5 SONGS THAT SHOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN REMADE!! (MUSICAL LIST #1)

So today marks the start of a new section in the blog — The “LISTS” Section, where I’ll be listing songs based on one particular theme, depending on what theme I’m feeling like listing songs about. :p

What better way to start this section off, than doing it in collaboration with one of my close blogger friends, Jemma Rajyaguru from the Girl At The Piano blog! Her blog is full of random musical thoughts, lists of songs, throwbacks to the Golden Era of Bollywood music, and new releases by new and upcoming artists!

Today, we will both be listing five songs each, which we wish would never have been remade! And yes, after reading my list, be sure to read Jemma’s, as her song choices are just as exciting, if not more exciting, than mine!! Correction: they definitely are more exciting!😁 So let’s get started with my five songs so you can check her list out! 🙂 If you want to check it out now though, here it is!

P.S.: I believe no song should be remade, but these are the ones where I just don’t agree with the remake!

P.P.S: These are in no particular order; it isn’t a Top5 list 🙂


1. Mere Rashke Qamar (Pop Song by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan)

• Original Song Details:

Music by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Lyrics by Ustad Qamar Jalalvi, Sung by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, First Performed in 1988, Music Label: Hi-Tech Music

• Remake Details:

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by Fana Buland Shehri & Manoj Muntashir, Sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Tulsi Kumar, Used in 2017 Bollywood film ‘Baadshaho’, Music Label: T-Series

One would think that nephew Rahat Fateh Ali Khan would object to mauling his uncle’s gem of a qawwali, but instead, he helps maul it even more, with loud and screechy vocals that would even make the laziest person cringe. Tanishk Bagchi’s constant mandolin hook doesn’t help when it keeps repeating itself all the time amidst the din of Rahat and the backing vocalists shouting.


2. Dum Maaro Dum (Hare Rama Hare Krishna; 1971)

• Original Song Details

Music by R.D. Burman, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Asha Bhosle, for the 1971 Bollywood film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’, Music Label: Saregama

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Pritam Chakraborty, New Lyrics by Jaideep Sahni, Sung by Anushka Manchanda, for the 2011 Bollywood film ‘Dum Maaro Dum’, Music Label: T-Series

One of the party songs I doubt Pritam is proud of making, ‘Dum Maaro Dum’ stands high as a song that ruined the original for me big time. Yes, a lot of cool stuff is going on in the music, but the major letdown is Anushka Manchanda’s vocals, where they create a mess of what Asha Bhosle ji and R.D. Burman actually created in the 70s. And don’t even ask me about the rap.


3. Tu Cheez Badi Hai Mast (Mohra; 1994)

• Original Song Details

Music by Viju Shah, Lyrics by Anand Bakshi, Sung by Udit Narayan & Kavita Krishnamurthy, for the 1994 Bollywood film ‘Mohra’, Music Label: Venus Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Tanishk Bagchi, New Lyrics by Shabbir Ahmed, Sung by Udit Narayan & Neha Kakkar, for the 2017 Bollywood film ‘Machine’, Music Label: T-Series

Probably the best remake on the list, but again, Tanishk stuck to his mandolin template here, where he kept repeating the hook of the song on mandolin, and though Neha Kakkar sounds passable, Udit Narayan seems to be the saving grace of the song, sounding younger than ever. The awkward dubstep mid way through the song is just *awkward*!


4. Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas (Blackmail; 1973)

• Original Song Details

Music by Kalyanji-Anandji, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan, Sung by Kishore Kumar, for the 1973 Bollywood film ‘Blackmail’, Music Label: Universal Music

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by Rajendra Kishan retained, Sung by Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neumann Pinto, for the 2016 Bollywood film ‘Wajah Tum Ho’, Music Label: T-Series

Arijit himself wasn’t happy with the way Abhijit Vaghani programmed his voice in this one; and I can’t help but agree! How would you like it if you got to remake a song by the legendary Kishore Kumar, and get your voice all destroyed by electronic touches? To complement Arijit’s bad voice, we had Tulsi Kumar, who surprisingly sounded better!


5. Waqt Ne Kiya Kya Haseen Sitam (Kaagaz Ke Phool; 1959)

• Original Song Details

Music by S.D. Burman, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi, Sung by Geeta Dutt, for the 1959 Bollywood film ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’, Music Label: Saregama-HMV

• Remake Details

Music recreation by Rohan-Vinayak, Lyrics by Kaifi Azmi retained, Sung by Amitabh Bachchan, for the 2018 Bollywood film ‘102 Not Out’, Music Label: Saregama

The most recent remake on the list. One would think Amitabh Bachchan ji would be a bit more sensitive when singing old classics as these, but sadly, he drones the song out in such a way, that you wonder “Waqt ne Kiya, kya Haseen sitam”. Rohan-Vinayak literally do nothing but stand and watch as they treat the listeners to almost six minutes of that torture without any enjoyable music in the background either!!


Well, all in all, I feel recreations were fine until they started to be blown out of proportion and being forced into every single album that Bollywood produced. Thanks to Jemma for giving me the mauka and dastoor to vent out my feelings about remakes; I hope you guys enjoyed our collaboration, and please make sure to check out Jemma’s list (it’s amazing)!

Thanks for reading, and stay tuned for more such lists about varied topics! 😁

NOTHING ROYAL ABOUT THE ALBUM!! (BAADSHAAHO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Tanishk Bagchi, Ankit Tiwari, Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Cafe, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, A1 Melody Master – Fana, Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Sahir Ludhianvi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 19th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 1st September 2017

Baadshaho Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Baadshaho is an upcoming crime action thriller, starring Ajay Devgn, Emraan Hashmi, Vidyut Jammwal, Ileana D’Cruz, Esha Gupta and Sanjay Mishra in lead roles. The film is directed by Milan Luthria, and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Milan Luthria. The film follows the story of a gold robbery from a train in the 1970s. The music album is yet another of those albums produced by T-Series wherein a load of people have been hired to remake songs. Here too, we have three remakes, two by Tanishk Bagchi, and one by Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Café, who remake Saint Kabir’s songs. Ankit Tiwari has done the last song, and it is an original song. Let’s see just how un-royal this album is.


1. Mere Rashke Qamar / Mere Rashke Qamar (Female Version) / Mere Rashke Qamar (Remix)

Singers ~ Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan / Tulsi Kumar / Rahat Fateh Ali Khan & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Additional Vocals by ~ Shabab Sabri & Altamash Faridi, Original Composition by ~ Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ A1 Melody Master – Fana & Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir, Remix by ~ DJ Chetas

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan’s Qawwali that has suddenly gotten a popularity spurt, had to be remade in a Bollywood film, and it happens to be this one. It appears in three versions. Tanishk ropes in Rahat, which is an apt decision, but nevertheless, the song is a letdown. Rahat sings in a very painfully high-pitched voice, and Tanishk gives it a very modern and digital based arrangement, making the song lose its soul. And those backing vocalists are just a pain to the ears. Tulsi Kumar’s version is surprisingly less high-pitched and hence less harsh to the ears. But the backing vocalists ruin it again. DJ Chetas’ remix is abominable. The lyrics have been modified to make it more Bollywoodish, but it gets more boring and tedious. The most tedious and loud romantic song ever!

Rating: 2/5 for Rahat Version, 2.5/5 for Tulsi Version, 1/5 for Remix

 

2. Piya More

Singers ~ Neeti Mohan & Mika Singh, Music by ~ Ankit Tiwari, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Ankit’s only song in the album is an item song, which features Emraan Hashmi with Sunny Leone. The composer has used the composition of his old song ‘Nasha Sar Pe Chadke Bole’ (Dee Saturday Night), and made it, and that had a very nice 50s-ish sound in the hookline. However, legal issues followed, and he changed the hook tune, making it sound so distorted, it is disgusting. So now I don’t like the hook tune, and the rest of the song was anyway a typical item song tune. Neeti’s vocals are awesome, but Mika (a double track of his vocals, God save us) sounds horrendous. The arrangements are nice, and the sarangi interlude is fun. Lyrics are bad. Could’ve been much better!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

3. Socha Hai / Socha Hai (2nd Version)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan / Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Sahir Ludhianvi, New Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

Again, this song was a remake of ‘Keh Doon Tumhe’ (Deewaar), until they changed it recently, and now it seems like they’ve tried to erase any trace of the old song. I don’t know why. Now it sounds so forced, I don’t know why they would interfere with art that way. The tune seems tweaked and stretched everywhere, to try to take it out of the ‘Keh Doon Tumhe’ mould. The funniest part is that now, there’s no mention of ‘Socha Hai’ in the song, which was there before. The vocals are good, but for Neeti’s portion, it sounds like somebody has a cloth tied around her mouth, which made her voice muffled. That sounds bad! Tanishk’s new antaras are the best parts of the song. Previously they had parts of the old song there too, but sadly those are gone too. Oh and the two versions are just one that is edited out of the other — why couldn’t they just keep it one version?? I don’t know what’s going on, but this song got a horrible makeover.

Rating: 2.5/5 for Short Version, 2.5/5 for Long Version

 

4. Hoshiyar Rehna

Singer ~ Neeraj Arya, Music & Lyrics Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Café

Neeraj Arya’s Kabir Cafe remakes traditional folk songs by Kabirdas. Here they present us with a very staid and clichéd and very preachy folk number that tries to tug at your heart, but is too weak. The song proceeds very monotonously, and the dialogues thrown in increase its heaviness. The arrangements are good with the Rajasthani touch, but again, some variations in terms of arrangements would’ve been welcome! Even Neeraj’s vocals are quite bland. Very straightforward and preachy, boring song.

Rating: 2.5/5


Baadshaho Is the typical below average multicomposer, full of remakes fare. It has four songs, out of which three are remakes, and then it has three versions of the remade songs. The only original song too, sounds like a distorted 50s song. There’s nothing Royal about this album! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album:  2 + 2.5 + 1 + 2.5 + 2.5+ 2.5 + 2.5 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 44.29%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग  <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: You Decide!

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 26 (from previous albums) + 03 = 29

 

Which is your favourite song from Baadshaho? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DAGAONKAR BABU SANGEETBAAZ!! (BABUMOSHAI BANDOOKBAAZ – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gaurav Dagaonkar, Abhilash-Joel, Debojyoti Mishra & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Ghalib Asad Bhopali & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 17th August 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 25th August 2017

Babumoshai Bandookbaaz Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a Bollywood crime comedy film, starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui and Bidita Bag and directed by Kushan Nandy. The film has been produced by Kiran Shyam Shroff and Ashmith Kunder. The music for this film has been given (five out of six songs) by Gaurav Dagaonkar, a composer we hear in Bollywood quite infrequently. The last time we heard him was in ‘Wah Taj’ when he made a song that nobody heard again. Before that though, he had given some good music for ‘Heartless’ (2014), and ‘Kaafirana’ (Joker; 2012). Hopefully since he’s in charge of the major chunk of the album here, he will do his best. The guest composers are a debutant duo named Abhilash-Joel, who have worked on a scratch composition by Debojyoti Mishra, and built their song around it. Hopefully, they make a great debut! So let’s jump into this bandookbaaz album and hope it is sangeetbaaz!!


1. Barfani (Male) / Barfani (Female)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Orunima Bhattacharya, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

Gaurav Dagaonkar starts off this album with a delightfully haunting (What an oxymoron) classical number, based on raag jog. The composer really pleasantly surprised me with his amazing command over classical notes. The way his notes have come out in such a mellifluous manner, is commendable. The mukhda is an instantly gripping portion, and the hook, ‘jal jaane do‘, is what gives you the goosebumps. The antara, in the ideal way that classical songs usually go, follows a more happy-sounding route, and it contrasts very well with that haunting mukhda. The composition reminds you of many 90s songs, when Bollywood music was so heavily inspired by traditional classical music. The lyrics by Ghalib Asad Bhopali are quite intense, and do justice to the song’s theme quite perfectly. The word ‘barfani‘, is a word I’m hearing for the first time in a Bollywood song in recent years! The song is presented in two versions, male and female — both with the same haunting arrangements, thanks to a wonderful beat given by the jingle bells (ghungroo), and a very beautiful play of the guitars and the Dobro (Shomu Seal) which give a very sitar-ish sound. The male version is sung with impeccable finesse, by Armaan Malik, and I believe this is his first such song, which is so heavily based on classical music. He handles the song beautifully, in the lower octaves, and I believe it is his career’s best performance, solely because he tries something new! Orunima Bhattacharya is in charge of the other version, and she takes up a higher pitch, and aces it, and you can tell she has been classically trained. A beautiful and haunting romantic song to start off the album!

Rating: 4.5/5 for Male Version, 4.5/5 for Female Version

 

2. Aye Saiyan

Singers ~ Orunima Bhattacharya & Vivek Naik, Original Composition & Lyrics Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The second song seems like a song that was a residue from the ‘Anaarkali Of Aarah’ album that released earlier this year. It follows the same folksy vibe, as if there’s a dance going on in the village. Gaurav aces the composition, which is essentially a Bhojpuri folk song, but his music makes it more lively and likeable. The same tune is repeated throughout the song, so it does get a bit tedious towards the end, but I guess that’s how the folk song is. The lyrics are funny, if you understand Bhojpuri. The harmonium (Satyajeet Prabhu) leads the way right from the beginning, giving a very fresh vibe to the song, and the sprightly rhythm and percussions (Satyajeet Jamsandekar) is enjoyable as well! There are amazing dholaks that give the song a rhythm to which you can nod your head! The vocals by Orunima are great here as well, and she showcases her versatility in this song, which is so different from the first one! Vivek Naik has a short interruption, which disturbs more than sounds good. A fun and cute folksy number!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

3. Ghungta

Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Chorus ~ Vivek Naik, Santosh Bote & Rahul Chitnis, Original (Hook) Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, New Composition by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi

Here comes another remake, and this time, it’s incorporated into an item song. But before we apply our judgements to that sentence, let’s listen to the song with an open mind. Because when I did that, I really enjoyed the song, thanks to Gaurav Dagaonkar’s enjoyable music, and Neha Kakkar’s very energetic vocals! The song is the remake of R.D. Burman’s ‘Haye Re Haye Tera Ghungta’ (Dhongi), and what I liked is that the only part taken from the old song is the hook. The only difference is that the girl is singing ‘mera ghungta‘ instead of the boys singing ‘tera ghungta‘. The rest of the composition goes well with that hook, and especially the antara is very catchy, and has a trademark Panchamda touch to it. The arrangements are just as lively, with the signature Maharashtrian dhol-taasha rhythm backing it. But amazing guitars (Arvind Haldipur) welcome the listeners into the antara, and that makes the antara sound even more enticing. The vocals are something that propel the song to heights that might not have been touched, had the singer been different, or if Neha Kakkar had sung even a little bit lifelessly. However, her rendition is lively, and she proves again how much energy her voice has. Ghalib Asad Bhopali’s lyrics are very typical to this genre. One of the better of such songs to release this year.

Rating: 3.5/5

 

4. Chulbuli

Singer ~ Papon, Additional Vocals ~ Vivek Hariharan, Music by ~ Gaurav Dagaonkar

The retro vibe kicks in with the next song, a naughty, mischievous number with a very retro tune. Gaurav Dagaonkar has composed it very well, and right from the opening harmonium bar, you know you are in for a treat. The composer has created a nice vaudevillian-esque tune, resembling the musical style that was prominent in the 50s. The tune of the Mukhda is amazing, and gets you gripped there itself. The lilt of the song is increased by the tempo and the beats. The Antara is irresistible, again having a very retro tune. The arrangements are beautiful; surprisingly, they’re a little less retro-esque. The European touch is high in them, with the accordions, mandolins and chimes being most prominent. However, to balance this old-school vibe, Gaurav throws in a number of wonderful things like electric guitars, drums and brass instruments. The vocals are mellifluous, and what can you expect other than mellifluous when it is the genius Papon behind the mic? His voice is so magnetic, you just can’t pay attention to anything else. Vivek Hariharan joins him in backing vocals. His rendition reminds me of ‘Labon Ka Karobaar’ (Befikre), and so do the arrangements, now that I think of it. Ghalib’s lyrics are great and fun! The best song of the album yet!!

Rating: 4.5/5

 

5. Khali Khali

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan, Music by ~ Debojyoti Mishra & Abhilash-Joel

The debutants Abhilash Lakra and Joel Dubba step in for this song, and they are in charge of a melancholic number, that haunts your soul. The composition is very haunting, and has been composed with such notes, that are sure to make you emotional, and frightened at the same time. The pace is very slow, aptly so. The problem arises in the Antara, where the song gets into the Bhatt mode, and as the listener, I started to zone out. And the way it runs after that is very tedious. The duo tries to make up for that with mysterious arrangements, but that too, sounds maudlin. There are amazing strings though, all throughout the song, and even the percussions are great. Mohit Chauhan sounds good, but doesn’t manage to keep our interest in the song. The lyrics are good, again. Not very impressive of a debut.

Rating: 2.5/5


Babumoshai Bandookbaaz is a pretty surprisingly good album! I was expecting very little from it before the first song came out. After that came out I started hoping for a little more, and the makers just gave more and more after that! Gaurav Dagaonkar finally gives an album that he can be proud of for ages — with Indian classical, folk, European music that proves his versatility. The debutant duo Abhilash-Joel do disappoint relatively, but show promise in their great sense of composition and arrangements. That makes this a quite sangeetbaaz album!!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 4.5 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4.5 + 2.5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Barfani (Male) = Barfani (Female) = Chulbuli > Aye Saiyan = Ghungta > Khali Khali

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 24 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz) = 26

Which is your favourite song from Babumoshai Bandookbaaz? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

MUBARAKAN! A FLOP ALBUM HAS BEEN BORN! (MUBARAKAN – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Gourov-Roshin, Hassan Jahangir, Amaal Mallik, Rishi Rich, Yash Anand & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Badshah & Hassan Jahangir
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 6th July 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 28th July 2017

Mubarakan Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Mubarakan is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy of errors starring Arjun Kapoor, Arjun Kapoor, Anil Kapoor, Ileana D’Cruz, Athiya Shetty and Ratna Pathak Shah in the lead roles. The film is directed by the only director in Bollywood who still insists on doing comedies with a cast larger than a herd of cows, Anees Bazmee and produced by Ashwin Varde, Murad Khetani and Balwinder Singh Janjua. The film’s plot consists of such never-before-tried aspects like — double roles, a love quadrangle, a huge Punjabi family and Punjabi dance numbers. It is going to redefine Bollywood, I’m sure of it. 😏 If you didn’t get that sarcasm, moving on. The music is by T-Series, and that means multiple composers. Thankfully, one name out of the three composers, is a relief, it being the name of Amaal Mallik, the young composer proving his mettle out there. He gets two, upbeat dance tracks, so I hope those are catchy! The next two composers are Gourov-Roshin, returning after treating us to a small break from their remakes, and sadly they have three songs, and Rishi Rich with Yash Anand, who have composed the title song of the film. Let’s just get this over with, eh?


1. The Goggle Song

Singers ~ Sonu Nigam, Armaan Malik, Neeti Mohan, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A wedding song to start the album, this one is an enjoyable tune from Amaal. Not the best he can do for sure, but it still makes you groove to the beat. The beat itself is infectious, with the composer adding quirky sound effects making it sound better. The ensemble of singers does really well for a wedding song, and for once, Tulsi sounds better than Neeti. The lyrics are mediocre, but hilarious at times. A good wedding track, but not very innovative.
Rating: 3.5/5

 

2. Mubarakan (Title Track)

Singers ~ Yash Narvekar, Juggy D, Sukriti Kakar & Badshah, Music by ~ Rishi Rich & Yash Anand, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Badshah, Yamma Yamma Credits: Music by ~ R.D. Burman

“This is the Rishi Rich beat.” The song starts with this obvious statement, and an unexpected incorporation of some portions ‘Yamma Yamma’ (Shaan). The actual composition falls flat, but it is saved by R.D. Burman’s old song, which plays throughout, and its addition was quite creative. Vocals are horrible. Lyrics are horrible. Rap is horrible. Arrangements are not so horrible. (Mostly, it is the awesome oud from the old song). In short, a horrible song, but for the arrangements and the old song’s portions.
P.S. I wouldn’t call this a Remake as such.
Rating: 2.5/5 (0.5 bonus for using that old song wisely)

 

3. Jatt Jaguar

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Navraj Hans & Apeksha Dandekar, Music by ~ Amaal Mallik, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another typical Punjabi song, the Punjabi flavour accentuated even more by a mediocre composition that barely manages to grasp your attention, except at the hook. Even Vishal doesn’t sound as energetic as always, but Navraj does. Lyrics are typical. Arrangements are typical, but there are traces Amaal’s digital quirks. At many places the tune seems like some old song I can’t recall! 😥 Not the best Amaal can do.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

4. Haathon Mein Thhe Haath

Singers ~ Papon, Altamash Faridi, Aditi Singh Sharma & Arpita Mukherjee, Backing Vocals by ~ Rinku Giri, Music by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

A typical Pakistani pop-esque song follows, and it immediately strikes me as Papon’s worst song after a long, long time. The composition is staid and clichéd, his vocals do not help at all. Aditi sounds over stylish as usual. Those typical digital beats add to the melancholia. Backing vocalists add to the staleness, especially the Sufi one. Lyrics are something you won’t even notice. A song that clearly doesn’t know where it belongs.
Rating: 2.5/5

 

5. Hawa Hawa

Singers ~ Mika Singh & Prakriti Kakar, Original Composition by ~ Hassan Jahangir, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

The hit Pakistani pop song remade, with a typppppical kuthu beat and rhythm! Mika singing increases the headache, and the new composition is just unbearable. The hookline is good, but the other parts fall flat. The female vocals by Prakriti sound good though. Lyrics belong to a Sajid-Wajid soundtrack. Why????
Rating: 2.5/5

 

6. Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

Singers ~ Rinku Giri & Puja Basnet, Original Composition Traditional, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Another Punjabi folksy song ends the album, this time a mélange of two Punjabi folk songs, ‘Kala Doriya’ and ‘Baari Barsi’. The composition doesn’t hook you at all; in fact it sounds like ‘Jatt Jaguar Part 2’. The new singer Rinku Giri is the typical Punjabi male singer affair, he sounds like Diljit Dosanjh. Arrangements are “louder louder”. Lyrics are typical. A song that relies on folk songs to propel it, but fails.
Rating: 2/5


Mubarakan is yet another feather in Bollywood’s cap of Punjabi albums. All of the songs are very staid, heard-before ones, that don’t really help generate any interest. Amaal does okayish in one song, but showcases his quirk in the other. The others perform subpar, with the exception of Rishi Rich, who has made quite a catchy song. But even with its catchiness I couldn’t rate it higher than 2.5. So, for anyone counting, Mubarakan! Another flop album has been born! 

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 = 15.5

Album Percentage: 51.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: The Goggle Song > Mubarakan = Jatt Jaguar = Haathon Mein Thhe Haath = Hawa Hawa > Dil Dhadke Louder Louder

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 18 (from previous albums) + 02 (from Mubarakan) = 20

 

Which is your favourite song from Mubarakan? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

A BEHEN WHO CAN’T DANCE, BUT CAN ONLY ROMANCE! (BEHEN HOGI TERI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Rishi Rich, Jaidev Kumar, Amjad-Nadeem, Yash Narvekar & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Bipin Das, Yash Narvekar, Amit Dhanani, Late Anand Bakshi, Sonu Saggu, Rohit Sharma, Parry G & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 23rd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Behen Hogi Teri Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Behen Hogi Teri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy starring Shruti Hassan, Rajkummar Rao, Gautam Gulati and Gulshan Grover in lead roles. The film is directed by Ajay K. Pannalal and produced by Tony D’Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. The film’s slogan is “All Indians are NOT Brothers and Sisters!” Well, going by the trailer and this slogan thingy, it seems like a quirky and light hearted romantic comedy, but you know Bollywood, they can add drama into anything and everything. The music of the film, as expected is by multiple composers, including Pritam’s A&R venture JAM8 (Kaushik-Akash-Guddu this time), Rishi Rich, Amjad-Nadeem (after a long time, huh!), Jaidev Kumar and Yash Narvekar. Out of these composers, none, I repeat none, have given anything outstanding in the past, so one can just hope that some miracle occurs and they give us great music for this film. Expectations are moderate, but hoping for the best, let’s explore the music of ‘Behen Hogi Teri’.


1. Jai Maa

Singers ~ Sahil Solanki, Jyotica Tangri & Parry G, Original Composition by ~ Prem Hardeep & Badshah, Music Recreated by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap Lyrics by ~ Parry G

Wow. So now the music industry has started remaking remakes. ‘Kala Chashma’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which was a quite banal remake by Badshah, of the Punjabi pop number ‘Kala Chashma’ by Prem Hardeep, itself, now gets remade into a mata-ki-chowki song. Jaidev Kumar, who had earlier remade ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz) into a similar satirical devotional song, ‘O Meri Mata’ in ‘Bajatey Raho’, takes the same composition that Badshah had made. Nothing changed in the tune, and that’s why it would make the public even crazier. The arrangements seem more toned down and not as harsh and shrill as they were in the original (I mean the original remake). I guess they added the dhols here specially for the jagraata setting. And they’ve, quite to my immense pleasure, gotten rid of the EDM at the end, and the shouting ladies and breaking glasses from the ‘Baar Baar Dekho’ song. Vocals here sound good and aptly funny as per the Goddess prayer setting. Sahil Solanki sounds much better than Amar Arshi, the original singer of both the original and Badshah’s remake. A rapper called Parry G {I don’t know why these people like to write a single letter after a weird nickname; we are going to meet another one later in the album!} reprises Badshah’s “sadkon pe chale jab ladkon ke dilon mein tu aag laga de baby firrrreeeeee” with a rap that sounds much more pleasant. Jyotica Tangri is a nice replacement for Neha Kakkar, but with less of an edge in her voice. The replacement lyrics by Sonu Saggu are quite funny too, but not something that will make you “ROFL” or “LOL” either. Interesting how the remake of a remake turns out to be better than the original remake. Let’s start remaking remakes now. P.S. I hope a certain music company doesn’t read that or else we will be over-flooded with ‘Baby Doll’ remakes. (Then again, aren’t we already over flooded by them!)

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tera Hoke Rahoon

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash-Guddu (KAG for JAM8), Lyrics by ~ Bipin Das

Next up, we get a dulcet melody from Pritam’s A&R company, JAM8. This time, the composers of the two songs in ‘1920 London’, Kaushik-Akash, are joined by someone calling himself Guddu, thus making it a trio. And this way, they produce a song that I will remember as one of the best (and the best till now) from any composer for JAM8. The composition, for once, doesn’t sound like a Pritam composition; for once the composers working behind the JAM8 label do not try to emulate Pritam’s late 2000s style of composition. In fact, the composition kind of reminded me of Bobby-Imran’s songs in ‘Badmaashiyan’, or some of Jeet Gannguli’s works. The free flow of the hookline makes it instantly likeable, and the mukhda and antara has a calm, soothing but haunting touch to it, something I’m always ready for if it isn’t too maudlin. The arrangements are fabulous; they just add to the haunting characteristic of the song. The guitar has been played in such a subtle manner, in the beginning, that it is impossible to not be sucked in right away. And when the orchestra sets in, the song just gets many times better. The electronic tabla adds to the serenity, while that wonderful flute interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. In the antara guitars have been played in a wonderful play-stop-play-stop manner that is so comforting. And the tabla doesn’t stop either! Arijit, the first choice for any composer associated with Pritam, and Pritam himself, renders the mellow composition with such ease, in the voice of his that I love, as opposed to that droning voice he uses in sleepy songs. The way he sings the “uff tak na yaara karoon”, is so beautiful! Bipin Das (newcomer?) writes lyrics that are instantly lovable. The first time JAM8 do something that doesn’t resemble their mentor’s work heavily, and it turns out to be a success. 

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Jaanu

Singers ~ Juggy D, Shivi & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

So after the remake of a remake, we get a remake of another classic, in fact, one of my favourite songs by R.D. Burman. The likeable, sweet and fun-to-listen-to classic gets a makeover and now it looks horrendous. Rishi Rich seems to have struck a big deal in Bollywood after his long hiatus, because after he returned in ‘Half Girlfriend’, with a mediocre title song, he gets to do another (though horrible) song here. The man makes sure that somebody says “This is a Rishi Rich refix” before the song starts, and that is so annoying! We have the credits in front of us and we can read your name there. I know here are some music listeners out there who don’t care about who made a song, and they will continue not caring, so even if you say your name there, they wouldn’t care. And then comes the cliché of saying the names of the singer (Juggy D) and the rapper (Raftaar). And what I don’t understand is, why not say the name of the female artiste! Hasn’t she contributed anything to the song? They did the same thing in ‘High Heels’ from ‘Ki & Ka’ and they repeat it here. If anything, Shivi is shining in this song amongst the hackneyed renditions of the male artist and Raftaar. Oh by the way, Juggy D. 😄 Another artist naming himself like that. Rishi Rich has kept the composition intact, fortunately. But what he does instead, is even more unfortunate. He breaks up the hookline, making it sound like a cassette that is stuck at one point. And then it stops to make way for a weirdly-placed techno music piece. And then it proceeds and ends. How boring. There are so many raps in the song, it is hard to concentrate on the actual song. And Raftaar raps so oddly. Just to keep the “Behen” theme intact, he adds so many lines about sisters, that were so unnecessary. And now for thr vocals. Juggy D can’t sing at all. The proof? If someone isn’t able to sing the nuance in the word “Hindustan” in this song, he or she is definitely not a good singer. Shivi barely manages to sing that part, but does much better than her co-singers, making her stand out even with a mediocre performance. Of course, they don’t match the singing calibre of the legendary combination of Kishore Kumar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle & Usha Mangeshkar from the original song. The arrangements are irritating club sounds, EDM thrown here and there. But I enjoyed the parts with the Spanish guitars, and the strings incorporated from the old song. A horrible remake of a song that deserved a much better remake, or no remake!

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Teri Yaadon Mein / Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai, Pawni Pandey & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar & Sukriti Kakar, Music Composed by ~ Yash Narvekar, Music Produced by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Yash Narvekar & Amit Dhanani

Rishi Rich comes back for the next song too, but this time, things are different. This time, the song is a romantic song. And this time, Rishi Rich has only produced the song. Rishi Rich gives a composing break to someone I’ve seen many times in the singer category in various Amaal Mallik, Meet Bros. and even Rishi Rich songs, Yash Narvekar. He gets to compose the tune. And I must say, it is quite a commendable tune! Yes,  does follow the usual Bollywood romance template, with its tune, but it manages to engage the listeners. However, the listener does lose interest in some places. The hookline is very typical, but still, it managed to garner my interest. The antara too, follows the same pattern. What really engages the listeners, though, is Rishi Rich’s beats and arrangements. In the first version, Rishi employs a nice and groovy beat, a hip-hop beat in a romantic song, which at first elicits a weird reaction from the listener, but it sets in perfectly after a couple of listens. Especially the tablas which Rishi has added occasionally, are amazing. The second version, the Reprise, takes a more templated route, with guitars and piano taking the lead, making for a more calm listen. A harmonium too pops up later on, quite oddly. The piano interlude in that version is a must-hear. The vocals are good in both versions. While Yasser, sounding as similar to Arijit as ever, and Pawni Pandey stir up a nice chemistry in the first version, the essence of the song only reaches us in the Reprise because the voices of Yash & Sukriti haven’t been touched. Programming ruins the feel of the voices in the first version. However, I loved Yash’s backing vocals in the first song, that sound like tabla bols. Yash & Amit Dhanani together write a song that is full of typical lines and phrases, like the song title itself. Experimental, but works to some extent. The Reprise version fares better!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Original Version, 4/5 for Reprise Version

 

5. Tenu Na Bol Pawaan / Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Jyotica Tangri / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Amjad-Nadeem, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Sharma

Amjad-Nadeem, back in the composing scene after quite some time, have been roped in for the final song on the album. Amjad-Nadeem are usually known to meddle in typical romantic songs or horrendous massy item songs. This time around too, they have provided a typical romantic song, but that typicality is very enjoyable. The composition is sugary-sweet, something that is very rare from Amjad-Nadeem, who usually produce melodramatic sounding songs. The hookline is so heard-before, so clichéd, yet it manages to click with the listener. There is a high-pitched line that just makes you love the song even more. The antaraa are a bit less engaging, but still manage to keep the flow of the song intact. There are two versions to this song as well; one being a male version (with female humming in the background, hence the credit for Jyotica) and the other being a female version, which is kind of unplugged. The male version has heavenly instrumentation. It starts off with nice chimey sounds, followed by the sweetest flute portion I’ve heard in quite a while. The melody is structured on a simple guitar riff that, though it is very simple and typical, engages the listener. Strings join in later, bringing the third dimension to the song, and how! The second version is, as I said before, unplugged, and has a nice acoustic guitar riff playing in the background, and nothing else. The minimalistic feel of it, makes it even more appealing. Vocals are perfect in both versions. This is no doubt, Yasser’s best performance ever, and he sounds so different than usual here! Jyotica does the humming in Yasser’s version. Asees Kaur, on the other hand, renders her unplugged version with such a beautiful aura around her, that it is mesmerizing. Though her track is longer by one minute than Yasser’s, it makes for a good calm listen. The lyrics by Rohit Sharma (I don’t know whether he’s the Sharma who composed the songs of ‘Anaarkali of Aaraah’ or any other one. He’s definitely not the cricketer, right?) are sweet too. A song full of sweet things. Sweetness lies in simplicity after all.

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Reprise Version


Behen Hogi Teri is an unexpectedly cool multicomposer album! Going by the composers’ names, I was least expecting such a good album. However, it seems like all the composers have pitched in to provide their best. For a romantic comedy, a good album is a must, and fortunately, this album delivers as expected, if not less than expected. Yes, one song is very bad, but the others make up for it. And since the finance theme predominates the album, maybe that’s why they managed to wrench out such good songs from the music directors. An album predominantly made of romantic songs, but still works fine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 4.5 + 1 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hoke Rahoon = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein > Jai Maa > Jaanu

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 12 (from previous albums) + 02 = 14

 

Which is your favourite song from Behen Hogi Teri? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

AMAAL’S ‘NOOR’AANI ALBUM!! (NOOR – Music Review)

Music Album Details

♪ Music by: Amaal Mallik & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Kumaar & Anand Bakshi
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 24th March 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 21st April 2017

Noor Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Noor is an upcoming Bollywood drama starring Sonakshi Sinha in the titular role and Purab Kohli, Kanan Gill, Shibani Dandekar in supporting roles. The film, directed by Sunhil Sippy and produced by Bhushan Kumar, Krishan Kumar and Vikram Malhotra, is based on Pakistani author Saba Imtiaz’s novel, ‘Karachi, You’re Killing Me!’ which is the account of a Pakistani journalist and her misadventures in both her profession and her love life. The film takes the setting to Mumbai, of course, or else who knows who would have to incur the wrath of You-Know-Who. Anyway, we are here for the music. So, the music of the film has been given by Amaal Mallik, making it his second ever completely solo album after ‘M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story’. Of course, I expect something fresh and light-hearted in keeping with the movie’s promos and theme. After two good songs in ‘Badrinath Ki Dulhania’ earlier this year, it is his second venture this year and hopefully it will get just as amazing a response.


1. Uff Yeh Noor

Singer ~ Armaan Malik, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Aditi Paul, Abin Thomas, Shishir Samant & Akshay Jadhav, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Seedhe seedhe sab chale, par ye tedhi chale,
Afra-tafri ho jahaan, ye bas nahi miley,
Paagalon se zyaada paagal, miley zameen aur maange baadal,
Kahin se jaake zara akal laa,
Uff ye Noor, Wallah!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The first song happens to be an apt title song, a song that enlightens us on what we can expect from the character of Noor in the movie. And it does give us quite a detailed insight on that, as well. Amaal’s composition is not only buttery and light-hearted, forcing you to groove to it, but it is also instantly catchy. A very Amit Trivedi-ish vibe accompanies the composition, and that hookline is one of the cutest stuff I’ve heard in a while. The groove that the song carries with it, is just unmatchable. The composition of the antara is just amazing. What helps the composition big time are the arrangements, trying to lighten the mood even more, what with the amazing brass instruments — the trumpet (Ketan Sodha), the Saxophone (Shyaam) and the trombone (Blasco). These three instruments remind one of another song from the genre, ‘Suno Aisha’ (Aisha) which was by Amit Trivedi. There’s an amazing flute portion (Tejas Vinchurkar) towards the end of the song, that’s very easy to miss, so listen carefully, and there is also another flute/woodwinds portion in one of the interludes, which is amazingly played! Occasional strings and those two dholak beats (Akshay Jadhav) at the beginning of the hookline, are some easily missable additions that Amaal has added into the song. Of course, you can’t talk about this song without talking about the instrument that gives it most of its fresh vibes, which is the guitar (Meghdeep Bose). The vocals by Armaan are amazing, and show his versatility; of course he doesn’t just sing romantic songs! It is probably one of his best performances. He controls our emotions of fun and laughter so well in this song, and also conveys the character of Noor very perfectly, as does lyricist Manoj Muntashir. The lyrics are where the similarities to ‘Suno Aisha’ end officially. In ‘Aisha’, Aisha was placed on a pedestal and how her ego was raised when Amitabh Bhattacharya wrote stuff like “Tum ho kamaal, tum bemisaal, tum lajawaab ho Aisha.” On the other hand, Manoj is doing nothing but hurting Noor’s ego, by saying stuff like “Kahin se jaake nayi shakal laa, and “Aankhon mein gussa bhara hai, chehre pe baarah baja hai“! Jokes apart, Manoj does a great job writing the lyrics! A nice protagonist-oriented song, with innumerable fresh vibes!

Rating: 5/5

 

2. Gulabi 2.0 / Gulabi Redux

Singers ~ Amaal Mallik, Tulsi Kumar & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar, Tulsi Kumar & Amaal Mallik, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated & New Composition by ~ Amaal Mallik, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal!!!”

– Kumaar

We are all familiar with probably the most famous Rafi song ever, ‘Gulabi Aankhein’ (The Train), a song that almost everyone, from the kids, to the grandparents in India, know by heart. Why wouldn’t we know it, considering that it has been through so many remakes and recreations and revamps by the likes of Atif Aslam, Raghav Sachar and of course the wonderful performance by Sonu Nigam in London. Well, now, the makers of ‘Noor’ make sure we get yet another version of the song, this time, a club revamp. Well, this song actually un-grew on me. I used to like it (just like) the first time I heard it, but it just slipped away after that; I couldn’t bring myself to love it any more, and whatever I liked also started to seem ordinary. The good thing about this remake is, that it only retains the hook of the old song. However, the tune that works as padding, is a bit weak, except the “haal hua behaal hua mera haal hua behaal” loop. The antara is super-ordinary, something I never expected from Amaal. The numerous interruptions going “gulabi, gulabi“, sound boring after some listens. There is an English female rap though, that is quite entertaining. The arrangements are mostly EDM, which is loud for the most part, but I will still maintain that it is better than all the noisy cacophony we find ourselves tripping to nowadays. Vocals are okay-ish as well, and the two versions differ from each other only in terms of vocals, the first one sung by Amaal, the second by Yash Narvekar. Still, Yash has backing vocals in the first song, and Amaal has backing vocals in the second. 😄😄 The two songs sound pretty much the same. The female singer is Tulsi Kumar, supposedly singing in a newly thick voice she has obtained. I just hope she doesn’t think that voice is good, and I hope she stops using this kind of voice. The additional lyrics by Kumaar are functional considering it is a club song. A cacophonous remake, which I hadn’t expected!

Rating: 3/5 for Gulabi 2.0, 3/5 for Gulabi Redux

 

3. Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai

Singer ~ Sukriti Kakar, Backing Vocals ~ Roshni Baptist, Mohini Gaur, Shishir Samant & Meghdeep Bose, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Yeh sabhi mausam ho rahe apne
Kal talak thhe jo ajnabi
Yeh safar yunhi le chala aage
Piche ab raahein na rahi!
Saari khwahishein,
Dil ki yeh farmaishein,
Tune suni iss tarah,
Koi duaa, jis tarah, sunle Khuda!”

– Kumaar

The next song turns out to be a very light-hearted romantic song, something that we know Amaal is an expert at, especially after ‘Sau Aasmaan’ (Baar Baar Dekho). This song is quite similar to that one in terms of overall feel of the song; a very sprightly and vivacious sound helps you forget your worries for the entire length of the song. The mukhda starts off quite abruptly, but you get used to it. The hookline is the peak of the song, obviously. But it is the antara that really surprised me pleasantly. I’ve never heard an antara starting so calmly and without making any ruckus like “Oh, I’m the antara now, you guys!” In fact, it just merges in so well with the interludes, you feel it is some extra stanza in the interlude, until it is so long that it has to be an antara. The arrangements add to the lightness of the song, the guitar (Ankur Mukherjee) played in this very MJ kind of way, is so oddly placed in such a song, yet so wonderful-sounding. The vocals are nice as well, Sukriti sounds cute in her very energetic rendition. I couldn’t help missing Neeti though, who usually sings such songs. Then I realised it would just sound like ‘Sau Aasmaan’ Part 2, so I started accepting Sukriti’s voice after that. 😂 The way she sings the sargam, in the first interlude is very beautiful. Kudos to Amaal for composing that. The backing vocalists really have a spectacular job, repeating the lines of the hookline after Sukriti. Lyrics are just as happy and boisterous as everything else, and suitable for the theme of the song. An enjoyable romantic song!

Rating: 4/5

 

4. Hai Zaroori

Singer ~ Prakriti Kakar, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Nasamajh thhe hum, jo yeh bhi na samjhe,
Waqt aane par, sab badalte hain!
Manzilein kya hain, aur raaste kya hain,
Log pal bhar mein, yahaan rabb badalte hain!
Kisi ke vaaste kahaan, kinaare aayi kashtiyaan,
Yeh dooriyan hai bas dooriyan!
Ke chori chori chupke se chupke se rona, hai zaroori,
Ke paani paani ankhiyon ka, ankhiyon ka hona, hai zaroori,
Reh gayi aarzoo ik adhuri,
Ke kabhi kabhi aisa bhi, aisa bhi hona, hai zaroori!”

-Manoj Muntashir

A sombre and pensive melody brings up the rear of the album, and it is a sheer delight to the ears. In spite of the song being pensive and slow-paced, it touches your heart in a way that probably no song has, recently. The song has a very beautiful tune, which makes you feel as if you are flying high in the sky. The composition has a very Western classical touch to it, and the arrangements just support the same feeling. The mukhda itself is so hard-hitting, you can’t help but listen further. And that hookline, that’s what can be charged legally for making people go crazy and making them speechless. The antaras carry forward the serious feel of the song perfectly, and it makes for a great listen overall. That bridge line between the antara and hookline is so heartbreaking! The arrangements as I was saying, are amazing. They ooze out grandeur like a leaking pipe. The live strings are so overwhelming (in a positive way), it transports you to a whole different world. You will feel like you are sitting in an Orchestra Hall in Europe. The slow pace is made up for by the grand arrangements, which make sure nobody has the audacity to dismiss this song by calling it boring. Twinkly sounds, heavenly wind instruments and amazing guitars (Joell Mukherjee) in an interlude, constitute the rest of the arrangements. Amaal’s piano notes are amazing, and he plays them like little treats throughout the larger treat that the song is. Prakriti steals the show, and after ‘Bheegh Loon’ (Khamoshiyan), it is her second song where she gets the opportunity to shine by herself. Her graceful, lilting voice in this song is something that I frankly never expected her to pull off, and she has!! Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are a spectacular piece of poetry, and it is after such a long time that I’m hearing a sad song that doesn’t go overboard with its sentimentality. I’m ready to be sad for a day, listening to this song on loop! Amaal surpasses his own ‘Kaun Tujhe’ (M.S. Dhoni) with this one!

Rating: 5/5


Noor is a charming album. With just four tracks, it still has the most variety I’ve seen in recent albums. With not song sounding even close to the next, Amaal provides us with a mixed bag, wherein anything you pick out from it, will be a treat to the ears. Barring one. Of course, everything has some flaws. Here, it is the club song. I’m sure Amaal would’ve been better off producing an original club song than remaking an old song! Anyway, the rest of the songs are a breeze of fresh air, something that has dwindled nowadays, what with music makers following some unnecessary clichés that will make their music hit for a week or so. But this album seems like something that will stay on my playlist for sure. ‘Noor’ means ‘light’, and the songs are so light-hearted, so I call this album Amaal’s Noor-aani album!! Bright and light!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 5 + 3 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 20

Album Percentage: 80%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Hai Zaroori = Uff Yeh Noor > Jise Kehte Pyaar Hai > Gulabi 2.0 = Gulabi Redux

 

Remake Counter
No. Of Remakes in 2017: 09 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Noor) = 10

Which is your favourite song from Noor? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

WAJAH REMAKES HAIN!! (WAJAH TUM HO – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mithoon, Abhijit Vaghani, Kalyanji-Anandji, Meet Bros., R.D. Burman, Gourov-Roshin & Anand Raaj Anand
♪ Lyrics by: Manoj Muntashir, Rajendra Krishan, Kumaar, Anand Bakshi & Dev Kohli
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 5th November 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 16th December 2016

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Wajah Tum Ho Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Wajah Tum Ho is an upcoming Bollywood crime thriller, starring Sana Khan, Gurmeet Choudhary, Rajniesh Duggal and Sharman Joshi in lead roles. The film is directed by Vishal Pandya and produced by Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. Those two names are enough to tell us that it’s a T-Series production, and that we may expect some good songs, and some remakes. Sure enough, three out of the four songs on the album are remakes of old songs. Only Mithoon composes an original song, in three versions, while Abhijit Vaghani, Meet Bros, and Gourov-Roshin recreate old songs, Abhijit’s appearing in two versions. Abhijit is debuting as a composer in Bollywood, having been on the programming panel before, and going by his pop single, a remake of ‘Pyaar Manga Hai’ that released earlier this year, the sing might be good enough. The Meet Brothers are back after long as a duo, and I’m expecting a lot from their remake as well. Gourov-Roshin are just done giving me a shock with their atrocious techno music in ‘Force 2’, and they had remade a song there too, so I don’t expect much from this remake of theirs. Without further ado, let’s see how good the remakes, and Mithoon’s original song, is!


1. Wajah Tum Ho / Wajah Tum Ho (Male) / Wajah Tum Ho (Lounge)
Singers ~ Altamash Faridi & Tulsi Kumar / Altamash Faridi / Altamash Faridi, Music by ~ Mithoon, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Bikhre bikhre se thhey hum pehle, abb sawarne lage
Tumhare galiyon se rozana jo hum guzarne lage!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Mithoon starts off this ambitious album, that has set out to remake many classics, but he starts off the album on an original note — just in case the remakes, are safely protected deep inside the album by a five-minute long buffer period that consists of Mithoon’s song, which happens to be the title song of the movie. The song is a new, interesting take on this title. The title is actually taken from the song ‘Wajah Tum Ho’ (Hate Story 3) from Vishal Pandya’s last film. While that song, composed by newcomer (and already-goner) Baman, was composed on typical Bhattish lines, this one has a nice old-world-charm mixed with the omnipresent Mithoon touch. The composition is more of a soft and soothing one, in contrast to the sensual and intense one of that song. Of course there’s no reason to compare, so I should just stop. Back to this song, the mukhda brings it to a nice beginning, but it is in the hookline where it receives its shocks and jerks, and starts slowing down. Repetition of the song’s title so many times in a seemingly ultra-slow pace, isn’t your everyday idea of a soothing romantic song. The antara gets better because of more high notes, which kind of lessen the laziness in the composition. The song is included in three versions in the album — One being a duet between Altamash Faridi and Tulsi Kumar, while the other two are solely sung by Altamash. The duet version works because of the male and female voices, and I must admit, Tulsi sounds good in the song, if not great. Just like Amaal Mallik does, Mithoon has used her voice nicely here. Altamash sounds a bit sleepy in places but the high notes in the antaras let us know that he is very much awake. In the male version, though, it gets tedious to hear the song in a complete male voice. The lounge version is a different case altogether. Though it has been sung by Altamash solo, the arrangements in the lounge version are BEAUTIFULLLL! While Mithoon graces the other two versions with the same arrangements consisting of soothing and breezy acoustic guitars (Kalyan Baruah), he has something more mystical and magical in store for you in the lounge version. Of course, a nice lounge touch has been added to the song, and many things happen all of a sudden, which suddenly transforms that lazy composition into one sounding utterly beautiful! The arrangements consist of some beautiful guitar work (Joell Mukherji), while the flutes (Madhu Mukherjee) are brilliant. Nice percussions with the drums make the song sound complete. The sarod (also by Madhu Mukherjee) and tablas are what give the song more of a lounge touch, though! It is this version that finally brings out the beauty of the composition and makes it succeed. Sadly, I don’t think it will be promoted much! 😦 About the lyrics, I would rather say that they are very sappy and icky, instead of praising them by saying they’re nice romantic lyrics. 😛 Manoj Muntashir writes words like “Kahan pe tu ho shuru, kahan main khatam, pata na chale“. I’m like, “Are you a blob of clay? Are you mud? Are you sand? Or are you the European and Asian parts of Russia? Please tell me so I can solve that problem for you so that you don’t have to sing it in songs!” The lyrics are rather a nice get-to-know-yourself course. A middling start to the album, but the lounge version of this track is surely a #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Dil Ke Paas / Dil Ke Paas (Unplugged)
Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Tulsi Kumar & Neuman Pinto / Armaan Malik, Tulsi Kumar & Shamita Bhatkar, Composition by ~ Kalyanji-Anandji, Music Recreated by ~ Abhijit Vaghani, Lyrics by ~ Rajendra Krishan

“(Male) Kal tujhko dekha tha, Maine apne aangan mein
Jaise keh rahi thi tum, Mujhe baandh lo bandhan mein

(Female) Ye kaisa rishta hain, Ye kaise sapne hain
Begaane hokar bhi, Kyon lagte apne hain
Main soch mein rehti hoon, Dar dar ke kehti hoon”

– Rajendra Krishan

Aah! Here are the “awaited” (by T-Series to release and torture us with) remakes, finally! Reading the name of the song, you won’t know that this song is a remake of “Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas” (Blackmail) because T-Series has cunningly named it in such a manner that you’ll never guess it. The music producer/arranger Abhijit Vaghani, who has earlier composed in Bollywood for ‘Chaarfutiya Chhokare’ with his partner Sameer, gets to remake this evergreen Kishore Kumar classic. Well, he hasn’t really composed anything new in the song, and Kalyanji-Anandji’s original composition has been kept intact (What a relief, that at least that has been done!) This song also comes in two versions, one that has the never-too-popular Arijit rendering it, and another tagged as “Unplugged”, which has his close successor, Armaan Malik singing it. They both are accompanied by the T-Series behnaa, Tulsi Kumar. The first version of the song really has everything going against it, in terms of the vocals, what with Arijit sounding like a terrible robot, while Tulsi gets her voice tripled and quadrupled. The original recorded voices will never reach us; we get the adulterated version of their voices, and the result is quite revolting! At least Tulsi sounds better than usual in her tripled voice, but Arijit sounds horrendous with his robotic voice, that is way too thin for it too be actually believed to be his. Neuman Pinto has a rap portion in the middle of this version, and it is just disgusting how such a rap can be shoved into a classic song like this! As if that wasn’t enough, Abhijit tries to make the song sound more sensuous (and fails too) by slowing the pace down by some kilometers per second. 😦 Armaan, in his version, gives us the pleasure of listening to a good, unadulterated rendition of the timeless classic, which we sadly couldn’t hear in Arijit’s voice. Thankfully, Armaan’s version is enough to make up for it, at least in terms of vocals. While in the first version, Arijit and Tulsi took turns singing one line each or something, this song is mostly Armaan’s, and Tulsi only sings the second antara, quite blandly, at that. Shamita Bhatkar’s backing vocals provide a good harmony to accompany Armaan, and it sounds good more so because the overdone harmonizations with the voices in Arijit’s version just failed to make a mark. The arrangements are better in the second version too, but they become quite boring after a while. At least real instruments like the guitar (Nyzel D’Lima) and violin (Manas Kumar) are brilliant here. The first version however, is overdone with techno sounds, and that kills the original old song. Rajendra Krishan’s lyrics from the original song have also been retained, thankfully. Except when Tulsi sings and they have to change the gender of the sentence, which was originally from the male point of view. (Like changing leta to leti). More of a revival, rather than a remake, but all that this so-called “revival” could do, is to make us return to the original classic!

 

3. Dil Mein Chhupa Loonga
Singers ~ Armaan Malik & Tulsi Kumar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Aise na mujhe tum dekho, seene se laga lunga
Tumko main chura lunga tumse, dil mein chupa loonga”

– Anand Bakshi

The Meet Brothers step into the album, hopefully in order to save it.. I mean, I really expect a lot from them after their work after their split with Anjjan. So this song happens to be a remake of R.D. Burman’s immensely popular ‘Aise Na Mujhe Tum Dekho’ (Darling Darling), and just hearing that this song has been remade, made me excited! But I must say, what I got wasn’t exactly what I was expecting. Of course, the hookline is amazing, what with more sensuality infused into its tune by slowing down its pace, but the padding is quite disappointing. The mukhda starts the song off on a faltering note, which gets stabilised only when the hookline arrives. The antara too sounds very generic and seems like an attempt to redo the ‘Aaj Phir’ (Hate Story 2) and ‘Tumhe Apna Banane Ka’ (Hate Story 3), which just seems more accentuated because of that slow-paced guitar-and-tabla arrangement that all three of these songs have. Anyway, the arrangements are good and suitable for the theme of the song. The acoustic guitars (Pawan Rasaily) sound nice and soothing, while those very typical tablas (in these songs) give it a more earthy touch, along with certain Arabic-sounding elements. The digital beats too, sound very typical. On the vocals front, ws have Armaan and Tulsi again, and Armaan sounds awesome as always, again reminding one of his rendition of ‘Tumhe Apna’ (Hate Story 3). The way he sings the hookline, he’s sure to get even more female followers. Tulsi, on the other hand, sounds atrocious trying to sound different. Meet Bros’ experimentation to make her sound more “you-know-what” fail when she starts sounding like Manjulika. Plus, that double-voice-overlapping thing doesn’t work with even Shreya Ghoshal, (remember ‘Mashallah’ from ‘Ek Tha Tiger’?) so how did the composers think it would work Tulsi? Lastly, the lyrics. Kumaar’s new lyrics suit the theme of the song, but aren’t really innovative; all the Bollywood clichés repeat themselves yet again. A revamp that could’ve been great, but ends up being mediocre.

 

4. Maahi Ve
Singer ~ Neha Kakkar, Backing Vocals ~ Amit Gupta, Original Composition by ~ Anand Raaj Anand, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Dev Kohli, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Judke bhi tooti rahi ishqe di dor ve,
Kisko sunaaye jaake toote dil ka shor ve”

– Kumaar

The last song on the album is also a remake, but happens to be a remake of a relatively newer song, ‘Maahi Ve’ (Kaante). People are still coping with the craze of the old song, and T-Series decides to remake it even before the old song’s magic wears away. Anyway, that’s none of our business. The song has been recreated by composer duo Gourov-Roshin, the same duo who remade ‘Kaate Nahin Kat Te’ in ‘Force 2’ and Punjabi Folk song ‘Nachna Aaonda Nahin’ in ‘Tum Bin 2’. Both of those songs, they didn’t quite get it right, what with excessive techno sounds and loud noises overpowering he melodies. This time, not only is Anand Raaj Anand’s original tune sounding great in the hookline, but the padding hat the duo provides in the form of the mukhda and antaras, also sounds nice. It has been composed nicely, perfect for the lounge song theme and NOT excessively and unnecessarily sensual-sounding. It actually sounds like a sad song, like the old song did. I myself cannot believe that I liked the remake. Maybe it is because I didn’t really love the old song too much either.. though I did like it. The arrangements by the duo are cool, especially the minimalistic techno sounds in the hookline. There is not much more to hear in terms of arrangements, but the whole sound of the song is lounge-ish. The interludes are good, having some kind of Arabic music playing in both of them. Neha Kakkar, Gourov-Roshin’s regular Singer, renders this one perfectly. Who could be a better replacement for Richa Sharma than Neha Kakkar? (Well maybe Sonu Kakkar could, but “assi ki kariye!?”) Amit Gupta’s robotic voice might sound irritating at first, but you learn to ignore that as the song progresses. Kumaar’s new lyrics, thankfully, are not cheap, but they take forward the a!bience of he song nicely in connection with Dev Kohli’s original words. A surprisingly good remake!! #5StarHotelSong!!


Wajah Tum Ho doesn’t really cater to my likes. An album full of remakes of great classics, out of which two remakes do not live up to the standards of the original. One original song, which fails because of a certain female singer, but excels in one of its three versions. Not a very enticing summary of an album, is it? But will T-Series understand? No. They’ll always be adamant on ruining old songs to add into their films; so be it. The album reeks of stale compositions and/or boring arrangements. One song, by Gourov-Roshin, a duo that has only disappointed up till this song, stands out as a good one, though it will be forgotten in no time. All in all, it is an album depending on the remakes to propel it forward. 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म <  < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Maahi Ve > Wajah Tum Ho (Lounge Version) > Wajah Tum Ho (Male) > Dil Mein Chhupa Loonga > Dil Ke Paas (Unplugged) > Wajah Tum Ho (Duet) > Dil Ke Paas

 

Which is your favourite song from Wajah Tum Ho? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

Next “dish”: Dangal, Chef: Pritam Chakraborty 

 

‘Dangal’ will be the last review of 2016!! 😀 I’m so excited! Stay tuned for a fun 2016 end-of-the-year wrap-up! 😉