THE REMAKE REBELLION CONTINUES! (BAAGHI 3 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Vishal-Shekhar, Rochak Kohli, Pranaay Rijia, Sachet-Parampara, Bappi Lahiri & René Bendali
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed, Tanishk Bagchi, Panchhi Jalonvi, Ginny Diwan, Gurpreet Saini, Gautam G. Sharma & René Bendali
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th March 2020
♪ Movie Released On: 6th March 2020

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Baaghi 3 Album Cover

Listen to the songs: JioSaavn | Gaana

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baaghi 3 is an Bollywood action film starring Tiger Shroff, Shraddha Kapoor, and Riteish DeshmukhThe film is directed by Ahmed Khan and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. Introduction to this film franchise is futile, everyone knows about it and everyone also knows how it is just stretching itself longer than it can hold. Ah, well, going by the reviews, I can see a ‘Baaghi 4’ has bleak prospects, but that is all the more reason for the filmmaker to actually make a ‘Baaghi 4’. Anyway, the film franchise boasted of an all-original album for the first film, followed by a bearable album for the sequel. Here comes the second sequel in the franchise, and in this age of remakes and recreations, I’m not surprised that the first four songs of ‘Baaghi 3’ are remakes! Hoots and cheers for the remake artist Tanishk Bagchi for handling two of these remakes, while Vishal-Shekhar successfully claimed rights to their song ‘Dus Bahane’ and remade it themselves, and Pranaay comes back to recreate his theme song that features in all ‘Baaghi’ films till now. As such, one awaits the original compositions by Sachet-Parampara and Rochak Kohli. Let’s see just how well this remake rebellion fares.


Vishal-Shekhar risk entering a multicomposer album in order to salvage their 2005 hit ‘Dus Bahane’ (Dus) which is the opening song for ‘Baaghi 3’. Dus Bahane 2.0 definitely lacks the punch that the original had, and just increasing the tempo of the original track makes the song sound a bit weird, making K.K. and Shaan’s voices sound highly processed. Tulsi Kumar’s portions are awkwardly low in pitch, and composed really uncreatively. That kind of makes me think if Vishal-Shekhar really did contribute any new melody to the remake or just asked Meghdeep Bose to create a ‘Vishal-Shekhar Mix’ or something, of the Tanishk Version. That being said, the beats are well placed, and the song works as a crowd-pleaser, since this is clearly what pleases the crowd these days.

Moving on to Tanishk’s actual remakes, he picks up yet another Bappi Lahiri classic after ‘Yaar Bina Chain Kahan Re’ was remade in ‘Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan’. This time ‘Ek Aankh Maarun’ (Tohfa) gets chosen to be recreated. The song’s catchphrase Bhankas becomes the title of the remake, and all that I notice in the first listen is the good choice of singers — Dev Negi and Jonita Gandhi. They bring the fun of the song to the forefront, and while Bagchi’s beats are just a modern mix of South kuthu beats with that 80s dhakkachika rhythm, the beats kind of work to the song’s favour. Songs like this do not really need their lyrics to be talked about, so I will do just that and go on to Tanishk’s next remake in the album, this time that of a foreign song, Do You Love Me by René Bendali. The song has already been remade by an English pop artist TroyBoi, and now T-Series picks it up for a Hindi reinterpretation. The Arabian setup isn’t new to Bollywood; we have had many original Hindi songs better than this, with the same musical setting. The new compositions with Hindi lyrics barely fit into the hook, but the creativity in the programming and beats makes it worth a listen. Nikhita gets not much space to shine, with very simplistic lines to sing, and before you know it, the song is thankfully over. Also, the Hindi lyricist for the new lyrics hasn’t been mentioned, so I’m guessing it is Tanishk.

Moving over to the franchise theme song by Pranaay, Get Ready to Fight Reloaded, which is probably the most ignored song from every ‘Baaghi’ album, but the makers still seem to be revamping it in hopes that it will get noticed by the audience this time around. The first time, it released as a single after the entire album released, so it went under the radar, while in the second album, it was very badly promoted. And this time, I finally do feel like it will get noticed. First of all, Pranaay packs it with a punch, and some interesting elements like EDM, electronic tablas, whistles, and a groovy beat coupled with Siddharth Basrur’s powerful vocals. The song doesn’t try too hard to be a ‘theme’, as in it doesn’t try too hard to do too much just to stick in the audience’s head, like the previous two versions of it, did. There is also a melodious antara to the song, and Ginny Diwan’s lyrics too make the song worthy of your attention. So this year, we saw the third version of ‘Bezubaan’ in ‘Street Dancer’ failing, but we get to see the third version of ‘Get Ready to Fight’, succeed in the same year. 🙂

Lastly, the two original, melodious songs of the album, one each by Sachet-Parampara and Rochak Kohli, two of the music composers that really impressed me with their original music last year. Sachet-Parampara follow their usual ‘Khwabfaroshi’ (Jabariya Jodi) and ‘Dilbara’ (Pati Patni Aur Woh) template in Faaslon Mein, a melancholic Bhatt-ish song that makes you wonder why nobody has taken them to Vishesh Films’ office yet. The piano, intense never-ending lines of singing, followed by a line of singing without any music in the background, and Parampara joining as background vocalist halfway through, the song contains all the standard elements of a Sachet-Parampara song, and that is scary — it means they have been typecast so soon into their career. The song ends with a brilliant strings piece accompanied by a chorus, and even though the composition seems underwhelming, at least Sourav Roy with his arrangements and Sachet with his vocals, have done a good job.

Rochak Kohli brings on board Shaan for his song Tujhe Rab Mana, getting him his second song in the album, if ‘Dus Bahane’ can be counted since it didn’t make him re-dub anything new. The song is a melodious ode to brotherhood, sort of like Rochak’s friendship anthems ‘Atrangi Yaari’ (Wazir) and ‘Tera Yaar Hoon Main’ (Sonu Ke Titu Ki Sweety). However, the song is musically set in a different space, intermediate to both of those aforementioned songs. Not as lively as the former, but not as melancholic as the latter, it finds its niche somewhere in the middle. The composition is sweet and uses the phrase “Tere jaisa yaar kahaan” in its lyrics, so that is enough to strike the brotherly string in Indians. 😂 Shaan delivers the piece with finesse, and Rochak aptly arranges strings, guitars and piano pieces to accompany the composition. However, I wouldn’t voluntarily go and listen to this song, it being around 5 minutes long.


As expected, ‘Baaghi 3’ relies on its remakes to propel it forward. And when the remakes actually do seem to be made and promoted with more efforts than the original tracks, it says a lot. Rochak and Sachet-Parampara’s songs are good but just that. The only great song was the ‘Get Ready to Fight’ remake by Pranaay. An album where not even one song is memorable.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5.5 + 6 + 5 + 7.5 + 6 + 6.5 = 36.5

Album Percentage: 60.83%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Get Ready To Fight Reloaded > Tujhe Rab Mana > Faaslon Mein = Bhankas > Dus Bahane 2.0 > Do You Love Me

Which is your favourite song from Baaghi 3? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

COMPLETELY REBELLIOUS!! (BAAGHI 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sandeep Shirodkar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Mithoon, Gourov-Roshin, Pranay M. Rijia, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Panjabi MC
♪ Lyrics by: Ginny Diwan, Javed Akhtar, Arko Pravo Mukherjee, Sayeed Quadri, Kumaar & Channi Khannewala
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 20th March 2018
♪ Movie Released On: 30th March 2018

Baaghi 2 Album Cover

 

Listen to the songs: Saavn

Buy the songs: iTunes


Baaghi 2 is a Bollywood action film (read comedy) starring Tiger Shroff, Disha Patani, Manoj Bajpayee, Prateik Babbar, Darshan Kumar, Randeep Hooda and Deepak Dobriyal in crucial roles. The film is directed by popular dance choreographer Ahmed Khan, and produced by Sajid Nadiadwala. If you remember, the first film (which I hated) had a quite likeable album, by Meet Bros., Amaal Mallik and Manj Musik. A “bonus” song by Pranay Rijia was released later. For this album, the music composers of the first film are completely forgotten, and except for Pranaay, they have all been replaced, by Sandeep Shirodkar, Gourov-Roshin, Arko Pravo Mukherjee and Mithoon. Now, I basically know that there will be a horde of remakes in this album, just by looking at the composers’ names — Sandeep Shirodkar and Gourov-Roshin have basically just created almost only remakes ever since they debuted. Arko and Mithoon’s songs do pique my interest, but nothing like “Oh, I’m so excited, I’m dying of excitement”.. nothing of that level. Anyway, let’s see just how well this album upholds the reputation (or demolishes it) of its predecessor.


Just because he has two songs, both remakes, Sandeep Shirodkar becomes lead composer for Baaghi 2. (It was Meet Bros. in ‘Baaghi’). His first remake is Mundiyan, a remake of Labh Janjua’s ‘Mundiyan Toh Bachke Rahi’. I must say, though, the song is quite enjoyable. Sandeep gets the Bhangra vibe right, and that’s the most important in such songs. Navraj Hans and Palak Muchhal make for some interesting vocals — especially Palak, who explores such songs once (okay, maybe twice, but not more) in a blue moon. She even raps! Navraj Hans is a vocal powerhouse as it is; there’s no use writing that he’s done well (it was taken for granted that he would). The one place Sandeep does mess up though, is the uncountable vocal breaks, disturbing proceedings many times, slowing down the pace of the song.
He doesn’t fare as well in his second song Ek Do Teen, remake of the song with the same name from ‘Tezaab’. Now, this is a very iconic song, not so much for its composition and music, (which was quite clichéd, if I may say so) than for Madhuri’s iconic moves on the dance floor. But even then, the flak the song is receiving is quite unjustified. Maybe it’s because the dance moves have been slaughtered (they have), or maybe it’s because the remake trend has achieved this abominable level these days. But the song isn’t that bad. Shreya substituting for Alka is a great decision; she sounds okay in the mukhda but amazing in the antaras. At least we haven’t gotten somebody like Neha Kakkar in charge of this song. The music is functional at best, with nothing remarkable in Sandeep’s new arrangements, except the easy-to-miss electric guitar riffs, and the spunky Bappi-ish disco sounds. Also, why does she only count till 20 here! That’s destroying the point of the song! 😂
Mithoon’s Lo Safar is a better result of his composition sung by Jubin Nautiyal, than the last one, which was ‘Tum Mere Ho’ (Hate Story IV). Here, at least, the composition isn’t overly sensuous, and not even trying to be. It is just a humble typical Mithoon melancholic melody, supposed to be a romantic song but playing more like a sad song. Jubin sings it well, and Mithoon’s arrangements consisting of nice guitar riffs, an amazing rap on many drums at the same time, and a serene flute, work wonders. Sayeed Quadri’s lyrics are just not the kind of lyrics he’s known for. Having written so many beautiful lyrics (especially the amazing ‘Ji Huzoori’ from ‘Ki & Ka’) for Mithoon, this should have been much better.
Gourov-Roshin’s Soniye Dil Nayi is also a remake of some T-Series pop single, whose credits on YouTube are so vague, they don’t credit the original composer, even in the video for the original song! The only good thing about this song, is that it doesn’t let Ankit Tiwari’s lazy voice get too much control over the song, because Shruti Pathak arrives at the right times to save us, with amazing aalaaps. Her portions are amazing, but the composition both of these singers have to sing is lazy, boring, dull and any other negative adjective you can think of. The composers try their best to ape Ankit’s composing style, so that his lines always end with us expecting a “Sunn Raha Hai Na Tu..” or a “Teri galliyan..” to follow. Too much said about this song.
The only composer repeated from ‘Baaghi’ is Pranaay Rijia, whose song ‘Get Ready To Fight’ from ‘Baaghi’ I neither reviewed nor heard (except in the movie) because it released late as a single track. Here he comes back to present Get Ready To Fight Again a song which you should be ready to fight again. That’s about it. I won’t tell you about the horde of singers roped in to sing a worthless song, and I won’t tell you about the actionless arrangements, even though this is probably the background song for when Tiger Shroff is showing off his stunts. This time the song gets a more folksy vocal treatment, thanks to Jatinder Shah’s vocals. Benny Dayal in the original song sounded terrible. (Let’s just put that out there since I hadn’t reviewed that.)
The best song of the album, more out of helplessness, than actually on its merit, is Arko’s O Saathi, a romantic melody sung by Atif Aslam, which fits perfectly into the Arko template of romantic songs. It might be a rehash of ‘Nazm Nazm’ (Bareilly Ki Barfi) and ‘Tere Sang Yaara’ (Rustom), with the exact same duff rhythm, and strings, and everything else, but it nevertheless sticks with you, because it is charming in spite of being heard before. Payal Dev’s humming lends the song a serene quality. The antara of the song is amazing; it follows a really unconventional composition, at least unconventional for Arko’s music. Atif sings it impeccably, especially the “Allah Mujhe” line. The hookline’s tune seemed forcibly stretched to cover about fifteen seconds of runtime each time it plays.. that’s about a minute that could’ve been spent in adding another antara! But I must say, Arko’s lyrics are beautiful, especially the mukhda!


While I still listen to ‘Baaghi’s music album sometimes even now, when I’m bored, I doubt I’ll listen to this album even one month from now. While “‘Baaghi’s album had zero remakes, this has four. While “‘Baaghi’s album was not a ‘BAAGHI’ (rebel) at all, this one totally is!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 7.5 + 6.5 + 7.5 + 5.5 + 4 + 8 =

Album Percentage: 65%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: O Saathi > Lo Safar = Mundiyan > Ek Do Teen > Soniye Dil Nayi > Get Ready To Fight Again

 

Which is your favourite song from Baaghi 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 04 (from Baaghi 2) = 10

MULTICOMPOSERS GIVE A HUGE, BUT NANHA-MUNNA ALBUM!! (MUNNA MICHAEL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Danish Sabri, Sabbir Khan & Tanishk-Vayu
♪ Music Label: Eros Music
♪ Music Released On: 21st June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st July 2017

Munna Michael Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Munna Michael is an upcoming Bollywood dance/action film starring Tiger Shroff, Nidhhi Agerwal and Nawazuddin Siddiqui in central roles. The film is directed by Sabbir Khan, and produced by Viki Rajani and Eros International. The film revolves around a dance competition, in which a vagabond played by Shroff decides to participate, until he is entangled into teaching the local villain how to dance, and they both fall in love with the same girl. So, the typical *yaaaaaawwwwwwwnnn* Bollywood plot. The music is by multiple composers, featuring songs by Tanishk Bagchi, Javed-Mohsin, Vishal Mishra, Pranay M. Rijia, Gourov-Roshin, Meet Bros. & Tanishk-Vayu. I’m not excited about anybody’s song particularly, except maybe Tanishk’s solo song and Tanishk’s song with his ex-co-composer Vayu, who he partnered up with again for this song after 2015’s smashing debut for them, ‘Banno’ (Tanu Weds Manu Returns), so let’s just see what the album is about and we might just get surprised!


1. Main Hoon

Singer ~ Siddharth Mahadevan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is a tribute to Michael Jackson, since the film is a dance film and the main character is probably an MJ fan, if we can deduce anything from his name. Tanishk’s composition is bland. Hookline is oddly-placed, but the Antara has a bearable tune. Arrangement and mixing are chaotic, as if Tanishk was adamant on using all techno sounds there are. The impactful vocals dont help either. Lyrics worth avoiding. When an oddly placed hook spoils almost the entire song!

Rating: 2/5

 

2. Ding Dang

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Antara Mitra, Rap by ~ Parry G, Shivi & Danish Sabri, Music by ~ Javed-Mohsin, Lyrics by ~ Danish Sabri & Sabbir Khan

A tribute to Jackie Shroff (atleast lyrically). The generic composition leaves you unflinched. Typical tapori arrangements with random backing vocals of “Aah-aah”. Both vocalists fail to make the song better, and the rappers fail miserably. Lyrics are cheap, trying-to-be-funny but failing miserably again. The hook lyrics make you go, “Sorry, what???” Ding dung?

Rating: 2/5

 

3. Pyar Ho

Singers ~ Vishal Mishra & Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A very soothing romantic composition but quite heard-before, and the arrangements too remind of some songs heard in the past. The strings, guitars and digital arrangement still win your heart, though. The composer himself has sung as if he wanted Arijit to have sung it and Arijit would have been apt. Sunidhi is her usual perfect self while Neeti Mohan seems to have done backing vocals, but hasn’t been credited! Lyrics are very staid and nothing new. Best of the album but nothing creative.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Swag

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya & Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

A very situational song for a performance of Nawazuddin’s character. And they have tried to make it sound so-called “cool”, but it doesn’t work much. That instrumental loop that keeps repeating throughout the song is catchy, and the digital beats are cool, but sound very similar to an English song that I can’t recall. Brijesh’s vocals are the fun part of the song, but Pranay’s interruptions could have been avoided. Lyrics are bad, again. Except for Brijesh and that instrumental loop, a forgettable song.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Beparwah

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Nandini Deb, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

This is one of Gourov-Roshin’s rare songs that are not recreations, and surprisingly, it starts off quite promisingly, in a retro-sounding prelude. The composition is still good, but a duration of six minutes is way too far-fetched, because the song is also very repetitive, and after one antara the song gets too boring. Arrangements are the same techno sounds that featured in the other songs, and many times in the past too. A rock interlude somewhere in the middle makes your ears bleed. Siddharth Basrur does a good job, but his cosinger, Nandini Deb, doesn’t impress. Again, lyrics are unimpressive. It is a song Hrithik Roshan should have got in 1999. 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Shake Karaan

Singers ~ Kanika Kapoor & Meet Bros., Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

I see the credits for this song.. and I prepare myself for another ‘Baby Doll’. And sure enough, those pop sounds and ladies shrieking feature in this song. I admit that the composition is catchy but not as much as previous Meet Bros-Kanika songs. The sound is a welcome change from the overpowering disco theme of the rest of the songs. Kanika’s voice is enjoyable as always. Lyrics continue to be the sloppiest they can be! A welcome change from the overbearing techno sounds of the album, but not innovative at all! 

Rating: 2.5/5

 

7. Feel The Rhythm

Singer ~ Rahul Pandey, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Pranay M. Rijia & Sabbir Khan

Pranay’s next song is actually quite impressive. The composition is a perfect example of a catchy MJ-ish tune, complete with glitzy arrangements that Pranay aces. The techno sounds here and the techno sounds in the other songs differ so much in the freshness quotient. This one is on the lines of ‘Iss Tarah’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu) and that’s how it impressed me. Rahul Pandey sings a bit like Yash Narvekar and Benny Dayal, and sings impressively too. Again, the lyrics are the usual. A nice and fresh-sounding dance song!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

8. Beat It Bijuriya

Singers ~ Asees Kaur & Renesa Baadchi, Music by ~ Tanishk-Vayu, Lyrics by ~ Tanishk-Vayu

Tanishk-Vayu return after two years (‘Banno’; ‘Tanu Weds Manu Returns’) with another folksy song, this time with a techno twist, obviously. The song has a very superficial tune, and hard to grip. Also it sounds inspired from Tanishk’s own ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ Title track. The arrangements match those of their first song; folksy harmonium, dhols and other techno sounds make for an entertaining listen. There’s an amazing fiddle interlude. Asees sings like never before, with a grunge in her voice in the hookline. The lyrics are a kind of funny Hinglish that I couldn’t grasp at once. Entertaining but limitedly.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

9. Pyar Ho (Redux)

Singer ~ Sunidhi Chauhan, Music by ~ Vishal Mishra, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Sunidhi sings this Redux of ‘Pyar Ho’ solo. It has a melancholic arrangement, with those slow and mellow piano notes, that gets quite boring to hear after some time. The strings are good enough though. Sunidhi’s solo rendition though, is a treat to the ears. The composition is the same, and the lyrics have been tweaked to make it sound sad. Not something I’d like to listen to often.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

10. Swag (Rebirth)

Singer ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Music by ~ Pranay M. Rijia, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar & Sabbir Khan

‘Swag’ had apparently died while the rest of the songs were playing, so its ‘Rebirth’ appears now. Now, whatever little elements ‘Swag’ had going for it, are all removed in this Rebirth. It has even been stripped of all melody (whatever little it had) and now sounds like a funky instrumental that makes you cringe because of the way Pranay chants those lines creepily. The arrangements are fresh here, but there’s nothing like a good tune or good vocals to accompany it. So that’s a wasted opportunity. I prefer the song in its last life.

Rating: 1.5/5


Munna Michael sounds like a very badly done ‘ABCD’ album. Then again, if ‘ABCD’ would’ve had such music, we wouldn’t have had a sequel. The overdose of (badly done) techno music really sounds useless. One song gets it right, but no others impress. When you can groove to only one song in a dance film’s album, the album’s got problems. Also, when a director or producer asks for “Give me one Kanika song, one tribute to Jackie Shroff, one to Michael Jackson, one funky Hinglish song, many wannabe retro songs”, the results are bound to be bad. ‘Munna’ is a name usually used for small kids. So may I say that these Munna Multicomposers failed miserably? 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 1.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 50%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pyar Ho = Feel The Rhythm > Swag = Beparwah = Shake Karaan = Beat It Bijuriya = Pyar Ho (Redux) > Main Hoon = Ding Dang > Swag (Rebirth)

 

Which is your favourite song from Munna Michael? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂