A BREACH IN THE RAABTA!! (RAABTA – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: JAM8, Meet Bros., Sohrabuddin & J-Star
♪ Lyrics by: Irshad Kamil, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Kumaar, Jitendra Raghuvanshi, J-Star & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 3rd June 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Raabta Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Raabta is an upcoming Bollywood romantic reincarnation drama, starring Kriti Sanon, Sushant Singh Rajput, Jim Sarbh, Varun Sharma and Rajkummar Rao. The film is the directorial debut of already many times successful producer, Dinesh Vijan. The film is produced by him along with Homi Adajania, Bhushan Kumar and Krishan Kumar. The film’s official gist is this: “When a human being dies, they lose 21 grams from the body. This, they say, is the weight of the soul. The journey of a soul transcends over space and time… beyond the realms of this earth. This film tells the story of two seemingly ordinary individuals, going about their lives until their paths cross and they realize that they belong with one another. Unaware of a connection that was forged several hundred years ago, Shiv and Saira are inexplicably drawn to each other, and it takes them on a hysterical rollercoaster of love, intrigue, entertainment and life (twice over!). When two souls unite, they become one.” 😴 Hopefully, it is executed well. The music of the film is by JAM8, and a guest composition by Meet Bros. also features on the album. I guess we all know the controver(sies) surrounding the music of the film, due to that one guest song, so there is no point reiterating them. We all know who the actual composer of the songs credited to JAM8 is, but he wishes that his name shouldn’t be associated with ‘Raabta’ because of his policy to only compose for solo-composer albums, so there’s no point in naming him. I just hope the music company learns its lessons and reconsiders it’s actions!! On this grave (😄) note, let’s start with the music review of ‘Raabta’. 


1. Ik Vaari Aa / Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version)

Singers ~ Arijit Singh / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Hai pyaar toh kayi dafaa kiya,
Tujhse nahi kiya toh kya kiya,
Tera mera yeh vaasta,
Hai iss zindagi ki daastaan,
Ya phir koi hamaara pehle se raabta?
Toh ikk Vaari aa, aa bhi jaa!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

The album starts off with a very happy-go-lucky, romantic club number, with a lilting yet groovy sound. The composition has the stamp of Pritam all over it, and the way it flows is in the trademark way that almost all Pritam songs flow. The song’s melody starts off right with the hook, which is a wonderfully composed piece, that efficiently works in pulling you into the song. The antara following it, too, is very happy-sounding and charming, but it is the last stanza, which I call the ‘conclusion’ because it just doesn’t seem like an antara, is what steals the thunder. That part has been composed in a very entrancing manner, and is a major throwback to the corresponding ‘conclusion’ part in Pritam’s ‘Tu Chahiye’ (Bajrangi Bhaijaan). The high-pitched bridge line that leads to the hookline, is just amazing. The arrangements are quite similar to Pritam’s previous club song arrangements, with the upbeat EDM portions, and that wonderful “chipmunk” that we heard in ‘The Breakup Song’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) last year. There is a Sajid-Wajid touch in the arrangements somewhere (‘Mukhtasar’ from ‘Teri Meri Kahaani’ and ‘Raat Bhar’ from ‘Heropanti’). But on a whole, the EDM has a very international touch to it, and it sounds like JAM8 is trying to recreate Pritam’s club arrangements in an international style. But because I always something out-of-this-world in a Pritam club song, and since this song is by his company, this song was quite underwhelming in that department. The pumped-up portions of the arrangements sometimes clash with Arijit’s super-high-pitch, and that sounds quite odd at times. That brings us to Arijit’s vocals. Definitely not the best he’s performed, but he still manages to carry the song in a quite charismatic way, and doesn’t drive you to sleep like he did in ‘Half Girlfriend’. But of course, the parts where he goes super-high-pitch, made me uncomfortable, and that doesn’t happen with every other singer. In the second version of the song which takes a sans EDM route, and is more reliant on guitars to propel it, everything that sounded wrong in the arrangements is set right. A slight rock guitar backdrop makes the song lighter than it was in the original version, and definitely more enjoyable. The company also replaces the fun chipmunk-like EDM with a nice vocal chorus, which gives off ‘Tum Mile’ vibes somehow,and immediatel removes all Sajid-Wajid vibes. As for the vocals, they have improved due to Jubin’s smooth treatment of the composition, taking care not to sound like he is straining his voice too much, and handling the high notes much better than Arijit did. And the small nuance he takes while singing “yaara” and all of its rhyming words, is just magnificent! In the conclusion stanza, Jubin gets to sing an entirely differently-tuned line that fits in perfectly and sounds as good as its counterpart in the original version. Oh, and it is a welcome change, considering that we have been hearing the original for over a month now. So this reprise is really one of the best reprises to have come out, ever! Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are great, and suitable for a fun romantic number. I don’t know what I missed in the first version, but something is surely missing. To cover it up though, the Reprise takes a nice romantic twist!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Arijit’s Version, 4.5/5 for Jubin’s Version

 

2. Raabta (Title Track)

Singers ~ Nikhita Gandhi & Arijit Singh, Original Composition by ~ Pritam, Music Recreated by ~ JAM8, Original Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya, New Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Hadd se zyaada mohabbat hoti hai jo,
Kehte hain ke ibaadat hoti hai woh,
Kusoor hai, ya koi yeh fitoor hai,
Kyun lage sab kuch andhera hai,
Bas yehi noor hai,
Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”

– Irshad Kamil

The recreation craze continues as ‘Raabta’ (Agent Vinod) is recreated in this movie, which takes its name from that song. But how fortunate are we, that the man who made the original song, is the one who is remaking it (through his company, that is). The track, originally a romantic number, and probably the first time Arijit Singh actually came into large notice, though he had sung other songs before that, has now been remade into a dance track for the film. But this dance track is as far from a regular Bollywoodish dance track as you can imagine. It has a very quite and soothing vibe to it, and a very unexpected twist in the form of a nice interruption wherein JAM8 introduces to Bollywood, a new genre of music called ‘Tropical House’, which sounds like some techno Caribbean music. Anyway, the new composition that the group has made for the remake, is great. The mukhda, sung by newbie (in Bollywood) Nikhita Gandhi, is charming and scintillating, with its romantic vibes really reaching you. The way they have joined it to the hookline of the original song too, is quite cool. The time the song goes downhill is when, after the nice and refreshing Tropical interlude, Arijit comes back to reprise his portion, the antara from the original song, a part I felt didn’t quite merge with this song. Yes, I know that if the hookline adapted well into this song, every other part should too, but I just didn’t feel the antara this time. When it went back to the new composition, I started grooving to the beats again. So it was like a sudden disconnection from the song. But then, JAM8 makes up for it in the fantabulous (which is a very small word to describe it!) ‘conclusion’ part of the song, which has a lilting and entrancing tune. Especially the oddly-but-fantastically placed line, “Jo bhi hai manzoor hai!”, is a wonderful bridge from the ‘Conclusion’ to the hookline. And the continuous EDM beats, really infuse life into the song. The composers also add wonderful piano notes occasionally, and the guitars that start off the song are so vibrant! So I guess I have already spoken about the arrangements as much as I could. Moving on to the vocals, Nikhita Gandhi, another singer from the Rahman camp of singers, joins Pritam’s camp for this one (quite similar a story to that of the other well known ‘Gandhi’ singer, Jonita — not sisters!) And she totally owns her debut. Yes, Arijit gets the major part in the song, but because she opens it so smashingly, the listeners get hooked and keep waiting for her voice to return. Sadly, it comes back only for the hooklines. Arijit is his usual self, trying to be charming , succeeding and also acing that aforementioned ‘conclusion’ portion. Irshad Kamil writes the new lyrics for this song, wrapping Amitabh Bhattacharya’s already awesome lyrics with an awesomeness of his own. A song that takes itself miles away from its original, neither better nor worse, but just at par, in a different genre. Barring the copy-paste antara, the song is quite good.

Rating: 4/5

 

3. Sadda Move

Singers ~ Diljit Dosanjh, Pardeep Singh Sran & Raftaar, Additional Vocals ~ Ashwin Kulkarni, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Bhangra ke rhythm mein, tuney Bharatnatyam kyun milaaya?
Mere mehboob, dekho sadda move!”

– Irshad Kamil & Amitabh Bhattacharya

In the next song, JAM8 cuts out the whole international feel that was looming over the album all this time, to replace it with a street hip-hop number in Punjabi style. And I must say, how disappointed I was, hearing this song. The composer takes a very weird route with this song. There isn’t much by way of composition, but whatever is, sounds like very often recycled Punjabi lines used innumerable times. Like the antaras. And the mukhda just starts off so abruptly, it takes time to adjust to it. Actually, a rap starts the song, and it is quite obnoxious. Raftaar. That “Sadda Move Move” line by Raftaar is so irritating. The hookline of the song, too, isn’t too impressive. Arrangements are what lift the song up for me. That flute loop that plays every now and then is just insane — a glimpse of the trademark Pritam-ish insanity that JAM8 has so far, cruelly kept out of this album. The digital beats are quite groovy, but they don’t really provide anything new and innovative, which is what I would like to hear when I listen to a Punjabi street hip-hop number. The tumbi and “burrrhhhaaaa“s are the typical Punjabi people clichés, thrust into the song just to stereotype Punjabi music. But I must say, the dhols are quite engaging. The vocals are above average — Diljit sounds good but not excellent; probably the composition is barring me from liking his rendition too. On the other hand, his co-singer, Pradeep Singh Sran, who made it big in Bollywood with his song ‘Cutiepie’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), brings back his Labh Janjua-ish voice and steals the listeners’ hearts. Raftaar is strictly annoying, and his rap is least enjoyable. Overall the song has a strong Meet Bros-ish vibe. Legends Amitabh Bhattacharya & Irshad Kamil come together to write something that Kumaar or Shabbir Ahmed would’ve written by themselves, if they had been approached. Quite stereotypical, and ‘enjoyable’ would be an exaggeration. A clear dip in the level of the album. 

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Altamash Faridi & Shadab Faridi, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Amitabh Bhattacharya

“Tere nishaan, yaadon mein hai,
Tu kyun nahin, taqdeer mein?
Naadaan dil, hai dhoondhta,
Qurbat teri tasveer mein.
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Mumkin nahin hai, tujhko bhulaana,
Dekhe khudaya, do aashiqaan diyaan tabaahiyaan
Ve badi lambiyaan si judaiyaan!”

– Amitabh Bhattacharya

After three relatively happy-sounding songs, it was necessary, I guess, for the composers to bring in a touch of pathos in the album. So they bring a sad song sung by Arijit, which I feel is loosely modelled on Pritam’s ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), because of the slight Sufi touch to it. The composition, I have to say, is something that disappointed me highly. I just couldn’t find anything great in it. The song is trying so hard to be emotional, but manages to ve not even one bit emotional! And that almost never happens with Pritam songs. The first two stanzas are composed on the same tune, and that is a major drawback, because it is what makes the song sound very, very monotonous. The very first line of the song made me think, “What?” because the music that starts off the song is very promising! After that it becomes a crying fest, something so overdramatic I wouldn’t have expected it to be a song from a big banner films as ‘Raabta’. The hookline is so unidimensional, it hardly managed to touch my heart as an emotional song should. The composition ends with another “conclusion” stanza, and this time, that stanza is clearly trying to emulate the “conclusion” of ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil) with its composition, arrangements and Arijit’s singing style. The arrangements of the song are also very heard-before, and stale arrangements. The Dholak rhythm has gotten so old and typical, I wish no composer uses it in sad songs anymore! The music that starts the song though, the violin one, is very good! And that is what made me believe the rest of the song too, would follow suit. Arijit sings this one with utmost lack of expression, almost like a robot. It seems he spent all his energy in ‘Ik Vaari Aa’. The Faridi brothers pitch in for a good but again, clichéd, Sufi interlude, that only makes the song sound more artificial. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are good, but not amazing. A sad song that makes me sad that it had to be in this film.

Rating: 2/5

 

5. Main Tera Boyfriend

Singers ~ Arijit Singh, Neha Kakkar & Meet Bros., Original Composition by ~ J-Star & Sohrabuddin, Music Recreated by ~ Meet Bros., Original Lyrics by ~ J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Na Na Na Na!

– J-Star & Jitendra Raghuvanshi

Guest composers, Meet Bros, step into the album now, for their remake of the popular track of J-Star’s, ‘Na Na Na Na’. Now there’s a huge controversy regarding who stole the song from whom and blah blah blah. But besides all that, I think the whole nation is raving about the song and how catchy it is. The original was definitely one of the catchiest pop songs of that year and even now, and Meet Bros try to keep its catchiness intact. They have built a typical Bollywoodish composition around it, which sounds least like a Meet Bros. composition, and more like a Pritam one. How coincidental because JAM8’s ‘Sadda Movie’s sounded like a Meet Bros song. The Mukhda starts the song off on a very nice tune, and expectations rise right away. It is the antara that could’ve been better, and repeating each Antara twice was not needed; it just made the song that much longer. The hook… Do I need to speak about it! 😀 The arrangements too, are very similar to Pritam’s, complete with the chipmunk noises here too. The club sounds are great as well, and make the song enjoyable at all points. The vocals are energetic, with Arijit replenishing all his drained energy, and giving a very spunky rendition of the song. Is it just me, or does anyone else also think he sounds amazing in upbeat numbers as well!? Neha cannot match up to her co-singer’s level and performs a bit disappointingly this time. Meet Bros. also come and sing an interlude that would have sounded better had it stayed out of the album. 😥 And after that, there’s a lady’s voice that says “I Wanna be your boyfriend.” 😮 Kumaar’s lyrics are the usual type of lyrics that go into such songs. A song that I didn’t expect much from, since it was a remake, turns out to be quite foot-tapping!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

6. Darasal

Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Music by ~ JAM8, Lyrics by ~ Irshad Kamil

“Inkaar mein jo chhupa hai woh ikraar ho!”

– Irshad Kamil

Finally, to finish off the album, JAM8 bring an Atif Aslam romantic melody, something that is quite quintessential in recent T-Series albums. As soon as the song started, it reminded me of ‘Jeena Jeena’ (Badlapur) because of the similar pattern of the guitar piece. The composition is actually very sweet, and it is also slow-paced like ‘Jeena Jeena’, and would suit well for a waltzy arrangement too. But JAM8 choose to keep things minimal and grace the song with nothing more than a nice and sweet guitar riff, and occasional amazing strings. The tune, though slow-paced, grows on you instantly. It is instantly likeable, unlike all the other JAM8 songs in the album, which I took some time to get accustomed to (Except the Jubin ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). I loved the way how they repeated the last line of every antara twice, and the last line of the song thrice. The antara itself is very calm and soothing, and gives a very breezy feel to the song. In the Mukhda, the line where he repeats the words twice, is just outstanding! (“Teri Ada, Ada Pe Marta…” etc.) This is actually what is expected from an ideal romantic comedy. Sadly, it comes in at the end of this album! 😪 Atif’s vocals are some of the best I’ve heard from him in quite a while; he sings the song with a totally different charm than he sung his other songs of late. It draws the picture of the typical boy-next-door image in Bollywood rom-coms. Kamil’s lyrics are just beautiful! Some of them are just salute-worthy, like the one I’ve featured up there at the beginning of this song’s review. Finally, a cute romantic song that befits the film’s romantic aspects. 

Rating: 4.5/5


Raabta is an album I wouldn’t have expected (read, I would have expected much more) from a romantic film like this. Most of the songs are prohibited to be the usual fun-and-frolic that we associate with Pritam, for no specific reason. In fact, the dance song from guests Meet Bros is better than the dance song from JAM8 itself. JAM8 sticks to a very conventional route, save the title track, and only manages to deliver well in two songs in that conventional barrier (‘Darasal’ and ‘Ik Vaari Aa’). But I can’t take away from the album that, as an entire album, it is full of variety and sounds good. It is just lacking on the innovative quotient, and likeability quotient, and hence, the repeat value. ‘Raabta’ means ‘connection’, but there is a slight breach in this Raabta!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3.5 + 4.5 + 4 + 3 + 2+ 3.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Darasal = Ik Vaari Aa (Jubin Version) > Raabta (Title Track) > Ik Vaari Aa = Main Tera Boyfriend > Sadda Move > Lambiyaan Si Judaiyaan

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 15 (from previous albums) + 02 = 17

 

Which is your favourite song from Raabta? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

A BEHEN WHO CAN’T DANCE, BUT CAN ONLY ROMANCE! (BEHEN HOGI TERI – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Kaushik-Akash-Guddu for JAM8, Rishi Rich, Jaidev Kumar, Amjad-Nadeem, Yash Narvekar & R.D. Burman
♪ Lyrics by: Bipin Das, Yash Narvekar, Amit Dhanani, Late Anand Bakshi, Sonu Saggu, Rohit Sharma, Parry G & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 23rd May 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 9th June 2017

Behen Hogi Teri Album Cover

 

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Behen Hogi Teri is an upcoming Bollywood romantic comedy starring Shruti Hassan, Rajkummar Rao, Gautam Gulati and Gulshan Grover in lead roles. The film is directed by Ajay K. Pannalal and produced by Tony D’Souza, Amul Vikas Mohan and Nitin Upadhyaya. The film’s slogan is “All Indians are NOT Brothers and Sisters!” Well, going by the trailer and this slogan thingy, it seems like a quirky and light hearted romantic comedy, but you know Bollywood, they can add drama into anything and everything. The music of the film, as expected is by multiple composers, including Pritam’s A&R venture JAM8 (Kaushik-Akash-Guddu this time), Rishi Rich, Amjad-Nadeem (after a long time, huh!), Jaidev Kumar and Yash Narvekar. Out of these composers, none, I repeat none, have given anything outstanding in the past, so one can just hope that some miracle occurs and they give us great music for this film. Expectations are moderate, but hoping for the best, let’s explore the music of ‘Behen Hogi Teri’.


1. Jai Maa

Singers ~ Sahil Solanki, Jyotica Tangri & Parry G, Original Composition by ~ Prem Hardeep & Badshah, Music Recreated by ~ Jaidev Kumar, Lyrics by ~ Sonu Saggu, Rap Lyrics by ~ Parry G

Wow. So now the music industry has started remaking remakes. ‘Kala Chashma’ (Baar Baar Dekho), which was a quite banal remake by Badshah, of the Punjabi pop number ‘Kala Chashma’ by Prem Hardeep, itself, now gets remade into a mata-ki-chowki song. Jaidev Kumar, who had earlier remade ‘Subha Hone Na De’ (Desi Boyz) into a similar satirical devotional song, ‘O Meri Mata’ in ‘Bajatey Raho’, takes the same composition that Badshah had made. Nothing changed in the tune, and that’s why it would make the public even crazier. The arrangements seem more toned down and not as harsh and shrill as they were in the original (I mean the original remake). I guess they added the dhols here specially for the jagraata setting. And they’ve, quite to my immense pleasure, gotten rid of the EDM at the end, and the shouting ladies and breaking glasses from the ‘Baar Baar Dekho’ song. Vocals here sound good and aptly funny as per the Goddess prayer setting. Sahil Solanki sounds much better than Amar Arshi, the original singer of both the original and Badshah’s remake. A rapper called Parry G {I don’t know why these people like to write a single letter after a weird nickname; we are going to meet another one later in the album!} reprises Badshah’s “sadkon pe chale jab ladkon ke dilon mein tu aag laga de baby firrrreeeeee” with a rap that sounds much more pleasant. Jyotica Tangri is a nice replacement for Neha Kakkar, but with less of an edge in her voice. The replacement lyrics by Sonu Saggu are quite funny too, but not something that will make you “ROFL” or “LOL” either. Interesting how the remake of a remake turns out to be better than the original remake. Let’s start remaking remakes now. P.S. I hope a certain music company doesn’t read that or else we will be over-flooded with ‘Baby Doll’ remakes. (Then again, aren’t we already over flooded by them!)

Rating: 3/5

 

2. Tera Hoke Rahoon

Singer ~ Arijit Singh, Music by ~ Kaushik-Akash-Guddu (KAG for JAM8), Lyrics by ~ Bipin Das

Next up, we get a dulcet melody from Pritam’s A&R company, JAM8. This time, the composers of the two songs in ‘1920 London’, Kaushik-Akash, are joined by someone calling himself Guddu, thus making it a trio. And this way, they produce a song that I will remember as one of the best (and the best till now) from any composer for JAM8. The composition, for once, doesn’t sound like a Pritam composition; for once the composers working behind the JAM8 label do not try to emulate Pritam’s late 2000s style of composition. In fact, the composition kind of reminded me of Bobby-Imran’s songs in ‘Badmaashiyan’, or some of Jeet Gannguli’s works. The free flow of the hookline makes it instantly likeable, and the mukhda and antara has a calm, soothing but haunting touch to it, something I’m always ready for if it isn’t too maudlin. The arrangements are fabulous; they just add to the haunting characteristic of the song. The guitar has been played in such a subtle manner, in the beginning, that it is impossible to not be sucked in right away. And when the orchestra sets in, the song just gets many times better. The electronic tabla adds to the serenity, while that wonderful flute interlude is something you shouldn’t miss. In the antara guitars have been played in a wonderful play-stop-play-stop manner that is so comforting. And the tabla doesn’t stop either! Arijit, the first choice for any composer associated with Pritam, and Pritam himself, renders the mellow composition with such ease, in the voice of his that I love, as opposed to that droning voice he uses in sleepy songs. The way he sings the “uff tak na yaara karoon”, is so beautiful! Bipin Das (newcomer?) writes lyrics that are instantly lovable. The first time JAM8 do something that doesn’t resemble their mentor’s work heavily, and it turns out to be a success. 

Rating: 4.5/5

 

3. Jaanu

Singers ~ Juggy D, Shivi & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ R.D. Burman, Music Recreated by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Late Anand Bakshi, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

So after the remake of a remake, we get a remake of another classic, in fact, one of my favourite songs by R.D. Burman. The likeable, sweet and fun-to-listen-to classic gets a makeover and now it looks horrendous. Rishi Rich seems to have struck a big deal in Bollywood after his long hiatus, because after he returned in ‘Half Girlfriend’, with a mediocre title song, he gets to do another (though horrible) song here. The man makes sure that somebody says “This is a Rishi Rich refix” before the song starts, and that is so annoying! We have the credits in front of us and we can read your name there. I know here are some music listeners out there who don’t care about who made a song, and they will continue not caring, so even if you say your name there, they wouldn’t care. And then comes the cliché of saying the names of the singer (Juggy D) and the rapper (Raftaar). And what I don’t understand is, why not say the name of the female artiste! Hasn’t she contributed anything to the song? They did the same thing in ‘High Heels’ from ‘Ki & Ka’ and they repeat it here. If anything, Shivi is shining in this song amongst the hackneyed renditions of the male artist and Raftaar. Oh by the way, Juggy D. 😄 Another artist naming himself like that. Rishi Rich has kept the composition intact, fortunately. But what he does instead, is even more unfortunate. He breaks up the hookline, making it sound like a cassette that is stuck at one point. And then it stops to make way for a weirdly-placed techno music piece. And then it proceeds and ends. How boring. There are so many raps in the song, it is hard to concentrate on the actual song. And Raftaar raps so oddly. Just to keep the “Behen” theme intact, he adds so many lines about sisters, that were so unnecessary. And now for thr vocals. Juggy D can’t sing at all. The proof? If someone isn’t able to sing the nuance in the word “Hindustan” in this song, he or she is definitely not a good singer. Shivi barely manages to sing that part, but does much better than her co-singers, making her stand out even with a mediocre performance. Of course, they don’t match the singing calibre of the legendary combination of Kishore Kumar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle & Usha Mangeshkar from the original song. The arrangements are irritating club sounds, EDM thrown here and there. But I enjoyed the parts with the Spanish guitars, and the strings incorporated from the old song. A horrible remake of a song that deserved a much better remake, or no remake!

Rating: 1/5

 

4. Teri Yaadon Mein / Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai, Pawni Pandey & Yash Narvekar / Yash Narvekar & Sukriti Kakar, Music Composed by ~ Yash Narvekar, Music Produced by ~ Rishi Rich, Lyrics by ~ Yash Narvekar & Amit Dhanani

Rishi Rich comes back for the next song too, but this time, things are different. This time, the song is a romantic song. And this time, Rishi Rich has only produced the song. Rishi Rich gives a composing break to someone I’ve seen many times in the singer category in various Amaal Mallik, Meet Bros. and even Rishi Rich songs, Yash Narvekar. He gets to compose the tune. And I must say, it is quite a commendable tune! Yes,  does follow the usual Bollywood romance template, with its tune, but it manages to engage the listeners. However, the listener does lose interest in some places. The hookline is very typical, but still, it managed to garner my interest. The antara too, follows the same pattern. What really engages the listeners, though, is Rishi Rich’s beats and arrangements. In the first version, Rishi employs a nice and groovy beat, a hip-hop beat in a romantic song, which at first elicits a weird reaction from the listener, but it sets in perfectly after a couple of listens. Especially the tablas which Rishi has added occasionally, are amazing. The second version, the Reprise, takes a more templated route, with guitars and piano taking the lead, making for a more calm listen. A harmonium too pops up later on, quite oddly. The piano interlude in that version is a must-hear. The vocals are good in both versions. While Yasser, sounding as similar to Arijit as ever, and Pawni Pandey stir up a nice chemistry in the first version, the essence of the song only reaches us in the Reprise because the voices of Yash & Sukriti haven’t been touched. Programming ruins the feel of the voices in the first version. However, I loved Yash’s backing vocals in the first song, that sound like tabla bols. Yash & Amit Dhanani together write a song that is full of typical lines and phrases, like the song title itself. Experimental, but works to some extent. The Reprise version fares better!

Rating: 3.5/5 for Original Version, 4/5 for Reprise Version

 

5. Tenu Na Bol Pawaan / Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Yasser Desai & Jyotica Tangri / Asees Kaur, Music by ~ Amjad-Nadeem, Lyrics by ~ Rohit Sharma

Amjad-Nadeem, back in the composing scene after quite some time, have been roped in for the final song on the album. Amjad-Nadeem are usually known to meddle in typical romantic songs or horrendous massy item songs. This time around too, they have provided a typical romantic song, but that typicality is very enjoyable. The composition is sugary-sweet, something that is very rare from Amjad-Nadeem, who usually produce melodramatic sounding songs. The hookline is so heard-before, so clichéd, yet it manages to click with the listener. There is a high-pitched line that just makes you love the song even more. The antaraa are a bit less engaging, but still manage to keep the flow of the song intact. There are two versions to this song as well; one being a male version (with female humming in the background, hence the credit for Jyotica) and the other being a female version, which is kind of unplugged. The male version has heavenly instrumentation. It starts off with nice chimey sounds, followed by the sweetest flute portion I’ve heard in quite a while. The melody is structured on a simple guitar riff that, though it is very simple and typical, engages the listener. Strings join in later, bringing the third dimension to the song, and how! The second version is, as I said before, unplugged, and has a nice acoustic guitar riff playing in the background, and nothing else. The minimalistic feel of it, makes it even more appealing. Vocals are perfect in both versions. This is no doubt, Yasser’s best performance ever, and he sounds so different than usual here! Jyotica does the humming in Yasser’s version. Asees Kaur, on the other hand, renders her unplugged version with such a beautiful aura around her, that it is mesmerizing. Though her track is longer by one minute than Yasser’s, it makes for a good calm listen. The lyrics by Rohit Sharma (I don’t know whether he’s the Sharma who composed the songs of ‘Anaarkali of Aaraah’ or any other one. He’s definitely not the cricketer, right?) are sweet too. A song full of sweet things. Sweetness lies in simplicity after all.

Rating: 4.5/5 for the Original Version, 4.5/5 for the Reprise Version


Behen Hogi Teri is an unexpectedly cool multicomposer album! Going by the composers’ names, I was least expecting such a good album. However, it seems like all the composers have pitched in to provide their best. For a romantic comedy, a good album is a must, and fortunately, this album delivers as expected, if not less than expected. Yes, one song is very bad, but the others make up for it. And since the finance theme predominates the album, maybe that’s why they managed to wrench out such good songs from the music directors. An album predominantly made of romantic songs, but still works fine!

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 3 + 4.5 + 1 + 3.5 + 4 + 4.5 + 4.5 = 25

Album Percentage: 71.43%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tera Hoke Rahoon = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan = Tenu Na Bol Pawaan (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein (Reprise) > Teri Yaadon Mein > Jai Maa > Jaanu

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 12 (from previous albums) + 02 = 14

 

Which is your favourite song from Behen Hogi Teri? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

A COMMANDO WITH LESS COMMAND ON TUNE! (COMMANDO 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Mannan Shaah, Gourov-Roshin & Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Kumaar, Aatish Kapadia, Raftaar & Sameer Anjaan
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th February 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 3rd March 2017

Commando 2 Album Cover

Commando 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To but this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Commando 2 is an upcoming Bollywood action thriller film starring Vidyut Jammwal, Adah Sharma, Esha Gupta and Freddy Daruwala, directed by Deven Bhojani, and produced by Vipul Amrutlal Shah. It is a sequel to 2013 sleeper-hit, ‘Commando’, which is still famous for its wonderful action scenes. That film had more of a rustic setting, wheras this one is a sleek, urban film. And that might reflect somehow in the music as well. Which is by the composer of the first movie, Mannan Shaah. I don’t know whether he did some other small albums during these four years, but I definitely didn’t hear any. He has composed three songs for the movie, while the guest composers Gourov-Roshin have “composed” another. It is a remake. My expectations are 50-50, considering that the music of the first film was good as per the movie’s theme, and that T-Series has changed over the years. And also, Gourov-Roshin have remade something, which succeeds only sometimes. At least I hope the Mannan Shaah part of the album is good. So let’s see how the album is, though I’m a bit apprehensive!


1. Hare Krishna Hare Ram

Singers ~ Armaan Malik, Ritika & Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Pritam Chakraborty, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Sameer Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap by ~ Raftaar

“Hare Ram, hare Ram, Hare Krishna Hare Ram!”

– Sameer Anjaan

T-Series’ habit of rehashing old hits continues with the first song of the album itself. And the song isn’t a hit from the 70s, 80s, or even 90s! It is a (relatively) new song (can’t believe ten years have passed already!!) from 2007! The goat that gets sent to the slaughterhouse this time is ‘Bhool Bhulaiyaa’s title track, by Pritam! And the remake is in the hands of the people I least trust with remakes nowadays, Gourov-Roshin! (With Abhijit Vaghani doing the programming) So yeah, lethal combination. Now, the song’s new composition by Gourov-Roshin cleverly doesn’t stray too far away from the original one, and in doing so, sounds quite similar to the old one in totality. However, it sounds completely incomplete! The song starts off with a rapid rap from Raftaar (if you don’t know, his name means speed 😛 ) which is quite impressive as far as rap is concerned. Then comes the new mukhda, which, as I said, sticks very close to the original. The hookline is the only thing here that deserves to be heard, because of its original catchy and haunting tune by Pritam. The antara too, can’t survive without the old tune serving as a structure. So yeah, I bet the duo did a lot of put-this-note-here-and-that-there, and composed the new parts with the same notes, but jumbled up. The arrangements are quite cool, and there’s a nice tap dance part after the rap at the beginning, which sounds amazing. And that plucked instrument loop from the original has been incorporated in the places you would least expect it to be, sometimes played on some trumpet-like instrument. The beats are groovy. And that synthesiser loop that starts the song is mind blowing. Vocals by Armaan Malik are one of his worst performances ever. The makers have made him song in a different voice, yes, but it doesn’t suit him or the song at all. The female vocalist hardly gets scope to say anything, and that too, is unintelligible. Raftaar, as mentioned before, raps efficiently. The new lyrics by Kumaar are no weirder than the original by Sameer. 😀 Good as a song, but not as a remake as it doesn’t meet the standards of the original, which was way ahead of its time!

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Tere Dil Mein / Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix)

Singers ~ Armaan Malik / Armaan Malik & Shefali Alvares, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Aatish Kapadia

“Abb toh intezaar hai, bas tere jawaab ka,
Milta hai khayal kya, tere mere khwaab ka,
Mera dil toh ho chala, ikk khuli kitaab re…
Tere dil mein kya hai tu bataa re!”

– Aatish Kapadia

Composer Mannan Shaah takes over from here, and his first song is a dulcet romantic ballad, that instantly gets you hooked. The composition is one of the sweetest I’ve heard this year. Each month seems to be having its own ‘Best romantic Song’, and while January’s and February’s songs were ‘Enna Sona’ (Ok Jaanu) and ‘Bawara Mann’ (Jolly LLB 2) respectively, I would vouch for this one as March’s best romantic track till now. Mannan’s composition is heart-rending, especially the hookline, which has an innate Indian touch to it. It is just so emotional-sounding for some reason! And the line going “Tu hi mera sach hai re…” has been composed beautifully! The antara just continues with the beauty of the composition, and I especially loved the part where the antara bridges to the hookline! That’s when the maximum goosebumps showed up. The arrangements are amazing, with acoustic guitar riffs (Warren Mendonsa) forming the base of the arrangements, and a ravishing Strings section by the Chennai Strings Conducted by Sax Raja blows away your mind. Electric guitar, also by Warren Mendonsa, makes a cameo in the interlude, and that’s quite interesting to listen to too. The vocals by Armaan are cute and sweet, but his diction falters at places, like “kaab” for “khwaab“, and he hasn’t seemed to have got time to rehearse those intricate aalaaps in the mukhda and hookline! Sad, because that makes a technical glitch in such a beautiful song! Armaan is usually good, but I cant help but miss Arijit here. The song is like a modern equivalent to ‘Commando’s romantic song ‘Saawan Bairi’, but gets nowhere close to it in terms of compositional intricacy and perfection. Then again, that was a semiclassical composition. There is a “Club Mix” included in the soundtrack, which is basically a remix, with the original track played at a very high tempo, that barely does any justice to it. There’s a female portion in that track, which is sung by Shefali Alvares (I got that even before reading the credits! Yayyyy! :p ). The song makes for a nice club track, but doesn’t at all do justice to the surreal composition. And yes, I am rating that because if the makers want to degrade their album by adding unnecessary remixes, it’s not my fault! Note that it is the first remix in all of 2017, and that means we are changing! The remix has been essentially done to bring forward another antara, which wasn’t in the original, and unused. So if you want to hear that, hear this club mix. Otherwise, I will only suggest that you hear it if you work as a DJ. The lyrics by Aatish Kapadia are simply wonderful, and I really loved them, both in the original and the antara of the song that got used in the remix. A romantic song straight from the heart.

Rating: 4.5/5 for original, 2/5 for Club Mix

 

3. Seedha Saadha / Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version)

Singers ~ Amit Mishra / Jubin Nautiyal, Music By ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Seedha saadha dil, Seedha saadha,
Mera Kam hai tera zyaada!”

– Kumaar

A melancholic rock song is the next song Mannan Shaah has to offer here, and from the way it starts, you can tell that it isn’t headed anywhere. The first version, at least. It has that feel to it right at the beginning, which tells you right away that it is a weird, unlikeable composition. And it definitely does start off that way. The composition is as colourless and dull as it can be, before the hookline. The only part the composition ever becomes likeable is in the hookline. The antara too, is decent, but because of the mukhda and other factors we’ll come to later, the song just doesn’t appeal to you. It is a pity that such a good hookline couldn’t get a better fitting part to it. Now for the other factors. Like Amit Mishra’s vocals. Amit Mishra. The one who stunned or entertained us with his renditions in ‘Manma Emotion Jaage’ (Dilwale), ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ (Dishoom) and the best, ‘Bulleya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), does nothing but disappoint in this song. His faltering voice doesn’t go with the composition, for which even K.K. would’ve worked. Jubin does way better in his version, but then, his version is a subtly arranged one, without as many hard-hitting rock noises as Amit’s version has. And I must say, Mannan’s composition sounds way better as a soft rock song, than a heavy rock song. Jubin’s soft voice had the right voice texture for it to come out right, which is why his version is way better. The arrangements in Amit Mishra’s version are too distracting, and the melody can’t be enjoyed as such. Whereas Jubin’s version has a wonderful, sway-inducing soft rock arrangement, enhanced by a synthesiser loop playing in the interlude. In a nutshell, you should go for the wholesome Reprise, than the incomplete and weird first version. Lyrics by Kumaar are good, but quite typical here. A sad song better felt in Jubin’s voice than Amit’s. It is basically a middling composition relying on voices to uplift it, out of which one clearly could not!

Rating: 2/5 for Original, 3.5/5 for Reprise Version

 

4. Commando (Title Track) / Commando (English Version)

Singer ~ Aditi Singh Sharma, Music by ~ Mannan Shaah, Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

Commando, commando, commando, commando!” :p

– Kumaar

The last song of the album is the title track of the film. Of course, it isn’t exactly the title track because they don’t say ‘Commando 2’, but then whatever. The composition is yet another middling composition by Mannan, and I don’t get why it flies all over the place and has so many turns and twists, that nobody will be able to decipher or even enjoy it. The mukhda makes it start off like a very run-of-the-mill track, without any shine whatsoever. The hookline is the easiest possible way you could imagine to put a tune to the word ‘Commando’. The interlude sees the song going all fusion-y, and then there’s a tempo increases that gets the song taking off at last. From there, the song at least sounds decent. There’s a nice traditional percussion in that part, and it is followed by a nice electric guitar piece. The antara that follows is also better composed, and has the required attitude that is seen in the action scenes of the movie’s trailer. There’s an English Version, in which just the mukhda’s Hindi parts have been replaced by lines in English, and it was actually unnecessary. They could’ve secretly added it in the movie without giving us another audio track, like some filmmakers do for certain songs that are actually good. Aditi is at her pretentious best, and stylises the words so much that it sounds too false! Mannan’s techno sounds do fare well for the song though. Kumaar’s lyrics are just bland. One of the most boring title tracks of late. *Remembers Raees title song*. Or maybe not.

Rating: 1.5/5 for original , 1.5/5 for English Version


Commando 2 is such a letdown, I can’t explain it in words. Only one song matches any expectations, and that too isn’t as good as the best song of “Commando”. Gourov-Roshin’s remake is good except for the fact that is unnecessarily relies on Pritam’s song to propel it forward. Mannan’s other songs are below the standards he set for himself with the first film’s album. Also, unnecessary reprises bog down the album. This Commando lacks command over tune, and composition! And maybe, choice of singers too.

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 4.5 + 2 + 2 + 3.5 + 1.5 + 1.5 = 17.5

Album Percentage: 50% (How convenient!) 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Tere Dil Mein > Seedha Saadha (Reprise Version) > Hare Krishna Hare Ram > Tere Dil Mein (Club Mix) > Seedha Saadha > Commando (Title Track) > Commando (English Version)

 

Remake Counter:
No. Of Remakes: 06 (from previous albums) + 01 (from Commando 2) = 07

 

Which is your favourite song from Commando 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

JOLLY GOOD ALBUM!! (JOLLY LL.B 2 – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Manj Musik, Nilesh Patel, Chirantan Bhatt, Meet Bros. & Vishal Khurana
♪ Lyrics by: Manj Musik, Raftaar, Junaid Wasi, Shabbir Ahmed & Earl Edgar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 13th January 2017
♪ Movie Releases On: 10th February 2017

Jolly LL.B 2 Album Cover

Jolly LL.B 2 Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Jolly LL.B 2 is an upcoming comedy courtroom drama starring Akshay Kumar, Annu Kapoor, Saurabh Shukla and Huma Qureshi in prominent roles. The film has been directed by Subhash Kapoor, who earlier directed ‘Phas Gaye Re Obama’, ‘Jolly LLB’ and ‘Guddu Rangeela’, and produced by Fox Star Studios. The film revolves around the story of a small-time lawyer Jagdishwar Mishra a.k.a. Jolly, who earns a living by fighting small cases. In his desires to become a full-fledged lawyer though, Jolly ends up committing a mistake that could just as well destroy his career as a lawyer. The film deals with how Jolly gets himself out of this predicament. The film is the sequel to 2013 sleeper hit ‘Jolly LLB’. While the earlier film had a music album which can hardly be counted as one of Krsna’s best works, or even good works, as it was as middling a fare as your everyday T-Series multicomposer album, the sequel has an album which is just that — your everyday T-Series multicomposer album. And as it almost always is, there is one song composed by one team of composers. Manj Musik, who has the full support of Akshay Kumar now, what with him composing for Akshay in ‘Gabbar is Back’ and ‘Singh is Bliing’ in 2015, gets the first song. Helping him is Nilesh Patel, who has been credited as “Co-Composer”! Expectations are not too high but not zero either, as he has given good songs in the past, but just messed up a couple of times, thus earning my anger. Next up is Chirrantan Bhatt, another composer whose Bollywood career is strongly backed by Akshay. He gave hits for Akshay in both ‘Boss’ (2013) and in ‘Gabbar is Back’ (2015). This time too, he is back to perhaps give yet another path breaking romantic song. Meet Bros. feature as the third composers on board, and their association with Akshay has started long ago in 2012 when they scored the beautiful ‘Mere Nishaan’ in ‘OMG – Oh My God!’ After that, they went on to score for Akshay in so many films like ‘Boss’ (2013), ‘Baby’ (2015) and ‘Singh is Bliing’ (2015). But that was when Anjjan too was a part of the team. After the split with Anjjan, this is Meet Bros’ first song for Akshay; hopefully, it is just as good. And lastly is one-album old, Vishal Khurana who debuted last February with the stellar album to ‘Neerja’. Thankful that he has got another project finally, (after like ages!) I hope he takes good advantage of it and gives a great song. So let’s see what this multicomposer assortment has in store for us! Because Akshay Kumar and multicomposer have this very nice relationship which more often than always, impresses me! (Take any of the albums mentioned above for example!)


1. Go Pagal

Singers ~ Raftaar & Nindy Kaur, Additional Vocals ~ Girish Nakod & Manj Musik, Music by ~ Manj Musik, Co-composed by ~ Nilesh Patel, Lyrics by ~ Raftaar & Manj Musik

(I didn’t find any lyrics worth mentioning here!)

The album starts with the song I was least excited to hear — a Holi song titled ‘Go Pagal’. Okay, so Manj Musik has given some pretty good songs in the past, but only sticking to one kind of songs — fast, update rap songs (with the exception of the awesome ‘Aaja Mahi’ from ‘Singh Is Bliing’) As such, all his songs sound almost the same and you can really predict what’s going to come next in each song. This song too falls into the same category, but it goes a bit too overboard with the craziness. The composition is a typical Manj composition, though there are some nice folksy lines in the middle, (‘Bheegi bheegi lage lovely lovely…‘) which I suspect are composed by the co-composer Nilesh Patel. Anyway, the composition is quite all round the place and it is kind of hard to grasp on to. And that hookline is just yuck! I was fine till it played. It was such an abrupt end to the flow of the song, that it spoiled all the fun, or whatever fun was there. Also, it is quite similar in sructure to ‘Let’s Nacho’ (Kapoor & Sons) where they ‘say’ the hookline, not sing it, and then some weird tune plays in some very annoyingly high digitized pitch. And what’s worse, the person who says ‘Go Pagal’ here (That’d be Raftaar, I guess) sounds like he’s burping it. It sounds eww. In some places, the composition resembles ‘Tamanche Pe Disco’ (Bullett Raja). The arrangements are very mediocre, though that nice rapid dholak beat is something for which I would listen to the song over and over again, despite everything. And that chipmunk voice that says ‘Goli Re’ in the mukhda is just so cute! Every other thing regarding arrangements is strictly banal. It sounds like it has been thrown out of 2013 and should’ve been in ‘Jolly LLB’, but it forecasted that Akshay Kumar would star in the sequel, which is why it is here for us to get troubled by it. The vocals sound like robots have done it. Raftaar tries to sing charmingly, but how can he? He has to carry the entire song on his shoulders, and though he does quite well, it just sounds very monotonous. And Nindy Kaur in her part initially sounds as if she’s so shy, she can’t sing at all. (She’s trying to sound naughty, but it sounds shy…) Her voice sounds as robotic as ever. The lyrics (Raftaar and Manj) are as banal as possible. A Holi song has never been so trashily written in the history of Bollywood, I guess. Okay, maybe ‘Ang Se Ang Lagana’ from ‘Darr’ is an exception, but in recent times they’ve all been very well-written and fun. Though the makers might think this is fun too, it isn’t. A mediocre start to the album, and a disappointment from Manj and his team.

Rating: 2.5/5

 

2. Bawara Mann

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Neeti Mohan, Aalap by ~ Rheek Chakraborty, Music by ~ Chirrantan Bhatt, Lyrics by ~ Junaid Wasi

“Bawra Mann raah taake tarse re, Naina bhi malhar banke barse re!
Aadhe se, adhoore se, bin tere hum huye, feeka lagey, mujhko saara jahaan!”

– Junaid Wasi

Chirrantan Bhatt, another composer that Akshay Kumar seems to be backing these days, enters the soundtrack, with his song. Usually, the composer impresses us with nice Bhatt-ish melodies. This time though, he follows the path of one of his earlier songs, ‘Coffee Peetey Peetey’ from ‘Gabbar Is Back’, and presents a breezy, feel-good melody that could not have sounded better. Previously, ‘Coffee Peetey Peetey’ was my favourite song by him, but now I have to say, that it is this one. The composition is, as I said before, very breezy and happy-go-lucky. And I just love it when such songs come out. The mukhda starts off right away with the hookline, a wonderful tune with a light touch to it. It’s as if Chirrantan is saying, “Want to cut down on fat in your musical diet? Well then, listen to this song, with 80% less musical fat than other songs out there!” The antara goes into a nice and soothing low scale, as opposed to the cute high pitch of the mukhda. The composition kind of reminded me of Pritam’s ‘I’m Sorry Par Tumse Pyaar Ho Gaya’ (Shaadi Ke Side/Effects), in that it is a toned down version of the peppy and breezy composition of that song. Arrangements are fantastic, with the ukulele (Shomu Seal) and guitars (Shomu Seal & Sanjoy Das) really winning your heart by the end of the song, and giving the song its quirkiness. Piano notes occasionally bring the sobriety to the song, while wonderrrrrrful harmonicas throughout the song provide that heavenly touch, accompanied by a wonderful vocal choir. The vocals by both singers are fabulous as well. Jubin, who has already sung so many songs this year, ranging from mediocre to beautiful, has emerged as the superstar of the beginning of the year with another fantabulous rendition from his side. Neeti, on the other hand, only strengthens her charming image by singing the second antara, with as much expertise as possible. Her characteristic feathery voice elevates her portions to other levels. Junaid Wasi, who returns to writing lyrics after like four-and-a-half years (His last was in Chirrantan Bhatt’s album ‘1920: Evil Returns’) writes a splendid poetry-like piece. Hindustani classical terminology meets modern romance in his writing, and it actually proves to be a nice and pleasant fusion. This is where the album starts, in my opinion!

Rating: 5/5

 

3. Jolly Good Fellow

Singers ~ Meet Brothers, Additional Vocals by ~ Purnima Solanki, Sanchita Sakat, Rap by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, English Rap by ~ Earl Edgar, Music by ~ Meet Bros., Lyrics by ~ Shabbir Ahmed, English Rap Written by ~ Earl Edgar

“Hello, how are you, mera Naam hai Jolly,
Manaane jashn nikli yaaron ki toli..
Bada colourful sa swag hai mera…
Karun jab use apni meethi si boli..
Nature mera hai cool, baaton mein banadoon fool,
Gopiyan bhi line mein hai karte Hi hello!
He’s a Jolly Good Fellow, He’s a Jolly Good Fellow,
Jai kanhaiyalaal ki, bolte chalo!”

– Shabbir Ahmed

What made me freak out even before starting the song was that the folk song ‘He’s A Jolly Good Fellow’ had been recreated! I mean if Bollywood can’t handle its own classics’ recreations, how will a British song be recreated well enough!! But then, the first note of the song played and all my worst doubts disappeared into thin air. The song starts with this uber-cool, smooth flute portion, played to the tune of the nursery rhyme! And from that moment on, you are hooked completely! The Meet Bros. have done an appreciable job in successfully recreating a Western song to suit the Indian music standards. A suitable “Chinta Ta Chita Chita” (Rowdy Rathore) based rhythm makes its way into the song and surprisingly provides an apt background beat for the English folk song. Of course, the duo has added their own composition for the mukhda and antara, and I can’t really say it is bad! The mukhda starts off the song well, showcasing the main character of the movie as a very sacrosanct person, and I must say, the tune is quite sanctimonious-sounding too. I mean, in Janmashtami, you will hear such tunes everywhere in India. The sound effects included by the duo are probably the most enjoyable I’ve heard in recent times. Yes, the sound of the song is very generic and heard-before. But I don’t really have any qualms in liking something that is likeable even though it has been heard before. The arrangements are booming and fun, with the aforementioned beats really infusing a lot of fun into the song. Different instruments, and especially the flute that plays occasionally, sound awesome. Whistles and the like make for nice “roadside attractions”. The vocals are good too,and the Meet Brothers sound at ease rendering the spunky song. The female backing vocalists provide nice entertainment with their cute inputs. Meanwhile the two rappers, (Shabbir Ahmed in Hindi and Earl Edgar in English) do not fare as well, with their commonplace rap. Shabbir, rapping to his own words, sounds confused. You can barely hear what he is saying. That being said, his lyrics are quite decent! It is a perfect character introduction song, and the incorporation of the “Jolly Good Fellow” phrase followed by “jai Kanhaiya laal ki, bolte chalo” is so interesting! It is a theme song that is quite entertaining. Might be irritating for some, but interesting for most!

Rating: 3/5

 

4. O Re Rangreza (Qawaali)

Singers ~ Sukhwinder Singh, Murtuza Mustafa & Qadir Mustafa, Music by ~ Vishal Khurana, Lyrics by ~ Junaid Wasi

{I do not know why T-Series is always so adamant on writing “Qawaali” in the title of their songs! I think this is like the third time they’ve done this, and once, the song wasn’t even a Qawwali! I think we are quite competent to make out whether a song is a Qawwali or not, and if they want to continue this, I advise them to write in brackets stuff like “Romantic Song” or “Dumb Party Song” too, why only Qawwali?}

“Rooh ne arzi lagaayi hai, Sahi kadam chala maula,
Mann ko ainth ke baati kar, tera charaag jala maula!”

– Junaid Wasi

Bollywood hasn’t churned out a single satisfying Qawwali as far as I can remember, after Tanishk Bagchi’s splendid rock-qawwali ‘Allah Hu Allah’s (Sarbjit). Now here comes another proper Qawwali, by which I mean a Qawwali without any unnecessary Bollywood elements. The young and talented composer Vishal Khurana (‘Neerja’ fame) has been roped in to compose this Qawwali, and going by the innovative work he did in ‘Neerja’, I was expecting a very, very impressive Qawwali. Unfortunately, I got quite a regular and ordinary one. The composition is good, and suits the situation (one of those situations that often arrive in Bollywood films where the protagonist has lost all hopes and has to leave it all up to God, and then a Qawwali or Bhajan plays) but goes awfully slow. It is not something that one would find themselves listening to too much. Because of these drawbacks, I expect the song to gain momentum only after the movie released, but the prospects of that are less too, because Qawwali isn’t a genre that finds many takers in today’s world. (Though I get fascinated and mesmerized by a good one, when it comes!) Anyway, that’s that in the composition. The “Mushkil kusha o re noor-e-khuda…” hook, though, is very beautifully composed, as are the antaras, slow speed notwithstanding. The arrangements follow a mesmerizing Roopak taal, with the tablas sounding spectacular, as does the Bulbultarang or Indian banjo. Vocals, thankfully, help the listener ignore the slow pace of the song, as Sukhwinder pours  his entire soul into the rendition, sounding very soulful in the process. Supported ably by the Mustafa brothers, he provides a nice, relaxing ambience with his voice. However, the main reason I would listen to this song again, even before the movie releases, is the spectacular writing by Junaid Wasi. He impressed in the romantic song and now impresses in a spiritual one as well. The line I’ve “showcased” is just one of the portions out of the many splendid lines in the song. A déjà-vu inducing Qawwali as far as the composition and arrangements go, but vocals and lyrics make this one an exemplary piece of art.

Rating: 4/5


Jolly LL.B 2 turns out to be quite a good album, if you judge it as a multicomposer album, which it is. Akshay Kumar almost always impresses whenever his music albums are scored by multiple composers. (Glaring exception being ‘Housefull 3′) The six individuals (counting Nilesh Patel and two Meet Brothers) come together to make an album that is definitely not perfect, but functional as a feel-good (or shall I say feel-jolly?) album, that will propagate the buzz of the movie before release. Yes, Manj and Meet Brothers’ songs could’ve been better, but they are still partially enjoyable. And I must say, this album is better than the album by Krsna to the first instalment of the franchise! A jolly jolly album! 😛

 

Total Points Scored by This Album: 2.5 + 5 + 3 + 4 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 72.5%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प <  < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Bawara Mann > O Re Rangreza (Qawaali) > Jolly Good Fellow > Go Pagal

 

Remake Counter
No. of Remakes: 04 (from previous albums) + 00 = 04

 

Which is your favourite song from Jolly LL.B 2? Please vote for it below! Thanks!

‘KAABIL’ OF BEING FORGOTTEN! (KAABIL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Rajesh Roshan & Gourov-Roshin
♪ Lyrics by: Nasir Faraaz, Manoj Muntashir, Anjaan, Anand Bakshi, Kumaar & Raftaar
♪ Music Label: T-Series
♪ Music Released On: 22nd December 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 26th January 2017

Kaabil Album Cover

Kaabil Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Kaabil is an upcoming Bollywood action/romantic film starring Hrithik Roshan, Yami Gautam and Ronit Roy. The movie is directed by Sanjay Gupta, and produced by Rakesh Roshan. The movie is about two blind people who fall in love (God knows how…). And then dishoom dishoom happens and then it probably ends happily. Moving on to the music. The music has been composed by yesteryear hitmaker Rajesh Roshan, who has given quite a number of great songs in the olden days, but seems to have lost his charm with his last outing, ‘Krrish 3’. I mean, I don’t even know how it is possible that his music in ‘Kites’ (2010) sounded so much with the music of the time, and so modern and all, while three years later in 2013, when ‘Krrish 3’ released, his music sounded dated. You would think that’s impossible! Well, all we can hope is that he has composed great tracks for this album. Again, as always, T-Series gives us a shock by adding a composer duo in the music directors panel for the album. The duo is Gourov-Roshin, the go-tos for remaking and spoiling old songs. This time they have been given charge of two of Rajesh Roshan’s hits from the 70s and 80s respectively — ‘Dil Kya Kare’ (Julie) and ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana). So technically, Rajesh Roshan has composed the songs. Smart. Expectations are a bit more than zero, and given that the songs to be remade are of such a high standing, the remakes have to be good or else T-Series wouldn’t have added them.. or at least that’s what I think.. 😛 Anyway, since I have such less expectations from the first album of 2017 to release, I’m just diving into it very cautiously and sceptically.

Note: Before you start off, you might want to check out the new rating scheme with effect from 2017..


1. Kaabil Hoon / Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version)

Singers ~ Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal / Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Nasir Faraaz

“Tere mere sapne sabhi, band aankhon ke taale mein hain,
Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa, woh Chaand ke pyaale mein hai,
Phir bhi sapne kar dikhaaon Sach toh kehna bas yehi…
Main tere kaabil hoon ya, tere kaabil nahi!”

– Nasir Faraaz

So this was the first song of 2017 to release, releasing in early December or so. You’d think that the makers had some reason behind releasing the song so early, but after hearing the song, you understand that the only reason was to get the songs released and aside, so the makers can concentrate on other ‘important’ stuff, like getting bad reviews. Veteran Rajesh Roshan offers nothing new in terms of composition. One might argue that he just tried to compose in his trademark style, and I agree, but it just doesn’t suit in today’s times. The mukhda is quite bland, but you start liking it after you hear the dreary hookline. And what’s more, it plays four times throughout the song! (Not the hookline, but the WHOLE mukhda!) The antaras are two very ear-splittingly high-pitched stanzas that irritate more than pacify. Look Mr. Roshan (and I hope you aren’t reading this..), we really appreciate you bringing forth the music of yore, but at least modernize it like Vishal Bhardwaj & Sanjay Leela Bhansali do! Yes, after a few listens, it gets listenable, but that’s only because we are so much rooted to our beautiful 90s music. 🙂 The arrangements are as typical and predictable as typicality and predictability can get. I don’t know if music programmer Abhijit Vaghani has chosen the beats (or maybe arranger Dhrubajit Gogoi), but whatever it is, it sounds like a desperate attempt to modernize the stale composition, by adding beats similar to Major Lazer and Justin Bieber’s pop single ‘Cold Water’. The dafli makes the arrangements sound sooooooo old-school. And whoever has arranged the song, has put in a mishmash of synth sounds as if his life depended on it, and horns wherever they shouldn’t have been. That guitar riff which the song starts off with resembles that hook tune of the aforementioned ‘Cold Water’ so much. And same with the trumpet. And the first time Jubin sings “Chaabi kahaan dhoondhe bataa…”, there is an unexpected outburst of noise that wasn’t required. However, in the first antara’s beginning, there is a nice trademark Rajesh Roshan percussion, which pleases the ears. The composer ditches his recent regulars for such songs, Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal, to bring in two supposedly ‘modern’ voices, Jubin Nautiyal & Palak Muchhal, but Mr. Roshan! Songs don’t sound modern because of singers! You need a modern tune for that…! Jubin sounds suppressed for some reason, and drawls out the lines like he’s bored, making you miss Arijit’s voice for once. And Palak is hands down off tune. Everything she sings is way too high-pitched for her to carry off perfectly, and her voice comes across as cheap. Especially when she sings the hookline after the first antara. And both of their voices have been kept raw, as they were recorded, making it sound more like a scratch version of the song. And at the end, the singers are made to sing “la la la…” and “hey hey hey...”, as if they are from the 80s! Nasir Faraaz’s lyrics ooze of the 90s! What is “Tere Naam ko hi pukaarke, khanakengi meri choodiyaan“??? I highly doubt she’s wearing bangles in the song.. unless the second antara is shot at their wedding. In the sad version, Rajesh Roshan slows down the pace so much that it is tough to discern that it is the same song. Not that it sounds any better though. The arrangements there are minimal except for some strings. And it is just one and a half minutes long, so it is clearly made only for the background score. The lyrics have been tweaked too, with no better result. A song that would’ve created waves, had it been included in ‘Krrish’! Heck, even the ‘Krrish’ album sounds better!

Ratings: 2/5 for Original Version, 1.5/5 for Sad Version

 

2. Haseeno Ka Deewana

Singer ~ Payal Dev, Rap By ~ Raftaar, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Music Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anjaan, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar, Rap Written by ~ Raftaar

“Sara zamaana, haseeno ka deewana,
Zamaana kahe phir kyun, bura hai dil lagaana!”

– Anjaan

Before the song released, I was having a tough time wondering how Rajesh Roshan would remake his own old song! And then it hit me, and my worst fears came true. T-Series had conveniently handed over Rajesh Roshan’s two old songs in the album to Gourov-Roshin! Unfortunately, there was no choice for us listeners but to hope the song would be remade well. The result, however, is atrocious. Gourov-Roshin follow the path they paved for themselves when they remade ‘Kaate Nahin Katte’ (Mr. India) in ‘Force 2’. They spoil this song, ‘Sara Zamaana’ (Yaarana) as well and present in front of us a bad mix of noises and horrendous singing. The mukhda and antara have been recomposed, and they sound horrible, nothing else. Even the original hook, which could’ve been the best part of the song, is spoiled by singing which is supposed to sound cool. The arrangements are nothing but a lot of unbearable noises, supposed to be club sounds. I don’t know if they want the clubbers to enjoy or die of some undiscovered ear disease. Random techno sounds grace the whole song, and it just sounds BAD! Payal Dev sings in her ‘Veerappan’ voice — an extremely harsh, cutting voice that does nothing but grate your eardrums. I don’t know what she’s up to.. on one side she sings gems like ‘Ab Tohe Jaane Na Dungi’ (Bajirao Mastani) and on the other hand, bleats out songs like this. She also mauls the hookline, the hookline that anybody raised in a Bollywoodish background has grown up listening. And the last straw is when she sings the antara. (“Yeh kaaauuuuun keh raha hai..”) Raftaar, after his successful stint in ‘Dangal’s ‘Dhaakad’, reverts to his original form, and delivers a rap that proves that it was a mistake that he bagged ‘Dhaakad’. The lyrics by Kumaar are just your normal Bollywood item song fare, with the lady praising her flaws. And the boy agrees, somehow. Now that everyone must have heard it, I can’t even tell you to skip it. A horrific remake.

Rating: 1/5 (and that’s being generous)

 

3. Kuch Din

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Aksar ataa pataa mera, rehta nahin, rehta nahin,
Koi nishaan mera kahin milta nahin, milta nahin,
Dhoondha gaya, jab bhi mujhe, tere gali mein mila..
Kuch din, se mujhe, teri aadat ho gayi hai,
Kuch din se meri, tu zaroorat ho gayi hai!”

– Manoj Muntashir

The next song is a romantic song, with a lulling melody. It starts off well enough, with dreamy music on the piano and something like a church organ. But then Jubin starts singing and you realise the blaring problem in the song — Bad recording. The vocals might be good, but bad recording and mixing help to steal all credit from Jubin. The voice is all muffled; even songs recorded in the 1970s sound better! The composition is better this time, because of that lilt in the melody. Again, it is a signature Roshan tune, and reminds you of the beautiful music of ‘Kaho Naa Pyaar Hai’. The mukhda plunges right into the hookline, and succeeds in the mission of soothing you. The antaras are a nice extension to the already nice tune. At least it pleases the ears. The high notes in the composition are pleasant this time, and the composition as a whole is hummable. Arrangements are nice and soothing, but muffled due to that flawed recording. Strings and brass instruments bring a nice 90s flavour to the song. Again, Roshan takes the help of techno beats, but this time it is a bit toned down, and hence doesn’t bother much. The second interlude has a nice guitar portion, which sounds good in spite of being a bit dated. Jubin, as mentioned before, sings well here, adhering to Roshan’s tune loyally, and evoking memory of Abhijeet’s songs with Shah Rukh Khan, at places. As mentioned above, that recording spoils the feel. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics are good, but nothing extraordinary. He sticks to the 90s style of lyrics-writing. A good, pleasant melody, with good vocals and arrangements, is spoiled by the bad recording and sound mixing!

Rating: 3/5

 

4. Mon Amour

Singer ~ Vishal Dadlani, Music by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Lyrics by ~ Manoj Muntashir

“Kadam se kadam jo miley, toh phir saath hum tum chale,
Chale saath hum tum jahaan, wahi pe baney qaafiley!
Mon Amour!!”

– Manoj Muntashir

Rajesh Roshan’s last song on the album takes the form of an upbeat Latino-flavoured song, that’ll surely get you up and dancing. The song starts off with a nice intro, taking the one of the repeating lines from the song having Vishal Dadlani sing it in a slow tempo, and it serves as a good buildup for the upbeat song that follows. The composition by Roshan this time too, is enjoyable. The hookline starts off the song, when the intro is over, and gets you ready for a nice dance song. The mukhda is what Vishal had sung in the intro, and it has a nice Spanish flavour to it, carried out very efficiently by Roshan. The antaras are as enjoyable as can be. They don’t seem like antaras, more like continuations of the mukhda, giving the effect that the whole song is a single stanza. All I can say is that they have been composed wonderfully. In the process, Rajesh Roshan tries to make a ‘Senorita’ (Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara) for this album, and succeeds to an extent. The arrangements remain loyal to the Latino flavour of the song, with guitars leading the way for some time, before handing over first command to the trumpets, which infuse life into the song after that short introduction is over. Percussion is topnotch, and it gives the Salsa feel very nicely. The xylophone that comes in the antara’s last line is so playfully awesome! I like how the title of the song stands alone in the song, with nothing to support it. It makes the song progress seamlessly from line to line. Vishal’s energy seems a bit diluted here, but nevertheless, the song sounds quite energetic still. Recording seems a problem here too, but it is ignorable because of the song being good. Manoj Muntashir’s lyrics here, are probably the only moderate lyrics on the album — not too old-fashioned (‘Kaabil Hoon’ and ‘Kuch Din’) and not toooooo modern (‘Haseeno Ka Deewana’). They are enjoyable though, making use of sounds like ‘Da ra di da ra’ and ‘Baila baila’ to make it sound more Latino-flavoured! A nice upbeat number, but I’m not sure whether it will be promoted enough to create an impact on the public!

Rating: 3.5/5

 

5. Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye

Singer ~ Jubin Nautiyal, Original Composition by ~ Rajesh Roshan, Muusic Recreated by ~ Gourov-Roshin, Original Lyrics by ~ Anand Bakshi, New Lyrics by ~ Kumaar

“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si, iss duniya ki rasmein,
Na kuchh tere bas mein jaana, na kuchh mere bas mein!”

– Anand Bakshi

Another remake. Once again, a Rajesh Roshan melody of the golden era, and again, remade by Gourov-Roshin. This time, Roshan’s beautiful melody from ‘Julie’, ‘Dil Kya Kare’. Expectations were zero, and maybe that’s why I was pleasantly surprised by this one! The main reason I liked it was that the composers have tried to retain the flavour of the original, and not tried to change everything. The mukhda has been changed, and that’s about it. This tracks starts with a nice modern touch, similar to so many (good) English songs you hear nowadays, to such an extent that that person singing ‘Woah’ or whatever at the beginning sounds like Justin Bieber. :\ Is this soundtrack inspired by Bieber or what? Anyway, the new mukhda is a nice addition to the song, it just takes time to get used to it. The hookline follows the new mukhda, and the mukhda of the old song (“Oonchi oonchi deewaron si…”) takes the form of the first antara, as it is (except the ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein Julie‘ is changed to ‘Na kuchh mere bas mein jaana‘) and the hookline returns, bridged to the antara by one of the lines of the new mukhda. The first antara of the old song appears as the second antara in this track, and it sounds good in Jubin’s voice! And this time, the programming is good too! The duo’s arrangements are pleasant, surprisingly, and they don’t bombard the ears with a fusillade of unwanted noises. Instead, they’re quite calm club beats. Now these are club beats! Piano graces the second interlude with its presence, to a great effect. The finger snaps are intriguing throughout the song. However, what I missed is that drum which Rajesh Roshan had added in the background of the old song (which he has also used in the title track of this album, if I’m right). Jubin perfectly takes over from Kishore Kumar, but of course the original always is better. Now that we have to deal with it though, I must say Jubin has done a good job. He sings the “oonchi oonchi..” part exceptionally well. I don’t know whether it is autotune or not, but here, his high notes sound good. At least it doesn’t sound like a scratch version. The additional lyrics are quite functional, if not great. I’m still in love with the original ones! 😍 A pleasant redux. That’s a remake for you. I think Gourov-Roshin are better at romantic songs (except ‘Maahi Ve’ from ‘Wajah Tum Ho’) than idiotic item numbers that are remakes.

Rating: 3.5/5 


In Kaabil, Rajesh Roshan actually delivers better than his last ‘Krrish 3’. Out of three songs, two are pleasant and sound much better than what he had offered in his last album. Gourov-Roshin with their two remakes of his old songs, do a mediocre job in one, and better in the second. However, as a whole, the albums seems extremely dated and behind its time. Had the album released somewhere around 2005 or so, the songs might’ve gained more momentum and more hearts. But now, it just seems like another average album. A middling start to 2017!

 

Total Points of the Album: 2 + 1.5 + 1 + 3 + 3.5 + 3.5 = 14.5

Album Percentage: 48.33%

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग <  < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlines is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Mon Amour = Kisi Se Pyar Ho Jaye > Kuch Din > Kaabil Hoon > Kaabil Hoon (Sad Version) > Haseeno Ka Deewana

 

ALERT! ANOTHER NEW SECTION!

Here is a remake counter, counting the number of remakes this year. :p Just for fun. 😉

Number of Remakes: 02

 

Which is your favourite song from Kaabil? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

DHAAKAD DUO PRITAM-AMITABH WIN THIS MUSICAL DANGAL!! (DANGAL – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Pritam Chakraborty
♪ Lyrics by: Amitabh Bhattacharya
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 14th December 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 23rd December 2016

Dangal Album Cover

Dangal Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


Dangal is an upcoming Bollywood sports drama / biopic starring Aamir Khan, Fatima Shaikh, Sanya Malhotra, Sakshi Tanwar, Zaira Wasim and Suhani Bhatnagar. The film has been directed by Nitesh Tiwari, and produced by Aamir Khan, Kiran Rao and Siddharth Roy Kapur. The film revolves around the life of wrestler Mahavir Singh Phogat (played by Aamir), who teaches his two daughters, Geeta and Babita Phogat to master the sport. The movie looks like a fun but emotional struggle of the family, and I’m looking forward to watching it. Of course though, till the 23rd of December, we all have the music album of the movie to entertain us. The music has been composed by Pritam, who has not even yet come out of the fresh success of his latest super-hit album ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’. This happens to be Pritam and Aamir Khan’s second time working together, the first being ‘Dhoom 3’, which, as most sequels are, was a bit underwhelming. This movie being a sports film, I was skeptical whether there would be any scope for Pritam to shine as much as he did in ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’, but again, we remember music albums like ‘Phantom’ and ‘Barfi’, movies where music might not have played too much of a role, but Pritam nailed it with his music and stunned critics as well as listeners. So let’s hope Pritam continues his hit spree with this album as well! With this album, Pritam offers 6 more songs to add to his 6 songs from ‘Ae Dil..’, so without further ado, let’s start!!!


1. Haanikaarak Bapu
Singers ~ Sarwar Khan, Sartaz Khan Barna, Backing Vocals ~ Kheta Khan & Dayam Khan

“Toffee chooran, khel khilaune, kulche naan parantha,
Keh gaye hain tata jabse, Bapu toone daanta!
Jis umar mein shobha dete, masti, sair, sapaata,
Uss umar ko naap raha hai, kyun ghadi ka kaanta?”

It is with the first song itself, that Pritam assures that whatever our doubts were before hearing the album, he is going to provide his utter best and not leave a single chance to give good music, whatever be the genre of the film. So of course, the film shows the struggle of Mr. Phogat’s daughters right from their childhood, in which case a children’s song is a must, isn’t it? And so, Pritam, very diligently, delivers a children’s song as the very first song of the album. And what a smashing opening it makes for! The composition is another one that falls into Pritam’s category of insane, fun songs, and is one that will instantly connect with the audience, especially the part of the audience that it is clearly aimed at — The kids! More specifically, the kids who have a very strict father, like the girls in the movie do. 😀 The song starts with a cute little ad-lib by the young boys, paving a nice way into a folk-flavoured rhythm that goes “ding dang ding dang…” and at the same time, makes you groove. And it is the mukhda which makes the song finally get going finally. The catchy tune, rendered by those cute young voices, just can’t let you hate it! The raps that act as fillers in the interludes are so entertaining, that the instruments almost don’t matter! (People wanting to sue me because of less recognition and rights for instruments, please note the ‘almost’ 😛 ) The antara showcases even more of the Folk flavour, by slowing the tempo down, sort of like how it is in Qawwalis, and that tune too is amazing! Pritam has employed great folksy nuances to complement his buoyant composition, the rock guitars (Vadim Zilberstien & Amandeep Singh) being the most prominent. What infuses the folksy feel into the song, though, are the lively harmoniums and that wonderful rhythm (Iqbal Azad, Hanif Dafrani, Aslam Dafrani & Yusuf Sheikh) that plays all throughout. The duffs and other folksy percussion have been used so wonderfully, not to mention the awesome occasional drums (Alan Hertz). I completely loved the fusion of Western and Folk music that Pritam has utilised in this song. The second interlude has a wonderful banjo solo, that is just a pleasure to listen to! Back to the rock guitars, it just rejuvenates you when those guitar strums play unexpectedly in the middle of a verse. The song ends on a nice high-energy conclusion, complete with whistles and the “ding dang” rhythm making it a grand finale. The vocals are impressive. Pritam’s earthy finds, Sarwar & Sartaz Khan, two young folk singers, render the song beautifully. That naughtiness that was required to render the song, has been very professionally brought into the song by them. Their diction of certain words is very fun and entertaining, like ‘torture’. But the backing vocalists, two more young boys, namely Dayam & Kheta Khan, also make the song sound better with their occasional embellishments throughout the song. The genius mastermind that he is, Amitabh Bhattacharya excels with the pen in this track. His witty nuances constitute the majority of the song, while also dissipating the subliminal message of letting children enjoy their childhood. Lines like “Bapu sehat Ke liye Tu toh haanikarak hai” (Father, you are injurious to health) and “Mitti ki gudiya se bole Chal body Bana, yo toh torture hai ghana re yo toh torture hai ghana” (He tells a young girl to do body building, this is sheer torture!) and “Discipline itna khudkhushi Ke laayak hai” (So much discipline, that it is enough for us to commit suicide), though marinated in sarcasm and exaggeration, do evoke laughter from you, even though they are a bit far-fetched. 😀 The jest contained in this song is enough to make you rolling with laughter. Finally, Bollywood evolves from songs that worship blindly, to songs that are straightforward like open letters. To those cute boys, please sing more in the future! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Dhaakad / Dhaakad (Aamir Khan Version)
Singers ~ Raftaar / Aamir Khan

“Tanne chaaro khaane chitt kar degi, Tere purje fit kar degi,
Datt kar degi Tere daanv se badhke, pech palat kar degi,
Chitt kar degi, chitt kar degi!
Aisi dhaakad hai, dhaakad hai, aisi dhaakad hai,
Aisi dhaakad hai, dhaakad hai, aisi dhaakad hai!”

The next song redefines Bollywood’s meaning of ‘rap’ and actually takes rap for what it means. The song is a Haryanvi hip-hop rap song, that is full of attitude and spunk. Though it is completely a rap song, it is that harmonium tune by Pritam that gets the listener hooked right from the beginning. The arrangements too are very captivating. More on them later. So as I was saying, or writing, the song starts off quite subtly with a rap that does not instantly grab you in. However, gradually, as the rhythm sets in and you get accustomed to the very innovative setting of the song, the song sounds nothing but catchy. Raftaar’s rap has this flow to it that makes you want to hear it over and over again. Especially the lines I’ve written above, that part sounds so good!! However, Raftaar only plays half the role in making the song sound so good. Because Pritam has decorated the background music with such cool sound effects, that it is difficult to keep your concentration on one particular thing. The song itself starts with a very stunning prelude, which gives us an insight into the Haryanvi setting of the song, with the sarangi (Rajesh Kumar) welcoming us into the song very warmly and getting us ready for some folksy fest, when unexpectedly, some techno sounds and digital beats start playing and those nice sound effects bring a modern touch to the song. The Folk percussion and the manjeeras too help the song to get elevated right at the beginning. Raftaar’s spunky rendition is just perfect. There couldn’t be a more full-of-attitude delivery of the verses. He also puts in those awesome backing vocals that interrupt in between the lines, like ‘haanji’, ‘kasam se’, ‘by God’, ‘ibb yo suno’ and whatnot. Those phrases just sound awesome in their randomness. Aamir’s version has Aamir starting off well, and with a lot of attitude, but you just get disconnected from the song midway. Nevertheless, it acts as a nice makeover of the actor’s goody-goody image. :p He does deliver the words very fast, and that one rap in the middle which Raftaar had rendered amazingly, Aamir too aces easily! About that ‘nineteen-to-the-dozen’ rap, though, there are many musical additions by Pritam behind whatever Raftaar or Aamir are saying. A nice techno base offers a modern touch, while electronic tablas steal the show and that been/pungi (Mukesh Nath) that sounds oh-so-earthy, is just awesome. Pritam places the techno elements in the song in places they are least expected. And that harmonium which plays everytime the rapper says “Tere purje fit Kar degi..” is just mind blowing!!! Amitabh’s lyrics are equally full of attitude. I doubt Raftaar being a rapper could’ve written the lyrics! A step towards the uplifting of the rap genre in Bollywood, this song acts as a nice relief from the rap songs of today. #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Gilehriyaan
Singer ~ Jonita Gandhi

“Ek nayi si dosti, aasmaan se ho gayi,
zameen mujhse jalke, muh banaake bole, Tu bigad rahi hai!
Zindagi bhi aaj kal, gintiyon se oobke,
Ganit ke aakdon ke saath ek aadha sher padh rahi hai!”

With the next song, the fun and naughty flavour of the album is gone, and replaced by a subtlety and innocence which can only be got in the best of romantic songs. With that fun flavour, even the rustic, folksy nature of the former tracks is replaced by an almost urban, modern touch. So Pritam has composed a song tracing the feelings of the girls when they go to the city for their training, and what results is a lilting composition that sucks you in right away. The mukhda is the hookline itself, and what a relief it is! It is so fresh and relaxing, that you cannot even imagine to hate it! The part that goes “Kyon zarasa mausam sarphira hai ya mera mood maskhara hai..” is beautiful! Pritam’s tune instantly gets you hooked, and you can’t do anything except sit and listen until the magic is over. The antara just continues the magic, and those two lines of the antara sound scintillating and surreal. The way Pritam connects the antara then, to the hook again, is fantastic! The hook has that lilt to it, which you normally feel when you are on top of the world, happy, jolly and indifferent to whatever’s going on around you! That lilt has been infused into it because of the amazing arrangements. The guitars (Nikhil Paul George) are so beautiful, that you just can’t ignore them, not to mention those finger snaps at the end of every line. The strings (The Symphony Team conducted by Christian Lorenz) are amazing, coupled with a nice choir piece to them. The mandolin can be heard in places, while the matkas are beautiful in the hook. The whole thing results in a wonderful positive vibe that does nothing but make you feel content and satisfied. It is Jonita that explores herself the most in this song. While she has sung quite some soft numbers for Rahman, it was her first such song with Pritam (the club numbers ‘Sau Tarah Ke’ from ‘Dishoom’ and ‘The Breakup Song’ from ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ being her previous songs with Pritam) and Pritam has made her sing so calmly and smoothly that it actually sounds fairy-land-ish and lulling. When she touches the high notes, her voice just directly touches your heart. Amitabh’s lyrics are genius here as well, and those lines from the antara are just ingenious!! A song that will make a place in everybody’s playlist for this year’s best songs! Melodic! #5StarHotelSong!!!

 

4. Dangal
Singer ~ Daler Mehndi

“Thhos majboot bharosa, apne sapnon pe karna,
Jitne munh utni baatein, gaur kitnon pe karna,
Aaj logon ki baari, jo kahe, keh lene de,
Tera bhi din aayega, uss din hisaab chukake rehnaaa..!
Arey, bhed ki hahakaar ke badle sher ki ek dahaad hai pyaare,
Dangal Dangal!”

The album’s title song comes quite late into the album, but how! The song is a pulsating, racy, energetic song that can be described just half of how great it actually is! Pritam has outdone himself here and produced such a heart-rending, motivational song, with such a beautiful composition, that I really have to salute him! The song starts off with those backing vocalists that we heard in the trailer of the film, and they sing that line with such conviction and energy, that it’s simply magical! The song immediately plunges into the mukhda that is the hookline, and then takes a small detour to the actual mukhda, which is amazing. (“Dhadkanein chhati mein…”) The composition of these two parts is enough to grab the attention of the listener and get him hooked! The backing vocals line keeps repeating throughout and it sounds just as exhilarating each time it plays. Though the hookline is oh-so-dependent on the repetition of the words “dangal dangal”, it still remains fresh in your mind after the song is over, and doesn’t come across as boring,because the padding around it has been composed rather professionally. Of course, what else can you expect from Pritam? The antara has a very emotional touch to its tune, and that was a welcome touch added by the composer. Everytime the verse connects with the hookline, you feel some thrilling sensation, and that just means that the motivational song has succeeded in its intentions! Arrangements are awesome as well! Of course, the usual rock guitars (Amandeep Singh & Roland Fernandes) and drums (Alan Hertz) that are used by everyone in such motivational title songs, are present. But leave it up to Pritam to give an already fortified and established cliché, an unexpected twist. He adds a nice Punjabi percussion to the song, and I must say, the percussion (Iqbal Azad, Girish Vishwa, Babloo Kumar, Ramjan Khavra, Ahmed Khavra) has added a nice and very intense quality to the music. Though it is a bit reminiscent of the ‘Rang De Basanti’ title song, which also had Daler Mehndi singing amidst heavy Punjabi percussion, this one too will make a place for itself in history. Moving on to the vocals, I can’t really praise Daler Mehndi enough! This year he has ventured into Bollywood thrice — once with Sachin-Jigar in ‘Raj Karega Khalsa’ (A Flying Jatt), then with Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy in the ‘Mirzya’ title track, and now this. Each time, he has showcased his awesome singing prowess and prices that he is the lion of Bollywood music. He uses his distinctive voice to awe the listeners in this track too, and doesn’t fail to live up to the energy that Pritam has created with his tune and arrangements. The backing vocalists (unfortunately uncredited by Zee Music), as mentioned earlier, are awesome! Amitabh goes to a different league altogether with the lyrics of this song. The struggle of the main character has been perfectly described through his words. The antaras are amazing, and somewhere I find that the words also apply to Pritam himself, who rose up from those demonic allegations of plagiarism and reinvented himself. The words are very touching and are sure to get some tears (even one will do, but don’t cheat and add glycerine please!) in your eyes! An adventurous title song, rendered beautifully by Daler Mehndi! Pritam has tried something different and succeeded with flying colours!! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

5. Naina
Singer ~ Arijit Singh

“Naina, jo saanjhe khwaab dekhte thhey,
Naina, bichhad ke aaj ro diye hain yun,
Naina, jo milke raat jaagte thhey,
Naina, seher mein palkein meechte hain yun”

The melancholia sets in with the next song. Pritam composes another song to accompany his songs in the league of ‘Channa Mereya’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil), ‘Kabira’ (Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani) and ‘Ashq Na Ho’ (Holiday). The same feeling of melancholia hits you as soon as this one starts playing. The song starts with a small verse that sounds a bit like that concluding Punjabi couplet of ‘Channa Mereya’ in certain notes. However, it soon passes through that small resemblance phase, and as the miraculous hookline takes over, you soon forget about whatever small resemblance both songs showed. The hookline is amazingly poignant, and touches the chords of your heart immediately, and then the mukhhda just consolidates their position in your heart. The antara too, is very soul-stirring, and the high notes in Pritam’s composition help that part to connect with the audience. The melody has some old-world charm to it, something that is missing in most of today’s songs. The arrangements are beautiful as well, and the Composer goes with the typical Duff rhythm to accompany the composition. Calm guitars help the song to grab the attention of the audience before the actual melody starts playing. A wonderful sitar provides a nice source of relief in the interlude, only to be followed by an accordion-mandolin combo. In other parts though, the Duff does the needful, and though I have gotten bored of this rhythm in other songs, it sounds fresh here, maybe because of the poignant melody. And that violin that appears out of the blue at 2:18 in the song!! It sounds so retro and soothing! 😀 Violins also join in to conclude the song during the last hookline. Arijit renders the song beautifully, but part of the sameness of this song and the others I mentioned at the beginning, is that Arijit has sung them. Nevertheless, he is good at his delivery and does what he’s best at. Amitabh’s lyrics are splendid and a great to listen to, especially with Pritam’s heart-touching melody. A song that might go unnoticed, but is actually a gem! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Idiot Banna
Singers ~ Jyoti Nooran & Sultana Nooran

“Main boli banna manne picture dikha de, Balcony ki do tho ticket kata de,
Yoon toh Sara theatre tha khaali, Banne ne ek ticket hi nikaali!
Bola ke interval take dekh le Tu, Interval ke aage ki main dekh loonga,
Ek ticket se kaam chale toh do leke Kya karna?!
Idiot hai mera banna!”

The last song on the album definitely suits as a grand finale to the album. The song is a wedding song, clearly a song where the ladies of the town are singing and dancing, and the men are nowhere to be seen. The song follows the convention of songs like ‘Mere Haathon Mein Nau Nau Chudiyan’ (Chandni), ‘Didi Tera Devar’ (Hum Aapke Hain Koun) and ‘Gore Gore Se Chhore’ (Hum Tum) where the girls are singing about the men, and making fun of them. And with the men being made fun of, we listeners too get let in on a few secrets as we enjoy the track. Pritam’s composition perfectly sums up the essence of village weddings, and has a distinct Haryanvi flavour to it. The backing vocalists (again uncredited) become a nice addition as they help with the gossiping and whatnot. They start the song off on a very upbeat and ‘Cutiepie’-ish note. The mukhda too, seems as if it has been taken out of ‘Cutiepie’ (Ae Dil Hai Mushkil). Again, the resemblance only lasts for an insignificant amount of time, and wears off right away. The hookline is catchy, and very fun. The antara is functional, but since the song is primarily situational, it doesn’t matter, as the fun lyrics help us through the song. Arrangements are fantastic, almost a replica of ‘Cutiepie’ but less loud and less in-your-ears. The dholaks are what reminded me of ‘Mere Haathon Mein’ (Chandni) and the shehnaai in the interlude is very fun and cute, though reminiscent of Salim-Sulaiman’s shehnaai in ‘Baari Barsi’ (Band Baaja Baaraat). The rock guitats and drums stand out here as well, and the harmonium sounds charming. The Nooran sisters with their ebullient voices, harmonize perfectly with each other and though their voices, usually left free to their natural extent, sounds a bit suppressed and restricted here, the magic produced is the same. Amitabh Bhattacharya’s lyrics are very humorous, and really make for a fun listen. The words I have showcased are just one of the three funny incidents about the Banna. (Groom) Bringing the old Bollywood traditions back into Bollywood as they were!! #5StarHotelSong!!


Phew!! Dangal is stunning! Each and every track has a different distinct flavour to it — one primarily a children’s song, another a rap song, yet abother a lilting romantic song, and a electrifying motivational song, a poignant melody, topped by a fun village-ish wedding song. Pritam has delivered songs that don’t even scream “Pritam has composed us!”. None of the songs sound like a Pritam song! How interesting it is, that all the sings from Pritam’s last album, ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ had that distinct Pritam flavour, while all of the songs in this album (save maybe ‘Naina’) don’t! Anyway, the album is one of Pritam’s best, and also Aamir Khan’s best albums in quite some time. (‘PK’ being good, ‘Dhoom 3’ being okay, and ‘Talaash’ being the last great album of his movie.) The variety of tracks that this album offers, is amazing! All I can say is that, the ‘dhaakad’ duo Pritam-Amitabh have won this Musical ‘Dangal’ and ended 2016 on a high, with a bang!!

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Dangal > All the rest! 😀

 

Which is your favourite song from Dangal? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂

 

THE YEAR’S ALBUMS ARE OVER!!! STAYTUNED FOR THE ANNUAL ROUND-UP! 🙂

SACHIN-JIGAR’S EXPERIMENTAL FLIGHT!! (A FLYING JATT – Music Review)

Music Album Details
♪ Music by: Sachin-Jigar
♪ Lyrics by: Vayu Shrivastav, Raftaar, Mayur Puri & Priya Saraiya
♪ Music Label: Zee Music Company
♪ Music Released On: 3rd August 2016
♪ Movie Releases On: 25th August 2016

A Flying Jatt Album Cover

A Flying Jatt Album Cover

 

To hear the full songs of this album on Saavn CLICK HERE

To buy this album on iTunes CLICK HERE


A Flying Jatt is an upcoming Bollywood comedy/superhero/action movie which stars Tiger Shroff and Jacqueline Fernandez in lead roles, while Australian actor (and retired wrestler) Nathan Jones is essaying the role of the antagonist. The film has been directed by Remo D’Souza, who is back after more than a year after his last hit, ‘ABCD 2’, and produced by Shobha Kapoor, Ekta Kapoor, Sameer Nair abd Aman Gill. The story revolves around a very un-superhero-like superhero, played by Tiger Shroff, and his adventures. The synopsis for the movie under the movie trailer on YouTube says that the movie is an account of a young superhero who is scared of heights! I don’t know how exciting that will be to watch, as the movie already looks like a mixture of ‘Singh Is Bliing’ and ‘Krrish’, so much so that it might even be ‘Krrish 4’, wherein Krrish, through his magical powers, turns into a Jatt. 😀 Anyway, since the movie seems to be targeted at little children, the makers are free to get away with anything. Remo D’Souza cannot make a successful album to his movies without his trustworthy duo, Sachin-Jigar, who are on board for this movie as well, coming back after a year, after their two songs in ‘Hero’, before which their last full album was another Remo D’Souza movie! 😛 Of course, seeing the theme of the movie, something zany is expected, and since it is not ‘ABCD 3748’, ten dance songs aren’t expected, so the duo makes 6 songs. Now, to see how high these six songs fly!


1. A Flying Jatt (Title Track)
Singers ~ Raftaar, Mansheel Gujral & Tanishkaa Sanghvi, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Shrivastav, Rap Lyrics & Vocals by ~ Raftaar

The first song on the album is what Sachin-Jigar are known for. The whackiness, craziness and catchiness of it all is their signature style of composing such songs. The song starts off with an anthemic chant that goes “Ho aa gaye J.A.T.T. maaro saare seeti...” The tune that it has been composed in, is just so infectious, that it actually made me take interest in such a song which I would never have listened to otherwise! The opening line is just too catchy to leave the song halfway and dismiss it as stupid or bad. The “Pagg, peg, swag, set” chants are just as catchy and crazy. The base composition is good as well, and Mansheel Gujral, contestant of 2014’s ‘Raw Star’, renders it with the right amount of gusto and gangsta-swag! The composition is more like a Punjabi pop song, butt the treatment is purely Sachin-Jigar! The hookline is something that will grow on you as you keep progressing through the song; it is repeated so many times, that you end up loving it unknowingly! The mukhda has the perfect gangster-pop feel to it, while the first antara follows the same tune. It is the second antara, where Sachin-Jigar introduce a clever twist, with a little girl singing about “Flying Jatt”, who is apparently her boyfriend. And that girl is none other than Sachin’s own daughter, Tanishkaa Sanghvi. She sings the little girl’s part soooo cute, and it sounds good in the song, which is obviously made for children to pull their parents to the theaters in order to watch a superhero movie. Raftaar’s rap constitutes most of the song, and it is surprisingly very entertaining! Maybe because it isn’t unnecessarily added into a song that doesn’t need it! In fact, it gels in quite well with the song, which idolizes the protagonist, a flying Sikh superhero. Sachin-Jigar of course, can’t make a peppy song without some insane additions randomly thrown into the song. This time, it is the insanity of the chorus going “Pagg, peg, swag, set” followed by somebody singing “aajao aajao aajao saare!” It is so random, that you end up loving it so much! The arrangements are apt, with the whole song placed upon a techno base, which is addictive and peppy. Of course, the duo place an unexpected twist in the form of typical Punjabi dhols in the hookline once, and that part sounds awesome! The lyrics by Vayu are cool, and suit the superhero-theme. Raftaar’s rap is a very enjoyable “be-good” kind of rap, which again, will help the superhero attract kids’ attention! A title track that is very experimental and showcases Sachin-Jigar’s ability to get listeners (old or young), hooked! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

2. Toota Jo Kabhi Taara
Singers ~ Atif Aslam & Sumedha Karmahe, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

The next song is a haunting romantic song, composed beautifully on a scintillating background. The song starts off with sounds that indicate nighttime and a field with crickets chirping in it, with a grand orchestration accompanying it. And then the real magic starts, when the piano kicks in with such a haunting and catchy tune, which actually is the hooktune of the song. The silence of it all makes you so serene, that it is hard to believe! The duo’s composition is pure black magic, with notes that touch your heart and how! When the piano gives way to Atif’s voice, which starts off with a dulcet melody, you get ready for the best romantic song you’ve heard in quote some time, but then, the duo surprises you with a very unexpected high-pitched, grand second line, which builds up to the hookline, which is just as calming and soothing. The structure of the song is the most interesting thing of all. After the hookline, the singers hum the tune which had started off the song (on piano), and it sounds so heavenly and extremely lovely! The duo follows the new-age trend of composing two antaras with different compositions, and give one completely to Atif, while the other goes completely to Sumedha. Both the antaras are bliss, with haunting notes galore! The second one though, is my personal favourite, with Sumedha (who has worked with the duo before in the movie ‘Teree Sang’) singing in the low octaves so beautifully, that it sounds as if she is singing specially for you! Atif’s antara, on the other hand, treads higher octaves (yet not too high either) with a very melodious tune. The way he sings some words rapidly to bridge one line to the next is a very ingenious trick played by the duo! It sounds so magical! About the arrangements, I can write a whole essay!! Sachin-Jigar have set such an entrancing backing rhythm to the song, made of nothing but techno sounds, which are just so enchanting! The way they’ve used the instruments is mind blowing and spectacular; a perfect blend of haunting strings and lilting flute, and that beautiful piano loop will stay in your mind for a long time! Sparkling sounds accentuate the fantasy-like, dreamy composition very well. Finger snaps and brisk strings in the first interlude grab your attention, while the second interlude is highly reduced, with only a flute playing that haunting tune that usually plays on the piano, followed by Sumedha’s antara. The magic of the strings though, is just unmatchable. A great assortment of high and low pitched strings make the listening experience worthwhile. I can just imagine how it is going to sound in the theaters! Priya Saraiya’s lyrics are the icing on top of the extra-sweet cake. She writes the song wonderfully, making many references to dreams herself. So what wrong is it to call the song a dreamy one?? Nothing, right? The dreamiest song I have heard recently! A masterstroke by the whole team behind the song! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

3. Khair Mangda
Singer ~ Atif Aslam, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

The duo bring Atif back to sing the next song, which is another haunting, dreamy and lilting, but very emotional and heart touching song. The composition has dark shades and is pure black magic, something that instantly makes your hair stand on end and sends a chill down your spine. The composition is highly reminiscent of the duo’s own song ‘Chunar’ from Remo D’Souza’s previous movie, ‘ABCD 2’, but still manages to strike a chord with the listener. Treading on the emotional notes, the composition still has a charm that will make you ready to hear it again and again, for a countless number of times. The mukhda is quite soft, until it gets into the high notes just before the hookline, which is when the goosebumps start to appear. The hookline itself, is exceptionally hooking and haunting. The way Atif introduces small variations in the tune each time he sings “khair mangda“, is remarkable. The antara continues with the darkness, but in a different way. The duo has churned out a trademark Rahman-styled composition, something he would constantly give in the 90s. The arrangements are mostly guitars, and other digital sounds that help the song sound more graceful. The gracious strings that elevate the thrill in the song, are wonderful. Everything else is almost only done by the guitars, and some wonderful chimes, which make it sound very enchanting. The song is tailor-made for Atif, and he doesn’t disappoint, proving how beautiful a singer he is, yet again. The humming he does in the start and in the interludes, is mind blowing, though very short! Priya, on the other hand, is adept at writing heart-touching lyrics, which she shows yet again here, as well. Though most of it is in Punjabi, the listener can instantgy connect to the words and it grows very soon. A song that is on an emotional high, something that needs repeat listens to discover each and every aspect of the song. in other words, another masterpiece by Sachin-Jigar!! #5StarHotelSong!

 

4. Bhangda Pa
Singers ~ Vishal Dadlani, Divya Kumar & Asees Kaur, Lyrics by ~ Mayur Puri

After the pathos, the duo is back to what they love, and what we love them doing! And that is, an upbeat, happy-sounding track that will get you up and dancing. Of course, such songs are usually very situational, and you don’t always love them before you see them in the movie, with the surrounding content and their placement. Made with the intention of entertainment and enjoyment, this song is a dance fest. The duo’s composition is definitely nothing great, and a quite typical Punjabi bhangra track, but does manage to entertain you for as long as it lasts. The mukhda is a very interestingly structured one with very fast-paced lines, fun to hear being sung so rapidly by Vishal Dadlani and Divya Kumar, the powerhouse male voices behind the track. The hookline is not so addictive, but as I said, it may grow after watching the movie. The first antara has the same tune as the mukhda, and again, keeps you listening for that masterclass singing by both the lead male singers, each having their own unique voice texture and quality. Vishal’s husky tone and Divya’s cutting-edge-like voice are a very interesting and compatible combination. The second antara, however, sees Asees Kaur, Zee Music Company’s pet singer, singing a quite ordinary giddha stanza which doesn’t entertain as much as her “timb lak lak timb“s interspersed throughout the song, which are insane! Arrangements are typical BHANGRA arrangements, but so energetic, dynamic and booming, that they end up making you like the song. The dhadd and dhols are powerful and just awesome. Of course, the duo can’t make a song with straightforward typical arrangements, so they do add some techno sounds, which aren’t so effective. The lyrics by Mayur Puri are enjoyable, and fun even in their nonsense manner. A dance song which clearly shows how the makers underestimated Sachin-Jigar, and eventually extracted an ordinary dance track out of them!

 

5. Beat Pe Booty
Singers ~ Sachin Sanghvi, Jigar Saraiya, Vayu Shrivastav & Kanika Kapoor, Lyrics by ~ Vayu Shrivastav

A techno beat lures you into the next track, a dance track totally arranged on addictive techno and EDM beats. Of course, a track is needed to show off Tiger’s dance moves, and this seems to be the track made for that purpose. Sachin-Jigar are at their best with the composition, which is an insanely catchy one even in its simplicity and Yo-Yo-Honey-Singh-ishness (Yup, I invented that word!! I hope its meaning has stared back at you while you were staring at it!) Just like their own song ‘Johnny Johnny’ (Entertainment), the duo has made a very simple and monotonous composition, and they are apparently very confident, that it will be a superhit. And why shouldn’t they be? The song has everything you need for a catchy song, and it sounds PERFECT for its genre. The beats are insanely catchy (I don’t know how many times I’ve already said that, but they are). The composition can’t get out of your head and the vocals are so addictive! Talking about vocals, Sachin-Jigar along with Vayu sing the male parts good (with special care taken not to make it sound too perfect, either, which would spoil the fun!) But it is Kanika’s short part that won over my heart. The part when she says “nacha de, mainu nacha de, nacha de mainu” is so catchy! And after that, when she sings the song’s antara, her sweet and addictive voice makes magic there too. To think that she’s working with Sachin-Jigar for the first time!! The Afro feel of the song makes it even more catchier than ever. Lyricist Vayu writes words that are enjoyable as well as humorous, and they go well with the addictive and sultry nature of the song. All in all, the song is an enjoyable dance track, where the duo full-fledgedly shows their experimentation capability! #5StarHotelSong!!

 

6. Raj Karega Khalsa
Singers ~ Navraj Hans & Daler Mehndi, Lyrics by ~ Priya Saraiya

To end the album on a very dynamic note, the duo now brings into the album a kind of heavy metal song. The song is a spectacular one, with a splendid use of rock guitars and drums. Electrifying electric guitar strums start the song off, until a composition that anyone would usually expect Vishal Dadlani to sing, sets into pace, with someone unexpected, Navraj Hans, (Hans Raj Hans’ son) rendering it with an immense amount of energy, and sounding awesome in the bargain. He is accompanied by Daler Mehndi in some places, who is more of a backing singer; the main parts of the song go to Navraj. Daler excels though, with his aalaaps in the background, and his occasional one-or-two lines in the song. He has some lines in the first interlude which he aces with his wonderful high-pitched voice. The duo’s composition is really emotional and also motivational at the same time. The song has those positive vibes in it, that make you feel both proud and sentimental at the same time. The hookline, “jaako raakhe saaiyaan… ” is phenomenal! This is probably another rock song (which usually don’t really appeal to me) which has appealed to me this much after Sultan’s title track, but of course, this one is less commercially appealing. The choice of singers is very experimental as well. Using the two rustic voices, the duo has succeeded in bringing home the idea that desi-flavoured rock songs do sound good! 😀 Navraj with his powerful voice, and Daler paaji with a just as powerful voice complement each other well to infuse the required energy into this quite darkly-composed rock song. Arrangements by the duo are fab, and they take liberty to add in techno elements, orchestral strings and trumpets to make the song sound less monotonous with just guitars and drums! Priya’s lyrics are a wonderful ode to the Sikh community and yet, are a kind of motivation for the whole world. The duo manages to end the album on such a brilliant note, that you are stunned after you finish hearing it!! Fantabulous!! #5StarHotelSong!!


A Flying Jatt turns out to be an apt album for a comedy/action/masala superhero film as this. Sachin-Jigar have introduced high levels of variety into the songs and each song sounds different than the next. The songs are enjoyable and they have not only created buzz to bring people to the movie, but will also be played after the movie releases too! All six songs are miles apart from each other and that is the USP of the album. To sum up, I would say that the duo, who is back after a year, is still flying with the same amount of variety and experimentation with which they had left us!! 

 

Final Rating for This Album: सा < रे < ग < म < प < ध < नी < सां

Note: The letter which is underlined is the final rating.

Recommended Listening Order: Toota Jo Kabhi Taara = Khair Mangda > Raj Karega Khalsa > Beat Pe Booty > A Flying Jatt (Title Track) > Bhangda Pa

 

Which is your favourite song from A Flying Jatt? Please vote for it below! Thanks! 🙂