BHANSALI’S MUSICAL GRANDEUR!! (PADMAAVAT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sanjay Leela Bhansali
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Siddharth-Garima & Swaroop Khan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 21st January 2018
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th January 2018

Padmaavat Album Cover

 

Listen to the album: Saavn

Buy the album: iTunes


Padmaavat is an upcoming Bollywood period film starring Deepika Padukone, Shahid Kapoor and Ranveer Singh in lead roles, and Aditi Rao Hydari, Jim Sarbh, Raza Murad and Anupriya Goenka in supporting roles. The film is directed by Sanjay Leela Bhansali and produced by himself along with Sudhanshu Vats and Ajit Andhare. So the film has been in the news for the past three months and so, and as happy as I am that it is finally releasing, I can’t stop wondering what Bhansali himself must have gone through during all this. Anyway, on to the music. Bhansali had started off in ‘Khamoshi’ with a composer duo that was quite famous back then — Jatin-Lalit. With his next film though, he started to push debutants, and we got Ismail Darbar and Monty Sharma. However, with “Guzaarish”, he started composing his films’ music himself, and that tradition has carried on to his fourth film after “Guzaarish”. The results were phenomenal everytime he composed for a film himself, and I’m expecting, of course, this one to be no less!!


Before going into the songs, two things I notice immediately are how late the music has released, since music plays such an integral part of Bhansali’s films, and the second thing I notice is corollary to that — it has only six songs, breaking the usual Bhansali tradition of ten songs — it seems this movie hinges more on its script than its music. That being said though, the album is a treat for lovers of music from different regions! Now, let’s see how the songs fared for me.
The minor blemishes in Ghoomar (will get to them) are wisely covered up by an enticing Rajasthani folk chorus and arrangement, which doesn’t make it necessary to delve deeper into the song for any criticism. The starting and end chorus portions let by Swaroop Khan, complemented by the wonderful female chorus — Aditi Paul, Tarannum Mallik, Pratibha Baghel & Kalpana Gandharv, are brilliant and rich in their sound, grand as an SLB song can only be. The blemishes referred to earlier are mainly whenever Shreya goes into ultra-high pitch, as in the antara. Percussions are delightful, with the dhols and khartals stealing the show, and the subtle sarangi and shehnaai too, make their presence felt. The only other song on the album that sounds Rajasthan-based is Holi, a folk song of the Manganiyar and Langa communities. Richa Sharma’s stupendous rendition figures well amidst the Mughal-e-Azam-esque music, with Shail Hada’s wonderful Aalaaps making the Mughal-e-Azam-esque feeling stronger! The tablas and all other percussions too, for that matter, are wonderful here, as is the sitar, and even the wonderful peacock sounds.
The next part of the album sounds wholly and solely Middle-Eastern, in keeping with the Khilji Dynasty sound. Khalibali seems to be a celebratory number in the villain’s lair, where the villain is lovestruck at first sight of you-know-who. And if the film had been produced by Disney, the song would not have been out of place. Not that it is out of place here too, but can’t imagine Khilji dancing to this just as I couldn’t imagine Bajirao dancing to ‘Malhari’ until I saw it. The song itself is quite enjoyable, with an overbearing Balkan touch, and nice Arabic warbling in the backing chorus. Shivam Pathak has a nice time crooning the song, and gets the evilness of Khilji quite perfect. Shail Hada complements him well. I just don’t know why it starts like a song from a movie like “Robot”. The arrangements are great — the Arabic violins, percussions give it an enjoyable touch.
More enjoyable as a Middle-Eastern themed song is Binte Dil by Arijit, breaking the usual Arijit-SLB song stereotype. The warbling by Arijit here is amazing, but gets awkward after a point. The oud and percussions are well done. The song starts promisingly but slows down in the middle portions, where Arijit sounds strained. The compositions of both these Khilji songs are quite ho-hum too, frankly.
The other two songs fit neither in the Rajasthan category nor the Middle-Eastern themed category. That being said, Ek Dil Ek Jaan is a wonderful Sufi romantic number, sung wonderfully by Shivam Pathak, the lucky man who gets to sing for both the male leads. The song is highly propped on his vocals, because otherwise it is a typical SLB Raag yaman number, almost a mix of ‘Laal Ishq’ (Ram-Leela) and ‘Aayat’ (Bajirao Mastani) in equal proportions. The best of the album also features here; Nainowale Ne by Neeti Mohan is a wonderful romantic number, which is heavily inspired by classical music. Neeti’s rendition is one of her most cute yet mature renditions yet. Bhansali increases the song’s richness by adding wonderful musical arrangements like the sitar, santoor, peacocks (again), matka, and the beautiful backing chorus towards the end and in the interlude. The song is way too short, and I wish it were much, much longer!! Siddharth-Garima’s lyrics are beautiful too, with a mix of innocence and sensuousness.

On a concluding note, you might have noticed I wrote almost nothing  about the lyrics in the album — thats because barring Siddharth-Garima’s ‘Nainowale Ne’, the lyrics are nothing but the usual, run-of-the-mill material.


Not as intriguing as Bhansali’s other albums, but definitely has a place of its own, with so much musical richness in the arrangements!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:8.5 + 8.5 + 8 + 8 + 8 + 9.5 = 50.5

Album Percentage: 84.17%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order:  Nainowale Ne > Holi = Ghoomar > Khalibali = Ek Dil Ek Jaan = Binte Dil

 

Which is your favourite song from Padmaavat? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

NOVEMBER 2017 ROUND-UP #2 (QARIB QARIB SINGLLE, TUMHARI SULU, AKSAR 2 & DIL JO NA KEH SAKA – Mini Music Reviews)

NOVEMBER ROUND-UP #2

November 2017 Round-Up #2

This Round-Up covers the rest of the albums of the November 2017 releases. Due to ‘Padmavati’s withdrawal from the 1st December release date, ‘Firangi’ and ‘Tera Intezaar’, have moved their dates to 1st December, so they will be included in the December Round-Up. The albums featured in this post are:

1) Qarib Qarib Singlle – (Music: Vishal Mishra & Rochak Kohli)
2) Tumhari Sulu – (Music: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut & Santanu Ghatak)
3) Aksar 2 – (Music: Mithoon)
4) Dil Jo Na Keh Saka – (Music: Shail-Pritesh)



♦ Qarib Qarib Perrfect: QARIB QARIB SINGLLE Music Review

♪ Music by: Vishal Mishra, Rochak Kohli & Ali Merchant
♪ Lyrics by: Raj Shekhar & Hussain Haidry
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 10th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 10th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Relative newcomer Vishal Mishra gets two songs in the film, and I must say, these two songs are definitely going to consolidate his place in the industry, even though I think it had been consolidated right from the moment he debuted (that spark that a good debutant possesses is always discernible). I say so because both his songs can be counted as his Bollywood career’s best music as yet. The opening track, Khatam Kahani, is outright hilarious, putting to great use the Nooran Sisters’ folksy voices to concoct a song with a strong Rajasthani folk element, and still having an amazing melody. Harmonium, khartals and dholaks provide us with the required expense to travel to the land of kings. Raj Shekhar’s comic lyrics enhance the listening experience, and they are quite comparable to the lyrics of ‘Haanikaarak Bapu’ (Dangal), when the lovers agree to kill each other. 😃 After the delightful and upbeat folksy number, Vishal puts in extra effort to create a sad song that is just as soulful as the first song is peppy. Jaane De, though nothing that we’ve not heard before — the seven-beat rhythm, on Atif’s sugar-sweet vocals — is a treat to listen to, mostly thanks to Mishra’s amazing composition, not to mention Raj Shekhar’s excellence that reflects in the lyrics. The words have such a poetic twinge to them, it just calms the soul. Arrangements are soulful too — the guitars and tabla being most prominently beautiful. A nice Spanish guitar interlude is a perfect interval from the melancholia.
Rochak Kohli also gets to present two songs, the first a journey-based one, again with amazing lyrics by Hussain Haidry. The unexpected twist midway through the song really puts one off guard, but it is really innovative. The composition of the rest is quite pleasant, with a nice and groovy lilt to it, and Rochak Kohli presents it with a nice drumbeat. {He is quite good with drum beats — ‘Rozana’ from ‘Naam Shabana’ earlier this year was another song where he presented great drum work!} Papon’s feathery voice is perfect for the song. Rochak’s second song Tanha Begum, is at the peak of experimentation, and is probably the most experimental song I’ve heard this year so far, which is at the same time so entertaining. It is a clever take on Nawab Wajid Ali Khan’s classical song, ‘Baabul Mora’, which was also remade earlier this year in ‘Poorna’ by Salim-Sulaiman. This time though, Hussain Haidry’s lyrics give it a modern twist. Actually, the modern lyrics are interspersed with some very old-school lyrics, and the contrast is brought out even better with Antara Mitra handling the old-school parts with an amazing imitation of Suraiya, while Neeti Mohan handles the modern portions with an amazing rock template supporting her. Rochak’s composition for the whole song is different, and quote innovative: only the lyrics of the hook from the Nawab’s old song have been taken.
Ali Merchant steps in last moment to make a hastily-made Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup, which is probably the worst track on the album. Also, it is just a mashup of ‘Khatam Kahani’ and ‘Tanha Begum’. The beats are mismatching and don’t fit in with the folksy vibe of the songs. These two songs don’t even REQUIRE a remix!


An enjoyable album from two young composers, where both of them bring out the best in them! The album is (barring the mashup) Qarib Qarib Perrfect!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 5 + 4 + 4.5 + 1 = 19

Album Percentage: 76%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Jaane De > Khatam Kahani = Tanha Begum > Tu Chale Toh > Qarib Qarib Singlle Mashup

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 40 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Qarib Qarib Singlle) = 41

{Will have to count ‘Tanha Begum’ as a remake since I had counted ‘Baabul Mora’ (Poorna) as one}



♦ Light-Hearted Album Where the Mellow Song Scores High! : TUMHARI SULU Music Review

♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Guru Randhawa, Rajat Nagpal, Amartya Rahut, Santanu Ghatak, Laxmikant-Pyarelal & Haji Springer
♪ Lyrics by: Guru Randhawa, Javed Akhtar, Vayu Srivastava, Siddhant Kaushal & Santanu Ghatak
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 4th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


Remake specialist Tanishk Bagchi leads the album, with two out of the five songs. Since he is the currently in-demand remake specialist, it would be treason not to demand yet another rehash from him. This time, the song chosen is Mr. India’s ‘Hawa Hawai’, which has been named Hawa Hawai 2.0. If I’m not wrong though, this is Hawa Hawai 3.0 because Mikey McCleary remade it already in 2011. 😆 The song itself is peppy, and a perfect celebratory number. Kavita’s vocals being retained is the best part of the song, while I can’t figure out where Shashaa’s voice is. The composer plays around with technology and cleverly copies and pastes the gibberish bits into different parts in the song, creating an overall whimsical and enjoyable effect. His second song too, is, coincidentally, based on the metaphorical flying. Manva Likes To Fly is the standard Tanishk experimental song, where the composer plays around with technology to merge electronic sounds and Indian classical sounds. The classical instruments in particular here, sounds beautiful. Shalmali’s voice is perfect for the uplifting nature of the song, and Vayu Srivastava as usual writes positive lyrics that make you smile by default.
Next up is the much overrated, in my opinion, Ban Ja Rani, in which Guru Randhawa represents his pop song composed by Haji Springer, in a way that it doesn’t fit into the movie’s setting at all — but since when has that mattered? The whistling is the catchiest part in this song. Amartya Rahut too, in his song, Farrata, tries to create a nice and upbeat song complete with a children’s chorus (Adithyan leads and sounds very cute) and enjoyable ukuleles. However, the song fails to create an impact. Armaan Malik fails to make the song sound better, and the composition is many notches lower than what Amartya offered in the recent ‘Tu Hai Mera Sunday’.
What really grabbed my attention is newcomer Santanu Ghatak’s Rafu, a beautiful semiclassical number, which really gave me the goosebumps. Written as soulfully as it has been composed, and sung just as beautifully by Ronkini Gupta, who has sung previously in ‘Aankhon Dekhi’ under the music direction of Sagar Desai. She is a voice to counter Kaushiki Chakraborty’s classical singing prowess.


This blend of music directors manages to provide the film it’s required happy-go-lucky touch, although very superficial. It is ironically the most mellow song, by debutant Santanu, that steals the show.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.5 = 18

Album Percentage: 72%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rafu > Manva Likes To Fly > Hawa Hawai 2.0 > Ban Ja Rani = Farrata

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 41 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Tumhari Sulu) = 42


♦ Aksar Sune Huye Gaane: AKSAR 2 Music Review

♪ Music by: Mithoon
♪ Lyrics by: Sayeed Quadri
♪ Music Label: Tips Music
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


The only song from the album that stands out right away is Aaj Zid, a wonderful romantic song with a groovy techno rhythm. Mithoon proves he is not only able to just make addictive romantic songs, but also club numbers. Well we knew that if you remember ‘Woh Ajnabee’ from his earlier days. Arijit sings wonderfully, and it is all in all a very nice and upbeat song, without letting go of the sensuality that should be a part of such a film’s music. The other two songs are the usual pathos-filled Bhatt-ish songs I have started to get afraid of hearing nowadays. Jaana Ve is so crybaby-ish, it is sad, and Arijit’s voice being auto tuned in the hookline is sad too, because he is a singer who doesn’t need autotuning! The antara of the song gives signature Mithoon goosebumps though! About Tanhaiyaan, the lesser said, the better. Pakistani pop is one genre which composers never experiment with, and present it as it is every single time. Here too, the fake emotions fail to penetrate our eardrums and touch the heart. The album is not even magnificent lyrically, which I would usually expect from a Sayeed Quadri-written album! But he seems to have moulded in with the stereotypical Bhatt setting as well.


An album which we have ‘Aksar’ heard. Definitely not as good as Himesh’s album to the first film.

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 3 + 2 = 9

Album Percentage: 60%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Aaj Zid > Jaana Ve > Tanhaiyaan



♦ Shail-Pritesh Sarbjit Mein Jo Kar Sake, Yahaan Nahin Kar Sake!: DIL JO NA KEH SAKA Music Review

♪ Music by: Shail-Pritesh
♪ Lyrics by: A.M. Turaz, Devshi Khanduri & Sandeep Singh Kamboj
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 7th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 17th November 2017

Listen to the songs: Saavn
Buy the songs: iTunes


With the title track of Dil Jo Na Keh Saka, I find that Shail Hada has lost that magic touch that used to be present in his voice until ‘Sarbjit’; he sounds terribly off tune in some places, while his co-singer, Shreya Ghoshal has been terribly miscast, and tries to fit into the mould of the song but fails. Shail-Pritesh’s composition is quite the typical 90s romantic song, and so fails to create much impact. However, the duo gets it amazingly right in the much more breezy and pleasant Bandh Khwabon Ki, in which Shail Hada thankfully returns to normal, barring some places. The composition here is thankfully, more contemporary and relatable. The finger snaps are really enjoyable, and the guitars are refreshing too.
Going to the retro portion of the album, Khwabon Ko Ankhon Mein is an enjoyable jazz number, and soulful too. The piano is splendid, as is the brass portion, because if the brass in jazz is bad, then it isn’t jazz. Aditi Paul sings beautifully too, touching the high notes effortlessly. The last romantic song on the album, Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhunde Dil, is a pleasant and breezy love ballad, again, a bit more inclined towards the previous decade than the current. Nevertheless, it provides for a fun couple of listens, after which its beauty kind of wears off. Jubin handles the vocals well, and with the 90s-ish composition and his voice, it sounds like a runaway song from ‘Kaabil’. The guitars are good here too, and very simple. Aditi Paul has less to do here, so she pales in comparison to Jubin. Obviously.
Out of the upbeat songs, Band Viyah Da Baje, builds on Shail-Pritesh’s earlier ‘Tung Lak’ (Sarbjit), but still manages to turn out enjoyable — Divya Kumar & Pratibha Baghel with their energetic voices infuse life into the complicated composition — surprisingly the first really complicated tune on the album, and intricacy is the thing Shail-Pritesh and their mentor Sanjay Leela Bhansali are known for! The ‘Tung Lak’ hangover stays till the end though, especially in the female portions. The second upbeat song, Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai, is a youthful club song with a very avoidable composition and just as avoidable vocals. It turns out to be the worst on the album!


Shail-Pritesh can do much better than this, but I guess they are much, much better at those classical melodies like they presented in ‘Sarbjit’, and they must stick to that!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 58.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bandh Khwabon ki = Band Viyah Da Baje = Khwabon ko Aankhon Mein > Tanha Tanha Ghum Ke Dhundhe Dil > Dil Jo Na Keh Saka > Nadaniyan Kar Jaati Hai



So that’s it for November, stay tuned for the Monthly Awards, which will be up in a moment!

SILENCE MAKES THE MOST SHORGUL! (SHORGUL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Niladri Kumar & Lalit Pandit
♪ Lyrics by: Kapil Sibal, Sameer Anjaan & Alok Ranjan Jha
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 13th June 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 24th June 2016

Shorgul Album Cover

Shorgul Album Cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hear the full songs of this album on YouTube:


Shorgulis an upcoming Bollywood thriller drama starring Jimmy Sheirgill, Ashutosh Rana, Sanjay Suri, Narendra Jha, Hiten Tejwani, Eijaz Khan, Aniruddh Dave & Suha Gezen. The film is directed by Jitendra Tiwari P. Singh, and produced by Swatantra Vijay Singh & Vyas Verma. The music has been composed by veteran music composer Lalit Pandit, of the Jatin-Lalit duo. After parting ways with his brother, Jatin Pandit, their last memorable work being ‘Fanaa’, Lalit has composed for many films like ‘Besharam’, ‘Dulha Mil Gaya’, ‘Spark’, ‘Life Mein Kabhie Kabhiee’ and of course, his most memorable solo work, ‘Munni Badnaam Hui’ from ‘Dabangg’. The composer has composed three songs out of four, for the album, and I’m looking forward to hear what he has to offer. Behind the fourth track, (technically the first, according to the track listing) is the hand of the famous Indian sitar player, classical and fusion musician, Niladri Kumar, as guest composer. He has worked with many Bollywood music directors such as A.R. Rahman, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Pritam, M.M. Kreem, Vishal Bhardwaj & Sajid-Wajid. The sitars and zitars you heard in songs like ‘Chup Chup Ke’ (Bumty Aur Babli), ‘Alvida’ (Life In A… Metro), ‘Crazy Kiya Re’ (Dhoom 2), ‘Dagabaaz Re’ (Dabangg 2), ‘Dheere Jalna’ (Paheli) and ‘Naina Thag Lenge’ (Omkara), have been played by this very maestro. Having played in such noteworthy songs for so many years, the man has decided to come to the forefront by composing for this movie, his first song in a Bollywood album. His first album was for the Kannada movie ‘Niruttara’, whose songs released just about a week ago. The mere names of the composers have drawn me towards this album, and so I’m expecting a lot from it. Let us see how much shor-gul (publicity/noise/excitement) this album is able to create!!


1. Tere Bina

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals by ~ Awaaz Children’s Choir & Jonita Gandhi, Music by ~ Niladri Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Kapil Sibal

The album is started off by the sitar maestro, Niladri Kumar. Niladri very aptly ropes in Arijit Singh to sing his song, which is a scintillating love ballad with all the right notes put together perfectly into a soothing blend, resulting in a calm and lovely romantic song. Naturally, the song is totally raaga-based, and with Niladri on board, this was expected. The composer has created a very lulling and tranquil atmosphere, something that will calm you down so much, that you will forget all of your stress, and just drown into the sea of the music. The raaga-inspired, very mature, composition reminds me of earlier this year’s ‘Sab Dhan Maati’ (Jai Gangaajal), which was also raaga-based, and sung by Arijit, but was conceptualised by Salim-Sulaiman. Anyway, before I go off on a tangent, the soothing composition lulls you to sleep, and at the same time, refreshes you so much. The arrangements are beautiful, blissful and heavenly. Nothing better could have been expected. Piano leads gracefully, while wonderful synthetic beats help to give you a beat to tap your feet and snap your fingers to. Of course, Niladri has placed wonderful zitars throughout the song, and this is what makes it sound ever-so-euphoric. The strings (violins) graciously support the backing arrangements. Guitars (Warren Mendonsa) are easy to miss, but do well in their portions. What’s special about the song is the polished voice of Arijit Singh, who hasn’t really sung such a beautiful song since a long time. His classical training has paid off here, and he stuns with the effortlessness with which he has sung the minute details and nuances in the song. What’s more, the makers of the film have employed a choir of underprivileged girls, trained by Arjun Nair, Prince Mulla, Jennifer Bansode and Samira Kelkar for not less and not more than 30 days, after which they got to feature in the same track as Arijit. What is more godlike than giving underprivileged kids a chance to feature on a Bollywood song? This was a great step played by the makers of the movie, and the girls sound awesome in the track; they sing both in the beginning as well as towards the end of the song. Jonita as a backing vocalist, doesn’t have much scope to shine, but if you pay attention, she sounds perfect with her classical rendition, and it has left me longing for a solo version by her! Kapil Sibal, on his third Bollywood film as lyricist after “Bandook” and “Dilli Gang”, writes beautiful lyrics, and must think of becoming a full-time Bollywood composer! 😀 The words are like a ghazal and sound ravishing. Something that has given me the goosebumps, something that will do nothing but surprise you a lot! Arijit’s top-class rendition of Niladri’s invigorating composition makes this song a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Shaam O Seher

Singer ~ Vishal Mishra, Music by ~ Lalit Pandit, Lyrics by ~ Sameer AnjaanLalit steps into the album with the next song, another romantic song. This time, the song has signs of a budding romance. Its light and happy-go-lucky mood tells you that. The innocence of the romance contrasts the mature romantic song that we heard just before this. lalit does quite well with the composition, considering that he was a composer in the 90s, and most of them have not evolved with time. However, Lalit has evolved, and that is evident the breeze of fresh air which is this song. The composition is easy on the ears and it easy for a typical Bollywood listener to get attracted to it, as well as the ones wanting something different. The hookline is really breezy. The arrangements are pleasant as well, with the regular, but functional combination of guitars and strings to set up the romantic atmosphere. Beats are synthetic here as well, and sound good. The rhythm is a pleasant one, which instantly makes you move to it. The whistling at the end sounds very cute, as well. The singer, Vishal Mishra, is perfect with his rendition. He sounds like Jubin Nautiyal at places, Ash King at other places, Javed Ali at others, and even Arijit sometimes, yet his voice appeals to the ears. Sameer’s lyrics are on the typical Bollywood lines, with the hookline going into very templated territory. Nevertheless, the composition makes everything valid. A pleasing and innocent romantic song, which is fortunately NOT sung by Shaan!!!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Mast Hawa

Singer ~ Pratibha Singh Baghel, Music by ~ Lalit Pandit, Lyrics by ~ Kapil Sibal

The third song on the album is a bigger evidence of how much Lalit has evolved to match up to the current generation. Lalit has tried to  present a song that would normally have been given a desi touch with dhols, and the like, in a totally different manner. He has given a hip-hop touch, which turns out to be a saviour for an otherwise average song. The composition makes it clear that it is an item song, but the arrangements totally contradict its nature. The composition is very amateurish, with the hookline repeating for over half of its duration. The mukhda is formed by the hookline repeating for an infinite number of times, and the antara fails to gain our attention. The hip-hop beats will remind you of Salim-Sulaiman’s ‘Dance Pe Chance’ (Rab Ne Bana Di Jodi). However, the arrangements are what makes the song listenable at least once. Lalit has infused a beautiful techno-desi fusion and tried something new, something I think he has never tried before. The techno sounds are what get you grooving, and the very captivating flute entraps you. The guitars provide a nice riff in the antaras. The second interlude is stolen by a harmonium, which is very appealing. Pratibha renders the composition quite decently. I mean, there is no other way she could’ve sung it, so it works, though it isn’t excellent. She is better in soft songs, I feel. I also feel this was a song Lalit must’ve made keeping Sunidhi in mind. Kapil’s lyrics are not so good here, so I don’t know if he should still take up the idea of being a full-time lyricist. Arrangements save the song, which otherwise suffers from a weak composition, lyrics and vocals!

 

4. Baroodi Hawa

Singer ~ Aishwarya Nigam, Music by ~ Lalit Pandit, Lyrics by ~ Alok Ranjan Jha

After a ‘Mast Hawa’, here comes the ‘Baroodi Hawa’. The song isn’t really like its title. On reading the title, I was under the impression that the song is an upbeat number. If you look at it, it is one, but not in the way you must be thinking. The song is a pathos-filled rock number, full of melancholia. The composition is yet again, quite decent, but not exactly instantly appealing, either. The pace is pretty slow for it to make an impact, but it definitely makes you emotional for as long as it plays. The arrangements are common Bhatt arrangements with rock guitars, drums and intense percussion. A backing choir impresses in the song. Aishwarya, a singer who I’ve heard mostly singing upbeat desi songs for Lalit, like ‘Munni Badnaam Hui’ (Dabangg) and ‘Tere Mohalle’ (Besharam), has moulded himself into this mode for the first time, and actually does great!! However, here he doesn’t sound as much like his namesake, Sonu Nigam, as he did in every other song he sang. The hookline isn’t too imposing, but it isn’t appealing at all. Alok’s lyrics are pretty good, though. They carry the melancholia to the listener very well. The song as a whole serves its purpose and I have to admit that, but it lacks in the composition and innovation department! Still, a pleasant song from Lalit! Not bad, but not great. Quite decent.


Shorgul has a surprise enclosed in the form of a wonderful classical gem by sitarist Niladri Kumar. He scores full marks with his single song on the album. Lalit Pandit, too performs decently, but he has undercooked the songs just a bit, otherwise, they would’ve turned out great as well. The silent songs in this album, would make more ‘shorgul’ as opposed to the ones that should! 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Bina > Shaam O Seher > Baroodi Hawa > Mast Hawa

 

Which is your favourite song from Shorgul? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

NOT A TYPICAL DHARMA DULHANIA! (HUMPTY SHARMA KI DULHANIA – Music Review)

Album Details:-

♪ Music by:- Sharib-Toshi, Sachin-Jigar, Badshah, The Titans & Jawad Ahmed
♪ Lyrics by:- Irshad Kamil, Kumaar, Shashank Khaitan, Badshah & Ahmad Anees
♪ Music Label:- Sony Music
♪ Music Released On:- 16th June 2014
♪ Movie Releases On:- 11th June 2014

Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania Album Cover

Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania is Karan Johar’s next production under his production house Dharma Productions. Again they are introducing a new director Shashank Khaitan for this film. The film stars the ‘Student of The Year’ Jodi Alia Bhatt and Varun Dhawan. The movie is a romantic comedy set in Punjab. Siddharth Shukla is playing an important role in the film too. The music of the film has been given by Sharib and Toshi Sabri, and Sachin-Jigar. Both of the duos are working with Dharma for the first time, and I was eager to know what they come up with for a film with such a quirky name. All the composers have always given their best while working for Dharma. I was hoping for the same with these two duos as well. Turns out that two of Sharib-Toshi’s songs have been recreated by them, with only one original. Sachin-Jigar have composed three songs. So let’s see how the songs of this album are!


1. Saturday Saturday:- Singers ~ Indeep Bakshi, Badshah & Akriti Kakkar ; Original Lyrics by ~ Badshah, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar ; Original Music by ~ Badshah & The Titans, Recreated by ~ Sharib-Toshi

This song is a club song which was released two years ago. Well, Sharib-Toshi say they have “recreated” it. We should believe them, shouldn’t we? Even though the song sounds exactly the same in terms of musical arrangements, we should call it a recreation! I mean come on! They’ve worked SO HARD to “compose” the Akriti part, right! Well turns out the song has no changes whatsoever in arrangements and tune, but Sharib-Toshi have just told Kumaar to write some lyrics to the same tune for a single paragraph and gotten Akriti to sing that. Kumaar has written the lyrics of the new paragraph suiting the mood of the song — Punjabi club — and Akriti sings it well, but seriously, Karan Johar didn’t need to call them just for that. :/ Badshah and The Titans have composed an efficient club song and if the makers of the film needed a female part in it, they could have just asked Badshah, why trouble the “oh so busy” Sharib-Toshi? 😛 Okay, sorry, now I will review the song actually, but all the credit will go to Badshah and the Titans. They have as I said composed an efficient club song with awesome techno and electronic beats, and In deep Bakshi has sung it well. The rap by Badshah is also good and catchy. The only problem I had with it was that they seem to be saying “Sachurday” and emphasizing on the “t” in Saturday a bit too much, with an American accent, that doesn’t sound so good in a Punjabi song frankly. 😛 The song is nevertheless a hit, so it doesn’t matter that much whether I liked it, and you should definitely listen to it!

 

2. Samjhawan:- Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shreya Ghoshal ; Original Lyrics by ~ Ahmad Anees, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar ; Original Music by ~ Jawad Ahmed, Recreated by ~ Sharib-Toshi

Sharib-Toshi return with another “recreated” track, this time of a famous Punjabi song from the Punjabi movie ‘Virsa’ and the song was sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan originally, and composed by Jawad Ahmed. Of course, this time Sharib-Toshi have decided to actually make the song a bit different from the original. Though they have not changed the tune, they have made it more suitable for the Bollywood audiences, by replacing Rahat sahab with Arijit, the nation’s current musical heartthrob, and adding the female singer as Shreya Ghoshal. Again, some lyrics have also been altered to cater to the Bollywood audiences, by changing some Punjabi words to Hindi. The song has been recreated very beautifully, and unlike ‘Saturday Saturday’, it actually sounds great, whatever they have done to recreate the track. Arijit has sung the song very soulfully, but of course he couldn’t match up to the sukoon level which Rahat sahab’s voice has. Shreya was supposed to sing just an interlude as per the old song, but she gets a whole extra paragraph to sing. And that paragraph which Shreya sings, is like a treat to all music lovers. She will amaze you with her voice, like she might have already done ‘n’ number of times till now, but she will amaze you yet again! The music has also been recreated very effectively. The harmonium part which plays many times in the song is just awesome, and after the song ends with that harmonium piece, it will leave you wanting more. A must-listen recreation! Almost flawless recreation of a superhit Punjabi track! #5StarHotelSong!! 

 

3. Daingad Daingad:- Singers ~ Divya Kumar, Pratibha Baghel, Deepali Sathe, Akriti Kakkar, Udit Narayan & Niharika Sinha, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar

With this song, Sachin-Jigar enter into the soundtrack with the first original song of the soundtrack. Looking at the never ending list of singers, I was expecting a great dhinchak type track, but what I got missed my expectations terribly. A wannabe ‘London Thumakda’ or ‘Kikli Kalerdi’ (Luv Shuv Tey Chicken Khurana) track, which just sounds like a mishmash of sentences and lines of different songs put together, this track fails terribly in whatever it wanted to achieve. Unless it wanted to annoy you. 😛 Sachin-Jigar have tried to make a wedding song and note that I have used the term “tried to” as in they haven’t succeeded in doing so. The two prime reasons to attempt this track are:- a) because you want to hear Udit Narayan’s voice after a long time since he only sings in Dharma films nowadays or b) because you’re hearing it for the first time, whicisare probably the only two reasons to hear it, because frankly speaking, after you hear it once, you might not play it again unless you are compelled to do so, for some reason! The lyrics by Irshad Kamil aren’t that impressive either, and out of the seven singers, only the known ones that is Divya, Akriti and Udit Narayan do well, others annoy. They sound like old aunties, which is probably the situation in the movie. The arrangements are very less, and not attractive at all. A mediocre song, with weak lyrics and average vocals. Listen at your own risk.

 

4. Lucky Tu Lucky Me:- Singers ~ Benny Dayal, Anushka Manchanda, Lyrics by ~ Shashank Khaitan, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar

Here is the second song by Sachin-Jigar, and along with being the second song by them, it is also the second club song in the same film. This one is also very catchy, but totally dependent on the video. The part from ‘banda main bachelor..’ till the title of the song comes has a very nice tune. Sachin-Jigar, who are the best nowadays at electronic music, have composed a good tune and the arrangements are also awesome. Benny Dayal must be so accustomed to singing such songs till now and he must have been the first choice for this song, too. If any composers are making club songs, by default they should call Benny first, because he is an expert at these now. Anushka, who has a small part, also sounds good, but I don’t know why her voice never reaches to us in its original form, and is always altered. The song is a good club song, but it won’t attract many listeners as an individual song, and will work mostly with the picturization. Lyrics by the director himself are perfect for the song, and Varun’s rap is also commendable. Give it an attempt, there’s nothing to regret!

 

5. Emotional Fool:- Singer ~ Toshi Sabri, Backing Vocals ~ Geet Sagar, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Music by ~ Sharib-Toshi

Sharib-Toshi re-enter the album with their first original track of the album, which strikes the right chord. They have composed a fun, romantic/peppy track, with interesting lyrics by Kumaar, and great arrangements. That is just for the mukhda. The song loses its charm in the antaras which follow. Toshi’s voice sounds great singing this composition, and the techno beats are catchy, but the catchiness and good stuff fall apart in the antaras, and aa great start gets wiped away by the subsequent antaras and disappoint. Nevertheless, the song provides entertainment and I guess that is what matters. Entertaining and disappointing at the same time!

 

6. D Se Dance:- Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Shalmali Kholgade, Backing Vocals ~ Anushka Manchanda, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil, Music by ~ Sachin-Jigar

Right from the moment it starts, you will get reminded of the superhit ‘Balam Pichkari’ from ‘Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani’ because of the harmonium arrangements along with the dholaks. When the singers kick in, the small feeling of resemblance to ‘Balam Pichkari’ becomes a certainty. The use of the same arrangements with the same singers, is something never to be done if the first song isn’t composed by you. Sachin-Jigar have done exactly what I have stated not to do. Irshad Kamil’s lyrics are also okay. Though the song will surely make you dance along, it doesn’t have that special ingredient which other Dharma dance songs have. The vocals are great, but again bear a big resemblance to ‘Balam Pichkari’, and though that isn’t a huge problem, but pretty unsafe to be so close to such a big hit song. Of course, Sachin-Jigar’s electronic touches are present throughout the song. Another average song, which is catchy but not up to the Dharma standards.


Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania is an album from which everyone had a lot of expectations. With each film, Dharma was giving superhit music up till now, and from this film, everyone was expecting even more. On top of that, it was Sachin-Jigar and Sharib-Toshi’s first time working with the big production house. Last year Pritam showed us his ability to compose for Dharma. Amit Trivedi succeeded in composing his first full album for Dharma in 2012 with ‘Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu’. Ajay-Atul had showed us their versatility when working with Dharma for the first time. Vishal and Shekhar time and time again show us their comfort in composing for Dharma, it is like their second home. However, I have to say that these two duos have not taken advantage of this opportunity. They have produced very ordinary songs, which could as well have been for any film, and not a Dharma film. Considering the standard of music which Dharma was known for, this album is simply a disgrace. Otherwise, it is an okay album. Both duos have delivered good songs but of course these good songs did have the scope to have been way better. It is definitely not a typical Dharma album, because Dharma albums are known for their repeat value, and in this album, very few so gs have that quality! So I conclude by saying that Sachin-Jigar and Sharib-Toshi did not make well use of the great opportunity which they had got and they have given to the world, the worst album ever in the history of Dharma films!

 

Final Rating for This Album:- सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी

Note:- The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

 

Which is your favourite song from Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania? Vote for your favourite! 🙂

 

Next “dish”:- Bobby Jasoos, Chef:- Shantanu Moitra