Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Vishal-Shekhar & Julius Packiam
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: YRF Music
♪ Music Released On: 12th December 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 22nd December 2017

Tiger Zinda Hai Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Tiger Zinda Hai is a Bollywood action film starring Salman Khan and Katrina Kaif in lead roles. The film is directed by ‘Mere Brother Ki Dulhan’, ‘Gunday’ and ‘Sultan’ fame Ali Abbas Zafarand produced by Aditya Chopra. The film is a sequel to 2012’s ‘Ek Tha Tiger’, which was directed by Kabir Khan. The music to that instalment was given by Sohail Sen, with a guest composition by Sajid-Wajid, but this time, despite the director’s past associations with Sohail Sen, he goes for his the duo who made the music for ‘Sultan’, Vishal-Shekhar. Now, Vishal-Shekhar’s last album was ‘Befikre’ around the same time last year. After a whole year, they are returning to the scene with such a huge film. Also, seeing that the YRF-Vishal-Shekhar combo has been such an amazing one, I’m sure the album will be great too. Though an action film doesn’t have much scope for great music, it sure can be appreciable! Let’s see whether they build on Sohail’s base of a good commercial album, or go the unconventional and experimental way!

Vishal-Shekhar’s year-long hiatus seemed long, but with the first song of their comeback album, Swag Se Swagat, it seems they returned with all the wrong music. The song sounds like a hastily made Sajid-Wajid-Salman number, with a hook that is utterly banal and another line that desperately goes ‘Kuchnikuchnikuch‘. Lyrically it is one of the most mediocre works coming out of Kamil’s pen. A nice incorporation of Julius Packiam’s theme music for ‘Ek Tha Tiger’ makes the song at least a little catchy. Neha Bhasin’s vocals are great, but Dadlani’s usual energy doesn’t come across this time. The second song Dil Diyan Gallan, marks the duo’s first time working with Atif Aslam, and though there’s nothing new in the way they present his voice, what is new is that he is made to sing in Punjabi — a quite interesting combination, and sounds beautiful too. The composition is soothing and fit for listening on loop. The slightly retrograde arrangements can’t be a good sign: I’ve noticed so many composers falling back on the tried-and-tested tabla rhythm this year. The strings do make their presence felt though — reminds me of Vishal-Shekhar’s ‘Naina’ (Gori Tere Pyaar Mein). Irshad’s lyrics are good too. The song is seen in a much earthier Unplugged Version sung by Neha Bhasin, back in her ‘Jag Ghoomeya’ mode, and her amazing diction of the Punjabi phrases sounds yummy once again. The arrangements here are beautiful too, with a lilting Kashmiri vibe to them. There are places even, when Neha sounds like Kavita Seth. I would’ve also loved another version by Harshdeep Kaur, who suits the Punjabi template amazingly.
The next song, called Zinda Hai, can be called the title track, except it never says ‘Tiger’. Anyway, the song is an electrifying rock number, with Sukhwinder back in his energetic form, and Raftaar complementing him well. Vishal-Shekhar’s composition is good, but not great. Arrangements are also good, but will inevitably be compared to ‘Sultan’s title track, in front of which they pale in comparison. The rest of the album is a very different zone of music than that which one would expect in a Salman Khan entertainer. Daata Tu sees Vishal-Shekhar in the ‘Kahaani’ mode, a beautiful divine melody with Shreya touching the heart strings effortlessly. A wonderful Sufi portion towards the end redeems the song for those who got bored in the beginning. The soundtrack’s best is cleverly saved for the last, and it is Jyoti Nooran’s Tera Noor, a hard-hitting Sufi number, with amazing lyrics by Kamil. The rock is hard-hitting, and though Sufi Rock is almost always great, Vishal-Shekhar take it a notch higher with this one. The adlib at the beginning is heavenly. But beware that this one is highly experimental and will take at least a couple of listens to develop a liking to.

Vishal-Shekhar’s music has beautifully inverted the course of the ‘Tiger’ franchise. Where Sohail Sen & Sajid-Wajid were religiously commercial in the first album, Vishal-Shekhar dare to go experimental and melodious in this one!


Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4.5 = 22.5

Album Percentage:  75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Noor > Daata Tu = Dil Diyan Gallan (Unplugged Version) = Zinda Hai > Dil Diyan Gallan > Swag Se Swagat


That was the last album for the year!! Wow, time flies fast! Do watch out for the December monthly awards, followed by the end of the year round-ups and lists!!



It is time for my Round-Up for December 2017, which is slightly delayed due to me being so busy, but better late than never, right?

December 2017 Round-Up

This Round-Up includes the following music reviews:

1) Fukrey Returns – Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, Gulraj Singh, IshQ Bector, Shree D & Laxmikant-Pyarelal

2) Firangi – Jatinder Shah

3) Tera Intezaar – Raaj Aashoo

4) Monsoon Shootout – Rochak Kohli, Viveick-Mayur, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry

The music review for “Tiger Zinda Hai” will be posted separately.

♦ Fukrey Returns, But Ram Sampath Doesn’t! – FUKREY RETURNS Music Review

♪ Music by: Prem-Hardeep, Jasleen Kaur Royal, Sumeet Bellary, Shaarib-Toshi, IshQ Bector, Shree D, Gulraj Singh & Laxmikant-Pyarelal
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Late Anand Bakshi, Aditya Sharma, Satya Khare, Raftaar, Rohit Sharma, Arsalaan Akhoon, Shree D, Mrighdeep Singh Lamba & Vipul Vig
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 16th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 8th December 2017


Listen to the songs: Saavn

So Fukrey has returned. Sadly, the man behind “Fukrey”s enjoyable music, Ram Sampath has not returned, and after his underwhelming stint in ‘Raees’, he doesn’t get a chance to bounce back with a franchise that was initially his. Anywho, let’s judge on what we have been given.
Prem-Hardeep, the original composers of ‘Kala Chashma’ before Badshah remade it in ‘Baar Baar Dekho’, get a chance now, to ruin somebody else’s song. Laxmikant-Pyarelal’s ‘O Meri Mehbooba’ (Dharam Veer) gets ‘remade’ into Mehbooba, a banal club song which starts and ends with the Fukras being rejected by a random girl in the club, who happens to be singing in Neha Kakkar’s voice. Yasser Desai gets one line that repeats over and over again, and it is frankly the best line of the song. Raftaar’s rap is too stereotypical. Jasleen Kaur Royal’s Peh Gaya Khalara, though fitting into her now-overused Punjabi dance number template, is quite enjoyable, with the sweet vocals by herself and Divya Kumar, Akasa Singh & Akanksha Bhandari accompanying them. The arrangements are what make the track more enjoyable, and also the quirky lyrics.
Familiar territory is entered in Ishq Bector & Shree D’s semiclassical Raina, which, though quite soothing, gets tedious due to its length (it is the only song on the album over three minutes long, and goes up to over four minutes long!) The arrangements help propel it forward though, and also Shree’s vocals. Shaarib-Toshi enter the Bollywood scene after a long time with a delightful Punjabi melody, Ishq De Fanniyar. The male version by Shaarib is great, but the Female Version has all the feels, hence scores higher. The beautiful melody seems like a wonderful sequel to the first movie’s ‘Ambarsariya’. The lyrics are sweet as well, not to mention amazing accordions in the arrangements.
The techno sounds come along with the last three songs, bunched up together, out of which two are by Sumeet Bellary (composed for ‘Fuddu’ last year), and one is by (another person who re-enters Bollywood as a composer after a loooooong time, longer than Shaarib-Toshi), Gulraj Singh.
Sumeet’s two songs rely on weird techno gimmicks, which fail to propel the songs forward. Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai is a quirky friendship anthem, but is pulled down by lack of catchiness in both music and composition. Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai is like a title song, but gets all over the place in no time. The arrangements are slightly better here. Both songs are sung by Gandharv Sachdev, wit Shahid Mallya joining him in the latter song, and aren’t all that well sung.
Gulraj does well in his title song, Fukrey Returns, with a nice catchy musical loop, and heavy use of brass and techno sounds which makes his song sound even better. Siddharth Mahadevan on the vocals is a bonus.

Not as great as the first movie’s album, but still a commendable album considering the amount of new talent on there. But nevertheless, I wish Ram Sampath had returned!


Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 = 27.5

Album Percentage: 68.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Ishq De Fanniyar = Ishq De Fanniyar (Female) > Peh Gaya Khalara = Tu Mera Bhai Nahi Hai = Raina = Fukrey Returns > Bura Na Maano Bholi Hai > Mehbooba

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 43 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Fukrey Returns) = 44

♦ Quite A Desi Album! : FIRANGI Music Review

♪ Music by: Jatinder Shah
♪ Lyrics by: Dr. Devendra Kafir, Ashraf Ali & Krishna Bhardwaj
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 21st November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017


Listen to the songs: Saavn

The song with almost the least amount of Punjabi words (second only to ‘Gulbadan’, which comes later on in the album) in its lyrics, Oye Firangi, starts the album off, and Jatinder Shah steals your heart right away. The charming melody immediately gets you grooving — thanks to a little EDM twist in the hookline — and though it is very simple, it is amazing thanks to the programming, and Sunidhi’s marvellous voice. There comes a British-era ballroom style orchestral portion at the end, but I wish the composer had extended that into another antara instead of ending the song with it! Another charming but heard-before melody, Sahiba Russ Gayiya, starts from where ‘Channa Mereya’ ended, with a similar structure and arrangement. Rahat’s voice is a boon to the song, and it’s the first song of his in a long time that doesn’t get on my nerves.(Ahem, ‘Mere Rashke Qamar’!) I love the way he pronounces the hookline. The Unplugged Version sung by Shafqat Amanat Ali, is funnily named ‘Sahiba (Male)’, as if Rahat’s version wasn’t by a male singer. The song itself is an improvement on the original, in that we get to hear Shafqat’s impeccable aalaaps, and though the choice of Shafqat doesn’t make it sound less like a Pritam song in general [Shafqat is just as much of a Pritam camp singer as Rahat is!] it surely does sound less like ‘Channa Mereya’, because the electric guitars have been toned down. Acoustic guitars play the larger role here. However some factors make both versions balance out at the end.
If ‘Sahiba’ had ‘Channa Mereya’ written all over it, Tu Jit Jawna has ‘Bhaag Milkha Bhaag’s title song all, and I mean ALL over it! Daler Mehndi, who I wish had sung the BMB number too, sings this one, and so it is quite bearable, but otherwise, it falls flat and sounds hollow in its emotion. It is also lyrically a counterpart to ‘Oye Firangi’, except Daler paaji doesn’t call him a ‘Firangi’ (foreigner), while Sunidhi did.
Gulbadan is a Qawwali-esque number, sung by Mamta Sharma. Good to hear her sing a different kind of song, though I’m sure the video will be the same kind of Bollywood ‘item number’. The hookline is greatly composed, with amazing arrangements by Shah, but again, falling into the too much tried-and-tested category of arrangements. I guess the best that comes out of this song is hearing Mamta Sharma’s gentle voice, because she thankfully hasn’t been made to sing in the annoying loud voice of hers.
But the album’s best is the wonderful folksy number, Sajna Sohne Jiha, which transports you back to the Punjab of the olden days. Wadali Bros’ Qawwali ‘Ve Sone Diya Kangna’ has been given a nice reinterpretation by Shah, and it works so well. The rhythms at the beginning really bring out the song’s folksiness, and Jyoti Nooran’s strong voice helps propel it to the finish line, where it emerges the winner compared to the other songs of the album!

A very desi album to the film ‘Firangi!’


Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 3.5 + 4 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 5 = 23

Album Percentage: 76.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Sajna Sohne Jiha > Sahiba Russ Gayiya (Shafqat) > Oye Firangi = Tu Jit Jawna = Gulbadan = Sahiba Russ Gayiya

♦ No Intezaar for This Album! : TERA INTEZAAR Music Review

♪ Music By: Raaj Aashoo
♪ Lyrics by: Shabbir Ahmed
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 11th November 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 1st December 2017


Listen to the songs: Saavn

After a long time (or is it the first time?), one single composer gets a chance to compose an album for a film starring Sunny Leone. Somehow, she debuted smack in the middle of the multicomposer craze and so, got mainly multiple composers to compose for all her films! Raaj Aashoo handles the album.
The title track, titled Intezaar Title, instead of a more apt ‘Tera Intezaar’ (Obviously, because that’s the film’s name), is a dreary 2000s melody, sung by Shreya Ghoshal too, as if she is still in her debut year. Adding to the ennui, is the Qawwali-ish chorus. Raaj’s composition is good, but dated. The arrangement is the best thing about the song, especially the flute. Another very typically 90s melody, Khali Khali Dil, sees Payal Dev and Armaan Malik at their clichéd best. The digital sounds do not help make it more ‘modern’ or anything, and even the harmonica fails to create any impact. Quite a similar sound follows in the dreary Mehfooz, another song straight out of Nadeem-Shravan’s music-bank. The guitar work makes it sound like a version of Mithoon’s ‘Sanam Re’ title track, sans the tablas. Yasser gets a version, and, sounding like Arijit as always, manages to make it sound genuinely interesting. The arrangements here too make this song much more interesting than ‘Khali Khali Dil’. The song appears in two more versions, one by Palak Muchhal and the other by a new singer named Hrishikesh Chury. Palak’s 2½ minute long version fares better than Hrishikesh’s normal length one, because of the pleasant arrangements. Also, Hrishikesh tries to sound like Kumar Sanu.
The best song on the album, Abhagi Piya Ki, becomes the best only because the others don’t deserve it. It appears in two versions, a banal one sung jarringly by Kanika Kapoor and Raja Hasan, and a slightly better version sung much better by Payal Dev and Javed Ali. The tablas that went missing from ‘Mehfooz’ seem to have come to this song, and they play in surplus. The semiclassical touch to the song is good, but the 90s melancholia seems to have followed the composer like a thundercloud whenever he sat to compose for this film.
The only song that does not sound anything like a 90s song is Sexy Baby Girl, and it doesn’t work because it tries to sound uber-cool with its lead singer Swati Sharrma, like always, trying to add unnecessary style to her words, resulting in a disaster. Also, the lyrics are cringeworthy.

This is not an album anyone would have waited for. 


Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 2 + 2.5 + 2.5 + 2 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21.5

Album Percentage: 53.75%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < < ध< नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Abhagi Piya Ki (Javed/Payal) > Abhagi Piya Ki = Intezaar Title = Sexy Baby Girl > Mehfooz = Mehfooz (Palak) > Mehfooz (Hrishikesh) = Khali Khali Dil

♦ Surprising Monsoon in Winter!!: MONSOON SHOOTOUT Music Review

♪ Music by: Rochak Kohli, Viveick Rajagopalan, Mayur Narvekar, Chinmay Harshe, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry
♪ Lyrics by: Sumant Vadhera, Kartik Krishnan, Deepak Ramona, Chinmay Harshe, Rohit Bhasy, Neeraj Sharma, Vinit Gulati, Nidhi Gulati
♪ Music Label: Saregama
♪ Music Released On: 19th December 2017
♪ Movie Released On: 15th December 2017


Listen to the songs: Saavn

Rochak gets two songs, and reminds us why he’s one composer that keeps popping up in numerous albums scattered over the year’s span. It is because of his strong melodies. Pal is a cherishable melody which, though predictable, does give you goosebumps, and makes you want it to rain. Arijit’s heart-touching rendition is enough to make anyone fall for the song. On the other hand Miliyo Re is a very Sachin-Jigar-ish romantic song, with Monali and Rochak behind the mic, with vocals that aren’t amazing, but are functional. The composition is good but very commonplace; not as distinct as Rochak’s other songs this year.
Viveick-Mayur present their only song Andheri Raat next, a haunting song with weird Marathi rap, and awesome Punjabi-flavoured male vocals. Neha Bhasin kills it behind the mic, as does her co-singer, Rajiv Sundaresan, doing the aforementioned Punjabi-flavoured portions. The Marathi rap by Aklesh Sutar is funny, and quite weird too.
The other three songs are quite situational, all by newcomers, with neither one exactly standing above the others. Chinmay Harshe’s Miss You Balma, by Akriti Kakar, is experimental but has you questioning “Why??” because the jazzy composition and the rock arrangements don’t really gel well with each other. Akriti aces the vocals though, singing in an unusually (for her) low pitch. The other duo, Chetan Rao & Vikram Shastry, present two songs, one being a folksy item song Maachis Ki Teeli, in which the very unconventional choice of singer, Bhavya Pandit, whi hasn’t ever sung such a song, proves to be great, as she adjusts to the song’s folksiness very well. Her co-vocalists provide good company as the loafers interjecting occasionally. The last song Faislay has a quite dated tune, and a very mismatching digital loop that starts it off, but Mandar Deshpande’s singing brings it up.

An album that is good, but still will be a wipeout.


Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 3.5 + 3 + 3.5 + 3 = 21

Album Percentage: 70%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Pal = Miliyo Re > Andheri Raat = Maachis Ki Teeli > Miss You Balma = Faislay

Hope you liked this section of reviews! The review for ‘Tiger Zinda Hai’ will be out soon!


Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Arjunna Harjaie, Rochak Kohli, Tanishk Bagchi, Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Adheesh Verma & Sukhwinder Singh
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 18th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 15th September 2017

Lucknow Central Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Lucknow Central is a Bollywood drama film, starring Farhan Akhtar, Gippy Grewal, Inaamulhaq, Deepak Dobriyal , Diana Penty, Rajesh Sharma and Ronit Roy. The film has been directed by Ranjit Tiwari, and produced by Viacom18 Motion Pictures, Monisha Advani, Madhu C. Bhojwani and Nikkhil Advani. The plotline of this film closely resembles that of recently released ‘Qaidi Band’, and it is obviously a coincidence of the worst case. There is a difference though. The music here, is done by multiple composers. Leading the way is youngster Arjunna Harjaie, with three songs, and after he impressed so much in ‘Titoo MBA’, I cant wait to hear what he did here. Tanishk Bagchi has two songs too, and one is a remake, because he is the remake specialist according to T-Series. Guest composer Rochak Kohli presents one song in the album. All three of these composers have proved their mettle in the past, and it goes without saying that when it is an Advani production, the film is bound to have good if not great music. Also, I think Farhan Akhtar himself looks into the music of his films, and so it is bound to be great. Comparisons between this film and ‘Qaidi Band’ are sure to happen, but I noticed ‘Qaidi Band’ relied much more on the music, and this will rely much more on plot points. It reflects even in the number of songs — that film had nine, while this one has five and one version. So let’s see if this album supports the film!

1. Kaavaan Kaavaan

Singer ~ Divya Kumar, Chorus ~ Shivek, Anubhav, Aditya, Shubham, Umesh, Veljon, Vishal and Sarthak From Asm Academy, Original Composition by ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna, Music Recreated by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Original Lyrics by ~ Sukhwinder Singh, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

When Bollywood starts remaking songs from Hollywood movies (doesn’t matter that the song is Hindi, though) you would think things are finally messed up for real. However, it is a pleasant surprise when the remake actually turns out to be good, and quite innovative. Arjuna Harjai (now spelling his name as Arjunna Harjaie) returns after a year and a half, after the song from ‘Do Lafzon Ki Kahani’ last year, and gets the opportunity to recreate this quite popular Punjabi number ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’ (Monsoon Wedding). The original had been composed jointly by Sukhwinder Singh and the film’s composer Mychael Danna. Now this remake is quite a good one. The composition has been kept intact for most of the song, with Arjunna having composed a new prelude to the song, with a haunting tune that immediately gets you interested. The original composition is good, and the “Kaavaan Kaavaan” portions, which I found irritating in the original, actually sound good here. The thing that makes this remake worthwhile though, is the amazing music. Arjunna equips a booming dhol rhythm (Vishal Dande), that has the required effect on the listener, making him or her groove to it happily. The shehnaai gives a wonderful traditional feel to the song. Strings and dafli have been used occasionally to infuse a strain of pathos through the song, and especially the antara (incorporated from the original itself) is beautiful, both in tune and its arrangements. The numerous tempo changes would normally be very confusing to a listener, but here, Arjunna manages them so seamlessly, it is unbelievable. As for the vocals, Divya Kumar steps into Sukhwinder Singh’s shoes without a problem, but because he does so, it evokes memories of Divya’s own ‘Jee Karda’ (Badlapur) in the first line of the song. 😄 And then a layman can easily say, “Hey! It’s a copy!” Because he wouldn’t know that ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’ came before ‘Jee Karda’. But I commend the makers for firmly sticking with Divya’s voice anyway, since he has sung amazingly — the Punjabi-ness comes across beautifully through his voice, and he especially does the emotional portions very nicely. Kumaar’s additional lyrics are good too, adding on Sukhwinder’s original. An apt remake, with an amazing rhythm, and changes that do not disrupt the original song’s integrity.

Rating: 4/5


2. Meer-E-Kaarwaan

Singers ~ Amit Mishra & Neeti Mohan, Music by ~ Rochak Kohli, Lyrics by ~ Adheesh Verma

Rochak Kohli enters the soundtrack next, with his sole song, which happens to be a wonderful Sufi duet, with, again, a strain of pathos running through it. The composer doesn’t usually get to do such songs, but he did impress us with the amazingly soothing ‘Rozana’ (Naam Shabana) earlier this year, so it is no surprise that he ended up composing this one so well. The composition is so fresh, and quite like the Pritam school of alternative rock, it mixes Sufi sounds with a templated rock rhythm. Without the Sufi, the rock would’ve sounded incomplete, and vice versa. So it is like a beautiful combination that couldn’t be avoided. The antara is beautiful, and I must mention Neeti here, because she has sung her antara splendidly, and it is a delight to hear her in that whispery voice of hers. Her co-singer, Amit Mishra, builds on where Pritam left him off in ‘Bulleya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), and here, he makes an effort to remain soft and not as energetic as he was there, and the result is excellent. The arrangements are rich as well, the dholaks providing the authentic Sufi touch, while the amazing guitar work (Keba Jeremiah) and strokes (Tapas Roy) are one of the highlights of the song. The choruses at the end and in the second interlude, have been composed beautifully. Also, there’s a pause after the second interlude, where one thinks the song ends, but it seems Rochak has more to give us! The lyrics by Adheesh Verma are great too! A song that wonderfully mixes elements of Pritam and Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy styles of composition, and a beautiful Sufi-Rock arrangement!

Rating: 4.5/5


3. Teen Kabootar

Singers ~ Mohit Chauhan & Divya Kumar, Additional Vocals ~ Aflatunes, Music by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written & Performed by ~ Raftaar

Arjunna returns to the album with his second song, this time, a fun a cappella number full of onomatopoeia. The beginning itself gets your interest peaked and you listen closely right from the beginning, where the singers do an innovative sargam, that sounds excellent. The composition by Arjunna, yet again, resembles the style of a cappella that Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy are well-known for, and they have succeeded with it in songs like ‘Maston Ka Jhund’ (Bhaag Milkha Bhaag). The composition doesn’t appeal to you at once though. It is the various vocal rhythms and sound effects that help you to find it appealing. The vocalists do an amazing job. Mohit’s metallic voice is the perfect choice for the song, and when he goes seamlessly from low to high notes, it sounds wonderful! Divya usually takes the high octaves and does so here as well. These lead singers definitely do well, but the backing vocalists also provide a very fun element to the song! The interlude where they sing “Chaaku Chaaku Leke Jaa..” is so fun to listen to! Even Raftaar’s rap adds an element of fun to the song. About the arrangements, whatever I say will be less. Amazing percussions (Taufiq Qureshi’s Mumbai Stamp) and guitar work makes the song appealing to listen to, and as mentioned before, Arjunna’s amazing use of the a cappella style in a desi way makes this song sound very unconventional. Kumaar’s situational lyrics too are clever and serve the purpose well. This song might be Arjunna’s ticket to many more Bollywood films which need quirky music!!

Rating: 4/5


4. Rangdaari

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Backing Vocals by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Music by ~ Arjunna Harjaie, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Arijit Singh has started to get songs in every film yet again; there was a kind of low phase intermittently. The only difference is that before, it used to appear right at the beginning of soundtracks. Now it has changed. And in this album too, we see an Arijit Singh song popping up as the fourth song on the soundtrack. The composition is amazingly beautiful. Arjunna Harjaie composes a wonderful Sufi tune, which is familiar to the ears, but soothing nonetheless. The hookline is something you’ve heard time and again, but still works its magic to soothe you down. Especially that line “tu laagey mujhe dushman si..” has been composed very beautifully. The antaras are beautiful, and the whole structure of the song reminds me of the recently released ‘Bairaagi’ (Bareilly Ki Barfi) which sadly, didn’t work for me as well as this. Arjunna decorates his magical composition with stellar musical instruments. First of all, he gives the genuine Sufi touch with the dholaks (Aanchal Goud), which sound wonderful and very earthy. But it is the interlude, in which he introduces a wonderful flute piece (Shubham Shirule), accompanied by a MIND-BLOWING sargam by Arijit (or is it Arjunna?). And it is then that the song gives off beautiful Rahmanish vibes, but also gets its own place in your heart. The Duff rhythms do sound too heard-before, but they’re ignorable due to the wonderful things Arjunna has added besides that. The ethnic strings sound amazing here, and as always, Tapas Roy has done magic with them. The vocals by Arijit are top-notch, but it is his everyday composition and he aces it as was expected. The lyrics are very impressive here as well. A beautiful Sufi song, with a familiar sound, but still impressed me because of its innocence!

Rating: 4.5/5


5. Kaavaan Kaavaan (Remix)

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Renesa, Original Music by ~ Sukhwinder Singh & Mychael Danna, Music Recreated by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Original Lyrics by ~ Sukhwinder Singh, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

So ‘Kaavaan Kaavaan’, the opening track of the album, gets a ‘Remix’, or so T-Series calls it. But this isn’t the remix of Arjunna Harjaie’s song. It is the remix of the original song from ‘Monsoon Wedding’, done by Tanishk Bagchi, the third composer of the album. Also, I wouldn’t call it a remix at all, since it might just be another remake of the song by Tanishk, but Arjunna’s must have gotten chosen as the main version. This one is merely Tanishk’s original take on this song. That having been said, I can say Tanishk has worked very hard on this one. He tries to add digital beats wherever possible to make the song sound fresh, but some places it just doesn’t work, especially after the Indian arrangements that led the Arjunna version. Not that Tanishk hasn’t added dhols and all, but the emotion of the song doesn’t come across as well in this one. For a dance track though, this is better. Tanishk also ropes in Sukhwinder himself to re-dub the song, and that’s definitely a plus point. Renesa does the female portions of the song, and she sounds awesome. What bugged me was the hookline, where I found the backing vocalists too loud. A more zesty remake, but not more effective.

Rating: 3.5/5


6. Baaki Rab Pe Chhod De

Singers ~ Brijesh Shandilya, Vayu, Tanishk Bagchi & Arman Hasan, Music by ~ Tanishk Bagchi, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Tanishk’s second song serves as the caboose for this album, closing the album on a very lively and bright note. I say this because right from the beginning of the song, you know it is going to lift your spirits. It starts quite similarly to ‘Raula’ (Jab Harry Met Sejal), with lively plucked strings. The composition is fun to listen to, too, but gets slightly disjointed in the latter parts. It starts off brilliantly though, and the hookline is delightful. The arrangements here too, are mainly digital beats, but this time they succeed in remaking the song livelier. Tanishk’s trademark liveliness comes across well through this song, and it is a thing to wonder, why he spends time in doing some remakes. The singers do justice to the song, the lead singer, Brijesh doing an exceptionally good job. Little Arman Hasan, who we heard in ‘Kankad’ (Shubh Mangal Saavdhan), singing alongside his father Raja Hasan, does well too. Vayu has probably done some backing vocals, so I couldn’t really place him in the song! Kumaar’s lyrics, are amazing. He writes some amazingly positive lines in this one too, taking the support of various scientific inventors like Thomas Edison and Graham Bell. Lively song, but could’ve been slightly better!

Rating: 4/5

Lucknow Central is one of those rare multicomposer albums that is a delight to listen to. Well, I guess when each composer knows what he is best at, and delivers the best of whatever he is best at, with the proper supervision by the director and producer, the multicomposer album can also turn out well. Ek Composer, Do Composer, Teen Composer, But No Sign That This Album is Multicomposer!!


Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 3.5 + 4 = 24.5

Album Percentage: 81.67%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Rangdaari = Meer-E-Kaarwaan > Kaavaan Kaavaan = Baaki Rab Pe Chhod De = Teen Kabootar > Kaavaan Kaavaan (Remix)


Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 31 (from previous albums) + 02 {counting both different takes on ‘Ajj Mera Jee Karda’} = 33


Which is your favourite song from Lucknow Central? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂



Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu, Priya Saraiya & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 17th August 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th August 2017

A Gentleman Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

A Gentleman is an upcoming Bollywood action comedy, starring Sidharth Malhotra, Jacqueline Fernandez, Suniel Shetty and Darshan Kumar in lead roles. The film is directed by Raj Nidimoru & Krishna DK and produced by Fox Star Studios. The film features Sidharth Malhotra in a double role, one being Sundar Susheel, and the other ‘Risky’. Hence the tagline of the film, ‘Sundar Susheel Risky’. The music of the film is given by the go-to music composers for Raj & DK, Sachin-Jigar. Going by the music of ‘Shor In The City’, ‘Go Goa Gone’, and ‘Happy Ending’, I’m sure this one’s also going to be a treat for people who love quirky music, and the genre of action comedy would give amazing song situations as well! Sachin-Jigar’s discography this year boasts of as many as seven film albums (with ‘Hindi Medium’ being a multicomposer one), and this one is the third to release. ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’ remained my favourite album of the year until Pritam’s gigantic ‘Jab Harry Met Sejal’ released. I can just hope that this one follows suit and becomes another favourite of mine this year!

1. Disco Disco

Singers ~ Benny Dayal & Shirley Setia, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Aaja ve hila denge hum aaj angana,
tere naal karke beat drop nachna,
Dil disco disco bole saari raat SAJNA!!” 

– Vayu

Sachin-Jigar’s third album of the year starts off with a very filmy disco song. Is filmy bad or good? Let’s find out. The composition is very catchy, especially the cross line that goes “Aaja Ve Hila Denge Hum Aaj Anganaa“. That part sounds so much like a retro number. The hookline is a typical Bollywood fare, but still manages to hook the listeners. I, for one, found this song more instantly appealing than any of the others on the album (because they took time to grow). The mukhda and antara follow suit, and don’t let the interest of the listener waiver. The major reason you are hooked to the song till the end, must be the short duration. Sachin-Jigar keep the song at a crisp 2:47, neither too long nor too short. The arrangements are great: the disco-esque feel comes out through the nice bass,drums and guitars, and a totally unexpected tumbi (Tapas Roy). The tumbi is what actually makes the song sound very experimental. It gets a nice solo portion in the interlude and towards the end. The vocals are entertaining; Can Benny Dayal ever disappoint in a club number? I love how he pronounces “sajna” as “sajjena“! Sachin-Jigar help Shirley Setia get her first Bollywood song, and despite everything against her on social media, she really handles the song well, and Sachin-Jigar with their genius thoughts, know how to use her voice to the best effect — in a club song! However, she does mumble a bit in the antara, but I guess the song called for that. Vayu’s lyrics are the usual Hinglish lyrics of Bollywood, but work quite well in the filmy song. A totally filmy disco song!

Rating: 4/5


2. Baat Ban Jaaye

Singers ~ Siddharth Basrur & Priya Saraiya, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Hum dono aur yeh saari raat, sharaabi ho jaaye toh,
Band ho kamre mein hum do, aur chaabi kahin kho jaaye toh!
Toh baat ban jaaye!!” 

– Priya Saraiya

Here onwards in the album, things get a bit more Sachin-Jigar-ish, in that you take more time to get accustomed to the song and like it. The time may be two listens, three listens or even more, but the song is actually are wonderful once you listen to them, with close attention to the music. This one here, is a beach party number, and again, it has a bit of a retro touch. It starts off with a very contemporary vibe, the composition flowing like a romantic song. However, it takes an unexpected turn in the cross line (“hum dono aur yeh saari raat“) where, if you pay close attention to the music, a retro vibe kicks in. The composition for the hookline is a trademark Sachin-Jigar one, and makes you groove instantly, especially the hoots after the words “baat ban jaaye” have been sung. The antara is where the song loses pace and we lose interest; that composition is quite heard-before. Luckily enough, this song is short too, which makes the cross line come back soon enough. The arrangements are fantastic here, and suit as a beach party number. Acoustic guitars start the song off, giving the freshness to the song, as a beach number should be. The retro vibe I talked about consists of amazing guitars played in a retro manner. The digital beats are more heavy in this song, and quirky sounds decorate the song. The vocals are good, Siddharth Basrur leading the way in getting the listeners hooked. However, Priya Saraiya seems a bit too much autotuned here, and it loses the charm of her actual voice. Her lyrics too, are an ordinary fare, but suit the situation well, especially the hookline. A party song that seems ordinary, but will grow!

Rating: 4/5


3. Chandralekha

Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani & Jonita Gandhi, Lyrics by ~ Vayu

“Maari tuney aisi entry, hil gayi poori country,
Mere dil pe dent permanent pad gayi, nazrein jo mili,
Hadd se bhi zyaada cute tu, mere karmon ka fruit tu,
Koi hai gagan mein toh heaven jahaan se aakar tu giri!”

– Vayu

The next song throws us back into the years, with a characteristic rock and roll/hard rock vibe to it. It slightly resembles what Sachin-Jigar had done in ‘Yeh Jawaani Teri’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), but in a more Westernized manner. The composition again, takes time to grow, and till then all you can really focus on is the music. The guitars and drums are groovy as expected in a rock and roll song, but of course, Sachin-Jigar add a surprise element every time, and here, it is that sensuous saxophone, which sounds amazing every time it plays. The composition is good too, and like I said, it just takes time for you to catch on. The hookline is the mukhda, making it very short yet again. Two antaras follow, and also an interlude by Jonita. I loved the effect Sachin-Jigar have given to the last line of each antara — “Mud Mud Ke Na Dekha“, and “mujhe ek bhi paise ka”. There’s another amazing saxophone solo in the interlude before Jonita’s portions, and that’s even more impressive. The characteristic piano played in that retro manner, is mind blowing too. The vocals are amazing. I mean, how can Vishal Dadlani fail to crank up the energy? His husky voice is all you need to make this song entertaining. Jonita gets a very small part to sing, which is more like an interlude, but she nails it, in the traditional ‘Bollywood girl’ ‘I’m-Not-Interested’ manner. Vayu’s lyrics are fun as well, and kudos to him for using a name like Chandralekha for the girl, and also to Sachin-Jigar for fitting it into the tune so perfectly! A retro rock song that is really stress-busting!

Rating: 4/5


4. Laagi Na Choote

Singers ~ Arijit Singh & Shreya Ghoshal, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

“Iss tarah chaahun tujhe,
Chaahun bhi toh tujhse main,
Ik pal ko bhi door na reh sakun..
Chaahe judaa,tere mere, raaste hain magar,
Aa main manzilein jod doon!
Rishta sa hai yeh, judne lagaa jo,
Chahoon kabhi na yeh toote!
Laagi na choote… Laagi na choote!”

– Priya Saraiya

After three upbeat numbers, and after much thought about whether the album does indeed have a soft and mellow number or not, here pops up a romantic song. Actually, this song was the last to release, so the makers successfully kept the romantic song a secret till the very end. The song falls into the category of ‘Slow Poison’ romantic songs — as you can tell, the song does take time to grow again! However, this time, the amount of time it takes is relatively less, thanks to the amazing composition! It has shades of Sachin-Jigar’s own ‘Thoda Thoda’ (Jayantabhai Ki Luv Story), but is way more intense. The mukhda is very trademark Sachin-Jigar, and the way the female portions are composed in the lower octave, is also, very characteristic of Sachin-Jigar’s previous works. It increases the magic manifold. The hook is something you just can’t forget soon! It has been made to stun us, and stun it does! The flow of the song is just so powerful, you are attentive till the end. Again, a short duration helps that to happen; your attention doesn’t wander somewhere in the middle. The arrangements are minimal and digital beats make up most of the background of the song. But the piano at the beginning and throughout is just so captivating, that you can’t dislike it. The guitar in the interlude also sounds unconventional. As for the vocals, Arijit and Shreya always make a good pair, and this time, Arijit takes the high portions while Shreya quite expertly handles the low portions, a role we see her taking up quite rarely. Well, Sachin-Jigar even made Rekha Bhardwaj (who is know for her beautifully high-pitched voice) to take up an amazing low-pitched voice in ‘Mileya Mileya’ (Happy Ending) and ‘Judaai’ (Badlapur), so I guess it’s just an innate trick that they use! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are good too, and she keeps them simple and sweet, avoiding heavy philosophical ideas. A beautiful romantic song, with nothing new, but really has you hooked!

Rating: 5/5


5. Bandook Meri Laila

Singers ~ Ash King & Jigar Saraiya, Rap Performed by ~ Sidharth Malhotra & Raftaar, Lyrics by ~ Vayu, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

“Aaye haaye haaye, yeh goli daayein baayein jaaye,
Har disha mein yeh visphot kardi ae,
Jaaye jaaye jaaye, jiya na jaaye jaaye jaaye,
Meri jaan pe yun chot kardi ae,
Seene mein tuney, bullet utaari toh,
Udey jugnu haan, udey jugnu,
Le gayi dil ko, kudi tu shikari,
Bana Majnu main, bana Majnu!
Bandook meri Laila!”

– Vayu

Now this was the song everybody was waiting for ever since the motion poster of the film had released. It is described by the makers as an action song, and an action song it is! The song is probably some of the most addictive stuff to have released in the recent years. The hook has had everyone grooving to it for a long time. I don’t know why, maybe because of high expectations, the song seemed very flat the first time I heard it. However, with every subsequent listen, it grew more and more. The composition is addictive; the mukhda is awesome, and the hookline is world-famous now. The rest of the song is mostly rap. Now, about the rap. The rap by Sidharth Malhotra seems very odd, and it seems like a publicity stunt. Earlier this year, Sachin-Jigar made Parineeti sing a ghazal ‘Maana Ke Hum Yaar Nahin’ (Meri Pyaari Bindu), and she aced it. However, here Sidharth seems a bit dull, and when Raftaar performs his rap, you can tell the huge difference between both of them. Of course, Raftaar is a professional rapper and that’s the reason, and I feel he should’ve gotten to sing the entire rap. The ‘Ban meri Laila‘ hooks are very addictive, and the way they sing ‘Laila!!‘ after that line is amazing! The arrangements are international sounding, and very impressive. It falls into the Tropical house genre which Pritam introduced earlier this year with the ‘Raabta’ title track. The EDM is highly impressive. It starts like a Chainsmokers track, and gets better than any Chainsmokers track as it progresses! The action theme is brought out amazingly through the arrangements. Ash King as the leading vocalist, does a fabulous job; it’s been a long time since we’ve heard him in such a groovy song! And Jigar Saraiya sounds great on the hookline. Vayu’s lyrics are fun and interesting as well. The song has a proper international touch to it, but it could’ve been better without Sidharth’s rap! 

Rating: 4/5

A Gentleman is yet another Sachin-Jigar album that doesn’t disappoint. It’s so tough to have an album in which all the songs have repeat value, and especially for an action film. Thankfully enough, Sachin-Jigar and Raj & DK always make a good team, and all of their albums together have been quirky and cool, not to mention catchy. And such albums are the ones that become chartbusters right away. After ‘Meri Pyaari Bindu’, Sachin-Jigar provide another wholesome album with ‘A Gentleman’! Sachin-Jigar are two gentlemen who hardly ever disappoint!!


Total Points Scored by This Album: 4 + 4 + 4 + 5 + 4 = 21

Album Percentage: 84%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Just listen to the album! 🙂



Which is your favourite song from A Gentleman? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂



Music Album Details
♪ Music by: JAM8, Meet Bros., Sohrabuddin & J-Star
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Kumaar, Jitendra Raghuvanshi, J-Star & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 3rd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Raabta Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Raabta is an upcoming Bollywood romantic reincarnation drama, starring Kriti Sanon, Sushant Singh Rajput, Jim Sarbh, Varun Sharma and Rajkummar Rao. The film is the directorial debut of already many times successful producer, Dinesh Vijan. The film is produced by him along with Homi Adajania, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s official gist is this: “When a human being dies, they lose 21 grams from the body. This, they say, is the weight of the soul. The journey of a soul transcends over space and time… beyond the realms of this earth. This film tells the story of two seemingly ordinary individuals, going about their lives until their paths cross and they realize that they belong with one another. Unaware of a connection that was forged several hundred years ago, Shiv and Saira are inexplicably drawn to each other, and it takes them on a hysterical rollercoaster of love, intrigue, entertainment and life (twice over!). When two souls unite, they become one.” 😴 Hopefully, it is executed well. The music of the film is by JAM8, and a guest composition by Meet Bros. also features on the album. I guess we all know the controver(sies) surrounding the music of the film, due to that one guest song, so there is no point reiterating them. We all know who the actual composer of the songs credited to JAM8 is, but he wishes that his name shouldn’t be associated with ‘Raabta’ because of his policy to only compose for solo-composer albums, so there’s no point in naming him. I just hope the music company learns its lessons and reconsiders it’s actions!! On this grave (😄) note, let’s start with the music review of ‘Raabta’. 

1. Ik Vaari Aa / Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hai pyaar toh kayi dafaa kiya,
Tujhse nahi kiya toh kya kiya,
Tera mera yeh vaasta,
Hai iss zindagi ki daastaan,
Ya phir koi hamaara pehle se raabta?
Toh ikk Vaari aa, aa bhi jaa!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The album starts off with a very happy-go-lucky, romantic club number, with a lilting yet groovy sound. The composition has the stamp of Pritam all over it, and the way it flows is in the trademark way that almost all Pritam songs flow. The song’s melody starts off right with the hook, which is a wonderfully composed piece, that efficiently works in pulling you into the song. The antara following it, too, is very happy-sounding and charming, but it is the last stanza, which I call the ‘conclusion’ because it just doesn’t seem like an antara, is what steals the thunder. That part has been composed in a very entrancing manner, and is a major throwback to the corresponding ‘conclusion’ part in Pritam’s ‘Tu Chahiye’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The high-pitched bridge line that leads to the hookline, is just amazing. The arrangements are quite similar to Pritam’s previous club song arrangements, with the upbeat EDM portions, and that wonderful “chipmunk” that we heard in ‘The Breakup Song’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) last year. There is a Sajid-Wajid touch in the arrangements somewhere (‘Mukhtasar’ from ‘Teri Meri Kahaani’ and ‘Raat Bhar’ from ‘Heropanti’). But on a whole, the EDM has a very international touch to it, and it sounds like JAM8 is trying to recreate Pritam’s club arrangements in an international style. But because I always something out-of-this-world in a Pritam club song, and since this song is by his company, this song was quite underwhelming in that department. The pumped-up portions of the arrangements sometimes clash with Arijit’s super-high-pitch, and that sounds quite odd at times. That brings us to Arijit’s vocals. Definitely not the best he’s performed, but he still manages to carry the song in a quite charismatic way, and doesn’t drive you to sleep like he did in ‘Half Girlfriend’. But of course, the parts where he goes super-high-pitch, made me uncomfortable, and that doesn’t happen with every other singer. In the second version of the song which takes a sans EDM route, and is more reliant on guitars to propel it, everything that sounded wrong in the arrangements is set right. A slight rock guitar backdrop makes the song lighter than it was in the original version, and definitely more enjoyable. The company also replaces the fun chipmunk-like EDM with a nice vocal chorus, which gives off ‘Tum Mile’ vibes somehow,and immediatel removes all Sajid-Wajid vibes. As for the vocals, they have improved due to Jubin’s smooth treatment of the composition, taking care not to sound like he is straining his voice too much, and handling the high notes much better than Arijit did. And the small nuance he takes while singing “yaara” and all of its rhyming words, is just magnificent! In the conclusion stanza, Jubin gets to sing an entirely differently-tuned line that fits in perfectly and sounds as good as its counterpart in the original version. Oh, and it is a welcome change, considering that we have been hearing the original for over a month now. So this reprise is really one of the best reprises to have come out, ever! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are great, and suitable for a fun romantic number. I don’t know what I missed in the first version, but something is surely missing. To cover it up though, the Reprise takes a nice romantic twist!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4.5/5 for Jubin’s Version


2. Raabta (Title Track)

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Arijit Singh, Original Composition by ~ Pritam, Music Recreated by ~ JAM8, Original Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya, New Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Hadd se zyaada mohabbat hoti hai jo,
Kehte hain ke ibaadat hoti hai woh,
Kusoor hai, ya koi yeh fitoor hai,
Kyun lage sab kuch andhera hai,
Bas yehi noor hai,
Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”

– Irshad Kamil

The recreation craze continues as ‘Raabta’ (Agent Vinod) is recreated in this movie, which takes its name from that song. But how fortunate are we, that the man who made the original song, is the one who is remaking it (through his company, that is). The track, originally a romantic number, and probably the first time Arijit Singh actually came into large notice, though he had sung other songs before that, has now been remade into a dance track for the film. But this dance track is as far from a regular Bollywoodish dance track as you can imagine. It has a very quite and soothing vibe to it, and a very unexpected twist in the form of a nice interruption wherein JAM8 introduces to Bollywood, a new genre of music called ‘Tropical House’, which sounds like some techno Caribbean music. Anyway, the new composition that the group has made for the remake, is great. The mukhda, sung by newbie (in Bollywood) Nikhita Gandhi, is charming and scintillating, with its romantic vibes really reaching you. The way they have joined it to the hookline of the original song too, is quite cool. The time the song goes downhill is when, after the nice and refreshing Tropical interlude, Arijit comes back to reprise his portion, the antara from the original song, a part I felt didn’t quite merge with this song. Yes, I know that if the hookline adapted well into this song, every other part should too, but I just didn’t feel the antara this time. When it went back to the new composition, I started grooving to the beats again. So it was like a sudden disconnection from the song. But then, JAM8 makes up for it in the fantabulous (which is a very small word to describe it!) ‘conclusion’ part of the song, which has a lilting and entrancing tune. Especially the oddly-but-fantastically placed line, “Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”, is a wonderful bridge from the ‘Conclusion’ to the hookline. And the continuous EDM beats, really infuse life into the song. The composers also add wonderful piano notes occasionally, and the guitars that start off the song are so vibrant! So I guess I have already spoken about the arrangements as much as I could. Moving on to the vocals, Nikhita Gandhi, another singer from the Rahman camp of singers, joins Pritam’s camp for this one (quite similar a story to that of the other well known ‘Gandhi’ singer, Jonita — not sisters!) And she totally owns her debut. Yes, Arijit gets the major part in the song, but because she opens it so smashingly, the listeners get hooked and keep waiting for her voice to return. Sadly, it comes back only for the hooklines. Arijit is his usual self, trying to be charming , succeeding and also acing that aforementioned ‘conclusion’ portion. Irshad Kamil writes the new lyrics for this song, wrapping Amitabh Bhattacharya’s already awesome lyrics with an awesomeness of his own. A song that takes itself miles away from its original, neither better nor worse, but just at par, in a different genre. Barring the copy-paste antara, the song is quite good.

Rating: 4/5


3. Sadda Move

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh, Pardeep Singh Sran & Raftaar, Additional Vocals ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Bhangra ke rhythm mein, tuney Bharatnatyam kyun milaaya?
Mere mehboob, dekho sadda move!”

– Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya

In the next song, JAM8 cuts out the whole international feel that was looming over the album all this time, to replace it with a street hip-hop number in Punjabi style. And I must say, how disappointed I was, hearing this song. The composer takes a very weird route with this song. There isn’t much by way of composition, but whatever is, sounds like very often recycled Punjabi lines used innumerable times. Like the antaras. And the mukhda just starts off so abruptly, it takes time to adjust to it. Actually, a rap starts the song, and it is quite obnoxious. Raftaar. That “Sadda Move Move” line by Raftaar is so irritating. The hookline of the song, too, isn’t too impressive. Arrangements are what lift the song up for me. That flute loop that plays every now and then is just insane — a glimpse of the trademark Pritam-ish insanity that JAM8 has so far, cruelly kept out of this album. The digital beats are quite groovy, but they don’t really provide anything new and innovative, which is what I would like to hear when I listen to a Punjabi street hip-hop number. The tumbi and “burrrhhhaaaa“s are the typical Punjabi people clichés, thrust into the song just to stereotype Punjabi music. But I must say, the dhols are quite engaging. The vocals are above average — Diljit sounds good but not excellent; probably the composition is barring me from liking his rendition too. On the other hand, his co-singer, Pradeep Singh Sran, who made it big in Bollywood with his song ‘Cutiepie’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), brings back his Labh Janjua-ish voice and steals the listeners’ hearts. Raftaar is strictly annoying, and his rap is least enjoyable. Overall the song has a strong Meet Bros-ish vibe. Legends Amitabh Bhattacharya & Irshad Kamil come together to write something that Kumaar or Shabbir Ahmed would’ve written by themselves, if they had been approached. Quite stereotypical, and ‘enjoyable’ would be an exaggeration. A clear dip in the level of the album. 

Rating: 3/5


4. Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Altamash Faridi & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Tere nishaan, yaadon mein hai,
Tu kyun nahin, taqdeer mein?
Naadaan dil, hai dhoondhta,
Qurbat teri tasveer mein.
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Dekhe khudaya, do aashiqaan diyaan tabaahiyaan
Ve badi lambiyaan si judaiyaan!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After three relatively happy-sounding songs, it was necessary, I guess, for the composers to bring in a touch of pathos in the album. So they bring a sad song sung by Arijit, which I feel is loosely modelled on Pritam’s ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), because of the slight Sufi touch to it. The composition, I have to say, is something that disappointed me highly. I just couldn’t find anything great in it. The song is trying so hard to be emotional, but manages to ve not even one bit emotional! And that almost never happens with Pritam songs. The first two stanzas are composed on the same tune, and that is a major drawback, because it is what makes the song sound very, very monotonous. The very first line of the song made me think, “What?” because the music that starts off the song is very promising! After that it becomes a crying fest, something so overdramatic I wouldn’t have expected it to be a song from a big banner films as ‘Raabta’. The hookline is so unidimensional, it hardly managed to touch my heart as an emotional song should. The composition ends with another “conclusion” stanza, and this time, that stanza is clearly trying to emulate the “conclusion” of ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) with its composition, arrangements and Arijit’s singing style. The arrangements of the song are also very heard-before, and stale arrangements. The Dholak rhythm has gotten so old and typical, I wish no composer uses it in sad songs anymore! The music that starts the song though, the violin one, is very good! And that is what made me believe the rest of the song too, would follow suit. Arijit sings this one with utmost lack of expression, almost like a robot. It seems he spent all his energy in ‘Ik Vaari Aa’. The Faridi brothers pitch in for a good but again, clichéd, Sufi interlude, that only makes the song sound more artificial. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are good, but not amazing. A sad song that makes me sad that it had to be in this film.

Rating: 2/5


5. Main Tera Boyfriend

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Neha Kakkar & Meet Bros., Original Composition by ~ J-Star & Sohrabuddin, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Na Na Na Na!

– J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi

Guest composers, Meet Bros, step into the album now, for their remake of the popular track of J-Star’s, ‘Na Na Na Na’. Now there’s a huge controversy regarding who stole the song from whom and blah blah blah. But besides all that, I think the whole nation is raving about the song and how catchy it is. The original was definitely one of the catchiest pop songs of that year and even now, and Meet Bros try to keep its catchiness intact. They have built a typical Bollywoodish composition around it, which sounds least like a Meet Bros. composition, and more like a Pritam one. How coincidental because JAM8’s ‘Sadda Movie’s sounded like a Meet Bros song. The Mukhda starts the song off on a very nice tune, and expectations rise right away. It is the antara that could’ve been better, and repeating each Antara twice was not needed; it just made the song that much longer. The hook… Do I need to speak about it! 😀 The arrangements too, are very similar to Pritam’s, complete with the chipmunk noises here too. The club sounds are great as well, and make the song enjoyable at all points. The vocals are energetic, with Arijit replenishing all his drained energy, and giving a very spunky rendition of the song. Is it just me, or does anyone else also think he sounds amazing in upbeat numbers as well!? Neha cannot match up to her co-singer’s level and performs a bit disappointingly this time. Meet Bros. also come and sing an interlude that would have sounded better had it stayed out of the album. 😥 And after that, there’s a lady’s voice that says “I Wanna be your boyfriend.” 😮 Kumaar’s lyrics are the usual type of lyrics that go into such songs. A song that I didn’t expect much from, since it was a remake, turns out to be quite foot-tapping!

Rating: 3.5/5


6. Darasal

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Inkaar mein jo chhupa hai woh ikraar ho!”

– Irshad Kamil

Finally, to finish off the album, JAM8 bring an Atif Aslam romantic melody, something that is quite quintessential in recent T-Series albums. As soon as the song started, it reminded me of ‘Jeena Jeena’ (Badlapur) because of the similar pattern of the guitar piece. The composition is actually very sweet, and it is also slow-paced like ‘Jeena Jeena’, and would suit well for a waltzy arrangement too. But JAM8 choose to keep things minimal and grace the song with nothing more than a nice and sweet guitar riff, and occasional amazing strings. The tune, though slow-paced, grows on you instantly. It is instantly likeable, unlike all the other JAM8 songs in the album, which I took some time to get accustomed to (Except the Jubin ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). I loved the way how they repeated the last line of every antara twice, and the last line of the song thrice. The antara itself is very calm and soothing, and gives a very breezy feel to the song. In the Mukhda, the line where he repeats the words twice, is just outstanding! (“Teri Ada, Ada Pe Marta…” etc.) This is actually what is expected from an ideal romantic comedy. Sadly, it comes in at the end of this album! 😪 Atif’s vocals are some of the best I’ve heard from him in quite a while; he sings the song with a totally different charm than he sung his other songs of late. It draws the picture of the typical boy-next-door image in Bollywood rom-coms. Kamil’s lyrics are just beautiful! Some of them are just salute-worthy, like the one I’ve featured up there at the beginning of this song’s review. Finally, a cute romantic song that befits the film’s romantic aspects. 

Rating: 4.5/5

Raabta is an album I wouldn’t have expected (read, I would have expected much more) from a romantic film like this. Most of the songs are prohibited to be the usual fun-and-frolic that we associate with Pritam, for no specific reason. In fact, the dance song from guests Meet Bros is better than the dance song from JAM8 itself. JAM8 sticks to a very conventional route, save the title track, and only manages to deliver well in two songs in that conventional barrier (‘Darasal’ and ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). But I can’t take away from the album that, as an entire album, it is full of variety and sounds good. It is just lacking on the innovative quotient, and likeability quotient, and hence, the repeat value. ‘Raabta’ means ‘connection’, but there is a slight breach in this Raabta!


Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 + 3 + 2+ 3.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darasal = Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version) > Raabta (Title Track) > Ik Vaari Aa = Main Tera Boyfriend > Sadda Move > Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan


Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 = 17


Which is your favourite song from Raabta? Please vote for it below! Thanks!



Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Rishi Rich, Jaidev Kumar, Amjad-Nadeem, Yash Narvekar & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Bipin Das, Yash Narvekar, Amit Dhanani, Late Anand Bakshi, Sonu Saggu, Rohit Sharma, Parry G & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 23rd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Behen Hogi Teri Album Cover



To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Behen Hogi Teri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy starring Shruti Hassan, Rajkummar Rao, Gautam Gulati and Gulshan Grover in lead roles. The film is directed by Ajay K. Pannalal and produced by Tony D’Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. The film’s slogan is “All Indians are NOT Brothers and Sisters!” Well, going by the trailer and this slogan thingy, it seems like a quirky and light hearted romantic comedy, but you know Bollywood, they can add drama into anything and everything. The music of the film, as expected is by multiple composers, including Pritam’s A&R venture JAM8 (Kaushik-Akash-Guddu this time), Rishi Rich, Amjad-Nadeem (after a long time, huh!), Jaidev Kumar and Yash Narvekar. Out of these composers, none, I repeat none, have given anything outstanding in the past, so one can just hope that some miracle occurs and they give us great music for this film. Expectations are moderate, but hoping for the best, let’s explore the music of ‘Behen Hogi Teri’.

1. Jai Maa

Singers ~ Sahil Solanki, Jyotica Tangri & Parry G, Original Composition by ~ Prem Hardeep & Badshah, Music Recreated by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap Lyrics by ~ Parry G

Wow. So now the music industry has started remaking remakes. ‘Kala Chashma’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which was a quite banal remake by Badshah, of the Punjabi pop number ‘Kala Chashma’ by Prem Hardeep, itself, now gets remade into a mata-ki-chowki song. Jaidev Kumar, who had earlier remade ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz) into a similar satirical devotional song, ‘O Meri Mata’ in ‘Bajatey Raho’, takes the same composition that Badshah had made. Nothing changed in the tune, and that’s why it would make the public even crazier. The arrangements seem more toned down and not as harsh and shrill as they were in the original (I mean the original remake). I guess they added the dhols here specially for the jagraata setting. And they’ve, quite to my immense pleasure, gotten rid of the EDM at the end, and the shouting ladies and breaking glasses from the ‘Baar Baar Dekho’ song. Vocals here sound good and aptly funny as per the Goddess prayer setting. Sahil Solanki sounds much better than Amar Arshi, the original singer of both the original and Badshah’s remake. A rapper called Parry G {I don’t know why these people like to write a single letter after a weird nickname; we are going to meet another one later in the album!} reprises Badshah’s “sadkon pe chale jab ladkon ke dilon mein tu aag laga de baby firrrreeeeee” with a rap that sounds much more pleasant. Jyotica Tangri is a nice replacement for Neha Kakkar, but with less of an edge in her voice. The replacement lyrics by Sonu Saggu are quite funny too, but not something that will make you “ROFL” or “LOL” either. Interesting how the remake of a remake turns out to be better than the original remake. Let’s start remaking remakes now. P.S. I hope a certain music company doesn’t read that or else we will be over-flooded with ‘Baby Doll’ remakes. (Then again, aren’t we already over flooded by them!)

Rating: 3/5


2. Tera Hoke Rahoon

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash-Guddu (KAG for JAM8), Lyrics by ~ Bipin Das

Next up, we get a dulcet melody from Pritam’s A&R company, JAM8. This time, the composers of the two songs in ‘1920 London’, Kaushik-Akash, are joined by someone calling himself Guddu, thus making it a trio. And this way, they produce a song that I will remember as one of the best (and the best till now) from any composer for JAM8. The composition, for once, doesn’t sound like a Pritam composition; for once the composers working behind the JAM8 label do not try to emulate Pritam’s late 2000s style of composition. In fact, the composition kind of reminded me of Bobby-Imran’s songs in ‘Badmaashiyan’, or some of Jeet Gannguli’s works. The free flow of the hookline makes it instantly likeable, and the mukhda and antara has a calm, soothing but haunting touch to it, something I’m always ready for if it isn’t too maudlin. The arrangements are fabulous; they just add to the haunting characteristic of the song. The guitar has been played in such a subtle manner, in the beginning, that it is impossible to not be sucked in right away. And when the orchestra sets in, the song just gets many times better. The electronic tabla adds to the serenity, while that wonderful flute interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. In the antara guitars have been played in a wonderful play-stop-play-stop manner that is so comforting. And the tabla doesn’t stop either! Arijit, the first choice for any composer associated with Pritam, and Pritam himself, renders the mellow composition with such ease, in the voice of his that I love, as opposed to that droning voice he uses in sleepy songs. The way he sings the “uff tak na yaara karoon”, is so beautiful! Bipin Das (newcomer?) writes lyrics that are instantly lovable. The first time JAM8 do something that doesn’t resemble their mentor’s work heavily, and it turns out to be a success. 

Rating: 4.5/5


3. Jaanu

Singers ~ Juggy D, Shivi & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

So after the remake of a remake, we get a remake of another classic, in fact, one of my favourite songs by R.D. Burman. The likeable, sweet and fun-to-listen-to classic gets a makeover and now it looks horrendous. Rishi Rich seems to have struck a big deal in Bollywood after his long hiatus, because after he returned in ‘Half Girlfriend’, with a mediocre title song, he gets to do another (though horrible) song here. The man makes sure that somebody says “This is a Rishi Rich refix” before the song starts, and that is so annoying! We have the credits in front of us and we can read your name there. I know here are some music listeners out there who don’t care about who made a song, and they will continue not caring, so even if you say your name there, they wouldn’t care. And then comes the cliché of saying the names of the singer (Juggy D) and the rapper (Raftaar). And what I don’t understand is, why not say the name of the female artiste! Hasn’t she contributed anything to the song? They did the same thing in ‘High Heels’ from ‘Ki & Ka’ and they repeat it here. If anything, Shivi is shining in this song amongst the hackneyed renditions of the male artist and Raftaar. Oh by the way, Juggy D. 😄 Another artist naming himself like that. Rishi Rich has kept the composition intact, fortunately. But what he does instead, is even more unfortunate. He breaks up the hookline, making it sound like a cassette that is stuck at one point. And then it stops to make way for a weirdly-placed techno music piece. And then it proceeds and ends. How boring. There are so many raps in the song, it is hard to concentrate on the actual song. And Raftaar raps so oddly. Just to keep the “Behen” theme intact, he adds so many lines about sisters, that were so unnecessary. And now for thr vocals. Juggy D can’t sing at all. The proof? If someone isn’t able to sing the nuance in the word “Hindustan” in this song, he or she is definitely not a good singer. Shivi barely manages to sing that part, but does much better than her co-singers, making her stand out even with a mediocre performance. Of course, they don’t match the singing calibre of the legendary combination of Kishore Kumar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle & Usha Mangeshkar from the original song. The arrangements are irritating club sounds, EDM thrown here and there. But I enjoyed the parts with the Spanish guitars, and the strings incorporated from the old song. A horrible remake of a song that deserved a much better remake, or no remake!

Rating: 1/5


4. Teri Yaadon Mein / Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai, Pawni Pandey & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar & Sukriti Kakar, Music Composed by ~ Yash Narvekar, Music Produced by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Yash Narvekar & Amit Dhanani

Rishi Rich comes back for the next song too, but this time, things are different. This time, the song is a romantic song. And this time, Rishi Rich has only produced the song. Rishi Rich gives a composing break to someone I’ve seen many times in the singer category in various Amaal Mallik, Meet Bros. and even Rishi Rich songs, Yash Narvekar. He gets to compose the tune. And I must say, it is quite a commendable tune! Yes,  does follow the usual Bollywood romance template, with its tune, but it manages to engage the listeners. However, the listener does lose interest in some places. The hookline is very typical, but still, it managed to garner my interest. The antara too, follows the same pattern. What really engages the listeners, though, is Rishi Rich’s beats and arrangements. In the first version, Rishi employs a nice and groovy beat, a hip-hop beat in a romantic song, which at first elicits a weird reaction from the listener, but it sets in perfectly after a couple of listens. Especially the tablas which Rishi has added occasionally, are amazing. The second version, the Reprise, takes a more templated route, with guitars and piano taking the lead, making for a more calm listen. A harmonium too pops up later on, quite oddly. The piano interlude in that version is a must-hear. The vocals are good in both versions. While Yasser, sounding as similar to Arijit as ever, and Pawni Pandey stir up a nice chemistry in the first version, the essence of the song only reaches us in the Reprise because the voices of Yash & Sukriti haven’t been touched. Programming ruins the feel of the voices in the first version. However, I loved Yash’s backing vocals in the first song, that sound like tabla bols. Yash & Amit Dhanani together write a song that is full of typical lines and phrases, like the song title itself. Experimental, but works to some extent. The Reprise version fares better!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Original Version, 4/5 for Reprise Version


5. Tenu Na Bol Pawaan / Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Jyotica Tangri / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Amjad-Nadeem, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Sharma

Amjad-Nadeem, back in the composing scene after quite some time, have been roped in for the final song on the album. Amjad-Nadeem are usually known to meddle in typical romantic songs or horrendous massy item songs. This time around too, they have provided a typical romantic song, but that typicality is very enjoyable. The composition is sugary-sweet, something that is very rare from Amjad-Nadeem, who usually produce melodramatic sounding songs. The hookline is so heard-before, so clichéd, yet it manages to click with the listener. There is a high-pitched line that just makes you love the song even more. The antaraa are a bit less engaging, but still manage to keep the flow of the song intact. There are two versions to this song as well; one being a male version (with female humming in the background, hence the credit for Jyotica) and the other being a female version, which is kind of unplugged. The male version has heavenly instrumentation. It starts off with nice chimey sounds, followed by the sweetest flute portion I’ve heard in quite a while. The melody is structured on a simple guitar riff that, though it is very simple and typical, engages the listener. Strings join in later, bringing the third dimension to the song, and how! The second version is, as I said before, unplugged, and has a nice acoustic guitar riff playing in the background, and nothing else. The minimalistic feel of it, makes it even more appealing. Vocals are perfect in both versions. This is no doubt, Yasser’s best performance ever, and he sounds so different than usual here! Jyotica does the humming in Yasser’s version. Asees Kaur, on the other hand, renders her unplugged version with such a beautiful aura around her, that it is mesmerizing. Though her track is longer by one minute than Yasser’s, it makes for a good calm listen. The lyrics by Rohit Sharma (I don’t know whether he’s the Sharma who composed the songs of ‘Anaarkali of Aaraah’ or any other one. He’s definitely not the cricketer, right?) are sweet too. A song full of sweet things. Sweetness lies in simplicity after all.

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Reprise Version

Behen Hogi Teri is an unexpectedly cool multicomposer album! Going by the composers’ names, I was least expecting such a good album. However, it seems like all the composers have pitched in to provide their best. For a romantic comedy, a good album is a must, and fortunately, this album delivers as expected, if not less than expected. Yes, one song is very bad, but the others make up for it. And since the finance theme predominates the album, maybe that’s why they managed to wrench out such good songs from the music directors. An album predominantly made of romantic songs, but still works fine!


Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 4.5 + 1 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hoke Rahoon = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein > Jai Maa > Jaanu


Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 12 (from previous albums) + 02 = 14


Which is your favourite song from Behen Hogi Teri? Please vote for it below! Thanks!



Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mannan Shaah, Gourov-Roshin & Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Aatish Kapadia, Raftaar & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 3rd March 2017

Commando 2 Album Cover

Commando 2 Album Cover


To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To but this album on iTunes CLICK HERE

Commando 2 is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film starring Vidyut Jammwal, Adah Sharma, Esha Gupta and Freddy Daruwala, directed by Deven Bhojani, and produced by Vipul Amrutlal Shah. It is a sequel to 2013 sleeper-hit, ‘Commando’, which is still famous for its wonderful action scenes. That film had more of a rustic setting, wheras this one is a sleek, urban film. And that might reflect somehow in the music as well. Which is by the composer of the first movie, Mannan Shaah. I don’t know whether he did some other small albums during these four years, but I definitely didn’t hear any. He has composed three songs for the movie, while the guest composers Gourov-Roshin have “composed” another. It is a remake. My expectations are 50-50, considering that the music of the first film was good as per the movie’s theme, and that T-Series has changed over the years. And also, Gourov-Roshin have remade something, which succeeds only sometimes. At least I hope the Mannan Shaah part of the album is good. So let’s see how the album is, though I’m a bit apprehensive!

1. Hare Krishna Hare Ram

Singers ~ Armaan Malik, Ritika & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Sameer Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Hare Ram, hare Ram, Hare Krishna Hare Ram!”

– Sameer Anjaan

T-Series’ habit of rehashing old hits continues with the first song of the album itself. And the song isn’t a hit from the 70s, 80s, or even 90s! It is a (relatively) new song (can’t believe ten years have passed already!!) from 2007! The goat that gets sent to the slaughterhouse this time is ‘Bhool Bhulaiyaa’s title track, by Pritam! And the remake is in the hands of the people I least trust with remakes nowadays, Gourov-Roshin! (With Abhijit Vaghani doing the programming) So yeah, lethal combination. Now, the song’s new composition by Gourov-Roshin cleverly doesn’t stray too far away from the original one, and in doing so, sounds quite similar to the old one in totality. However, it sounds completely incomplete! The song starts off with a rapid rap from Raftaar (if you don’t know, his name means speed 😛 ) which is quite impressive as far as rap is concerned. Then comes the new mukhda, which, as I said, sticks very close to the original. The hookline is the only thing here that deserves to be heard, because of its original catchy and haunting tune by Pritam. The antara too, can’t survive without the old tune serving as a structure. So yeah, I bet the duo did a lot of put-this-note-here-and-that-there, and composed the new parts with the same notes, but jumbled up. The arrangements are quite cool, and there’s a nice tap dance part after the rap at the beginning, which sounds amazing. And that plucked instrument loop from the original has been incorporated in the places you would least expect it to be, sometimes played on some trumpet-like instrument. The beats are groovy. And that synthesiser loop that starts the song is mind blowing. Vocals by Armaan Malik are one of his worst performances ever. The makers have made him song in a different voice, yes, but it doesn’t suit him or the song at all. The female vocalist hardly gets scope to say anything, and that too, is unintelligible. Raftaar, as mentioned before, raps efficiently. The new lyrics by Kumaar are no weirder than the original by Sameer. 😀 Good as a song, but not as a remake as it doesn’t meet the standards of the original, which was way ahead of its time!

Rating: 2.5/5


2. Tere Dil Mein / Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Armaan Malik & Shefali Alvares, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Aatish Kapadia

“Abb toh intezaar hai, bas tere jawaab ka,
Milta hai khayal kya, tere mere khwaab ka,
Mera dil toh ho chala, ikk khuli kitaab re…
Tere dil mein kya hai tu bataa re!”

– Aatish Kapadia

Composer Mannan Shaah takes over from here, and his first song is a dulcet romantic ballad, that instantly gets you hooked. The composition is one of the sweetest I’ve heard this year. Each month seems to be having its own ‘Best romantic Song’, and while January’s and February’s songs were ‘Enna Sona’ (Ok Jaanu) and ‘Bawara Mann’ (Jolly LLB 2) respectively, I would vouch for this one as March’s best romantic track till now. Mannan’s composition is heart-rending, especially the hookline, which has an innate Indian touch to it. It is just so emotional-sounding for some reason! And the line going “Tu hi mera sach hai re…” has been composed beautifully! The antara just continues with the beauty of the composition, and I especially loved the part where the antara bridges to the hookline! That’s when the maximum goosebumps showed up. The arrangements are amazing, with acoustic guitar riffs (Warren Mendonsa) forming the base of the arrangements, and a ravishing Strings section by the Chennai Strings Conducted by Sax Raja blows away your mind. Electric guitar, also by Warren Mendonsa, makes a cameo in the interlude, and that’s quite interesting to listen to too. The vocals by Armaan are cute and sweet, but his diction falters at places, like “kaab” for “khwaab“, and he hasn’t seemed to have got time to rehearse those intricate aalaaps in the mukhda and hookline! Sad, because that makes a technical glitch in such a beautiful song! Armaan is usually good, but I cant help but miss Arijit here. The song is like a modern equivalent to ‘Commando’s romantic song ‘Saawan Bairi’, but gets nowhere close to it in terms of compositional intricacy and perfection. Then again, that was a semiclassical composition. There is a “Club Mix” included in the soundtrack, which is basically a remix, with the original track played at a very high tempo, that barely does any justice to it. There’s a female portion in that track, which is sung by Shefali Alvares (I got that even before reading the credits! Yayyyy! :p ). The song makes for a nice club track, but doesn’t at all do justice to the surreal composition. And yes, I am rating that because if the makers want to degrade their album by adding unnecessary remixes, it’s not my fault! Note that it is the first remix in all of 2017, and that means we are changing! The remix has been essentially done to bring forward another antara, which wasn’t in the original, and unused. So if you want to hear that, hear this club mix. Otherwise, I will only suggest that you hear it if you work as a DJ. The lyrics by Aatish Kapadia are simply wonderful, and I really loved them, both in the original and the antara of the song that got used in the remix. A romantic song straight from the heart.

Rating: 4.5/5 for original, 2/5 for Club Mix


3. Seedha Saadha / Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Amit Mishra / Jubin Nautiyal, Music By ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Seedha saadha dil, Seedha saadha,
Mera Kam hai tera zyaada!”

– Kumaar

A melancholic rock song is the next song Mannan Shaah has to offer here, and from the way it starts, you can tell that it isn’t headed anywhere. The first version, at least. It has that feel to it right at the beginning, which tells you right away that it is a weird, unlikeable composition. And it definitely does start off that way. The composition is as colourless and dull as it can be, before the hookline. The only part the composition ever becomes likeable is in the hookline. The antara too, is decent, but because of the mukhda and other factors we’ll come to later, the song just doesn’t appeal to you. It is a pity that such a good hookline couldn’t get a better fitting part to it. Now for the other factors. Like Amit Mishra’s vocals. Amit Mishra. The one who stunned or entertained us with his renditions in ‘Manma Emotion Jaage’ (Dilwale), ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ (Dishoom) and the best, ‘Bulleya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), does nothing but disappoint in this song. His faltering voice doesn’t go with the composition, for which even K.K. would’ve worked. Jubin does way better in his version, but then, his version is a subtly arranged one, without as many hard-hitting rock noises as Amit’s version has. And I must say, Mannan’s composition sounds way better as a soft rock song, than a heavy rock song. Jubin’s soft voice had the right voice texture for it to come out right, which is why his version is way better. The arrangements in Amit Mishra’s version are too distracting, and the melody can’t be enjoyed as such. Whereas Jubin’s version has a wonderful, sway-inducing soft rock arrangement, enhanced by a synthesiser loop playing in the interlude. In a nutshell, you should go for the wholesome Reprise, than the incomplete and weird first version. Lyrics by Kumaar are good, but quite typical here. A sad song better felt in Jubin’s voice than Amit’s. It is basically a middling composition relying on voices to uplift it, out of which one clearly could not!

Rating: 2/5 for Original, 3.5/5 for Reprise Version


4. Commando (Title Track) / Commando (English Version)

Singer ~ Aditi Singh Sharma, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Commando, commando, commando, commando!” :p

– Kumaar

The last song of the album is the title track of the film. Of course, it isn’t exactly the title track because they don’t say ‘Commando 2’, but then whatever. The composition is yet another middling composition by Mannan, and I don’t get why it flies all over the place and has so many turns and twists, that nobody will be able to decipher or even enjoy it. The mukhda makes it start off like a very run-of-the-mill track, without any shine whatsoever. The hookline is the easiest possible way you could imagine to put a tune to the word ‘Commando’. The interlude sees the song going all fusion-y, and then there’s a tempo increases that gets the song taking off at last. From there, the song at least sounds decent. There’s a nice traditional percussion in that part, and it is followed by a nice electric guitar piece. The antara that follows is also better composed, and has the required attitude that is seen in the action scenes of the movie’s trailer. There’s an English Version, in which just the mukhda’s Hindi parts have been replaced by lines in English, and it was actually unnecessary. They could’ve secretly added it in the movie without giving us another audio track, like some filmmakers do for certain songs that are actually good. Aditi is at her pretentious best, and stylises the words so much that it sounds too false! Mannan’s techno sounds do fare well for the song though. Kumaar’s lyrics are just bland. One of the most boring title tracks of late. *Remembers Raees title song*. Or maybe not.

Rating: 1.5/5 for original , 1.5/5 for English Version

Commando 2 is such a letdown, I can’t explain it in words. Only one song matches any expectations, and that too isn’t as good as the best song of “Commando”. Gourov-Roshin’s remake is good except for the fact that is unnecessarily relies on Pritam’s song to propel it forward. Mannan’s other songs are below the standards he set for himself with the first film’s album. Also, unnecessary reprises bog down the album. This Commando lacks command over tune, and composition! And maybe, choice of singers too.


Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4.5 + 2 + 2 + 3.5 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 50% (How convenient!) 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Dil Mein > Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version) > Hare Krishna Hare Ram > Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix) > Seedha Saadha > Commando (Title Track) > Commando (English Version)


Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Commando 2) = 07


Which is your favourite song from Commando 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂