I guess! :\ ) and lions roaring. And one guy who keeps yelling “Rrraaa!” The “Rap Version” just has some rap by someone called Vee. (What if that’s Veerappan himself! :O Oh I’m so scared!) The rap is in English and it’s pathetic. “I promise your life will come to an end.” and such is the award-deserving rap. I can’t un-hear that… So I’m rescuing you… Don’t hear it!!

 

3. Khallas
Singers ~ Jasmine Sandlas, Sharib Sabri & Toshi Sabri. Original Composition by ~ Sandeep Chowta, Music Recreated by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Original Lyrics by ~ Nitin Raikwar, Additional Lyrics by ~ Manoj Yadav

Sandeep Chowta’s ‘Khallas’ (Company) has been featured on this album and there’s another addition to the list of bad remakes. What’s more, this song is what I will call a ‘Copy Remake’. Before you think that I’m stupid, by thinking that remakes are always copies technically, let me be clear. The fact that it is a remake is a different story. The song’s beats have been copied from a song which is not the song of which it is a remake! Yes, you heard me right! The song is a remake of ‘Khallas’ but its beats are the same as the beats of the song ‘Get Low’ from the ‘Furious 7’ soundtrack. That’s why they’re so impressive. That whole Arabic theme and all. But it’s not original, it is ‘inspired’. Speaking about the composition, nothing much new has been added except the antara, which has a boring tune too. What’s worse, Jasmine’s voice serves as a spoilsport for the whole thing. If Asha Bhosle hears it, she’ll be shocked at how they’ve reduced her song to something stupid. The lyrics have been changed for the worse. ‘Ye hai ishq samjha tujhe kar dega khallas’ has been very happily changed to ‘Ye hai maut Teri, tujhe kar hi dega khallas’. Sharib-Toshi’s new composition for the antara is pretty irritating, coupled with the lyrics. And when Jasmine sings it, it is just cheap. ‘Bachke Tu Rehna’ from this song!!!


Veerappan turned out just as expected. Sharib-Toshi continue on their disappointing spree of cheap songs, while Jeet Gannguli actually tries to raise the level of the album! I guess nothing more could’ve been expected from a gangster film, right? Instead of Veerappan, I would call the album Kaayar-appan!! (‘Veer’ = brave, ‘kaayar’ = scaredy-cat 😂)

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Only hear Muchhi Re for the arrangements, everything else isn’t listen-worthy! 

 

Which is your favourite song from Veerappan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next: 19th Music Mastani Monthly Awards (May 2016)

UTTERLY UN’POSSESSIVE’!!! (1920 LONDON – Music Review)

Music Album Details:
♪ Music by: Sharib-Toshi, Kaushik-Akash (JAM) & Shankar-Jaikishan
♪ Lyrics by: Kunaal Vermaa, Hasrat Jaipuri, Sharib-Toshi, Kaalim Sheikh, Azeem Shirazi & Prashant Ingole
♪ Music Label: T-Series [‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’ on Saregama]
♪ Music Released On: 21st April 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 6th May 2016

1920 London Album Cover

1920 London Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To hear ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’ on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

To buy ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’ on iTunes CLICK HERE


1920 London is an upcoming Bollywood horror flick. It is the third installment in the “dreaded” 1920 franchise, and stars Sharman Joshi as the exorcist, Meera Chopra as the wife of the person who is possessed, and Vishal Kharwal as the person who is possessed. 😛 The film is written by Vikram Bhatt, and directed by Tinu Suresh Desai, who was supposed to debut with the upcoming Akshay Kumar flick, ‘Rustom’, but this happened to release first. The film is produced by Reliance Entertainment. There’s no point discussing the story, because there will be a twist somewhere or the other, so let’s move on to discuss about the music. The music has been composed by Sharib-Toshi (Now to be credits as Shaarib and Toshi) who haven’t really impressed highly with their previous works (maybe a bit in ‘Zid’ and ‘Jashnn’). Hopefully, this might be their best album, going by the music of the first and second parts of the franchise. The duo has three songs in the album. Debutants Kaushik-Akash are the guest composers, with two songs, representing a company known as JAM (Just About Music) which has been founded by Pritam. It is an A&R (Artists & Repertoire) venture by Pritam, under which he will launch new music directors and look after their development in the industry. This is his first go at the venture, and hopefully, it turns out successful, so that he will be motivated to introduce more newbies and we will get many new, talented composers! 😀 So, here I start hearing the music of ‘1920 London’ with great expectations! Let’s hope the music keeps up to expectations!


♪ BONUS SONG

♦ Gumnaam Hai Koi
Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Antara Mitra, Original Song’s Singer ~ Lata Mangeshkar, Music Recreated and Composed by ~ Kaushik-Akash, Original Composition by ~ Shankar-Jaikishan, New Lyrics by ~ Kunaal Vermaa, Original Lyrics by ~ Hasrat Jaipuri, Music Label ~ Saregama

Saregama is still at its silly behaviour, claiming rights to their old songs, if remade. That’s absolutely right, but kinda irritating by now. 😛 Anyways, they should be proud of the wonderful collection of songs they have in their kitty and the first song of the ‘1920 London’ album is yet another one of such famous old songs from them. This time, since it is a horror movie, nothing could’ve been better than this song to pick, and the makers have chosen it perfectly. The song I’m talking about is the haunting old song composed by maestros Shankar-Jaikishan, and sung by none other than Lata Mangeshkar, ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’ (Gumnaam). And the newcomers Kaushik-Akash get a chance to put forth to the world, their version of the classic haunting song. They get the general idea, which is to make the song haunting and totally ghoulish, right. The starting itself is wonderful with all kinds of sound effects — wind, screeching bats, and a whole lot of weird ghostly whispers. Antara starts the song with a line that sounds more of a backing vocal line. Once Jubin starts singing, you definitely will get goosebumps. His smooth voice has the right amount of haunt and romance and even dominance. He touches the high notes with such ease, it is hard to imagine. The duo has beautifully crafted his part of the song, which is their own composition. The only thing retained from the old song is the hookline, and that is helmed by Antara, not sounding like herself thanks to the heavy programming of whispers, trying to make her sound like a ghost, but kind of failing. I would’ve preferred it if she would’ve been allowed to sing freely without any programming done to her voice. Nevertheless, it has been sung great, in a whispery voice and I guess it was necessary to make it sound more scary. The duo has composed Jubin’s parts perfectly, and they’re the best parts in the song. The mukhda hooks the listener, while the antara does the job of not letting go, which means the attempt has been successful. Kunaal Vermaa (‘Hasi’ — Hamari Adhuri Kahani fame) writes nice lyrics here, but I can’t make out whether they’re romantic or haunting or both. The duo excel in the arrangements. As mentioned earlier, various sound effects grace the song, and it sounds awesome. They send chills down the spine, but of course it isn’t exactly spooky; after all, it is a song. Piano and strings gracefully lead the arrangements, while the rest is digital stuff. Owls, bats, ghouls form the sound effects part of the song, and it is commendable. A great first attempt for Kaushik-Akash, and a decent revamp of the classic. Jubin excels, while Antara gets very less scope to open up!


Now, the review of the ‘1920 London’ album, released by T-Series, consisting of four songs, with three by Sharib-Toshi and one by Kaushik-Akash. 🙂


1. Aaj Ro Len De
Singer ~ Sharib Sabri, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Sharib-Toshi & Kaalim Sheikh

The first song in the album starts off with a beautiful Middle-Eastern feel of the oud, starting off the song on a high. Sharib-Toshi go the familiar way, composing a song quite similar to all their previous works of this genre. I couldn’t help but think of all their other works. It is a romantic song with a very heavy melancholic touch. To be honest, I am already very tired and sick of all this from the duo. The hookline, though repetitive and typical, however, foes garner some interest from the listener, as do all of Sharib-Toshi’s melodies. It is in the parts surrounding the hookline, where the problem lies. Nothing has been composed in a very likable or catchy tune; in fact, it exhausted me to hear the song, which is just less than five minutes long (too long when the song has nothing new to offer!) The mukhda might interest listeners, but the interest wears off until the antara. Sharib’s voice is good, but I would’ve preferred somebody else to sing this song. His voice seems too soft and rustic for the composition, which hasn’t worked in its favour, sadly. The duo really works hard to make up for the lack in melody, by giving wonderful, awe-inspiring arrangements! The arrangements are something which I haven’t heard recently! With an Indian and Middle-Eastern touch, they touch the heart and sound really grand — the aforementioned oud, various string instruments, and I think a santoor, if that’s not the oud itself, being played on a higher note. The lyrics are exhausting and boring, too, trying to be too fancy. I wonder what Sharib-Toshi wrote and what Kaalim Sheikh wrote. 😁 This will be liked only by those who love the typical Bhatt-ish songs. I’m so drained out after hearing this song! 😦 A very disappointing start by the duo.

 

2. Rootha Kyun
Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan & Payal Dev, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Azeem Shirazi

The next song in the album does start off quite promisingly. As I have said before, piano notes are a wonderful way to start off a song. They have the power to grab the attention of the listener from the beginning of the song. This time, Sharib-Toshi do just that. They use the very diplomatic piano to lure listeners into the song. However, once the listeners are lured inside, the trap is quite pleasant. Unlike my expectations after hearing ‘Aaj Ro Len De’, this song fares better. Mohit Chauhan is a safe choice taken by the composers. He sings the heard-before-yet-appealing composition beautifully. Especially the way he sings the hookline, is impressive. Payal gets to sing the second antara along with the hookline. Let me say it takes time to get used to her voice there. She seems to have used an unnecessarily high-pitched voice, trying to ape Sadhana Sargam, but after a listen or two, it starts sounding beautiful, and then it seems nobody could have done better. i don’t know how that happened because until I wrote this, I had only heard the song once and didn’t like her voice, but now suddenly started liking it. Sharib-Toshi get it right with the composition, and play  it safe there too. Though typical, it is pretty catchy, unlike the first one, which only had a catchy hook. But this song has the mukhda and antaras catchy too. The main reason for the catchiness has to be the fast pace of the song, which does make a huge difference. The hookline has been composed really well, and as I said before, sang just as well by Mohit and Payal, later on. Again, arrangements are fabulous. I remember Sharib-Toshi’s fab arrangements in ‘Zid’ as well, and it is great how they always pay attention to their arrangements, though their compositions might not be so strong. Here, they have equally balanced both. The arrangements are a good mixture of a string orchestra, rock elements (guitars and drums), digital sounds and sparkling Indian instruments like the santoor. Azeem’s lyrics are typical too, but still go well with the song and sound good, so that’s is passable. When typicality meets genius, it sounds like this. A safe song from all angles! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Tujhko Mein
Singer ~ Shaan, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi, Lyrics by ~ Azeem Shirazi

Here Sharib-Toshi try to do what I’ve been ranting and rambling on about — something that isn’t the typical horror Bhatt-ish stuff. They rope in Shaan for this, and you will understand why, after you hear the song. Sharib-Toshi have composed a happy-go-lucky, sugary-sweet song, which tries so hard to be romantic without getting melancholic. The result? The duo fails miserably even there. The sweetness is overdone, just like an over-ripe fruit. Too sweet, and you start feeling nauseated. The same is the case with this song. The composition falls into the same category of songs which Shaan is getting nowadays, that sound pretty mild and kiddish. He does well, no doubt, but it has gotten boring hearing him sing the same types of songs, with no variations at all. In the hookline he sings “main aankhon mein” in a very irritating manner. Sharib-Toshi do try hard to  give a good composition, but as I sad, it sounds too goody-goody, and artificial. With the composition and vocals not making a deep impact, we can only expect the duo to add great instrumentation, but sadly, the arrangements here are pretty clichéd and banal. What with the seemingly forced finger snaps, and other weird digital beats. Guitars and the saxophone try to normalise things, but to a limited extent. A synthesiser tries to impress in the first interlude, but even that does not work. There is nothing new in the arrangements, and if the duo wanted to make an outstanding romantic track, there are many things they could have added to the otherwise boring composition. It is high time they realise that things have changed since their debut in ‘Raaz: The Mystery Continues’ in 2009, seven years ago, when all this seemed appealing. Azeem Shirazi’s lyrics are plain and simple, but not backed by a strong composition, they fall flat on their nose, if they have one. 😛 I wanted the duo to do something different. They did. But not very impressively. It is called Typicality in Experimentation.

 

4. Aafreen
Singers ~ K.K. & Antara Mitra, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash, Lyrics by ~ Prashant Ingole

The newcomer duo comes back to finish off the album with their second song, a romantic duet. The song does have a heard-before tune, but it has been crafted so well, that it manages to appeal to the ears, and fits into the category of breezy romantic songs Bollywood used to produce in wholesale, until those melancholic romantic songs started arriving in bulk. So, this song provides a great respite from those melancholic songs of these days. Unlike ‘Tujhko Mein’, this is a great example of how such a song is done. Kaushik-Akash score with the composition. The distinct Pritam-ish touch is omnipresent in the song, and it sounds good. The hookline does remind of Salim-Sulaiman’s method of composing romantic hooklines, and is quite pleasant itself. As with the composition, the duo has made a great choice by roping in K.K. to do the male vocals. This is his territory, and he rules in such songs, as is evident in the song. Antara does seem out of place, and to be extremely honest, Tulsi Kumar would have carried it out beautifully too, as she has sung such songs before. Antara gets more scope to open up in this song than ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’, but still she sounds too artificially sweet. It is all the fault of her having different voices in each song. Her parts have been composed beautifully, though, doing half of her job for her. The arrangements are mostly techno sounds, but electric guitars and a faint string orchestra are audible. The fingersnaps sound good in this song. In the line just before the hookline, a wonderful church-like choir joins in with great harmonious backing vocals. Prashant Ingole’s lyrics, which would seem dull and typical otherwise, are definitely saved by the composition. At last the finale is great, with the duo showing a lot of promise. Great for a debut! Vocals and composition holds all the magic! #5StarHotelSong!!


As much as I was expecting, 1920 London isn’t even half as good! The newcomers from the A&R project fare well, even if I don’t consider that it is their debut. While on one side, with the remake of ‘Gumnaam Hai Koi’, they give a quite hellish composition, on the other side they give a breezy, heavenly composition with ‘Aafreen’. Sharib-Toshi, the more seasoned artists of the two, however, disappoint. They stick to their old templates, out of which luckily, one turned out to be exceptional, while the other two are extremely avoidable. In 2014, when the duo had claimed that ‘Zid’ was their career best, I ignored it as it was unbelievably ordinary. But now I think they had said it right. In retrospect, their career best does seem to be ‘Zid’. Horror films are seemingly their forté, seeing their albums, but here they disappoint. And thoughh the newcomers do well, neither of their two songs will have a long life; they aren’t that strong either! So overall, the album is full of song that would not grip you, or shall I say would not ‘possess’ you?? 😀 👻👻

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aafreen > Rootha Kyun > Gumnaam Hai Koi > Tujhko Mein > Aaj Ro Len De

 

Which is your favorite song from 1920 London? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Cabaret, Chefs: Kaustav Narayan Niyogi, Munish Makhija & Tony Kakkar